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Filmspotting Message Boards => Movie Talk => Movie Games => Topic started by: 1SO on July 06, 2011, 10:05:59 PM

Title: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 06, 2011, 10:05:59 PM
This idea is based on Roger Ebert's "Movie Answer Man" Column.
Every few days, I'll post a question that was submitted to Ebert and leave it for you to answer. Some questions will be more personally insightful. Some will call upon your movie knowledge. I'm sure all will lend themselves to humorous answers, if you choose to go that route. Put in your opinion when and how you wish. I'll ask a new question when I feel the conversation has died down.
Let's begin...

What great actors has America produced in the last 20 years? Who has emerged to unseat DeNiro, Pacino, Hackman, Duvall etc., the way they took the mantle from Brando, Tracy etc.? Which Americans are really pushing the envelope in a way that equals foreign contemporaries such as Daniel Day-Lewis and Javier Bardem?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 06, 2011, 10:12:44 PM
I think Joaquin Phoenix is one of the great contemporaries. He brings a vulnerability and openness to a lot of his performances that one rarely sees. While a lot of modern actors feel like they're acting, Phoenix seems more interested in immersing himself in a state of being. While he may not be as bold or daring as him. However, I do think his performances are changing in a different way. A way that isn't about pushing acting or what a performance can be, but more about challenging the notion that an actor acts.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bill Thompson on July 06, 2011, 10:21:32 PM
I don't actually consider Bardem to be that great of an actor, one epic performance surrounded by a lot of acceptable to good performances. However, of the current American crap, I'd say the best actor, and someone I would take over every person listed in this thread so far, is Viggo Mortensen. He can take on any role and make it believable, he can do funny, gravitas, everything.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 06, 2011, 10:23:23 PM
Wow, tough to take on a question like this that assumes the likes of DeNiro, Pacino, and Day-Lewis are good actors rather than over the top hams. I'm sure we've got people to step in for that already, but I'm more interested in who is going to step into the quality of the Tom Hanks and the Kevin Spacey types. So what American actors are going to carry us forward the next decade or two? Well, Leonardo DiCaprio was arguably the best actor of the 00s in terms of his full body of work, starting with things like Catch Me If You Can and going through Blood Diamond and last years double-header of Shutter Island and Inception. That isn't even counting all the other Scorsese.

Who else? Well, Matt Damon deserves some recognition. DiCaprio's Inception co-star Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a fascinating actor in his own right. Of course, one thing I notice about the listed actors is that they are all male. Is there a good reason to keep this discussion an all boys club or can we mention the impressive emerging talent of Elle Fanning and Dakota as well. You've also got Chloe Moretz who has burst on the scene in the past couple years. At the end of the day, I'm not all that sure why we care about American actors. Film is a truly globalized industry at this point. It seems increasingly irrelevant an actor's nationality if they can deliver the necessary performance and there are scores more really impressive younger actors and actresses out there around the world. There are plenty of people who can carry the banner for the next generation.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bill Thompson on July 06, 2011, 10:27:37 PM
Wow, tough to take on a question like this that assumes the likes of DeNiro, Pacino, and Day-Lewis are good actors rather than over the top hams.

I left this out, but I do agree with a lot of this. Pacino especially I've rarely found to be anything better than decent, while I do honestly believe that DeNiro's last ten years or so of work (sans Stardust) hurt his credibility a lot. Day-Lewis does have the tendency to be hammy, but I still like him and have found many of his performances to be quite great.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on July 06, 2011, 10:29:42 PM
I have Joaquin Phoenix at the top of my list as well. Sam's description is exactly right. I could only add--generous.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 06, 2011, 10:54:07 PM
Woody Harrelson for me is that guy. Oh I don't know about "unseating" the legends, I don't think anyone can do that, but here's a guy taking roles at all ends of the spectrum and delivering memorable performances again and again. He's never been a big star, a popular face, but over the last 20 years he's quietly been winning.

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 06, 2011, 11:40:28 PM
I get the choice of Joaquin Phoenix. He's someone I thought of as I read the question. I just find he's trying way too hard to come off like he's pushing boundaries. Once I watched James Dean in Giant, I saw the performance Phoenix has been trying to give naturally his entire career.

I knew there would be debate over the names mentioned, and whether or not they deserve to be called "great directors". It's missing the question by getting hung up on details. I was offering a general list of the type of actors considered great. So it doesn't assume any of them are good actors so much as make the case that every generation has their handful of great American actors.

To answer the question myself, I would say Leonardo DiCaprio, even though I wish he was still making the riskier indie fare he used to be drawn to. (I guess The Beach cured him of that.) Joseph Gordon-Levitt certainly has a couple of bold choices on his resume. Chloe Moretz is an inspired choice. Let's see if she can keep it up these next few years.

Woody Harrelson is also inspired, but I feel like he fits more as a character actor then as a leading man. But you're right, he's done some great work in unexpected films lately.

What about Philip Seymour Hoffman? Do you think he qualifies? And while it's easy to dismiss Brad Pitt as a Hollywood Movie Star, you have to admire him taking on films like Babel, Fight Club, Tree of Life and The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Yeah, I think I'd have to change my answer from DiCaprio to Pitt.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on July 07, 2011, 09:56:58 AM
What great actors has America produced in the last 20 years? Who has emerged to unseat...
I wouldn't say unseat, but I think you can safely put Sean Penn and Philip Seymour Hoffman in the pantheon of great American actors. Less obvious to me, but certainly the cream of the current crop might include Denzel Washington, James Franco, Johnny Depp, John C. Reilly, Samuel L. Jackson, and Joaquin Phoenix. Also, if we're allowed to include television, James Gandolfini can't be overlooked.

By the way, those 70s guys only seem untouchable because Boomers wont shut up about them.  :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Antares on July 07, 2011, 10:08:35 AM
For the range of roles that he's played over the last 15 years, I'd have to say Brad Pitt. With Philip Seymour Hoffman a close second. There was a time when I would have said Johnny Depp, but  now he's so submerged in his own ego, I can't.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on July 07, 2011, 10:26:15 AM
Its difficult because the new Hollywood generation was making a lot more good movies in my opinion. Even the actors that reserve themselves for the most interesting roles these days (DiCaprio, Lewis, Bale, Pitt, PSH) arent batting at the same average that the guys in the 70s did. A lot of my all time favorite performances and movies come from those 4 guys in the 1970-82 era.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 07, 2011, 10:29:28 AM
You make a good case for Pitt, 1SO. I did initially dismiss him.

Penn, yeah. I can't really argue against it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on July 07, 2011, 10:41:06 AM
While I cant say he's been in too many movies Ive loved, Clooney always brings it and makes interesting choices. He's basically Soderbergh's guy, he's worked multiple times with the Coen Bros.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 07, 2011, 11:10:21 AM
Not trying to argue against Clooney or anything I'm just thinking, has he ever done big emotion? Like lose all control wailing, or total rage... that sort of thing.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on July 07, 2011, 11:19:44 AM
What about Meryl Streep?  Or are we only discussing men?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 07, 2011, 11:23:58 AM
What about Meryl Streep?  Or are we only discussing men?
We're looking at the last 20 years. Streep is from the Pacino DeNiro era. But who would you say is a modern equal to Meryl Streep? (You could argue there is no equal to Streep at any time in film history, but who in the last 20 years comes closest?)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 07, 2011, 11:25:53 AM
Perhaps Winslet? I've only seen her in a few films, but she's always really good.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on July 07, 2011, 11:46:19 AM
winslet isnt american (she's in the DDL and Bardhem category).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on July 07, 2011, 12:44:56 PM
For men, I'd agree with PS Hoffman and Penn.  For women, I'd argue that Streep hasn't tapped out like DeNiro and others.  I keep forgetting that Sophie's Choice wasn't her first film.  (Which still isn't the last 20 years, but Doubt was.)

Winslet comes really close, but not to the same level as the older generation, I'd say.


Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 07, 2011, 12:54:54 PM
For women, I'd argue that Streep hasn't tapped out

Agree.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Beavermoose on July 07, 2011, 01:22:17 PM
Amy Adams?
Anne Hathaway?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 07, 2011, 01:27:07 PM
Adams is the new Monroe, Hathaway is wildly inconsistent.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on July 07, 2011, 01:48:48 PM
Pitt, Seymour Hoffman, and Gordan Levitt in years to come. But I'd agree, The US really has nothing compared with international film actors of the moment.

Tony Leung anyone? Or my favourite Ejiofer?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 07, 2011, 01:51:55 PM
You must watch more Phoenix, noke.  ;)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on July 07, 2011, 02:20:48 PM
You must watch more Phoenix, noke.  ;)

My response is Matty's Massacre Theatre performance of Gladiator, but there's no clips of it online. Sad face.

(I love Miami Vice, so I must love James Gray, right?)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on July 07, 2011, 02:22:34 PM
Casey Affleck?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Verite on July 07, 2011, 02:30:15 PM
What great actors has America produced in the last 20 years? Who has emerged to unseat DeNiro, Pacino, Hackman, Duvall etc., the way they took the mantle from Brando, Tracy etc.? Which Americans are really pushing the envelope in a way that equals foreign contemporaries such as Daniel Day-Lewis and Javier Bardem?

I think many of the great American actors and actresses of the past 20 years haven't had (as much) the ubericonic roles in iconic/culturally popular movies that the De Niros, Pacinos, Streeps had.  And many of my choices don't have great filmographies.  Great acting talent, though, methinks.

My current first tier excluding the older generation: Jeff Bridges, Penn, Julianne Moore, Laura Linney, Ryan Gosling, Michelle Williams, and Viggo.

Current second tier: Jeffrey Wright, PSH, Matt Damon, Denzel, Holly Hunter, Forest Whitaker, Clooney

Very close/maybe should be in my second tier: Adrien Brody, Campbell Scott, Andre Braugher, Ruffalo, Farmiga, and Sam Rockwell.

Need to see more but will likely make the first 2 tiers in the future: Casey Affleck, Joaquin Phoenix, Kerry Washington

Missing some, definitely.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 07, 2011, 02:41:49 PM
You must watch more Phoenix, noke.  ;)

My response is Matty's Massacre Theatre performance of Gladiator, but there's no clips of it online. Sad face.

(I love Miami Vice, so I must love James Gray, right?)
Phoenix is the only good part of Gladiator.

Also, you should totally watch some James Gray.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Verite on July 07, 2011, 02:55:21 PM
Forgot about Robert Downey, Jr.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 07, 2011, 03:41:33 PM
What great actors has America produced in the last 20 years? Who has emerged to unseat DeNiro, Pacino, Hackman, Duvall etc., the way they took the mantle from Brando, Tracy etc.? Which Americans are really pushing the envelope in a way that equals foreign contemporaries such as Daniel Day-Lewis and Javier Bardem?

Very close/maybe should be in my second tier: Sam Rockwell.

Oh I forgot about him! He'd be in my upper echelon I think.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Verite on July 07, 2011, 03:50:36 PM
Very close/maybe should be in my second tier: Sam Rockwell.

Oh I forgot about him! He'd be in my upper echelon I think.

Yeah, we talked about him a little in the Actors Below 55 Years Old list thread.  You were the one who brought him up!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: tinyholidays on July 07, 2011, 03:52:25 PM
My response is a PT Anderson cast list - Julianne Moore.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 07, 2011, 04:10:15 PM
Very close/maybe should be in my second tier: Sam Rockwell.

Oh I forgot about him! He'd be in my upper echelon I think.

Yeah, we talked about him a little in the Actors Below 55 Years Old list thread.  You were the one who brought him up!

Man, good memory! :D
Title: NEW Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 08, 2011, 05:53:30 PM
NEW QUESTION:

There's a moment in The 40-Year-Old Virgin where Paul Rudd is watching The Bourne Identity and he says "You know, I always thought that Matt Damon was like a Streisand, but I think he's rockin' the shit in this one!" We've seen Helen Mirren in Red, Michael Cera in Scott Pilgrim, heck even Johnny Depp was an unlikely action hero before Pirates of the Caribbean. Who do you think has the stuff to be the next unlikely action hero?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on July 08, 2011, 06:03:30 PM
Chiwetel Ejiofer as James Bond!!!

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on July 08, 2011, 07:06:18 PM
I was going to say Nicholas Hoult, but...already an unlikely hero. So, I will go with Alexander Gould.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 08, 2011, 07:45:23 PM
Orlando Bloom. He's been in a number of action roles and it still seems unlikely that he'll become an action hero.

Peter Dinklage...that guy needs to get cast as an action hero. That film would own.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 08, 2011, 10:38:38 PM
Chiwetel Ejiofer as James Bond!!!
Only if Colin Firth is the bad guy and they have a knife fight at the end.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ses on July 08, 2011, 10:39:37 PM
Chiwetel Ejiofer as James Bond!!!
Only if Colin Firth is the bad guy and they have a knife fight at the end.

I like the Colin Firth/Hugh Grant fight in Bridget Jones' Diary.  :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on July 08, 2011, 10:41:06 PM
Ricky Jay
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 10, 2011, 06:38:38 PM
Why does Rachel McAdams jump out as a clear choice here.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 11, 2011, 10:21:17 AM
Thought that last question would last longer.

NEW QUESTION:

Amazing how far Hanks and Roberts have fallen as draws.  Even as badly reviewed and marketed as Crowne was - 5 years ago this would've been a 25-30m opener on a 3 day weekend.

What part do movie stars play today in getting people to see a film? How much can you credit an actor with a movie's success or blame them for its failure?

A great current example to discuss is Brad Pitt. Inglourious Basterds was a big hit. The biggest for Quentin Tarantino, so you could easily say the film affirms Pitt's box office clout, even though he's only in about a third of the film. That clout helped get films like Tree of Life and The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford financed. Jesse James in particular did so poorly ($15m worldwide), you almost have to hope Pitt wasn't cast for box office reasons. Looking at these two films, you could argue that Pitt is a terrific actor, but not a bankable movie star.

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 11, 2011, 11:22:21 AM
Stars just aren't worth much, because they often aren't great predictors of quality. Natalie Portman wins an Oscar for Black Swan and follows it up with No Strings Attached and Thor and such. Christoph Waltz got on all our radars with Inglourious Basterds and jumped off it with Green Hornet and Water For Elephants. Portman and Waltz are still strong actors and probably were even good for what they were given in those lesser films, but there's just no point in assuming an good actor can or will make a good movie separate from independent signals of quality such as director or subject matter that may be more reliable.

Now, quality and box-office are not synonymous, so why did I just talk about quality. Well, if actors are so variable on quality, it goes to figure that their film choices are variable enough that audiences of less discerning tastes will also find them unreliable. The only degree to which you can blame an actor for a film's failure is the degree to which the production deluded itself into thinking the actor would guarantee a hit.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 11, 2011, 11:28:14 AM
Stars put a face to a film. As people who communicate through the face, it's the thing we remember most, so I'd say they're almost always essential in getting the average person to see a movie. Get the right face and half the battle is won.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 11, 2011, 11:28:16 AM
Water For Elephants is a great film to look at. Reese Witherspoon has had a few hits and won an Oscar, but I don't see opening a film just on her being in it. Then again, I don't know why anybody went to Four Christmases. R. Pats, got a lot of work because of the Twilight films, but right now his fans only want to see him as Edward (or is it Jacob?) Just like how nobody wanted to see Daniel, Emma and Rupert outside of Harry Potter until the saga was done. And even then it's a big ?.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 11, 2011, 11:32:31 AM
I think the other half is building positive buzz. A lot of big actors will do small films that don't get that much money. That's because they don't have those massive PR machines behind them.

Also, I think to be a true star, you've got to be in a handful of various films and receive more success. The Pattensons and Radclifes of the industry are sustained on series. Much like Toby Maguire was with Spider-Man. Some will go on to be stars, but they only become big because of their series, not so much because of them. 
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Shaw13 on July 11, 2011, 02:24:25 PM
The fact that people are going to Tree Of Life without any knowledge of Malick, shows the power stars like Pitt and Penn still have.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on July 11, 2011, 03:15:21 PM
Goodness. To answer that question we need Bill Simmons to come explain why Bruce Willis, Jaime Foxx and Ryan Reynolds arent movie stars but Jake Gyllenhall, Zach Galafinakis and Justin Timberlake are.

I think stars probably mean little for a major franchise's box office (for example, Im sure the new Spiderman will do just fine).  Alternately, a Matt Damon or Will Smith or RDJ might make something like Battle: Los Angeles make 2 times as much.

Personally, I want to see anything thats good or at least interesting looking. Rarely is the star something that pushes that over the brink. Sometimes, but rarely
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on July 11, 2011, 03:21:34 PM
There aren't many actors whose films I would definitely go out to see and none of those are the ones who might seem the most 'bankable'. Currently, Ejiofor and Fassbinder (I put Hunger on my rental list despite the subject matter being something I shy away from (Sands isn't really much of a hero in the UK)) are the ones who come to mind. Penelope Cruz? Maybe. After that it has to be a combination of subject, director, actors.

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on July 11, 2011, 05:00:48 PM
There aren't many actors whose films I would definitely go out to see and none of those are the ones who might seem the most 'bankable'. Currently, Ejiofor and Fassbinder (I put Hunger on my rental list despite the subject matter being something I shy away from (Sands isn't really much of a hero in the UK))

Oh verbALs, why must you do these things that make me love you so? My two favourite actors, ever, of all time. Hunger is interesting, as if you let your politics go to the side for the film you'll like it, I think, as it's really a portrait of the physical and mental disintegration of a man and the choices he makes to put himself through that. There's the infamous dialogue scene, true, but that's much more and ideological debate then it is glorification. I think you'd love it. Or at least appreciate it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 11, 2011, 05:04:32 PM
I really appreciated my popcorn during Hunger. Tasted at least twice as good.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on July 11, 2011, 05:13:01 PM
I really appreciated my popcorn during Hunger. Tasted at least twice as good.

During the entirety of 127 Hours I turned to my friend sitting next to me who had gotten a large coke and whispering "You're horrible"
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 11, 2011, 05:25:45 PM
"I will not eat until my country has complete freedom...is that a Butterfinger?" - High Strung
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 13, 2011, 01:22:08 PM
NEW QUESTION:

Who here has seen a film credited to Alan Smithee (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Smithee#Uses)? Was it really that bad?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on July 13, 2011, 04:00:27 PM
The only one I know that I have seen is Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983) and it is for the Second Assistant Director.  (taken from Wiki) ...credit for the first segment is credited to "Alan Smithee". This position is commonly involved in shooting action scenes, such as the one in which actor Vic Morrow was killed during production of this film.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 13, 2011, 04:08:56 PM
I totally want to see Woman Wanted (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woman_Wanted_(2000_film)).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 13, 2011, 04:20:36 PM
I have not seen any of "his" films but I have read some of his posts (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=5658).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on July 14, 2011, 11:37:54 AM
Ive seen the modified version of Dune. It's bad, but then so is the Lynch vision of the movie.

Either way, the movie opens with a long explanation of the universe by Princess Irulian, telling the viewer rather than showing organically throughout the movie.  I remember thinking Id have no idea wtf was going on had I not read the book.

Believe Ive seen the Smithee tv versions of a couple as well...probably Showgirls and Scent of a Woman.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 21, 2011, 10:06:28 AM
NEW QUESTION:

What is the greatest film performance by an animal? A lot of leeway with this question since most animal performances are heavily manipulated, often with multiples playing one part. Many have the assistance of special effects (like my choice 'Babe'), which means I have to allow for animals that are completely animated (like Mr. Fox.)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 21, 2011, 10:08:06 AM
Balthazar.  :'(
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on July 21, 2011, 10:11:28 AM
That little dog in Umberto D.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on July 21, 2011, 10:19:47 AM
Balthazar.  :'(

That little dog in Umberto D.

Can't argue with either of these, or Babe.  And of course there's the obvious Toto.  Balthazar was the first one that came to mind for me, and I think he's my choice unless I think of something better.

Fantastic Mr. Fox (or Bambi, or Dumbo, et cetera) is just completely ignoring the spirit of the question.  There's no real animal involved at any point.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 21, 2011, 10:54:11 AM
Balthazar.  :'(

That little dog in Umberto D.

Fantastic Mr. Fox (or Bambi, or Dumbo, et cetera) is just completely ignoring the spirit of the question.  There's no real animal involved at any point.
Balthazar is really inspired, especially since the whole point was to not give the impression of a performance. He's a donkey. Behaves like a donkey. Oblivious to what's happening around him.

The dog in Umberto D made me think of the cat in Harry and Tonto. I'd go with Tonto.

I mentioned Mr. Fox because I saw this question dissolving into a debate over how much effects goes into a performance before it's no longer an animal performance. (Babe utilized puppets, animatronics and effects to make him talk.) I also see Pixote saying how Man is an animal.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 21, 2011, 10:56:20 AM
I'd have to say Old Yeller. I heard in an interview once it was his performance that inspired Pacino to start acting.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 21, 2011, 10:57:03 AM
John Candy in Spaceballs

Milo of Milo and Otis...KITTENS!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: FroHam X on July 21, 2011, 11:01:07 AM
This question is somewhat pointless considering the best performance by an animal will come very soon in my upcoming film about a time traveling dog who runs for President of the United States.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on July 21, 2011, 11:11:38 AM
Thought of a couple more good ones...

Lucy (Wendy and Lucy):
(http://i.imgur.com/ZvXmJ.jpg)

And this might be my favorite... the camel in Big Animal:
(http://i.imgur.com/PmT11.jpg)


I loved that goddamn camel
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on July 21, 2011, 11:11:52 AM
Astor the dog in The Thin Man. I think he mixes and drinks a cocktail at one point (pre-12am as well probably).

(https://img.skitch.com/20110721-q7w296ixi1dj45mukd893aaym2.jpg)
Here Astor gives a press conference.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 21, 2011, 11:13:16 AM
The narrator of the forthcoming The Future by Miranda July?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 21, 2011, 11:24:31 AM
I'd have to say Old Yeller. I heard in an interview once it was his performance that inspired Pacino to start acting.
That explains a lot of Pacino's performances.  ;D
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on July 21, 2011, 11:26:09 AM
Astor the dog in The Thin Man. I think he mixes and drinks a cocktail at one point (pre-12am as well probably).

(https://img.skitch.com/20110721-q7w296ixi1dj45mukd893aaym2.jpg)
Here Astor gives a press conference.

Asta!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ses on July 21, 2011, 11:26:38 AM
I'd have to say Old Yeller. I heard in an interview once it was his performance that inspired Pacino to start acting.

Best doggone dog in the West
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on July 21, 2011, 11:42:47 AM
huh, cool thread.

Obviously the cast of Project X is the correct answer - especially Virgil & Goliath.

Project X - Trailer #1 (1987) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YE9vPWswOog#)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 21, 2011, 12:54:41 PM
The narrator of the forthcoming The Future by Miranda July?
  :D
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on July 21, 2011, 01:46:13 PM
From The Mask

(https://img.skitch.com/20110721-8xnixspyr2j94xuw62dmxkd9tp.jpg)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bill Thompson on July 21, 2011, 04:26:26 PM
Babe
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on July 23, 2011, 01:25:52 AM
Babe

I really don't think there's a second choice for me.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oneaprilday on July 23, 2011, 12:50:08 PM
(http://i52.tinypic.com/2djnhux.jpg)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: FroHam X on July 23, 2011, 12:53:54 PM
I prefer the dogs and cat in Homeward Bound.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 23, 2011, 12:54:25 PM
The childhood memories.  :'(
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oneaprilday on July 23, 2011, 03:24:59 PM
The childhood memories.  :'(
Indeed.  And that trio still has the power to reduce me to a puddle.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 26, 2011, 11:50:39 PM
New Question:

We've all read some questionable blurbs on posters and print ads. What are some of your favorites?


My favorite would be the advertising for the Sandra Bullock's Two if By Sea. Norman Mark, (WMAQ-TV/Chicago) called it "The best romantic comedy, caper, date film of the year." I love how many subdivisions he put into his praise, especially since the film opened on January 12.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on July 27, 2011, 12:16:11 AM
"The headiest, most singular science fiction movie since Kubrick made 2001." - Esquire

About Primer. I guess it is both singular and heady. It says nothing of the quality, though.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: FroHam X on July 27, 2011, 12:45:35 AM
"The headiest, most singular science fiction movie since Kubrick made 2001." - Esquire

About Primer. I guess it is both singular and heady. It says nothing of the quality, though.

Primer is just as good as 2001.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on July 27, 2011, 02:27:32 AM
That would have been a funnier one.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 01, 2011, 11:04:43 PM
NEW QUESTION:

What's the most ineptly filmed, laughable death you've ever seen in a movie?


For me it's probably Brad Pitt's double car hit near the beginning of Meet Joe Black. The film is so serious about it and the CGI human physics is incredibly poor.

Meet Joe Black - Brad Pitt gets hit by two cars (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mikj8eDKxMQ#ws)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ses on August 01, 2011, 11:07:18 PM
That's the perfect choice, when I saw that in the theater there were some screams and someone yelled "Oh Sh*t!".  It was followed by silence then raucous laughter. 
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 01, 2011, 11:14:55 PM
This one is fresh in mind but it is also really terrible...Dial M For Murder (go to the minute mark)

Dial M For Murder - Murder Sequence (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBoL2vMJkCs#noexternalembed-ws)

Actually a big fan of Meet Joe Black. Not so much Dial M For Murder.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 01, 2011, 11:35:45 PM
I remember the angle of the initial stab is off, but I love the hand reaching towards the screen beforehand, and Hitch totally sells it when the guy hits the ground.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ses on August 01, 2011, 11:43:21 PM
Wasn't it originally shown in 3D?  Is that why it looks so funny?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on August 01, 2011, 11:55:32 PM
I watched Nicholson's death scene in Bridge on the River Kwai the other day. Alec Guinness stumbles a hell of a long way to fall on the detonator plunger.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 02, 2011, 08:28:32 AM
Wasn't it originally shown in 3D?  Is that why it looks so funny?
Yes, and that could be the reason it looks so awkward.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 08, 2011, 10:38:57 PM
NEXT QUESTION:

Name an animated film you would like to see done in live-action. Name a live-action film you would like to see animated.


It's a tricky question because it implies that I don't like the film in its current form. As much as I love the 1950s watercolor style, I'd be really interested in a live-action version of The Iron Giant.
As for the other way around, we've already seen Batman work great in both animation and live-action. However I'm thinking The Matrix, which has some pretty swell animated shorts, could make for a great animated feature. Perhaps something that works better than Matrix Revolutions.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 08, 2011, 11:12:33 PM
A live action version of Beowulf! And an animated version of Avatar!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 08, 2011, 11:22:15 PM
I definitely want animated Harry Potter at some point (ideally as a TV series though). Animation allows you to really go for broke on fantastical elements without worrying about whether the CGI will be successful. While later in the series especially there was some genius art direction, there were definitely some moments earlier on in particular that were less than elegant.

A lot of my favorite films have actually been made in live-action in the sense that Disney based a lot of its films on well worn stories (Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast, Hunchback of Notre Dame) though not as musicals or has actually gone ahead and done a live-action staging of the musicals (Lion King, BotB, Little Mermaid). One that sticks out as interesting to me is Grave of the Fireflies. It is possible that film would just be way too intense live action, but it could also be great.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on August 08, 2011, 11:23:26 PM
A like action South Park: Bigger, Longer, Uncut, obvi.

i'd love to see an anime Taxi Driver.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 08, 2011, 11:26:51 PM
I think a live action Paprika would be mind-blowing, if done well.

An animated Spy Kids would be fun.  I'd also love to see more Tarantino animated stuff-- the animated section in Kill Bill was pretty intense.

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 08, 2011, 11:35:05 PM
Some great responses on this one already.

@ Sam. Zemeckis should never have been allowed to do animated films. Avatar feels like a cheat. I believe you can up with two more creative answers (or at least agree with me about Matrix.)

@Bondo. When thinking of a live-action version of an animated film I considered Aladdin before remembering you showed me a pretty respectable version of it already. And there is a live-action version of Grave of the Fireflies. I watched some of it and it's pretty interesting.

@¡Keith!. I don't know if you were joking about Taxi Driver, but it got me thinking of the animation style in Kill Bill. It could be great. (or rotoscoping like A Scanner Darkly.)

@oldkid. I remember when I saw Kon's Perfect Blue it played like a cross between DePalma and Gilliam. Would've been happy with a live-action version by either. You don't think of adapting Kon to live-action because he was so creative with a brush, but I agree with you.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on August 08, 2011, 11:40:18 PM
nah, wasn't joking on either - the jazzy score and steam and grime of NYC would look fantastic in the right hands.  something like Trainspotting would look great rotoscoped:

(http://www.spittinflicks.com/images/trainspotting2.jpg)

(http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film2/DVDReviews45/trainspotting%20blu-ray/large/large%20trainspotting%20blu-ray6x.jpg)

(http://images2.fanpop.com/image/photos/10700000/Trainspotting-jonny-lee-miller-10720625-720-540.jpg)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 09, 2011, 12:07:32 AM
@ Sam. Zemeckis should never have been allowed to do animated films. Avatar feels like a cheat. I believe you can up with two more creative answers (or at least agree with me about Matrix.)
I kid, of course. As both films are so close on the verge of being the other, or at least trying hard to be.

For serious answers:

Maybe I'm crazy, but I think an animated version of The Good, The Bad and the Ugly would be cool. It's got terrible dubbing problems and with the animation you could alleviate that. I also think the finale would be even more epic in animated form.

Animated is tough. A lot of animated films just look so good animated, I feel they'd loose their charm in live action form. However, Grave of the Fireflies is a film that I think I might have appreciated more as a life action film.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 09, 2011, 12:13:33 AM
I'd like to see Adaptation animated. With the necessary adaptations to the script to make it fit in with animation, obviously. And if it's not cheating, I'd see a version of Planet of the Apes that uses the Rise... technology instead of weird mouth prosthetic.


I'd like to see a live action version of The Black Cauldron. Just make it look cool.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 09, 2011, 07:57:02 AM
I think any of the recent children's book adaptations (Narnia, Terebithia, Lemony Snicket, Stardust, Golden Compass) would make great animated films. Hand drawn, there's just something warmer about it.

I think The Girl Who Leapt Through Time is a great story and would be easy to pull off in live-action. I'd have to think about the casting. Now that I mention it I'm wondering how I left it off my top 100... going to fix that.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on August 09, 2011, 08:03:19 AM
I think The Girl Who Leapt Through Time is a great story and would be easy to pull off in live-action. I'd have to think about the casting.

Obayashi (House) did it in 1983.  My review:

Quote
Toki o kakeru shôjo (The Little Girl Who Conquered Time)
November 15, 2009

An often-adapted (including the recent anime The Girl Who Leapt Through Time) story of a teenage girl who has a mysterious lab accident that sends her reeling through time.  In terms of weirdness and ingenuity, this is a step up from Exchange Students but still nowhere near as out there as Hausu.  The first half of the movie is very slow, focusing more on the coming-of-age aspects rather than the sci-fi angle.  It's not until about an hour into it when things start getting bizarre, and even then they're relatively tame.  Some of the time travel sequences are dynamite, however.  If the movie wasn't quite what I was hoping for, at least it was pleasant with likable characters, especially teen idol Tomoyo Harada in the lead.  Rating: 7
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 09, 2011, 08:04:45 AM
The Golden Compass would be awesome animated, good call there...and maybe they'd do the entire trilogy.

But yeah, that's another one I knew had a live-action version already...makes it tougher to answer that part of the question.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 16, 2011, 11:27:12 PM
NEW QUESTION:

What is the greatest performance by a character that is animated, computer generated or motion captured?


This question was first put to Ebert many years ago and he went on about Robin Williams' contribution as Genie in Aladdin. Since then it seems there's a push every year for a performance that isn't 100% human. The closest we got to one of these types of performances actually getting an Oscar nom has to be Andy Serkis as Gollum. Since then there's been buzz for Zoe Saldana in Avatar and now Serkis strikes again as Caesar in Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

Are they better performances than Wall-E? or someone from Studio Ghibli? Perhaps the brother from Grave of the Fireflies? I feel like that would have to be my choice. However, I would like to champion a performance for me that is simply perfect. In expression and movement and voice I'm a huge fan of Remy the Rat (voiced by Patton Oswald) in Ratatouille.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 16, 2011, 11:46:38 PM
So I'm caught up by the performance aspect.

I'd be inclined to go with Dory in Finding Nemo, but that is because of the voice work/script. I'm inclined to want to interpret the question as being more about the physical performance created by the animators. Maybe Quasimodo in Hunchback.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 16, 2011, 11:48:54 PM
Caesar is truly astounding. There are only a few shots that don't totally work. He's the main character, the one with the real growth, and it feels right.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on August 17, 2011, 02:24:35 AM
Spanish Buzz
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on August 17, 2011, 08:28:36 AM
I'd go with Billy crudup in mononoke.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on August 17, 2011, 09:47:51 AM
NEW QUESTION:

What is the greatest performance by a character that is animated, computer generated or motion captured?

Gotta go Gromit.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Mike Shutt on August 17, 2011, 10:16:58 AM
One that immediately springs to mind is Carl Fredrickson (Ed Asner) from Up.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 17, 2011, 08:47:37 PM
I love Daveigh Chase's performances in the dub of Spirited Away and in Lilo and Stitch.  Among my favorite performances ever.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 17, 2011, 08:57:40 PM
I'd go with Billy crudup in mononoke.

Yes! (and Watchmen).

Man that guy is cool.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 17, 2011, 09:10:16 PM
I'd go with Billy crudup in mononoke.

Yes! (and Watchmen).

Man that guy is cool.

Ooh! Watchmen is a good call. Dr. Manhattan is pretty awesome. And extremely well played.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 17, 2011, 11:17:12 PM
One that immediately springs to mind is Carl Fredrickson (Ed Asner) from Up.
This was my wife's choice.

Gromit is a great pick that I hadn't thought of. Like Remy it's a performance that relies a lot on facial expression and an almost deadpan comic timing. Gromit has absolutely no speaking voice so the level of difficulty is higher, but I still say Remy is the better performance.

I'm especially curious to hear FLY and Bill's answer.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bill Thompson on August 19, 2011, 05:51:24 PM
Tough one for me, there are so many great performances to choose from, and two distinct ways to interpret your question I think.

1) Voice acting

This interpretation is at the feet of the guy/gal behind the microphone in the studio. I'd have to go with Ayano Shiraishi as Setsuko, the little sister from Grave of the Fireflies. Such a powerful, joyous, performance that falls into despair without the viewer even realizing it.

2) Artistic application

In this instance I am interpreting your question to mean the character that the animators/CG people have brought to life the fullest. Going by that interpretation I have to go with Wall-E from Wall-E, a simple character who completely embodies the tramp and does so quite effortlessly. Wall-E is the hero that everyone wants to root for and laugh along with at the same time, and the emotional connection he is able to get from the me never fails to amaze me.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on August 19, 2011, 10:03:49 PM
leaning toward Wilbur & Charlotte in Charlotte's Web
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 19, 2011, 11:10:27 PM
Bill, I'm out of town and responding via iPhone. I hope when I return I remember to respond to your answers, which are two of my favorite picks.


¡Keith!, nice pick outside the norm. Reminded me of Chuck Jones' Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, though Nagaina probably stole that show.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 21, 2011, 11:34:23 PM
Tough one for me, there are so many great performances to choose from, and two distinct ways to interpret your question I think.

1) Voice acting

This interpretation is at the feet of the guy/gal behind the microphone in the studio. I'd have to go with Ayano Shiraishi as Setsuko, the little sister from Grave of the Fireflies. Such a powerful, joyous, performance that falls into despair without the viewer even realizing it.

2) Artistic application

In this instance I am interpreting your question to mean the character that the animators/CG people have brought to life the fullest. Going by that interpretation I have to go with Wall-E from Wall-E, a simple character who completely embodies the tramp and does so quite effortlessly. Wall-E is the hero that everyone wants to root for and laugh along with at the same time, and the emotional connection he is able to get from the me never fails to amaze me.

First, choosing a great animated performance kind of asks for something that slam dunks both voice acting and artistic application. While there are many superb examples of one or the other, finding the best in both is quite rare. It may be why I like your picks so much is you chose to give two prizes.

For voice acting, I completely get what you're saying about Setsuko's descent. It's subtle as a whisper, yet unmistakable. I was always aware of it, but never enough to appreciate how amazing the voice work is. With Wall-E, I've seen that film a couple of dozen times, yet the way his head is designed and utilized is like the reinvention of eyes and facial expressions. He has perfectly natural eyebrows and I love how his mechanical iris moves to focus and create new emotional looks. Both performances would probably be in my Top 5. I'm probably marking down Setsuko because her face and expressions is very similar to all of the Miyazaki heroines. Mononoke is probably the most uniquely expressive Ghibli female.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 22, 2011, 06:34:27 PM
NEW QUESTION:

Name a modern movie, shot in color that you think does/would play better in Black and White?

Of course this was done with The Mist, so let's make that the honorary choice.
When it was posed to Ebert, the writer turned down the color in The Grifters. "Suddenly the atmosphere of Jim Thompson's book seemed to pop out more."
Ebert's answer, "Although it is probably just as unethical as colorization, I sometimes experiment by turning down the color settings on a television to experience a movie in black and white. Among recent movies, Fargo is one I enjoyed in both modes."

This is a tough one for me, but I would be curious to see Mulholland Drive in B&W. I wonder if any of recent S. Korean cinema would play well with the color drained out. Lady Vengeance tried something like it, but what about Thirst, A Bittersweet Life or Mother?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 22, 2011, 07:24:54 PM
There is definitely something about noir that screams black and white, so something like Memento might be interesting.

Another thought would be something like Saving Private Ryan...as if you were watching footage of the war on TV at the time. Or along a slightly similar premise...Starship Troopers.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 22, 2011, 08:58:07 PM
I don't know about Thirst. It has that excellent flourescent lighting later on that might be missed in B+W.

I wonder how There Will Be Blood would look. It feels like an older movie. I'd be sad to lose the bright orange fire against the dark in that explosion scene, though.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ferris on August 22, 2011, 09:35:41 PM
NEW QUESTION:

Name a modern movie, shot in color that you think does/would play better in Black and White?

Of course this was done with The Mist, so let's make that the honorary choice.
When it was posed to Ebert, the writer turned down the color in The Grifters. "Suddenly the atmosphere of Jim Thompson's book seemed to pop out more."
Ebert's answer, "Although it is probably just as unethical as colorization, I sometimes experiment by turning down the color settings on a television to experience a movie in black and white. Among recent movies, Fargo is one I enjoyed in both modes."

This is a tough one for me, but I would be curious to see Mulholland Drive in B&W. I wonder if any of recent S. Korean cinema would play well with the color drained out. Lady Vengeance tried something like it, but what about Thirst, A Bittersweet Life or Mother?

Probably not the best person to answer this -but the first thing that came to mind was Duncan Jone's Moon
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 22, 2011, 10:16:33 PM
Speed Racer :)


All About My Mother would probably improve in b&w, giving it one more tie in to All About Eve.

Doubt.  It would have even more of a somber feel.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 22, 2011, 10:23:31 PM
Doubt's a good pick.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on August 22, 2011, 11:00:30 PM
All About My Mother would probably improve in b&w, giving it one more tie in to All About Eve.

With the way Almodovar uses color?  Blasphemy!!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 24, 2011, 12:22:45 AM
All About My Mother would probably improve in b&w, giving it one more tie in to All About Eve.

With the way Almodovar uses color?  Blasphemy!!

Admittedly, the color is fascinating.  Nevertheless, I think black and white would have served the plot and characters better.  Maybe not.  Just thinking about it.  It's not like I'm going to re-shoot it :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on August 24, 2011, 12:54:21 AM
i honestly can't think of many.  Drive had some interesting shadows that that would've been really nice in B&W but seriously... Color>>Colour>B&W.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 28, 2011, 11:29:45 PM
NEW QUESTION:

What is the responsibility of the filmmaker when a film is based on a true story or real events?


The question came up in regards to Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story and how little that film is based on Lee's actual life or the biography written by his wife (even though her character narrates the film.) Ebert talked about In the Name of the Father, a film that is also quite different from the real events though a lot of people don't know that because the real events are not as well known as Bruce Lee. Ultimately, Ebert decides that "accuracy always finishes second to the devices of drama, pacing and storytelling. The film critic can only review the film, not the facts."

This is a policy I apply to documentaries, which is why I can say good things about Michael Moore. He's very good at using the documentary medium to make an entertaining film. However, there's always a problem when the filmmakers try to present their film as fact. FroHam had this problem (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8177.msg494056#msg494056) with The King of Kong, while I enjoyed the underdog aspect a lot (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8177.msg493902#msg493902). I had a problem with Mississippi Burning, which throws away 90min of a great film for an amped up 3rd Act because the truth was dull. Except the film's climax was way too twisty to feel real.

Then there's Fargo, which the Coen Brothers sold as based on real events. That helped make the movie great. Then when we learned those 'real events' was part of the fiction, it somehow made the film better.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: saltine on August 28, 2011, 11:34:39 PM
I love this question...anxious to hear what filmspotters have to say!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 28, 2011, 11:38:30 PM
I guess it depends insofar as the writer and director is trying to depict their film as the reality of their subject. It's one thing to change the timing facts of Rudy Ruettiger's life to make a more climatic film, it's another to depict Billy Mitchel as the ultimate douche in The King of Kong in order to try to construct an antagonism that likely doesn't exist in reality.

To me, it's more about when you go about depicting things that are wrong about the characters, not so much the events surrounding them.

That being said, if you're making a film about very charged and emotional events, like the holocaust, you've got a whole plethora of issues involving crafting scenes that facade as recreations of true moments in order to elicit emotions from your audience. It's a whole other can of worms there.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 28, 2011, 11:40:56 PM
Film has great power to it. If you tell a story in a reasonably popular film, that story is going to be far more widely understood than any reality of the event. The more that audience conception of reality has an effect on the world, the more responsibility the filmmaker has to be accurate. I'd say this means that if you are portraying real living people, however dramatized the story may be, or in the case of a documentary, if the subject has great social relevance, factual accuracy is rather important.

As much as I love the film The Social Network, it is in my top-100 of all time, I do think there are real concerns in its portrayal of Mark Zuckerberg at times. This is a real important person who in real life has been dating the same woman since before he thought up Facebook. No matter how much people might point out the fictionalized nature of the portrayal, a lot of people are probably going to think worse things about his incentives for starting up Facebook. The film also makes Larry Summers out to be the coolest person ever (and in reality, his statements about the Winklevi confirm this in part), yet watching something like Inside Job which tackles a far more important matter, you see Summers as rather key in creating the problems that are devastating us. Far more people are bound to watch The Social Network than Inside Job. Not sure what can be done about that though.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Lobby on August 28, 2011, 11:44:12 PM
I think it depends on the source material. If you mess around with the truth and people who are pictured in the movie in a negative way still are alive, I see a problem. That's what gave me such a bad taste in my mouth when I learned about the true story of The Diving Belly and the butterfly.

I wrote about this in a blogpost: Based on a true story is a tricky thing.  (http://thevelvetcafe.wordpress.com/2011/08/24/based-on-a-true-story-is-a-tricky-thing)

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: saltine on August 28, 2011, 11:52:46 PM
I recently saw Senna.  The archival footage and the story it told gave me the sense of realism and truth.  I'd be devastated to learn that any of that was a lie, or even a stretch of the truth.  On the other hand, I know that film isn't a history lesson, but one person's view of the truth.  In that way, it never surprises me to learn that the "truth" is skewed, always subject to interpretation.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: StudentOFilm on August 29, 2011, 12:03:25 AM
It of course depends on the nature of the story. Putting that aside for a second, the story is probably being made into a film already because there is the promise of a good narrative to be found. I love how films like Redford's Quiz Show, Mann's The Insider, or more recent films like Fincher's The Social Network or Hanson's Too Big to Fail, take situations that in reality aren't as compelling as they perhaps should be and turn them into watchable scenarios. Things always need to be changed for the screen. This even holds true for adaptations of novels, plays, etc. I think the filmmaker should look at the truth and then as they go over it, decide what is true in spirit to tell their story.

I mentioned the nature of the story, and you have popular films from last year like Boyle's 127 Hours or O. Russell's The Fighter that showcase characters who aren't in the happiest of places. Aron Ralston and Micky Ward supported the films. I think when your subject is alive and the publicist/the agent/themselves are supportive- then you have a responsibility to consult with them and have them aware of your approach. Their story may be widely known or already published in another format- so if they've opened their heart up to the world then I'm sure you can approach them like you would approach an actor playing them.

If the subject isn't supportive and at the risk of sounding too hypocritical, well then Fincher's film is a great example. It takes events mentioned in a book and creates a character named Mark who goes through an emotional arc. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but no one ever said this is Facebook: The Movie, it's a dramatized story. This is how I personally feel, I realize that when you claim a film is based on truth, the mass audience probably expects the truth, but that is where I differ from the mainstream. There is a careful balance of responsibility to watchability. I think Fincher, Sorkin, and co. realized that and they took a big risk. I consider it to be an outside-the-box approach to capturing the truth (an extreme case being something like Hayne's I'm Not There). I don't mean this as an insult to Zuckerberg for not participating, but then it is up to the press for the film as well as Zuckerberg's people to mention the artistic merits of the film being placed over the truth... which, yeah kind of sucks but film is a form of free speech yada yada yada.

When it comes to dramatizing true stories/events, it is a very comprehensive puzzle of "you can do this if A is the case but you can't do that if B is the case, but if C is also the case along with B then you can do . . . ". It's like when is it more appropriate to call or text someone with your cell phone? There are a wide variety of exceptions to the "rules."

To continue using recent popular films as an example, I think Affleck's The Town does a great job of explaining to its audience the dramatized facts (Charlestown has a lot of crime) but at the end it is sure to be respectful (saying during the credits that the citizens of Charlestown are not meant to all be depicted in a certain light).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 29, 2011, 12:38:36 AM
In my opinion, all film is fiction.  So is almost all literature, except for the most researched, documented material.  In every film there is a kind of truth that they are trying to reach for and a kind of fiction that supports their version of the truth.   If a film states "based on real events", this only means to me that something vaguely like what occurred in the film happened.  If the real events were important to me, I'd read a journalistic, documented report of such events.

Documentaries, while using actual footage, is at best interpreted fact.  At worst, it is created from whole cloth.  This does not hinder my enjoyment of said film because I believe that all film is fiction. 

I wish that the term "documentary" didn't mean, in many people's estimation, a factual account.  I wish that when anyone reads the phrase "based on real events" that they would emphasize the word "based", and recognize that there is a lot in the film that isn't fact in any way.  But people want to think that reality happens in this entertaining fashion.  So it is.

What is a director's responsibility?  Not much more than what they have done already.  I wish that every documentarian would say, "This film is more about me than my subject".  I wish that every filmmaker who creates a movie about real events would admit that they made up a lot or at least changed a lot.  But that's kind of like asking a magician to tell how they did their trick (as The Prestige would say).  Frankly, it ruins the trick for the audience.  It's like a child saying, "Let's pretend" in a Let's Pretend game.  To acknowledge the curtain is to acknowledge that you are being tricked and that ruins the real fiction: the one where the audience thinks they are being given facts instead of opinion.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Lobby on August 29, 2011, 12:55:31 AM
What is a director's responsibility?  Not much more than what they have done already.
But what if real people get hurt in the name of art? Such as in the case of the movie I wrote about where the girlfriend untruthfully was pictured as if she didn't care and deserted her partner when things got rough? As you say, the audience takes the "based on a true story" as the truth.
Don't you think the director needs to relate to this and consider the consequences his lies may have for people in the world?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 29, 2011, 01:02:34 AM
I think that the director said enough when he said "based on true events".  To me that means, it's not true.  I think it's sad that people don't realize it.  Like I said, I wish, for the sake of truth, directors would explain that it simply isn't true.  But then it ruins the film.  I don't have a good solution, but putting all the responsibility on the director doesn't seem a good answer.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 29, 2011, 01:03:13 AM
I have to wonder what the impact would be if films were no longer allowed to say "Based on a True Story" or anything of that type.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: FroHam X on August 29, 2011, 01:13:38 AM
I think the only true responsibility is the legal one of not committing libel.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on August 29, 2011, 09:52:37 AM
What is a director's responsibility?  Not much more than what they have done already.
But what if real people get hurt in the name of art? Such as in the case of the movie I wrote about where the girlfriend untruthfully was pictured as if she didn't care and deserted her partner when things got rough? As you say, the audience takes the "based on a true story" as the truth.
Don't you think the director needs to relate to this and consider the consequences his lies may have for people in the world?

I think that the director said enough when he said "based on true events".  To me that means, it's not true.  I think it's sad that people don't realize it.  Like I said, I wish, for the sake of truth, directors would explain that it simply isn't true.  But then it ruins the film.  I don't have a good solution, but putting all the responsibility on the director doesn't seem a good answer.

Along these lines, I think it's the responsibility of the audience to understand that "based on a true story" does not mean "everything in this film is 100% true".  In fact, this applies even to documentaries. 
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on August 29, 2011, 10:40:59 AM
Ecstatic truth is the only truth. I like filmmakers to have points of view, once it's on screen I'll determine if it feels honest to me or not.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on August 29, 2011, 02:03:57 PM
I recently saw Senna.  The archival footage and the story it told gave me the sense of realism and truth.  I'd be devastated to learn that any of that was a lie, or even a stretch of the truth.  On the other hand, I know that film isn't a history lesson, but one person's view of the truth.  In that way, it never surprises me to learn that the "truth" is skewed, always subject to interpretation.

The only lie about Senna the film was that it didn't convey how dangerous Senna was considered to be at the time. At a time when drivers died quite regularly the film didn't show how intimidating he was to other drivers. The film shows how cavalier he was in a positive light , that's not how it was.

However the film is so damn good I can forgive that slight niggle whilst I was watching it. I am reading The Interruptors reviews as if I was reading Senna reviews so it must be good- a golden age for docs obv.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bill Thompson on August 30, 2011, 05:26:03 PM
I'm of the mindset that I don't need a film to be historically accurate. I guess things like a director's responsibility to the truth don't matter to me that much, I'm more interested in the story. As long as the story is a good one I am a happy camper, that's why I'm okay with history being flushed down the cinema toilet.

Documentaries are another case, simply because the genre itself is trying to aim for something more truthful. Docs are pretty much the only time I care about historical accuracy to the point where the inaccuracies are a detriment to the film. This is one of the many reasons why I can't stand the majority of docs, especially those by Michael Moore.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 30, 2011, 08:16:57 PM
I can appreciate your ideal, Bill, but I think docs have gone too far down the road for them to be called "truthful".  F is for Fake, Exit Through the Gift Shop, Michael Moore, Morgan Spurlock and even Errol Morris, let alone the one sided diatribes of conservative or liberal politics, or the religious wars come to documentaries.  And what about 24 City?  Is that really objective?  I think we need to recognize that at least half of the documentaries out there aren't made with the ideal of objectivity, and the other half often fail at that goal. 

However, that doesn't make them good films.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 30, 2011, 10:51:42 PM
There was something clever I said once about Braveheart but I can't remember what it was.

For me, the only truth that matters when it comes to film is the emotional truth. And then it's only the emotional truth when it comes to the director that matters. Who gives a shit if William Wallace wasn't a Christ figure in real life, if Mel Gibson wants to portray him as such it is interesting in that light. Feel free to twist as much as you want to make that work. If I wanted a history lesson I'd hop in my TARDIS and check it out for myself. Then I'd make a biased movie about it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ferris on September 01, 2011, 03:51:43 PM
Then I'd make a biased movie about it.

:D
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on September 08, 2011, 01:49:28 AM
NEW QUESTION:

What is your All Time favorite movie goof?



There are literally thousands of these, with websites devoted to them and youtube clips counting down personal favorites.
For Ebert the answer is Jaws: The Revenge when Michael Caine's plane crashes into the ocean and he is pulled on board completely dry.
The one that springs to mind for me is in Gladiator. After the opening battle, Maximus walks up to his horse and a P.A. in modern day jeans appears under the horse's neck.

(http://i.imgur.com/duF8A.png)

The scene continues and the P.A. tries to casually back up until he is blocked by the horse.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: jim brown on September 08, 2011, 09:29:08 AM
My go-to gaffe is the boy covering his ears before the gunshot in "North by Northwest".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAhKLfzDHcI
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on September 08, 2011, 10:40:31 AM
I liked how they kept this in. Maybe they thought it was as funny as I did.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBQaLuqwtl8
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: StudentOFilm on September 09, 2011, 01:40:41 AM
The multiple times you can see the other cameras, sound recorders, production assistants, etc. in Crank: High Voltage.

I had to go with a forum favorite.  ;D
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 'Noke on September 09, 2011, 11:19:27 AM
I liked how they kept this in. Maybe they thought it was as funny as I did.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBQaLuqwtl8

The thing with that is, the scene just goes straight ahead. It's not so much a goof (I always think of a goof as something amusing which breaks the reality of the film) as it is something unexpected but funny.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on September 21, 2011, 11:50:13 PM
NEW QUESTION:

How do you feel about movies that trade on an actor's unpopularity by revealing in the marketing that their character dies?


I haven't seen the recent film Contagion, but based on the advertising I'd be very surprised if Gwyneth Paltrow made it to the end credits. Paltrow is a fine actress, but she's not the most beloved talent in Hollywood and it seems like the studio is hoping to entice people to show up and watch Paltrow die a horrible death.

This is not a new marketing gimmick. Roger Ebert talks about the film Executive Decision which stars Kurt Russell and Steven Seagal. The studio happily revealed that at one point Seagal sacrifices himself for the good of the film the mission. Jersey Girl was made when Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez were a popular couple. Before that film could open, Gigli was released, so Miramax wasted no time letting you know Lopez wasn't in Jersey Girl all that much. (It's a surprise Kevin Smith originally intended to keep secret to lure people into a Lopez/Affleck rom-com). House of Wax is another example, with the cast revealing that Paris Hilton was in the film, but her last scene would be brutal and bloody.

What other films can you think of, and do you think it's in bad taste to sell a movie this way?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 22, 2011, 06:25:44 AM
The only one I can think of is Executive Decision, with Steven Segal, but that was more the buzz than the marketing, so it does not count.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bill Thompson on September 22, 2011, 08:20:32 AM
I don't think it's in bad taste. The goal of a studio is to sell a movie, and playing on the death of an actor/actress who is not a popular figure among fans seems perfectly acceptable to me. Think of it this way, no one bats an eye when a studio uses the charming and affable nature of Tom Hanks to sell a movie. Even if he only has a cameo in a movie the studio will play up how likable Hanks is and use that as a draw. Death marketing is the same thing in effect.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on September 26, 2011, 11:21:12 PM
NEW QUESTION:

Looking at the films that won the Oscar for Best Picture, which one stands out to you as the least Academy friendly?


Everyone talks about films being Oscar bait and most years the Oscar-friendly film wins over the edgier nominees (like when Forrest Gump beat Pulp Fiction in 1994). Here's a list of all the Best Picture Winners (http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/best-pictures.html). Which one stands out to you as a surprise because of its content?

Ebert talked about Braveheart, which he called the most violent film to ever win the Oscar for Best Picture. I was surprised in 2006 when The Departed won, because it was the least friendly and most genre-based film of the pack. (Other nominees were Babel, Letters from Iwo Jima, Little Miss Sunshine and The Queen). By 2007 I was no longer surprised when No Country For Old Men took home the statue.

My pick however would have to be from 1991. One year after the uncompromising Goodfellas lost to Dances With Wolves, Best Picture went to The Silence of the Lambs, a horror film with little in the way of good moral lessons or Oscar class. Not only did it beat out Beauty & The Beast, Bugsy, JFK and The Prince of Tides, it won all 5 major Awards: Picture, Director, Actor, Actress and Screenplay.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: sdedalus on September 26, 2011, 11:29:56 PM
It Happened One Night.  A pure romantic comedy with nary a hint of drama (Annie Hall), history (Shakespeare in Love) or social messaging (You Can't Take It With You).  The first winner of the 5 big awards.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: FroHam X on September 26, 2011, 11:34:42 PM
The ones that always feel like they shouldn't really be on that list:

It Happened One Night (1933) - Capra
The Lost Weekend (1945) - Wilder
The Apartment (1960) - Wilder
In the Heat of the Night (1967) - Jewison
Midnight Cowboy (1969) - Schlesinger
The French Connection (1971) - Friedkin
The Silence of the Lambs (1991) - Demme
Unforgiven (1992) - Eastwood
No Country for Old Men - Coens

A couple explanations are in order. Unforgiven always gets me because this was before the big Academy love affair with Eastwood, and Unforgiven really is a dark dark film, and it's a western, and it really doesn't have that epicness or anything like that that you'd expect to get it Academy recognition. The same can be said of No Country for Old Men. I figured There Will Be Blood had a better shot of winning that year. Though it was also very dark, it was also epic, and it had that epic showy performance at its centre. No Country is much smaller, more low key to an extent. It's much more inward and introspective in style than the bombastic, attention-grabbing TWBB.

Notice, all of those choices are also what i'd consider some of the best wins in that entire list.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on September 26, 2011, 11:38:07 PM
The one that stands out most to me is Rocky. Not only is it not a particularly special film, it is of a type that seems entirely out of the nature of the Academy. This is an Academy that didn't give Raging Bull the win even though many people feel that is the superior film (I don't).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on September 27, 2011, 05:17:39 AM
I was pretty young when Rocky won Best Picture, but I can remember the overwhelming omnipresence of that film that year.  Rocky was huge... maybe not as much as Star Wars was going to be the next year. It seems that Rocky was the obvious choice for popularity that year.   Network and All the President's Men were the better critical darlings, but no one could escape the draw of Sly that year.  It seemed like an obvious choice at the time.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: StudentOFilm on September 28, 2011, 06:01:07 PM
Based on what I think of as Academy friendly...

On the Waterfront
Midnight Cowboy
Platoon
The Silence of the Lambs
Unforgiven
American Beauty
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
No Country for Old Men
The Hurt Locker
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on June 20, 2012, 05:50:27 PM
Every few days, I'll post a question that was submitted to Ebert and leave it for you to answer.

(http://www.mahjoob.com/en/forums/images/smilies/hskjut.gif)

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey...
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: adolfojacosta on June 20, 2012, 05:59:45 PM
The one that stands out most to me is Rocky. Not only is it not a particularly special film, it is of a type that seems entirely out of the nature of the Academy. This is an Academy that didn't give Raging Bull the win even though many people feel that is the superior film (I don't).

I've never understood the antagonism people have towards this film.  I think it's very well-crafted and I actually think it IS an Academy-friendly film. Raging Bull and Rocky are only similar in that they have boxing as the central setting of the film, but one is a feel-good drama while the other is a character study.  Both films are excellent in my view.  I think if it had not been followed by the lackluster sequels, people would have a higher opinion of Rocky.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 20, 2012, 06:26:28 PM
Every few days, I'll post a question that was submitted to Ebert and leave it for you to answer.

(http://www.mahjoob.com/en/forums/images/smilies/hskjut.gif)

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey...


I thought this thread had lost interest. I'll pull out the book and post a question tonight.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on June 20, 2012, 08:46:23 PM
I think if it had not been followed by the lackluster sequels, people would have a higher opinion of Rocky.

This rang true the instant I read it. Interesting thought, aj.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on June 20, 2012, 08:50:50 PM
I thought this thread had lost interest. I'll pull out the book and post a question tonight.

It may have, but I still love your idea. You never know, your next question could spark a 10 page discussion! (http://noffload.net/uploader/files/1/econs/typerhappy.gif)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 20, 2012, 11:16:09 PM
NEW QUESTION:

As someone who watches a lot of movies, is there a particular moral area (excessive language, violence, nudity etc.) you still find difficult to sit through? (Not looking for taboo busting, but stuff that's likely in a mainstream film.)


Ebert's answer was about Hollywood playing these elements for entertaining thrills rather than taking such material seriously. He singled out Basic Instinct, marketed on its sexual content even though it's attitude towards sex and lesbianism pandered towards people too young for the R Rating.


As for me, I'm uneasy about rape, no matter how it's treated. It was a major plot point during (I think Season 2) of "The Sopranos" and even though it was handled with the upmost care I didn't like the scene and I really hated the ultimate resolution of that story.

The worst example from the last 20 years was 1995's Strange Days, which not only adds an extra layer of creepy to the rape through the film's recording device but it's plopped into the middle of a popcorn thriller. I question the inclusion of this scene, the way it lingers on the victim's ample chest and most of all, the fact that it was directed by Kathryn Bigelow. We have a lot of interesting gender discussions on these boards, even asking if we would hold men to the same line of questioning. I'm usually gender blind, but the scene (from a movie I really like overall) brings up some big questions, such as was it supposed to be easier to accept because the director was a female and not Michael Bay or Tony Scott? Should Bigelow take responsibility in her depiction and necessity of the scene, not just as a filmmaker but as a woman? Did the studio release the film with no objection to such a depressing plot point because they figured if there was a problem the female director would have brought it up?

I'll end my part of this with one last example that must be mentioned, Irreversible. Gaspar Noe is a provocative filmmaker, but here he depicts the act in all its horror. Filmed in real time with no edits. This is not done for lingering exploitation - the camera is far back - but to get across with no ambiguity the horror of the act. I was still very uneasy, but at least Noe prepared me for what was to come though his reverse time approach. He treats the scene with a responsibility that Bigelow does not and the worst part is actually the reaction by a pedestrian who walk into the scene.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on June 20, 2012, 11:52:15 PM
I think mindless violence is the trigger for me, as I went on at length recently. I want to see consideration of the ramifications of the violence. Anything that seems to condone violence or sexual aggression against women bothers me as well (see Bellflower and Black Swan).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 21, 2012, 12:04:32 AM
I thought you might bring up your recent blog post. (Where's the link, man? Be proud.) Retired Spotter Bill Thompson recently watched Bellflower and had a similar reaction to the hate (http://billsmovieemporium.wordpress.com/2012/06/19/review-bellflower-2011/). And he's not as emotionally reserved, compared to us.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on June 21, 2012, 12:13:26 AM
Almodovar particularly. I love the man's films, but seeing the casual rape of a character resurface in The Skin I Live In, was nasty. It's something I've mentioned every time I have seen it in his old films (Kika & Matador are two that immediately come to mind). Obviously, strong female characters throughout Almo...and then this "motif"(?!?)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on June 21, 2012, 12:24:52 AM
I thought you might bring up your recent blog post. (Where's the link, man? Be proud.) Retired Spotter Bill Thompson recently watched Bellflower and had a similar reaction to the hate (http://billsmovieemporium.wordpress.com/2012/06/19/review-bellflower-2011/). And he's not as emotionally reserved, compared to us.

So you are saying that suggesting the film's director is the type of guy that would commit date rape is emotional reserve? I'm just glad I've thus far been spared anything quite so horrid on the year.

Oh, and I already linked my post in the appropriate thread. This isn't 'nam.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on June 21, 2012, 12:27:01 AM
Before I read any of the responses, "rape" was the first thing that popped in my head.  Not just violent rape, but any forced sex on a woman in general.  This is why The Piano is my most hated good film of all time. 

The other thing that is most offensive to me is rationalizations for hurting innocent people.  Henry V, despite the director's attempt to make it an anti-war film, is really just a justification for attacking a nation that didn't attack first (at least, lately).  Pleasantville is listed on my Criticker rankings as my least favorite film for this reason "Do what you like, damn the consequences (including hurting others), so you can be in color!"
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: OmNom on June 21, 2012, 10:11:07 AM
So... How do you guys feel about the scene in Pulp Fiction then.  We've only mentioned being uncomfortable with the rape of a woman, what about a dude.  Same feeling?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 21, 2012, 10:16:04 AM
I was so startled by what was happening. It didn't make me uncomfortable so much as gobsmacked because I didn't think the movie was going to take such a turn. I was off balance the moment the gimp came out.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on June 21, 2012, 11:06:45 AM
I'm probably the most skittish of the filmspotters. Heck, even Ideathy likes bloody movies. :) I have a really hard time shaking images, so savage violence and torture I'll stay away from, unless it's in context like Night and Fog and then those images should stay with me.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on June 21, 2012, 11:12:20 AM
So... How do you guys feel about the scene in Pulp Fiction then.  We've only mentioned being uncomfortable with the rape of a woman, what about a dude.  Same feeling?
No, the feeling is different. It's the feeling of not being able to sit down for a week (I imagine).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: OmNom on June 21, 2012, 11:31:05 AM
I was so startled by what was happening. It didn't make me uncomfortable so much as gobsmacked because I didn't think the movie was going to take such a turn. I was off balance the moment the gimp came out.

What about subsequent viewings?  I've seen it a few times, and I'm assuming you have too.  Is it as difficult to watch as the rape of a woman?

I'm probably the most skittish of the filmspotters. Heck, even Ideathy likes bloody movies. :) I have a really hard time shaking images, so savage violence and torture I'll stay away from, unless it's in context like Night and Fog and then those images should stay with me.

I'm pretty skittish as well, aye.  My big problem is any kind of torture scene... like... well, it's why I will never watch Reservoir Dogs again.  The torture scene in that movie freaked me out for nearly 3 months.  It's really disturbing.

So... How do you guys feel about the scene in Pulp Fiction then.  We've only mentioned being uncomfortable with the rape of a woman, what about a dude.  Same feeling?
No, the feeling is different. It's the feeling of not being able to sit down for a week (I imagine).

LOL yeah, I imagine too.   ;D
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: sdedalus on June 21, 2012, 11:42:28 AM
"Things" in movies don't particularly bother me.  The way some things are used, though, can make me angry, disturbed, or sad.  Strange Days doesn't disturb me, but Dancer in the Dark does (in a bad way).  Patton doesn't disturb me, but Come and See does (in a good way).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 21, 2012, 11:48:52 AM
I was so startled by what was happening. It didn't make me uncomfortable so much as gobsmacked because I didn't think the movie was going to take such a turn. I was off balance the moment the gimp came out.

What about subsequent viewings?  I've seen it a few times, and I'm assuming you have too.  Is it as difficult to watch as the rape of a woman?

The shot from Bruce Willis' point of view is okay. It's far enough back and the focus is on the act, not the guys taking pleasure in it. I remember that angle clearly, yet I believe there's a shot inside the room as well that's fuzzy in my mind, (which says something by itself.) That shot makes me a bit uncomfortable. I don't recall any shot on Zed, taking pleasure in the act, and there's no angle on Wallace. Those probably would've made the scene difficult to sit through.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on June 21, 2012, 11:57:19 AM
As I noted in my recent review (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11277.msg682384#msg682384) of Mademoiselle, I'm always irked by a film that treats infidelity as a casual "no big deal" thing.  I'm a staunch monogamist... I may be physically tempted to have extramarital sex, but emotionally I could never ever make that leap.  The guilt would destroy me.  I know this isn't the case for everyone and -- on an intellectual level -- I know it can be good for a film not to wag a finger at its characters for their decisions.  But it really bugs me anyway.  Even when it's "justified" because a character is in a bad relationship, I want to see some kind of internal conflict about it, or negative consequences.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on June 21, 2012, 11:58:21 AM
I think Le bonheur does this best!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on June 21, 2012, 12:02:33 PM
I think Le bonheur does this best!

Indeed.  Great movie.

Man, maybe I should buy Criterion's Varda set.  I wish they sold Le bonheur separately.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on June 21, 2012, 12:07:33 PM
I used to be reflexively put off by infidelity in film. Now as I've become more supportive of the concept of monogamish, it's more contextual. Open Hearts more recently is a film about infidelity that really worked for me because it wasn't making infidelity into exotic fantasy (I'm looking at you Unfaithful). I've actually grown more annoyed not in the infidelity but films where the discovery of the infidelity must naturally lead to a way over the top emotional response. It's natural that there will be pain but I like films that treat it with a bit of a grown-up perspective that understands that infidelity is basically the norm in human relationships.

As to the interaction of gender and rape, I'm not sure it matters, it still comes down to the tone of the film, I don't like violence, sexual or otherwise, to be treated casually.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 21, 2012, 12:13:21 PM
OmNom, I feel like I haven't answered your question. It's not the gender of the victim that bothers me so much as the powerlessness mixed with the pleasure taken by the attacker.

Martin, your answer interests me since I know you watch a lot of French cinema and many of their films seem to regard infidelity as part of a marriage. This is something I noted in particular during the Antoine Doinel series. French films also have a very casual attitude about sexualizing underage girls and that bothers me a lot more.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on June 21, 2012, 12:20:09 PM
Martin, your answer interests me since I know you watch a lot of French cinema and many of their films seem to regard infidelity as part of a marriage. This is something I noted in particular during the Antoine Doinel series.

Yeah, as I said in the review, it seems to be a very French thing.  It all depends on the handling of it.  For instance, in Jules and Jim, it's clear that these are people experimenting with relationship configurations that they think they're "sophisticated" enough to manage, but really aren't.

sexualizing underage girls ... bothers me a lot more.

Yes, for sure.  That always creeps me out.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: OmNom on June 21, 2012, 12:21:33 PM
OmNom, I feel like I haven't answered your question. It's not the gender of the victim that bothers me so much as the powerlessness mixed with the pleasure taken by the attacker.

Yeah.  I just wonder... Bear with me, I'm typing through a massive headache.  I think what that scene does is flip some gender tables a bit.  In a big way it's a gender neutral scene.  Tarantino controlled for gender.  How do we feel about it?  Is it the same... Is it dependent on who we, as men or women, are able to identify with? 

Look at another "unwilling sex" scene.  The one in Inglourious Basterds.  It's only 7 seconds or so, but for some reason it's funny... I laugh every time.  And then I feel dirty.   ;D

My top scenes, scenes that I cannot watch, are drug use scenes.  I can look the other way I guess, with torture.  People start shooting up or whatever and I have to fast forward.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on June 21, 2012, 12:33:14 PM

sexualizing underage girls ... bothers me a lot more.

Yes, for sure.  That always creeps me out.

This came up in writing about Leon. Definitely a weird experience however sweetly the director wants to make it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 21, 2012, 01:24:59 PM
Look at another "unwilling sex" scene.  The one in Inglourious Basterds.  It's only 7 seconds or so, but for some reason it's funny... I laugh every time.  And then I feel dirty.   ;D

My top scenes, scenes that I cannot watch, are drug use scenes.  I can look the other way I guess, with torture.  People start shooting up or whatever and I have to fast forward.

I don't even remember than moment from IB. Is it during the Hugo Stigletz intro?

I have a friend who doesn't like the shot in drug scenes where the needle goes into the arm. I had to warn him ahead of time about Requiem For a Dream, which has the most cringing version of that shot ever.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: OmNom on June 21, 2012, 01:46:47 PM
Look at another "unwilling sex" scene.  The one in Inglourious Basterds.  It's only 7 seconds or so, but for some reason it's funny... I laugh every time.  And then I feel dirty.   ;D

My top scenes, scenes that I cannot watch, are drug use scenes.  I can look the other way I guess, with torture.  People start shooting up or whatever and I have to fast forward.

I don't even remember than moment from IB. Is it during the Hugo Stigletz intro?

I have a friend who doesn't like the shot in drug scenes where the needle goes into the arm. I had to warn him ahead of time about Requiem For a Dream, which has the most cringing version of that shot ever.

The Inglourious Basterds moment happens in the restaurant, immediately after Shoshanna Dreyfus is introduced to Joseph Goebbels', um, "interpreter."

(http://i46.tinypic.com/21ahfdw.jpg)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on June 21, 2012, 01:56:04 PM
I don't remember the scene in IB, either, even after your help.  Clearly, it's time for me to watch it again.

The Pulp Fiction scene disturbs me just as much as any other rape scene. 

And the sexualization of young girls also disturbs me.  The pushing of Pauline into being active in Pauline at the Beach was quite wrong.  Leon didn't bother me as much, but I tried to ignore some of the sexual messages going on there.  Clearly, we are supposed to be disturbed at Jodie Foster's character in Taxi Driver.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: StudentOFilm on June 21, 2012, 02:55:45 PM
This is more of a taboo, but movies with incest eek me out.

Oldboy and Spanking the Monkey come to mind.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: OmNom on June 21, 2012, 03:00:56 PM
This is more of a taboo, but movies with incest eek me out.

Oldboy and Spanking the Monkey come to mind.

Amen to that. 
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on June 21, 2012, 03:54:24 PM
It upsets my wife when people are served cake in movies but they don't actually eat it. Wasted cake is a moral issue for her.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on June 21, 2012, 04:16:10 PM
French films also have a very casual attitude about sexualizing underage girls and that bothers me a lot more.

American films' attitude about desexualizing underage girls bothers me a lot more...the removal of sexual desire or initiative on the part of a girl that leaves the implication that a "good" girl is asexual and pure. I think that's way more harmful to the psyche.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 21, 2012, 04:16:26 PM
It upsets my wife when people are served cake in movies but they don't actually eat it. Wasted cake is a moral issue for her.

Food is wasted all the time on film sets. Even beyond the set, catering and craft service throws out a ton of food that is purchased and never eaten. If someone eats ice cream in a scene, Props will buy 20 containers. On most shows, once the scene is done that food will be offered to the crew. (Ate a lot of frozen bananas on "Arrested Development".) The only time it bothered me was on one film I worked on in the 90s where we purchased about $1000 in liquor and then poured the liquor down the drain to replace with non-alcoholic substitutes. They didn't even have some empty containers for us to take the stuff home. (The Prop Master hated alcohol.)


Just found my review for High Plains Drifter (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=9536.msg678681#msg678681) which features this...

Clint Eastwood is the title character, a mysterious stranger who rides into town and within minutes shoots three people and rapes the town harlot. This is our hero in an unusual western that puts some serious questions to its audience. The rape is shocking considering who's committing the act. At first I dismissed it as something more acceptable back in 1973. (There's even a comic scene when the woman tries to shoot Clint the next day. He asks what took her so long to get mad and one of the town folk replies, "Because maybe you didn't go back for more?") As the story unfolds, I started thinking that Clint knew exactly what he was doing. His character commits an unforgivable act, and he wants you to sit uncomfortably with it. The whole film is about moments like this.

This scene even featured a shot of the woman thrown to the ground looking up at Eastwood while he unbuckles his pants. A very uncomfortable moment, but I don't object to it so much, which goes back to the question. I don't object to Eastwood filming the scene and the questions it raises are interesting ones. I was just super uncomfortable. Mrs. 1SO was there and she had the same reaction. Uneasy, but could understand what Eastwood was doing, much more so than the attempted rapes in Outlaw Josey Wales and Ride the High Country.



And OmNom, I just remembered a scene of male violation that was a major story point in "The Shield". That made me extremely uncomfortable. Way more than the scene in Pulp Fiction.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on June 21, 2012, 04:16:57 PM
It upsets my wife when people are served cake in movies but they don't actually eat it. Wasted cake is a moral issue for her.

Third circle of hell: dessert wasting

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_FSh6IvJgRvU/SUCqu5a9j9I/AAAAAAAAAYk/Em-zJTWbf60/s400/wedding+cake+on+face.jpg)

Terrible!

(http://www.lolpix.com/_pics/Funny_Pictures_993/Funny_Pictures_9931.jpg)

That's better.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on June 21, 2012, 04:23:32 PM
French films also have a very casual attitude about sexualizing underage girls and that bothers me a lot more.

American films' attitude about desexualizing underage girls bothers me a lot more...the removal of sexual desire or initiative on the part of a girl that leaves the implication that a "good" girl is asexual and pure. I think that's way more harmful to the psyche.

It's one thing to acknowledge that "underage" (a slippery term to be sure, let's avoid the quagmire of putting a number on it) boys and girls have a sense of sexuality.  It's another thing to depict -- or want to see depicted -- children in sexual situations.  Innocence handles it with thoughtfulness, insight and delicacy.  Kids is sleazy shock value that makes you think the director is a creep.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on June 21, 2012, 05:27:11 PM
The problem with rape in movies is that there's no coming back from it. I once watched a movie with a rape where in the end the rapist got his head cooked in a microwave until he died. Did it help? Not at all. I still felt sick to my stomach all during the scene, for the rest of the movie and for days after that.

But then there's Strange Days, which I saw not that long ago, and I walked away from that singing its praises. Was the rape less graphic than in the above film? No. Was the revenge more brutal? No. So why didn't it upset me the same way? It made me sick to my stomach during "that scene" just like the above film, but it didn't linger. Why not?

The major difference as I see it is that the person who gets raped in Film A is the protagonist, whereas the person who got raped in Strange Days was not someone known to me, the audience. "That scene" was her first scene, and so I never had a chance to build any emotional connection. It's uncomfortable to admit, but it hurts me less when I don't know the person being hurt.  :-\

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: roujin on June 21, 2012, 05:50:02 PM
All of you should stay away from certain Japanese film genres/movements  8)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Totoro on June 21, 2012, 06:07:19 PM
Incest.

Misogyny and misandry.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Antares on June 21, 2012, 07:45:37 PM
This scene even featured a shot of the woman thrown to the ground looking up at Eastwood while he unbuckles his pants.

I think that scene can be put into context when you watch the scene later on in the film when they flashback to the killing of the sheriff. He's being bullwhipped to death by the three hired killers and he's on the ground looking up at the townspeople (including Hallie, the woman he rapes), who do nothing.

The townfolk hear her screams as she is taken into the barn, but again, they do nothing.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on June 21, 2012, 07:52:32 PM
All of you should stay away from certain Japanese film genres/movements  8)

I'm good with that.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Totoro on June 21, 2012, 07:56:10 PM
I have a difficult time with all of the HBO new series because incest, it seems, is the new OMG EXPLICIT THING that everyone else seems to have a subconscious *shudder* fantasy fulfillment desire for. Or else why would they show it so much?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on June 21, 2012, 09:44:02 PM
To make you dislike the characters.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: RazorRamon on June 22, 2012, 11:08:51 PM
There is no one thing that creeps me out or makes me cringe in movies. Everything and anything is pretty much acceptable providing it's staged and simulated (if it's an illegal act). The only real prerequisite is that it is done for a reason. As far as I'm concerned you can show the most graphic act imaginable as long as it is informing the characters, the story or otherwise contributing to the film in a way that goes further than mere shock value or to simply incite disgust and/or controversy.

I can already think of a few exceptions to this, such as Pink Flamingos, where the entire point is to shock and be obscene, but I think in most cases this holds pretty solid for me.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: RazorRamon on June 22, 2012, 11:14:07 PM
bourgeois morality

I struggle to see how my view would fit into this bracket, if that is what the post was intended to mean.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 23, 2012, 12:50:41 AM
There is no one thing that creeps me out or makes me cringe in movies. Everything and anything is pretty much acceptable providing it's staged and simulated (if it's an illegal act). The only real prerequisite is that it is done for a reason. As far as I'm concerned you can show the most graphic act imaginable as long as it is informing the characters, the story or otherwise contributing to the film in a way that goes further than mere shock value or to simply incite disgust and/or controversy.

I can already think of a few exceptions to this, such as Pink Flamingos, where the entire point is to shock and be obscene, but I think in most cases this holds pretty solid for me.

Have you seen Cannibal Holocaust? That one features real animal slaughter and you can argue there is a purpose to it. You could also say it's just trying to shock. My review is quite damning (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10545.msg629234#msg629234) but I wrestled with it more than I expected to and a lot of it has stuck with me.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: RazorRamon on June 23, 2012, 01:08:24 AM
There is no one thing that creeps me out or makes me cringe in movies. Everything and anything is pretty much acceptable providing it's staged and simulated (if it's an illegal act). The only real prerequisite is that it is done for a reason. As far as I'm concerned you can show the most graphic act imaginable as long as it is informing the characters, the story or otherwise contributing to the film in a way that goes further than mere shock value or to simply incite disgust and/or controversy.

I can already think of a few exceptions to this, such as Pink Flamingos, where the entire point is to shock and be obscene, but I think in most cases this holds pretty solid for me.

Have you seen Cannibal Holocaust? That one features real animal slaughter and you can argue there is a purpose to it. You could also say it's just trying to shock. My review is quite damning (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10545.msg629234#msg629234) but I wrestled with it more than I expected to and a lot of it has stuck with me.

There is certainly a purpose to it, and I think Cannibal Holocaust is a well-made film with some interesting ideas. On the ethical side, Deodato himself regrets the film's cruelty to animals but in cases like the two monkeys being killed for the film and later eaten by the cast, it raises interesting debates about what is acceptable/unacceptable or in good taste/bad taste.

I definitely do not condone the killing of animals for a film but I don't feel bad about watching and enjoying Cannibal Holocaust. I'm not sure what that says about me as a person  ???
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 23, 2012, 01:27:01 AM
I definitely do not condone the killing of animals for a film...

Neither do I, but the catering truck at lunch makes me a hypocrite.

I don't feel bad about watching Cannibal Holocaust, but I would stop well short of saying it's enjoyable.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: RazorRamon on June 23, 2012, 01:29:18 AM
I definitely do not condone the killing of animals for a film...

Neither do I, but the catering truck at lunch makes me a hypocrite.

I don't feel bad about watching Cannibal Holocaust, but I would stop well short of saying it's enjoyable.

I admire it more than I enjoy it. It's not an easy film to love.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on June 23, 2012, 04:21:36 PM
Proletarian morality.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on June 24, 2012, 02:27:11 AM
Republican morality. 
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on June 24, 2012, 02:45:00 AM
Human mortality.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 01, 2012, 10:25:22 PM
NEW QUESTION:

With at least a couple of films every year costing over $200 million, shouldn't moviegoers be protesting these gargantuan budgets?


Ebert's answer I found very interesting.

"Why? Are they billing it all to your credit cards? I've never been able to understand public indignation over big budgets. As long as they're not charging you $60 to see the films, how can you lose? The more they spend on a movie that still costs you the same ticket price, the better--right?"

On one hand it would be interesting if studios never disclosed the price tags on their films. They're not 100% truthful about them anyway. They only give estimated costs, usually shaving $10-$50 million off the real cost, and don't factor in the amount of publicity that needs to be paid for before a movie is truly in profit. Different box office sites will even list different production budgets.

Then there's the question of where does the money go? How much of Lone Ranger's budget is special effects and how much is Johnny Depp, Gore Verbinski, Jerry Bruckheimer and other expensive personnel. How come the special effects in Chronicle and District 9 look so great and the ones in G.I. Joe look terrible? How much does a Michael Bay explosion cost compared to other filmmakers and why does Snow White and the Huntsman need $50 million more than Prometheus? Now I'm doing exactly what Ebert says I shouldn't. Yet,  part of me that thinks there's a better way to spend $500 million then on a couple of Hobbit films.

Does a movie's budget matter to you? Do you think that it should? Can you resist wondering how much it's going to cost to make a 2nd Avengers movie or Pirates 5? (I can't.) Len Wiseman is not only a bad director but someone I don't see as profitable enough to spend ?? millions on the expensive-looking remake of Total Recall. Do you trust certain filmmakers with large investments, (Ridley Scott, Christopher Nolan and James Cameron), yet think others (like Peter Berg and Baz Luhrmann) haven't earned the right?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mousterpiece on July 01, 2012, 11:00:10 PM
The only reason why I ever consider a movie's budget is if that money isn't present on screen (to me). If a movie has a massive budget and its special effects are awful, I consider how much it cost. Otherwise, it does not matter to me at all. I don't care, for example, that John Carter cost 250 million. Of course that's an insanely large amount of money. But it only concerns me if the film's effects--of which there are a lot--sucked. And they didn't, I think. So, no for the most part.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 01, 2012, 11:12:44 PM
While it is true I pay no more or no less for a $200 million dollar film than a $20 million dollar film, I still feel like the existence of the $200 million dollar film is driving up the price of tickets for all films. It would be interesting to see the correlation of ticket price increase (controlled for inflation) and average film budget (also controlled for inflation, and probably # of screens since that's kind of zero-sum). If the tickets aren't more expensive because more is being spent on the films, why are they more expensive? Just inflation? Fewer people going to spread the fixed theatre costs?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 01, 2012, 11:50:40 PM
A film's budget does not affect my expectation or appreciation of a film. It is just an interesting fact. It does affect my appreciation of the effects, but more in low budget films where I may be impressed by what they have done for so little.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on July 01, 2012, 11:52:29 PM
The only time when the movie budgets really irritate me is when they spend millions of dollars on a really dull, unoriginal piece of tripe, especially if it's a remake.  I'm always thinking, "They could be eradicating malaria in the world.  They could be saving thousands of people with AIDS, and instead they chose to remake a perfectly good film and add nothing to it?"  The latest Spider Man is my most recent focus on this.  If they were telling a completely different take on the story, I'd understand it, but to basically do a remake of a film only about ten years old... really?  Couldn't they find something else better to do with the money?  I won't bother to see it, that's for certain.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: OmNom on July 02, 2012, 12:08:12 AM
$200,000,000 + Bad Script = Bad Movie. 

That's when I find myself looking at a movie's budget and thinking about how it should have been spent.  "If they had that much money, couldn't they have spent a fraction of it to get a better writer," etc.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Lobby on July 02, 2012, 09:04:18 AM
I think I take budget issues into consideration. Especially when people make well use of a very small budget, like the special effects in Chronicle you mention, I can't but be a bit impressed by it. It takes skills and smartness to make something great when you're short on money.

Compare it to cooking. If you use expensive ingredients like exclusive meat, cream etc, it's likely that you're going to make something decent (but no guaranteee; if you're bad enough you'll just burn the meat and put too much salt in the sause and it will taste terribly).  Only a good chef can make a delicious meal out of potatoes, onion and carrots.  I love to eat what the good chefs serve me. Even though I once in a while can appreciate an extravagant piece of meat.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on July 02, 2012, 01:49:01 PM
NEW QUESTION:

With at least a couple of films every year costing over $200 million, shouldn't moviegoers be protesting these gargantuan budgets?


I'm with Ebert. Why?

I don't understand what their position would be.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: sdedalus on July 02, 2012, 02:26:51 PM
Don't care one little bit.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: keefey45 on July 02, 2012, 06:23:18 PM
Some movies just have a feel to it that makes me brainstorm about filmmaking while I watch it. It's for those movies that I may look up the budget out of curiousity. Other than that, I couldn't care less how much studios will spend on a film. Doesn't affect me one bit.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 09, 2012, 10:19:51 AM
A follow-up to last week's discussion.

NEW QUESTION:

Can you resist have special affection for or giving extra concessions to films made on an extremely low budget?


Ebert talks about how Clerks, The Brothers McMullen and El Mariachi were given a boost of goodwill by their extremely low budgets. Then he adds, "the spiritual Godfather of all these films is John Cassavetes, who made his films with little money and a lot of help from his friends."

I'm certainly guilty of this, much more so when the technical qualities shame big-budget blockbusters. Many people pointed out how much District 9 accomplished with $30 million, and I've been saying all year how impressive Chronicle looks on a budget of $12 million. Of course I don't know what kind of deals were struck with effects houses. Certainly Peter Jackson producing District 9 got them a big discount at WETA.

Then there's a film like Bellflower, made on a shoestring and boasting a very distinctive look. Any points for resourcefulness are lost in the morally repugnant whirlpool that pulls the movie down.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on July 09, 2012, 10:27:35 AM
I don't often know about the budget of a film before I watch it and I don't really care.  I've seen low budget films I've hated and high budget films I loved.  I might give a little more boost to an independently crafted film, rather than one guided by a production company, but other than that, I want to see what they've done with the film, not how much money they put into it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 09, 2012, 10:30:39 AM
I don't think I really put my finger on the scale when it comes to low-budget films. I'm someone generally willing to forgive technical or even acting deficits if the ideas of a film grab me, but this is without regard to budget. The one area where I'll give a low-budget (and likely more obscure) film extra attention is just in pushing it out there. The world doesn't really need me trumpeting the latest blockbuster but championing a good indie can actually make a difference on the margins.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on July 09, 2012, 10:32:16 AM
You didn't mention Monsters in your examples, which goes a step further by being produced by one man. Primer is another. In both cases the question to ask is whether such distinct...quirky films would have been made at all, otherwise.

So my positive inclination towards films like these is mainly due to their existence being predicated by the dedication of one or two people to go beyond existing film-making paradigms, and doing it themselves, instead of waiting for a corporation to help em out.

In that sense your question isn't the opposite alternative of the earlier question. It isn't an appreciation of budget filmmaking it is an appreciation of singular visions.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 09, 2012, 10:54:25 AM
In that sense your question isn't the opposite alternative of the earlier question. It isn't an appreciation of budget filmmaking it is an appreciation of singular visions.

This is why I mentioned Bellflower A singular vision that would have benefitted from some questioning of those ideas.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on July 09, 2012, 11:48:05 AM
I will not automatically give a film more "credit" if it has a low budget, if that's what you're asking.  However, a low budget can often lend a film a certain scrappy charm (like Detour) or be a limitation that serves as the mother of invention (like Eraserhead).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: spoko on July 09, 2012, 11:49:03 AM
I'm another person that doesn't really know about a film's budget before I go see it. I mean obviously I'm aware when something's a blockbuster, and sometimes it's pretty obvious when a film was made for less than my annual salary. But unless the budget is really apparent in the film (in the aesthetic, usually), I don't give it a lot of thought. When it is apparent in the film, I judge it fairly neutrally--it can help, and it can hurt.

I will say that I think I'm more likely to notice the budget as a factor when it works, than when it doesn't. When a small budget hurts a film, I'm probably likely to call it ineptitude (rightly or wrongly) rather than strictly pinning it on the budget. And when a large budget hurts a film, I'm likely to call it over-indulgence (rightly, probably). When a small budget lends a fitting simplicity to a film, though, I may notice that. And when there's some appropriately breathtaking scene in a film that could only have happened with a lot of money, I'll probably notice that as well.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: sdedalus on July 09, 2012, 12:41:28 PM
Still don't care.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: keefey45 on July 09, 2012, 12:49:42 PM
I suppose I give an unfair edge to low budget films. If it's really good, I praise it a little more than I would a big budget picture of the same caliber. But if it's awful, I'm not nearly as critical.

I guess that's wrong of me, but it's the truth. Never notched til now though.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 09, 2012, 03:32:02 PM
Still don't care.

Me either
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 12, 2012, 11:04:14 AM
Totoro gave me a great idea.
The studios have reached an all time low. (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1877830/)

NEW QUESTION:

What do you think is the All Time Low Point for a Hollywood Studio in regards to making a film?

I'm going to have to think on this one, but when they paid Jim Carrey $20 million for Cable Guy and made it public, that was a big mistake. Not because of the film but because it set a standard on actor salaries and their importance to a film.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on July 12, 2012, 11:09:30 AM
Having the audacity to think they can make movies for profit in the first place, it seems.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on July 12, 2012, 11:28:53 AM
Fox/Paramount not getting Cameron to actually sign a contract handing over his back-end points on Titanic after he stated so verbally was pretty dumb.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 12, 2012, 12:48:17 PM
Disney's assault on the public domain is the single gravest sin committed by a film studio.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: spoko on July 12, 2012, 04:39:41 PM
Disney's assault on the public domain is the single gravest sin committed by a film studio.

This. Oh my god, this, a thousand times over.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: OmNom on July 13, 2012, 05:36:24 PM
Disney's assault on the public domain is the single gravest sin committed by a film studio.

This. Oh my god, this, a thousand times over.

Interesting shiz this.  I don't know much about it, but I googled "disney assault public domain" and found an interesting article.

http://www.cbe.csueastbay.edu/~alima/courses/3107/Articles/SprigmanDisneyCopyright.pdf

Cultural giants borrow, and so do corporate giants. Ironically, many of Disney's animated films are based on Nineteenth Century public domain works, including Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Cinderella, Pinocchio, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Alice in Wonderland, and The Jungle Book (released exactly one year after Kipling's copyrights expired).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 05, 2012, 11:44:51 PM
NEW QUESTION:

If you were selected to be the President of the Feature Film jury at the Cannes Film Festival, who are the 8 people you want want on your jury?


This is a list I could revise for weeks. Keeping in mind that the main jury is a really diverse group from around the world. Here's 8 pulled mostly off the top of my head.

Brad Bird
Song Kang-ho
Abbas Kiarostami
Lynne Ramsay
Nicholas Winding Refn
Aaron Sorkin
Tom Tykwer
Edgar Wright
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: roujin on August 05, 2012, 11:50:09 PM
Vincent Gallo
Olivier Assayas
Leos Carax
Jacques Rivette
James Gray
Bruce La Bruce
Sammi Cheng
Guy Maddin
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 05, 2012, 11:54:18 PM
Going by director commentary tracks, so no foreigners (that don't speak English).

Rian Johnson
John Carpenter
Guillermo del Toro
Danny Boyle
Edgar Wright
Steven Soderbergh
David Fincher
Terry Gilliam
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on August 06, 2012, 12:55:10 AM
David Lynch
Kelly Reichardt
Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Martin Scorsese
Tilda Swinton
Spike Lee
Gaspar Noe
Agnes Varda

who you don't want on your jury: Bela Tarr (listen to Rosenbaum's commentary on The Turin Horse for fun anecdotes about this)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ArmenianScientist on August 06, 2012, 03:07:04 AM
Darren Aronofsky
Werner Herzog
Abbas Kiarostami
The Dardenne's (They count as one person as evidenced by their single ballot for the S&S Poll)
Paul Thomas Anderson
Pedro Almodovar
Martin Scorsese
Lars Von Trier  ;)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Verite on August 06, 2012, 04:42:18 AM
Judy Davis
Christopher Doyle
Tom Waits
Aki Kaurismaki
Hal Hartley
Claire Denis
Agnes Varda
Simon Yam
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 06, 2012, 06:29:16 AM
Catherine Breillat
Andrea Arnold
Susanne Bier
Alfonso Cuaron
Tom Tykwer
John Cameron Mitchell
Ashutosh Gawariker
Hirokazu Koreeda

I'd consider Lucy Walker, but I don't really identify Cannes as being a docs place, though Fahrenheit 9/11 did win the big prize.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 06, 2012, 09:27:51 AM
Looking at it not as a list of individual favorites but as the parts of a single jury, I really like Bondo's list. It isn't just hearing Cuaron talk about movies, but he's talking about them with Catherine Breillat and John Cameron Mitchell.

Verite, I like the inclusion of Chris Doyle. I was looking to include a DP as well, but I don't see Wally Pfister working in a group dynamic and Deakins is just too wise. He would tell me why a film was shot poorly or missed an opportunity and I would just have to bow to his expertise. (Same reason why I wouldn't want Scorsese or the Coen Bros on my jury.)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 06, 2012, 09:54:31 AM
Pedro Almodóvar
Michael Haneke
Werner Herzog
Wong Kar-Wai
Terrence Malick
Robert Rodriguez
Martin Scorsese
Steven Soderbergh

Tom Waits

Nice. (Just as long as there are no ONE FROM THE HEART remakes submitted for competition.)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on August 06, 2012, 10:03:56 AM
Bill Murray (Chairman)
Johnny To
Thelma Schoonmaker
Jacques Audiard
Steven Soderbergh
Chris Cunningham
Parker Posey
Gerardo Naranjo
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 06, 2012, 10:18:23 AM
AAAutin, I just noticed you have Malick and Herzog on the jury together. That's awesome. (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=5377.msg675470#msg675470)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 06, 2012, 10:23:20 AM
Brett Ratner
Errol Morris
David Mamet
Michael Radford
Mel Gibson
Robert Rodriguez
Sylvester Stallone
Ron Shelton
James Cameron
Mike Leigh
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 06, 2012, 10:34:30 AM
AAAutin, I just noticed you have Malick and Herzog on the jury together. That's awesome. (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=5377.msg675470#msg675470)

"And the Palme d'Or goes to...THE HUNGER GAMES?"

Brett Ratner

Better keep that shrimp bar stocked.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 06, 2012, 02:09:04 PM
Brett Ratner

Better keep that shrimp bar stocked.

Hah. I just think he might be a better movie watcher than movie maker. :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 06, 2012, 10:53:34 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/AITPx.png)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 13, 2012, 12:04:17 AM
NEW QUESTION:

Name a comedy you love that nearly everybody else thinks is not funny?



Ebert got into a series of questions about this, mostly involving comedies he recommended that were met with letters telling him how wrong he is. "As a critic I am at the service of my personal reaction. If I laughed, I have to say so. I cannot suppress that information and lecture the filmmakers on their taste." This was in response to his praise for Kingpin. "I grant you the vulgarity, the sexism the cheap laughs, even the dreck. But I laughed. Something about the movie's heedless spirit struck me as funny, and once I got hooked, everything seemed funny." He also mentions Congo, which he insists is a comedy mislabeled as an action drama.

I have 2 that come to mind immediately because I saw them in empty theaters and bought them. Kids in the Hall: Brain Candy is even funnier than their TV show and Brain Donors is a modern day attempt at a Marx Brothers movie that would place 3rd if ranked in a list with Marx Brothers movies. John Turturro plays Groucho, and I rest my case on this alone. (Click here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJBmlM-4lb0) for highlights.)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 13, 2012, 12:19:12 AM
I can not think of any. However every time I think of Kids in the Hall I think "I crush your head".
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: sdb_1970 on August 13, 2012, 01:24:24 AM
For the record, 'Kingpin' is my personal favorite Farrelly bros. movie, and 'Brain Candy' is awesome ... It's difficult to people what portion of viewers do not find a film to be funny, but I guess my answer would be 'Happiness' (Todd Solondz, 1998).  I suspect that it goes way too dark for most people.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Animaniac on August 13, 2012, 02:12:09 AM
"Zack and Miri Make a Porno" but I've been a fan of most of Kevin Smith's movies and I laughed out loud in the theater a few times when I first saw it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 13, 2012, 06:22:04 AM
If this forum has taught me anything, it is that High Strung is my answer to this question.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 13, 2012, 07:53:26 AM
Name a comedy you love that nearly everybody else thinks is not funny?

SOUR GRAPES

'Happiness' (Todd Solondz, 1998).

You're right: I don't find it very funny. But I do like it. Todd Solondz is great.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Lobby on August 13, 2012, 09:31:18 AM
I really wish I could name a comedy that I love and nearly everybody else thinks is funny. But I can't think of a single one.

For me it's always the opposite: everyone else loves and thinks a comedy is hillarious while I don't see what's funny about it at all. Or rather: I "get" the jokes. But I don't laugh at them.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 13, 2012, 10:51:41 AM
For me it's always the opposite: everyone else loves and thinks a comedy is hillarious while I don't see what's funny about it at all. Or rather: I "get" the jokes. But I don't laugh at them.

C'mon, you're just playing into the stereotype of chilly Scandinavian austerity. What are some of your favorite comedies? There must be at least one divisive pick in there.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: pixote on August 13, 2012, 10:52:23 AM
Les carabiniers.

pixote
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: sdedalus on August 13, 2012, 10:58:43 AM
Cabin Boy
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on August 13, 2012, 11:01:50 AM
Tapeheads.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: pixote on August 13, 2012, 11:03:02 AM
Cabin Boy

I thought your answer was going to be 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days.

pixote
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 13, 2012, 11:07:30 AM
I laughed at Scary Movie 3 when I watched it with my little brother a ways back.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Lobby on August 13, 2012, 11:54:19 AM

C'mon, you're just playing into the stereotype of chilly Scandinavian austerity. What are some of your favorite comedies? There must be at least one divisive pick in there.

I really can't think of anything special. I love Monty Python, but who doesn't? Gregory's Girl and other Forsyth movies. Some odd ones such as King of Comedy, Blues Brothers, Four Lions, Groundhog Day and Annie Hall (if it counts as a comedy). Well basically a lot of Woody Allen's comedies apart from the very earliest ones such as Bananas, which really isn't my type of comedy. The Full Monty. Love that kind of British humor.

But I can't claim that those are movies that everyone else hates.

I have a memory of really loving Big when it came out, but I haven't seen it since so I have no idea of what I'd make of it now. In any case I don't think it's particularly weird to like that one.

The oddest choice I can think of is perhaps the 80s high school movie Can't Buy Me Love, but I doubt that this one is hated by those who actually have watched it. It's just a bit old.

Not sure how my type of humor fits into Scandinavian style. To be honest a lot of our biggest successes at the box office over the years have been Swedish comedies, intended for a Swedish market. I avoid to see them since I never find them funny at all.

Good grief, I sound like a complete bore, don't I?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 13, 2012, 12:17:25 PM
Well, if you're referring to Scorsese's THE KING OF COMEDY and not Stephen Chow's, that would fit. Otherwise, I'd say CAN'T BUY ME LOVE is a good pick.

But I can't claim that those are movies that everyone else hates.

Not everyone else hates, just everyone else doesn't find funny.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Lobby on August 13, 2012, 12:20:24 PM
Well at least I know that Martin has a thing for Can't buy me love as well. I'm not alone in my love for that dance!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: sdedalus on August 13, 2012, 12:51:58 PM
Cabin Boy

I thought your answer was going to be 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days.I
pixote

That's a good one, but Mr. Lazarescu is funnier.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 13, 2012, 02:44:31 PM
Some of my most favorite comedies are ones that others don't really care for or are just "meh" about:

The Emperor's New Groove
The Gods Must Be Crazy
Being There
50 First Dates
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 13, 2012, 06:52:16 PM
Brain Donors is a modern day attempt at a Marx Brothers movie that would place 3rd if ranked in a list with Marx Brothers movies. John Turturro plays Groucho, and I rest my case on this alone. (Click here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJBmlM-4lb0) for highlights.)

I like what I'm seeing here!

I tried to see Brain Candy with my friends when we were twelve. We did the old buy tickets for one movie, and walk in to another thing (it was 14A after all). Two minutes into the movie an usher came in and threw us out. Oh well. The memory alone is worth the 5$ dollars I lost that day. :D I never have bothered to see it now that I'm allowed. It doesn't interest me any more. I never was a fan of those guys anyways. It was just about the cache of restricted comedy.



Date Movie would be mine. I didn't just laugh, I laughed hysterically. Harder than any other film. Not necessarily as often as other comedies, but harder. I've seen it at least three times... I still love it. I don't know anyone who even likes it.

Most impressive to me, the first time I saw it I was alone AND sober.

(http://www.blogcdn.com/www.urlesque.com/media/2011/02/oreillycantexplain1.jpg)

And whenever I mention my love for Date Movie I also like to add in my defense that I have nothing good to say about Epic movie, Disaster Movie, Meet the Spartans, or Vampires Suck. Scary Movie 1 and 2 are glorious though. It's too bad the Wayans left that series.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on August 13, 2012, 07:20:06 PM
(http://i50.tinypic.com/30shoom.jpg)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 13, 2012, 08:24:59 PM
Bondo, this question was too easy for you. What would come in 2nd?

So far 2 of you have recommended films which feature Chris Elliot, who is all the reason you need to qualify as a correct answer.

Always had an interest in Sour Grapes. It's from Larry David, so I imagine there has to be some laughs.

oldkid, I'll see your Emperor's New Groove and raise you a Home on the Range. I own the one with the cows, but not the Llama.

smirnoff, Date Movie is a great pick, but is it funnier than Grandma's Boy?

Doesn't someone here like Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film For Theaters?

mañana, great Will Ferrell movie or Greatest Will Ferrell movie?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 13, 2012, 08:37:58 PM
smirnoff, Date Movie is a great pick, but is it funnier than Grandma's Boy?

I forgot about GB! Ooo, you know me too well. Now I can't decide. :D
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on August 13, 2012, 09:09:31 PM
mañana, great Will Ferrell movie or Greatest Will Ferrell movie?
Neither, but definitely Kattan's greatest.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 13, 2012, 09:29:24 PM
Ebert... also mentions Congo, which he insists is a comedy mislabeled as an action drama.

He IS being cheeky about this isn't he? He's not actually proposing it was parody...
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 13, 2012, 10:08:22 PM
Always had an interest in Sour Grapes. It's from Larry David, so I imagine there has to be some laughs.

Most people can't get past the lead performances, but I disagree: Craig Bierko is a beast.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 13, 2012, 10:11:50 PM
Quote from: Roger Ebert
`Congo" is a splendid example of a genre no longer much in fashion, the jungle adventure story. Perhaps aware that its material was already dated when Stewart Granger made "King Solomon's Mines" in 1950, the filmmakers have cheerfully turned it into an action comedy, and the actors have gone a step further, treating it like one of those movies like "Beat the Devil" that is a put-on of itself. The result is not a movie that is very good, exactly, but it's entertaining and funny. False sophisticates will scorn it. Real sophisticates will relish it.

it is impossible to imagine this material being played for anything but laughs

Like my friend said, if Congo was supposed to be a comedy Bruce Campbell would've been the lead instead of getting killed in the opening scene.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 13, 2012, 10:41:16 PM
Lol, his 60 year old references aren't helping me figure out what he really thinks. I'm just going to assume he means "so bad it's funny". Or maybe he's like me and finds the earnestness in the face of absurdity completely wonderful, and yes, sometimes funny.

I don't like any of this knowing bullcrap though. That's when you think your too good for something. These actors are pro. They just came in and owned it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 13, 2012, 10:47:44 PM
Dang, really?  Home on the Range?  Wow, that's seriously bad.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ArmenianScientist on August 13, 2012, 10:54:25 PM
Well I laughed quite a bit at Nacho Libre when I was 12-14. Do other people think that movie is funny?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on August 13, 2012, 10:56:44 PM
I remember there being one line or scene that REALLY got me, I think it may have even been in the trailer, but other than that I did not enjoy it.

edit: Yeah, I found the part. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0uTN8hPpP0&t=0m31s
JB's reaction to eating gruel... still makes me tear up. :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 13, 2012, 11:15:45 PM
I laughed when he drank the yolk of a giant eagle egg (http://graceasheboro.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/nacho_eggs.png) but that was the only laugh.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ses on August 13, 2012, 11:18:53 PM
My college roommate and I used to watch Robin Hood: Men in Tights and laugh all the time, nobody else ever thought it was as funny as we did.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ArmenianScientist on August 13, 2012, 11:26:24 PM
Most of my favorite moments in Nacho Libre involved corn.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOLyoxBSo1g
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58jkqqgVV08
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNE0-dV8j00
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 14, 2012, 03:02:50 AM
Some of my most favorite comedies are ones that others don't really care for or are just "meh" about:

The Gods Must Be Crazy

I love the scene winching the 4WD and it ends up in the tree and still loved the idea when Rat Race did a very similar scene.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on August 14, 2012, 08:27:42 AM
Well I laughed quite a bit at Nacho Libre when I was 12-14 24.

 :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on August 19, 2012, 06:02:30 PM
Name a comedy you love that nearly everybody else thinks is not funny?

The stuff I think is really funny is probably generally funny. :D It would be easier to answer this in reverse.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ¡Keith! on August 28, 2012, 09:53:37 AM
(http://www.poptheology.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/the_happening_pics_6.jpg)(http://www.clashmusic.com/files/imagecache/big_node_view/files/images/The%2520Happening.jpg)(http://www.filmofilia.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/thehappening02.jpg)(http://www.worstpreviews.com/images/photos/thehappening/thehappening6.jpg)(http://images1.fanpop.com/images/photos/1400000/The-Happening-Stills-zooey-deschanel-1446967-1200-800.jpg)(http://www.rowthree.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/happening.jpg)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on August 28, 2012, 11:22:11 AM
This one is good with all the recent Top 100 Books Discussion (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11505.0).

NEW QUESTION:

What author or book would you like to see brought to the screen?


Ebert posted this one before No Country For Old Men and he talked about Cormac McCarthy, whose books are great pieces of literature but could exist also as great cinema without one version making the other irrelevant. He added a good luck to anyone who tackles Blood Meridian, which is the story he'd most want to see adapted though it's the one least likely to survive the development and production process with its teeth.


I like that Ebert considers how much you want to see the movie vs. what it would do to the legacy of the book. The more successful films nowadays are almost direct translations. The book acts as a production draft of the screenplay, because that's what the fans want to see. Ebert asks for a Lolita (1962) approach, where a book that thrives on its word choice became a film that works on its performance and direction.

I'm not a big reader, but I always thought Clive Barker never got his due. His stories became increasingly fantastical and overflowed with too many great ideas, but a lot of his early horror and fantasy material could make for great cinema without taking away from the original stories. Barker adaptations usually end up as grindhouse fare with budgets too low and filmmakers more interested in the gore and slime than the themes. The Midnight Meat Train is a nifty, original idea but the film reduces it to a serial killer on a train with a muddled ending that's a nod to Barker's original concept. This is common with Clive.

Two Barker stories I would like to see. His short story The Age of Desire is a Frankenstein-esque manhunt set in a modern metropolis. Characters defy labels of right and wrong as wonderfully as in Princess Mononoke. Then there's his first novel, The Damnation Game, an epic masterwork of fantasy horror with some of the greatest sequences of terror I've ever known. Plus, again the villains are more of a sympathetic evil while the heroes actions are called into question.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on August 28, 2012, 11:27:07 AM
Italo Calvino.  Most of his work would be hard to translate to the screen, but I think an imaginative director (along the lines of Gilliam or Jeunet, though not necessarily either one of them) could do a really good version of The Nonexistent Knight.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 28, 2012, 11:37:58 AM
From my top 50 list...

Kraken by China Mieville. It'd be a fast paced and fun summer blockbuster, but a little dark and fantastical at the same time. There are so many cinematic ideas, including the big setpiece at the end which takes place in the Sea's embassy on land, a house filled with water. It looks really cool in my head.

I'm sure the Magician series by Lev Grossman will be a thing at some point. It's part Narnia and part Harry Potter and more adult than either of those.

A stranger Murakami like The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle or Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World would be cool.

The Giver would be super easy to do, I think.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 28, 2012, 11:55:38 AM
What author or book would you like to see brought to the screen?

I've long had ideas for an adaptation of Denis Johnson's ALREADY DEAD (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9911.Already_Dead). With its PULP FICTION spirit, a cinematic version could be quite the hit...back in the '90s.

(I also, at one time, had a treatment in mind for KISS ME, JUDAS; but that's already happening (http://www.mythicfilms.tv/#/Projects/Kiss%20Me%20Judas/1/).)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on August 28, 2012, 12:18:27 PM
I know there is at least one botched attempt at filming a Travis McGee novel. If one was filmed right, then there are another 17 to film ie instant goldmine. McGee is like the 60s version of Jack Reacher (although John D Mac Donald writes Lee Child under the table), and no I can't see Tom Cruise in that role; unless those platforms are a foot high.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on August 28, 2012, 03:40:21 PM
Jennifer Government by Max Barry...cool political sci-fi. It was (is) optioned but who knows if anything will ever happen. Last news I heard of a film adaptation was like 5 years ago.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: ses on August 28, 2012, 05:19:39 PM
The Giver would be super easy to do, I think.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on August 28, 2012, 07:51:18 PM
Jennifer Government by Max Barry...cool political sci-fi. It was (is) optioned but who knows if anything will ever happen. Last news I heard of a film adaptation was like 5 years ago.

Well, if I recall, it had been optioned by Soderbergh/Clooney's Section 8; but, of course, that production company doesn't exist anymore. I'm pretty sure the SYRUP movie is in the can, however. (Another one for which I had an adaptation strategy; except mine was a short film that only dealt with the first couple of chapters.)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 28, 2012, 08:46:05 PM
I'm glad that they're finally going to make Ender's Game.  That's long overdue.

I have love/hate feelings for producing Jeff Smith's Bone.  I've been reading that book out loud to my children for almost ten years and I have the voices down and the timing and I can't imagine it being done differently.  How I would love to get the part for Smiley Bone, especially-- what a great character!

My favorite John Grisham novel is The Testament, which has never been done as a film and I think it would be great-- exotic locations... cool stuff.

Finally, American Gods by Neil Gaiman would be wonderful, although very dark.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on August 28, 2012, 10:43:46 PM
I've heard American Gods is going to be a TV show on HBO.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on August 28, 2012, 10:49:42 PM
I've heard American Gods is going to be a TV show on HBO.

That'll do.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on April 14, 2013, 12:06:03 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/NJWtjtX.jpg)

This cartoon got to me. The thought that for the first time in 14 years, Siskel and Ebert are once again sharing a theater and watching a film together. You would hope they would disagree, then I thought about the infinite possibility of a movie theater in heaven. I believe Mr. Siskel would show his old friend the greatest film that hasn't been released down here yet. A film perhaps that may never get a release on Earth. My friend and I came up with a triple bill of...

Stanley Kubrick's Napoleon
Robert Altman's Heaven
Conversation's With God (Dir: Ingmar Bergman)


Can you come up with some titles? Turn this into a festival.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on April 14, 2013, 12:15:50 PM
Guillermo del Toro's The Hobbit.
Darren Aronofsky's The Wolverine (or Perfect Blue)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: don s. on April 14, 2013, 12:20:32 PM
Soderbergh's Moneyball.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on April 14, 2013, 12:46:13 PM
Remember, this festival is for Ebert. I don't know how much he'd want to see Darren Aronofsky's The Wolverine.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on April 14, 2013, 01:31:09 PM
Why not? Who wouldn't?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on April 14, 2013, 05:52:43 PM
THE BROWN BUNNY 2.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on April 14, 2013, 06:37:30 PM
THE BROWN BUNNY 2.
THIS x3.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on April 14, 2013, 06:55:02 PM
Kieslowski-directed Heaven.  And Hell and Purgatory.  It would only be appropriate.  And done from a different perspective.

Welles' cut of The Magnificent Ambersons.

Terry Gilliam's Don Quixote

 
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on April 14, 2013, 07:16:25 PM
The first time I saw this thread, I thought of Welles' Heart of Darkness.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: FLYmeatwad on April 14, 2013, 07:24:20 PM
We aren't good enough for Gallo.

Given a completely empty theatre who would willingly elect to sit in the front row right on the end?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on April 15, 2013, 01:09:06 AM
Given a completely empty theatre who would willingly elect to sit in the front row right on the end?

The blind and/or criminally insane.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Antares on April 16, 2013, 09:36:26 AM
Akira Kurosawa and David Lean - Tora, Tora, Tora!

The film that Kurosawa thought he was making, and the director he thought he was working with on the original project. With those two directors working on their own segment, that film would have run close to 7 hours and probably would have been amazing.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 03, 2013, 03:44:19 PM
Stanton-Walsh Rule - No movie featuring either Harry Dean Stanton or M. Emmet Walsh in a supporting role can be altogether bad.

Who is your Stanton and/or Walsh?
Someone with a lot of credits.
Rarely if ever the lead.
You get way more excited than anyone else to learn they're in the film.
also
What movie cemented this person's reputation for you?


For me, it would have to be Dan Duryea, who I saw in a western this morning. I had no idea he was even in the film let alone the main bad guy. My interest in the movie tripled when his name appeared in the credits. This has been ever since my Noir Marathon with Mrs. 1SO, capped off by Too Late For Tears. Now, whenever someone is about to see a film he's in, I usually respond with "DURYEA!".

Dan Duryea is to 1SO, as Simon Yam is to flieger.

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 03, 2013, 04:10:13 PM
Mine would be Stanton, then as he slowed down on making movies Steve Buscemi took over.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on July 04, 2013, 10:36:28 AM
Who is your Stanton and/or Walsh?
Someone with a lot of credits.
Rarely if ever the lead.
You get way more excited than anyone else to learn they're in the film.

The ultimate answer would probably be John Cazale. Tom Wilkinson is a good one. I'd say Oscar Isaac, but he doesn't have "a lot" of credits. Nicky Katt, maybe. William Fichtner. Djimon Hounsou. Jeremy Davies. Michael Rapaport.

What movie cemented this person's reputation for you?

BOILER ROOM (Katt). ALBINO ALLIGATOR (Fichtner). THE FOUR FEATHERS (Hounsou). RAVENOUS (Davies). COP LAND (Rapaport).
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on July 04, 2013, 12:58:01 PM
The ultimate answer would probably be John Cazale.

Not when one of the criteria is "Someone with a lot of credits".

For me, the ones that pop to mind first are Marie Windsor and Gloria Grahame.  For a more modern choice, I dunno... maybe Don Cheadle?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Antares on July 04, 2013, 01:18:01 PM
Thomas Mitchell or Ernest Borgnine. The amount of classic films that these two guys were in is amazing.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on July 04, 2013, 01:24:44 PM
Thomas Mitchell is a great choice. Does Claude Rains fit the bill? I love everything he's in.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 04, 2013, 03:33:14 PM
Going older, Walter Brennan
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on July 04, 2013, 04:08:29 PM
The ultimate answer would probably be John Cazale.

Not when one of the criteria is "Someone with a lot of credits".

Oh yeah! Oops.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Antares on July 04, 2013, 05:49:21 PM
What movie cemented this person's reputation for you?

Thomas Mitchell - Only Angels Have Wings
Ernest Borgnine - Emperor of the North

Does Claude Rains fit the bill? I love everything he's in.

I forgot about him, one of my all time favorite character actors.  :-[
Claude Rains - Here Comes Mr. Jordan

Going older, Walter Brennan

100 demerits for Rio Bravo, otherwise another solid choice. I loved him in My Darling Clementine. Marshalling....... in Tombstone??
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 04, 2013, 07:18:41 PM
Marie Windsor took some warming up. I wasn't used to her rhythms when I saw The Killing, but after The Narrow Margin I agree. Gloria Grahame is a good choice too, with Oklahoma being a large exception.

I like Thomas Mitchell, who I don't remember in Gone With the Wind or High Noon, but won't forget after Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. My brain sometimes mixes him with Edmond O'Brien who left his mark on me with The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

Walter Brennan is a great pick. I underestimated him until I saw The Westerner and learned soon after he'd won 3 Oscars. I have similar regard for Walter Huston. I don't know if Huston is more of a leading actor, but I know him more from Treasure of the Sierra Madre and Yankee Doodle Dandy than Dodsworth.

That reminds me of another great that always gets me excited... Barry Fitzgerald. Ever since Going my Way I've been happy to see him in And Then There Were None (with Huston), The Naked City, The Long Voyage Home, The Sea Wolf, How Green Was My Valley, and of course, The Quiet Man.

You could sub-question this in regards to the John Ford players. Always enjoy seeing them, especially Hank Worden, whose never had more than a cameo except in The Searchers.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on July 04, 2013, 09:21:48 PM
Peter Mullan is probably the correct answer. Children of Men, HP7, Trainspotting, etc.

Plus he has modest lead work in Tyrannosaur, directing cred for Magdalene Sisters and TV cred for Top of the Lake.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: AAAutin on July 04, 2013, 10:38:10 PM
Peter Mullan

Good answer.

directing cred for Magdalene Sisters

And NEDS!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Devil on July 05, 2013, 01:40:19 AM

Who is your Stanton and/or Walsh?
Someone with a lot of credits.
Rarely if ever the lead.
You get way more excited than anyone else to learn they're in the film.



First one that popped into my head cause I've watched a few things recently where he shows up is Christian Berkel .

Quote
What movie cemented this person's reputation for you?

Der Untergang is probably the movie I think of first for him.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on July 05, 2013, 09:47:13 AM
I'd never heard of him, but he's certainly got a nice list of credits. I recognize him as the bartender from the basement scene in Inglourious Basterds.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on July 05, 2013, 09:54:32 AM
Ward Bond for me. Most recently in The Maltese Falcon.
Title: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: 1SO on January 25, 2015, 01:42:04 PM
Patton Oswalt released a book about his cinema addiction called Silver Screen Fiend. Promoting it he named 10 Movies that Changed His Life. What titles fit these descriptions for you?

1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
2. The film that defined your generation?
3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
10. A film that made you rethink your life?

Patton's Answers:
1. Nosferatu
2. Star Wars
3. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre
4. Female Trouble
5. Richard Pryor: Live in Concert
6. Cabaret ("It's using the form of a movie musical in this almost sort of sardonic, mocking way to comment on this absolutely awful subject.")
7. It's a Gift
8. Aaltra ("it's a Belgian movie about these two assholes that become paraplegic and end up traveling around the country in their wheelchairs.")
9. Big Fan
10. Ikiru!, Groundhog Day and After Life
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on January 25, 2015, 04:40:19 PM
That's all fine and good, but I don't really care about Mr. Oswalt's answers. I want to know what your answers are! :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on January 25, 2015, 05:04:50 PM
Working on it. I have some but not all.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on January 25, 2015, 05:22:46 PM
It's a very challenging list to come up with.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on January 25, 2015, 11:09:29 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
A safe bet would be Aladdin, the first I saw in theaters and then about a bajillion times on VHS. I should revisit that. If it's the movie that kickstarted me taking films seriously, that'd probably be Pan's Labyrinth. I'm a slow starter.

2. The film that defined your generation?
It's gotta be something like The Sandlot, or maybe the recently mentioned The Mighty Ducks. There was a huge number of young-kids-playing-sports movies that my generation watched the crap out of. You can say "You're killing me Smalls" and everybody in my age bracket will know what you're referencing. Titanic might be an outside shot, and would maybe be my choice were I a girl.

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
Hmm, I think the only two movies I was ever forbidden from seeing were Payback and True Lies. So True Lies.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
Shocking is an interesting word here, one which would point me towards the extreme ends of horror probably. I'm going to go with The Innocents. The implications of that movie are pretty shocking, I think.

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
The easy choice here is Dead Poets Society. Not quite what I'm aiming at, but close.

6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
This is a two parter. The first part is Blade Runner, which showed that sci-fi movies didn't have to be full of lasers and explosions and could be about really interesting things. And then the original Solaris blew even that newly broadened definition out of the water. Basically, Solaris proved that anything could work on screen, even sentient oceans and weird not-people.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
The Lady Eve is the raciest movie with no sex I've ever seen. And hilarious for it.

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
Four Lions is the modern choice, His Girl Friday for kicking it old school. One about inept Muslim terrorists, the other a hijinks filled romp about a guy on death row.

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
Heh, The Conjuring is the first that springs to mind. Making 'em almost exactly like a 70s horror film.

10. A film that made you rethink your life?
How about movies I think about most in a given day/week/month/year? Fanny and Alexander, The Long Day Closes, Fantastic Mr. Fox.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2015, 12:22:14 AM
I was answering this with an epic post when the computer froze and restarted. All was lost.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on January 26, 2015, 12:24:50 AM
Oof. Sounds like you're going to need about six million dollars.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HoLs0V8T5AA
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on January 26, 2015, 12:52:34 AM
Dunno if I'll get around to all of these, but this one is easy:

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
A Clockwork Orange.  I remember being at a book fair with my dad and I wanted to get the novel (why? I can't remember) and he refused to buy it for me.  I was probably about 12.  In retrospect, that's a pretty messed-up book for a 12-year-old, but he didn't seem to have a problem with me reading Stephen King.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2015, 02:07:36 AM
And now Martin took one of my answers. Okay, let's try the short version. (Sorry Junior, my response to your answers is lost to the dataverse.)


1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies? The Terminator is the one that made me wonder how they made movies.

2. The film that defined your generation? I'm from the Star Wars era, but I would say Pulp Fiction, which was the pinnacle of 90s independent cinema. Often imitated but never duplicated.

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see? When I was early teens my neighbor and I started watching A Clockwork Orange. We didn't get far before my mom came in and put an end to that. I didn't see the film in its entirety till college.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own. This happens all the time now. (Angst (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12403.0).) But the first one was The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover. It was the first NC-17 film I saw in the theater

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be? Living in Oblivion is a comedy, but it's a scary accurate look at filmmaking through a neurotic prism.

6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre? My double feature of Hanna-Bi and Sonatine blew open my perimeters for action films by emphasizing stillness, contemplation and the aftermath more than the action.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era? What the hell. Another chance to mention Dixie, the most honest and unapologetic film about Blackface entertainment there will ever be, starring Mr. Entertainment, Bing Crosby.

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny? Fight Club, though I probably laugh more with Trainspotting

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to? To me, the films they used to make overall have better dialogue than films today, and more emphasis on that part of the film. So, I'm thinking Aaron Sorkin. A Few Good Men is a modern day Caine Mutiny, but The American President is like classic Frank Capra.

10. A film that made you rethink your life? I'm posting the link because my answer is ironic considering where this list came from. When I saw Big Fan (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11349.msg721310#msg721310) I wrote...
Watching Big Fan has made me think about this obsession I have with movies and my need to talk about it incessantly and with an abundance of passion. I need to reconsider how I'm spending my time.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: The Deer Hunter on January 26, 2015, 03:27:09 AM
3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
Hmm, I think the only two movies I was ever forbidden from seeing were Payback and True Lies. So True Lies.

This surprises me. What's so bad about True Lies?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: Bondo on January 26, 2015, 08:48:23 AM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
I'm not sure about earliest movie, but Jurassic Park at 10 was definitely an entry point into the magic that movies could create.

2. The film that defined your generation?
I've gotta go with The Matrix, and its unfortunate association with Columbine.

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
The only film I can distinctly remember my parents stopping me from seeing is The Ref, which I don't call a great film (though I did try to watch it later as an adult). I generally had pretty free reign, I saw Species in the theatre at 12 (with a friend's mom functioning as our qualifying adult), though I had wanted to see Clueless.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
I'm not even sure how to answer this as the list of great shocking films my parents didn't know existed is pretty vast. Shortbus I suppose.

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
In The Loop, or more practically, The Thick of It. If my life hadn't deviated into perpetual purgatory, that kind of bureaucratic aide function (more Toby than Malcolm) was kind of what I was hoping for. Guess I should have gone to an Ivy League school because I don't think they higher public university grads. I doubt they make movies about what I actually do.

6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
28 Days Later perhaps with the zombie label, or (500) Days of Summer with RomCom.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
The Great Dictator

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
The Ringer. Surprisingly sensitive comedy involving the Special Olympics.

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
Considering "like they used to" is not really a compliment for me, I'm going to go with the Hobbit trilogy. Look, films can be just as unwieldy and poorly edited as they were back in the glory days.

10. A film that made you rethink your life?
Memorial It's A Wonderful Life spot?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: colonel_mexico on January 26, 2015, 08:50:14 AM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
BEN-HUR or IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ton of old movies being watched when I was younger and these were my first film memories, can't remember which I saw first.  What's funny is PLATOON and THE SECRET OF NIMH are back there in the old memories of earliest films.

2. The film that defined your generation?
What 1SO said about PULP FICTION is spot on.

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
Again PULP FICTION, it was turned off within 5 minutes, we were living in Germany when it came out on VHS and I remember sneaking up in the middle of the night to watch it.  I would spend an entire summer deconstructing it.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own?
CALIGULA 1979 yikes!

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
A FEW GOOD MEN, though my service in the military was not within the legal realm.

6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
AKIRA what an eye opener for anime and led me to the really cool COWBOY BEBOP series.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
I am unfamiliar with classic era comedy and don't really have one to offer, though as an aside BLAZING SADDLES was one of those didn't skirt any of those classic unsafe jokes and unloaded with both barrels.

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
INGLORIOUS BASTERDS I'm not sure if this should go here, but bashing Nazi heads in and the ending were sure comical enough to make me smirk and feel slightly uncomfortable, very slightly. 

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
I'm not sure what this means exactly like Disney still can make great animated films like FROZEN or 3:10 TO YUMA or even TOMBSTONE from the 90s are a testament to great westerns?  ACROSS THE UNIVERSE was a fun musical though it is nowhere near anything great like they used to make 'em.  PRIDE AND GLORY was one of those films I really enjoyed just because I love those types of movies, but what would I compare it to?  Too many questions, I should not have even attempted this lol.

10. A film that made you rethink your life?
THE PURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS, anybody who has a dream and the willingness to work hard can truly achieve anything. 
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on January 26, 2015, 10:18:08 AM
So first of all, I just did some searching because I wanted to learn more about why Patton made his choices (still waiting for the library to get the book).  I found this (http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/lists/patton-oswalt-my-life-in-10-movies-20150105/nosferatu-1922-20150105).  1SO, did you make the questions up to fit his choices, because I don't see them in the piece.


1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
I'm finding this difficult to answer.  Airplane! and/or The Muppet Movie were the first I obsessively watched over and over again, but that's not really a "love of movies" so much as it is love for particular movies.  When I really think about it, it was seeing Halloween (which my dad rented for me around the same time that he refused to let me read A Clockwork Orange) that made me chase down a bunch of other slasher films trying to find more of that magic.

2. The film that defined your generation?
It sure as shit isn't Slacker or Reality Bites or Singles or any of the other movies that tried to "define" my generation.  Since I'm only a couple years younger than Patton, I guess I'll just say Star Wars.  But he doesn't say it defines his generation, he says it "hit the sweet spot for our generation".  I agree with his assessment, anyway.

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
go back a few posts

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own?
I was going to say I Stand Alone but that's not really fair because it didn't exist while they were raising me.  I'll go with The Wicker Man but I don't know if it's "shocking" enough to be in the spirit of the question.  Female Trouble is a pretty great answer.

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
God I hate to say it because it's so cliché, but Office Space.  As a programmer most of my other options are pretty ridiculous.

6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
All That Jazz

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
It's a Gift is not only very safe but a horribly unfunny movie.  I'll say Hellzapoppin', which completely throws the rule book out the window.

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
Aaltra is a nice choice.  I'm gonna say Devils on the Doorstep.

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
Yeah I dunno what this means either.  Is it "as good as they used to" or "in the same manner they used to"?  I'll assume the former and say Once.

10. A film that made you rethink your life?
Scenes from a Marriage
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2015, 11:19:18 AM
I was reading his list and noticed that each fit neatly into a different aspect of his life, which got me thinking of my own choices that run along parallel lines. So the questions have a small amount of extrapolation and are not a direct transfer.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Junior & Bondo
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2015, 02:18:58 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
A safe bet would be Aladdin, the first I saw in theaters and then about a bajillion times on VHS. I should revisit that. If it's the movie that kickstarted me taking films seriously, that'd probably be Pan's Labyrinth. I'm a slow starter.
Were you aware of the Disney hot streak at the time? This film follows Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast. When did you go back and catch those? Did your love of Aladdin carry over into excitement for The Lion King, or did you not yet know this was from the same studio?

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2. The film that defined your generation?
It's gotta be something like The Sandlot, or maybe the recently mentioned The Mighty Ducks. There was a huge number of young-kids-playing-sports movies that my generation watched the crap out of.
One that I thought of from my generation was The Goonies, that has a similar attitude where the bad behavior of kids is almost rewarded. Difference being I like The Sandlot and hate The Goonies. It wasn't until Sin City that I realized lifeguard dreamgirl Wendy Peffercorn was played by Marley Shelton. Filmmaker David Mickey Evans also collaborated with Richard Donner on Radio Flyer, a very interesting fantasy drama about child abuse with spectacular direction.

I like that you went a different way with not picking a graphic film for your shocking selection.

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7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
The Lady Eve is the raciest movie with no sex I've ever seen. And hilarious for it.
Barbara Stanwyck usually had that effect on classic movies. Ball of Fire is right up there.



1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
I'm not sure about earliest movie, but Jurassic Park at 10 was definitely an entry point into the magic that movies could create.
I could see that being a popular choice. A movie that shows you something you've never seen in real life. Wonder if anybody will say The Matrix here.

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2. The film that defined your generation?
I've gotta go with The Matrix, and its unfortunate association with Columbine.
Interesting how you tie Columbine to this film, which is hardly the first to go with the long black coat.

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4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
I'm not even sure how to answer this as the list of great shocking films my parents didn't know existed is pretty vast. Shortbus I suppose.
Could you show Shortbus to your parents? Can you think of a film you watched with them where it was awkward?

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6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
28 Days Later perhaps with the zombie label, or (500) Days of Summer with RomCom.
This is the most interesting question for me, and one of the hardest ones for me to answer. (500) Days of Summer is an excellent choice because you could argue it also upholds the narrow rom/com formula while playing as a subversion of it. Expectations vs. Reality is one of my favorite moments in recent cinema.

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7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
The Great Dictator
Nice. Doesn't get much more unsafe than that.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - colonel_mexico & MartinTeller
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2015, 03:05:52 PM
3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
Again PULP FICTION, it was turned off within 5 minutes, we were living in Germany when it came out on VHS and I remember sneaking up in the middle of the night to watch it.  I would spend an entire summer deconstructing it.
With only 5 minutes, I'm guessing it was the foul language, or did they decide in that amount of time that the film was probably not good?

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4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own?
CALIGULA 1979 yikes!
Yeah. That's the only film I can think of that's porn with movie stars. I saw the shorter cut, which was plenty. Bizarrely if you strip out all the sex, there's still the often sickening violence and occasional bits of good dialogue. Such a strange film.

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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
A FEW GOOD MEN, though my service in the military was not within the legal realm.
What do you think of Jessup's argument that they had a duty to train this washout recruit. Things went bad in this case, but Code Reds save lives. I've never read a defense of that position, though it always stood out as a fairly logical argument, though a bit outdated in the modern day softer view of military training.

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6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
AKIRA what an eye opener for anime and led me to the really cool COWBOY BEBOP series.
I love this question. If somebody said they didn't like Japanese animation, I would steer them towards Miyazaki. You go for perhaps the definitive example (though probably not the best of the anime genre.) Cowboy Bebop is so cool, I'm surprised there isn't a live action feature in the works.

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10. A film that made you rethink your life?
THE PURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS, anybody who has a dream and the willingness to work hard can truly achieve anything.
I like the film, but the cynic in me doesn't believe the message.



1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
... When I really think about it, it was seeing Halloween (which my dad rented for me around the same time that he refused to let me read A Clockwork Orange) that made me chase down a bunch of other slasher films trying to find more of that magic.
Hard to reconcile this is the same Martin who to me has loved Bergman since grade school. Do you remember a particular film that developed your tastes more towards where they were when you joined the Boards? What was your first Bergman? What do you think of 80s slasher films now? Could you make a top 5 that you're still fond of?

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4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own?
I was going to say I Stand Alone but that's not really fair because it didn't exist while they were raising me.  I'll go with The Wicker Man but I don't know if it's "shocking" enough to be in the spirit of the question.  Female Trouble is a pretty great answer.
You have an appreciation of John Waters. Midnight movies were dying out right as I got big into cinema. I saw Rocky Horror that way and Pink Floyd: The Wall and I think that's it. Did you see anything this way? Like maybe Eraserhead?

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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
God I hate to say it because it's so cliché, but Office Space.  As a programmer most of my other options are pretty ridiculous.
Don't see yourself in Hackers? (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113243/?ref_=nv_sr_1) Were you a fan of "The Office"?

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7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
It's a Gift is not only very safe but a horribly unfunny movie.  I'll say Hellzapoppin', which completely throws the rule book out the window.
Great pick.

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8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
Aaltra is a nice choice.  I'm gonna say Devils on the Doorstep.
Also a good pick, though I'm the only person on the planet who wasn't hot on the film. That makes me think of Woman in the Dunes, though calling it a comedy is a stretch.

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10. A film that made you rethink your life?
Scenes from a Marriage
Will this film have a different effect on you now that you're in a vastly improved and healthy relationship?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - colonel_mexico & MartinTeller
Post by: MartinTeller on January 26, 2015, 04:06:55 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
... When I really think about it, it was seeing Halloween (which my dad rented for me around the same time that he refused to let me read A Clockwork Orange) that made me chase down a bunch of other slasher films trying to find more of that magic.
Hard to reconcile this is the same Martin who to me has loved Bergman since grade school.  Do you remember a particular film that developed your tastes more towards where they were when you joined the Boards?  What was your first Bergman?

I didn't see my first Bergman until I was 32.  It was Cries and Whispers, and then Seventh Seal.  I would say that's the movie that really steered me towards my current tastes.

What do you think of 80s slasher films now? Could you make a top 5 that you're still fond of?

Oh lord, no.  Now that list would pretty much begin and end with Halloween.  I was a kid into shocking and gross stuff, I grew out of it quickly.

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4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own?
I was going to say I Stand Alone but that's not really fair because it didn't exist while they were raising me.  I'll go with The Wicker Man but I don't know if it's "shocking" enough to be in the spirit of the question.  Female Trouble is a pretty great answer.
You have an appreciation of John Waters. Midnight movies were dying out right as I got big into cinema. I saw Rocky Horror that way and Pink Floyd: The Wall and I think that's it. Did you see anything this way? Like maybe Eraserhead?

The only "midnight movies" I remember seeing were Rocky Horror (which was thoroughly obnoxious, hated it) and Texas Chainsaw Massacre, which I think wasn't even a midnight showing, just a somewhat late screening at my college.  I saw The Wall at a matinee.

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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
God I hate to say it because it's so cliché, but Office Space.  As a programmer most of my other options are pretty ridiculous.
Don't see yourself in Hackers? (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113243/?ref_=nv_sr_1) Were you a fan of "The Office"?

I dunno if you're serious about Hackers but um, no.  Sure, I liked "The Office", but I wouldn't say any of my jobs were much like that.  Really, neither is Office Space, especially now that I work from home.

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10. A film that made you rethink your life?
Scenes from a Marriage
Will this film have a different effect on you now that you're in a vastly improved and healthy relationship?

I've been wondering that myself.  I don't want to show it to my fiancée and be like "hey, this movie really spoke to me".  Or worse, have it to speak to her.  Ditto for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: Antares on January 26, 2015, 05:02:21 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?

I really can't pinpoint it, but there were three things that made me love movies. First, when I was 5 years old, WCVB channel 5 out of Boston would air Charlie Chaplin shorts at 6AM on Saturday mornings. Second, my father bought a UHF antenna in 1968 and channel 56 in Boston aired movies every night of the week at 8PM. And finally, my father took me to watch the re-release of Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1970 and that pretty much cemented it for me.

2. The film that defined your generation?

For my generation's time frame it is probably Star Wars, but I hated that movie, so I'll go with Repo Man, which shredded the Reagan political dogma and mass consumerism, while extolling the virtues of hardcore punk.

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?

My parents never stopped me from watching any films.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.

Can't think of one.

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?

I watched Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe and I fell in love with the thought of becoming a master cook.

6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?

Il Postino - I came to this film at the perfect time. I had just gotten a 35 inch TV and I could now actually read the subtitles at the bottom of the screen and this coincided with the release of films in a widescreen format. I fell in love with foreign films and have never looked back.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?

Monsieur Verdoux - I know a lot of Chaplin fans don't care for it, but it was a huge leap for deconstructing the legacy of the tramp by his creator.

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?

Withnail and IThe guy CINECAST!ing drank lighter fluid!!! He definitely had a severe substance abuse problem.

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?

Sorry, they DON"T make 'em like they used to.

10. A film that made you rethink your life?

Two films which I watched within a few weeks of each other. 5 Centimeters per Second and Still Walking. The Japanese have such a somber way at looking at life and such a subtle way of highlighting its great moments.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on January 26, 2015, 05:57:44 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
It’s a tie: Star Wars for the spectacular experience; Being There for it’s quiet, thoughtful comedy; The Ten Commandments (1956) for an epic classic film.
 
2. The film that defined your generation?
Easy- Star Wars.

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
The Last Temptation of Christ.  My mother said, “But what if you see something blasphemous?” 

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
Does this mean as a kid?  I wouldn’t call Monty Python and the Holy Grail “shocking”, but they probably didn’t know about it, even after I started quoting it.  But they still wouldn’t know about almost any foreign language film, like Oldboy or Irreversable, both quite shocking.

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
As a religious leader, The Mission (1986) and Calvary (2014).  The first points to a cross-cultural experience and the defense of the outcast.  The second is the lonely path of faith, and being blamed for what you did not do.

6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
Western—Unforgiven, which breaks the black and white morality
Gangster—The Godfather, which creates full characters full of questions
Romantic Comedy—Annie Hall, which changed the definition of what could be comedy.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
Hellzapoppin’- Insane comedy from 1941.  I notice now that it was chosen above, but really, it's the best choice for being something completely unexpected from the classic era.

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
50/50—about terminal cancer.  But it’s really funny.

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
Blockbuster-- Gravity
Intense drama—The Selfish Giant

10. A film that made you rethink your life?
Apart from The Mission, perhaps Walker by Tsai Ming-liang.  I am so busy, this film made me wonder about what I miss.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on January 26, 2015, 06:35:39 PM
I was answering this with an epic post when the computer froze and restarted. All was lost.

(http://reactiongifs.me/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/computer-smash-other-guys-Mark-Wahlberg-angry.gif)

Feel for ya.  :'(
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on January 26, 2015, 08:27:26 PM
10. A film that made you rethink your life?
Apart from The Mission, perhaps Walker by Tsai Ming-liang.  I am so busy, this film made me wonder about what I miss.

Nice!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - MartinTeller
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2015, 10:17:30 PM
What do you think of 80s slasher films now? Could you make a top 5 that you're still fond of?

Oh lord, no.  Now that list would pretty much begin and end with Halloween.  I was a kid into shocking and gross stuff, I grew out of it quickly.
I had a feeling. I aim to watch the hidden treasures from this era during Shocktober, but they're routinely poor, which makes me stay far away from the rest. Getting away from slasher, the 80s also had The Evil Dead and years later, the slapstick films of Peter Jackson.

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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
God I hate to say it because it's so cliché, but Office Space.  As a programmer most of my other options are pretty ridiculous.
Don't see yourself in Hackers? (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113243/?ref_=nv_sr_1) Were you a fan of "The Office"?

I dunno if you're serious about Hackers but um, no.  Sure, I liked "The Office", but I wouldn't say any of my jobs were much like that.  Really, neither is Office Space, especially now that I work from home.
Not serious. I just like how that created a subculture about computer hackers that doesn't exist except in the movies.


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10. A film that made you rethink your life?
Scenes from a Marriage
Will this film have a different effect on you now that you're in a vastly improved and healthy relationship?

I've been wondering that myself.  I don't want to show it to my fiancée and be like "hey, this movie really spoke to me".  Or worse, have it to speak to her.  Ditto for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?.
I understand that. There are films people call 'bad date films' but there are also plenty of 'bad relationship films.'  Force Majeure may even be one of those.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Antares & oldkid
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2015, 10:48:47 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
I really can't pinpoint it, but there were three things that made me love movies. First, when I was 5 years old, WCVB channel 5 out of Boston would air Charlie Chaplin shorts at 6AM on Saturday mornings. Second, my father bought a UHF antenna in 1968 and channel 56 in Boston aired movies every night of the week at 8PM. And finally, my father took me to watch the re-release of Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1970 and that pretty much cemented it for me.
Seems like 2001 would be a make or break film at that age. It's what would separate the sdedalusses from the 1SOs. I first saw 2001 in film school and appreciated it for being different, but I had no interest in being a part of that type of film.

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2. The film that defined your generation?

For my generation's time frame it is probably Star Wars, but I hated that movie, so I'll go with Repo Man, which shredded the Reagan political dogma and mass consumerism, while extolling the virtues of hardcore punk.
Another one I didn't appreciate till I was older. Curious that we both rebuked Star Wars. I actually like the movie, but everyone around me was watching it every weekend, and I didn't see the big deal. It's among my Essentials now, but I think I needed the time for the hype to die down.

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3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?

My parents never stopped me from watching any films.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.

Can't think of one.
So what was the first film you remember thinking, "should I be watching this?" Something that was more disturbing than anything you had seen before.

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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?

I watched Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe and I fell in love with the thought of becoming a master cook.
How do you feel know watching movies about food? Do you have a Top 5 films about cooking?

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7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?

Monsieur Verdoux - I know a lot of Chaplin fans don't care for it, but it was a huge leap for deconstructing the legacy of the tramp by his creator.
Good pick. I grew cold on his later features, like this and A King in New York, but I remember the subject matter was pretty dark for a comedy.


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10. A film that made you rethink your life?

Two films which I watched within a few weeks of each other. 5 Centimeters per Second and Still Walking. The Japanese have such a somber way at looking at life and such a subtle way of highlighting its great moments.
I also find a great deal of humanity in Japanese cinema flowing through many genres. You wouldn't think you might see a reflection of yourself in a samurai film, but it's there.





1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
It’s a tie: Star Wars for the spectacular experience; Being There for it’s quiet, thoughtful comedy; The Ten Commandments (1956) for an epic classic film.
Would you call Being There a spiritual film? Have you ever written about Ten Commandments or seen it in the past few years? I fear that I would find it silly now, but am curious.

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3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
The Last Temptation of Christ.  My mother said, “But what if you see something blasphemous?”

And? What do you think of it?

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4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
Does this mean as a kid?  I wouldn’t call Monty Python and the Holy Grail “shocking”, but they probably didn’t know about it, even after I started quoting it.  But they still wouldn’t know about almost any foreign language film, like Oldboy or Irreversable, both quite shocking.
Do you prefer Holy Grail to Life of Brian?

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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
As a religious leader, The Mission (1986) and Calvary (2014).  The first points to a cross-cultural experience and the defense of the outcast.  The second is the lonely path of faith, and being blamed for what you did not do.
Calvary seems to be the new Ostrov with you.

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6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
Romantic Comedy—Annie Hall, which changed the definition of what could be comedy.
I agree with the first two, but Annie Hall seems to be the blueprint for nearly every rom-com that followed. I guess I never saw it as such a game changer, though it probably was.

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8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
50/50—about terminal cancer.  But it’s really funny.
Great pick. I thought the options would be limited for this one, but there has been a lot of great answers.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Antares & oldkid
Post by: oldkid on January 26, 2015, 11:10:14 PM

1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
It’s a tie: Star Wars for the spectacular experience; Being There for it’s quiet, thoughtful comedy; The Ten Commandments (1956) for an epic classic film.
Would you call Being There a spiritual film? Have you ever written about Ten Commandments or seen it in the past few years? I fear that I would find it silly now, but am curious.

The final scene of Being There might indicate that there is a spiritual component to the film, but I saw it as foolish people drawn to the innocent.  Now I see it as a prophecy about Ronald Reagan.  Not so spiritual as sly.   I haven't seen The Ten Commandments since I was a teen because I am also concerned that I would see it silly.  I have really turned off of Charlton Heston as well.  Still, its one of the films that got me started.
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3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
The Last Temptation of Christ.  My mother said, “But what if you see something blasphemous?”

And? What do you think of it?

Loved it.  Probably my favorite portrayal of Jesus, where he comes across as more human than divine.  Many evangelicals don't get the difference between fiction and non-fiction.  It's okay to portray Jesus as fully human, as their theology says.
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4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
Does this mean as a kid?  I wouldn’t call Monty Python and the Holy Grail “shocking”, but they probably didn’t know about it, even after I started quoting it.  But they still wouldn’t know about almost any foreign language film, like Oldboy or Irreversable, both quite shocking.
Do you prefer Holy Grail to Life of Brian?
I'm at the place where I can't decide.  Holy Grail has a nostalgia aura for me and Life of Brian I've only seen twice so it is still apt to surprise me.
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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
As a religious leader, The Mission (1986) and Calvary (2014).  The first points to a cross-cultural experience and the defense of the outcast.  The second is the lonely path of faith, and being blamed for what you did not do.
Calvary seems to be the new Ostrov with you.
Calvary really strikes home.  Both The Mission and Ostrov present saints, an ideal for me to aspire to.  Calvary presents a reality I'm more familiar with, the brokenness of trying to be 'good" all the time, the rejection of the ideal you are supposed to represent.  It's very personal.
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6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
Romantic Comedy—Annie Hall, which changed the definition of what could be comedy.
I agree with the first two, but Annie Hall seems to be the blueprint for nearly every rom-com that followed. I guess I never saw it as such a game changer, though it probably was.

I saw Annie Hall in the last couple years and while I think other films do this same thing better, I can recognize that there is a difference in rom-coms before and after Annie Hall.  Yes, there are plenty of the standard rom-coms, but could When Harry Met Sally, 500 Days of Summer, or even 50 First Dates exist without it?

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Junior & Bondo
Post by: Bondo on January 26, 2015, 11:34:23 PM
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2. The film that defined your generation?
I've gotta go with The Matrix, and its unfortunate association with Columbine.
Interesting how you tie Columbine to this film, which is hardly the first to go with the long black coat.

Well, The Matrix did come out a month before Columbine happened and it was kind of an awkward moment for the film.

Could you show Shortbus to your parents? Can you think of a film you watched with them where it was awkward?

There are very few people I could watch Shortbus with and not have it be awkward. Among the more awkward was The Kids Are All Right...rawer sex going on in that then the lesbian parented household dramedy it was sold as.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - colonel_mexico & MartinTeller
Post by: colonel_mexico on January 27, 2015, 08:07:20 AM
3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
Again PULP FICTION, it was turned off within 5 minutes, we were living in Germany when it came out on VHS and I remember sneaking up in the middle of the night to watch it.  I would spend an entire summer deconstructing it.
With only 5 minutes, I'm guessing it was the foul language, or did they decide in that amount of time that the film was probably not good?

The foul language all the way.  What's really funny is as an adult I've watched this film with my mom and she kind of likes it.  Very strange lol.

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5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
A FEW GOOD MEN, though my service in the military was not within the legal realm.
What do you think of Jessup's argument that they had a duty to train this washout recruit. Things went bad in this case, but Code Reds save lives. I've never read a defense of that position, though it always stood out as a fairly logical argument, though a bit outdated in the modern day softer view of military training.

I don't know exactly how to answer that, except to say there is a line between hazing and training, but it is often blurred when you are in the midst of training that is meant to push you beyond your physical and mental limits.  What they did in the film crosses that line, but does it go on, probably.  From my experience there were training instructors who seemed to carry things too far, who pushed guys (verbally and physically, but never actually striking anybody) around that did seem weaker or less prepared mentally for the rigors of military life, but I can't honestly say what they were doing was wrong because not a single guy in my flight failed.  And at the end of Warrior week and we were no longer trainees that instructor was like an old pal.  Night and day.  So, there are things that go on that at first blush may seem ridiculous or too far, but ultimately you are training for life and death work, there can be no question as to your resolve.  Also, during that time I had heard rumors about 'blanket parties' similar to the Code Reds (not a term we ever used) going on in the bathroom in the middle of the night, but I pulled dorm guard during the night often and never saw anything like that going on.

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6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
AKIRA what an eye opener for anime and led me to the really cool COWBOY BEBOP series.
I love this question. If somebody said they didn't like Japanese animation, I would steer them towards Miyazaki. You go for perhaps the definitive example (though probably not the best of the anime genre.) Cowboy Bebop is so cool, I'm surprised there isn't a live action feature in the works.

I really would like to see one, but friends who enjoy Bebop seem reluctant thinking that it would be tarnished by a poor film.  I'm not one of those, I would like to see a movie which at the very least would encourage, hopefully, others to explore the series which led to the film

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10. A film that made you rethink your life?
THE PURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS, anybody who has a dream and the willingness to work hard can truly achieve anything.
I like the film, but the cynic in me doesn't believe the message.

Ha, well I've had a little bit of experience that has made me somewhat of a believer.  Obviously not everyone gets to be President or a movie star or great director, but I think the aspiration and drive to work hard has it's merits even if it doesn't mean an arrival at a particular destination.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on January 27, 2015, 10:53:51 AM
I was hesitant about whether I could really do this questionnaire, but then I read this and it made me laugh!

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
I'm not sure what this means exactly like Disney still can make great animated films like FROZEN or 3:10 TO YUMA or even TOMBSTONE from the 90s are a testament to great westerns?  ACROSS THE UNIVERSE was a fun musical though it is nowhere near anything great like they used to make 'em.  PRIDE AND GLORY was one of those films I really enjoyed just because I love those types of movies, but what would I compare it to?  Too many questions, I should not have even attempted this lol.

I too should not even attempt most of these, but you're candid response, gives me courage. :)




1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?

Fiddler on the Roof. This is the first movie I really remember. Beautiful ornate theater. Beautiful movie, full of life and heartache and song--the rest (of what I gravitate towards) is history. :)


2. The film that defined your generation?

The Breakfast Club  "We're all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it, that's all." (I just missed the Star Wars wave and didn't catch the perfect pipeline until Empire.)


3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.

I don't think I've seen these yet. oh well.


5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?

It's a Wonderful Life Borrowing from another movie, ""The little things. There's nothing bigger, is there?" :)


6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?

West Side Story ...opened it up, threw it on the floor and stomped all over it. Perfect.


7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?

Some Like it Hot? Not sure what unsafe means really.


8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?

Harold and Maude


9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?

Jane Eyre, of course. :)


10. A film that made you rethink your life?

Cast Away "Who knows what the tide may bring?"
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: colonel_mexico on January 27, 2015, 11:23:04 AM
Sandy I'm so glad you joined in!  Love to see HAROLD AND MAUDE, CAST AWAY and JANE EYRE :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on January 27, 2015, 10:28:12 PM
Harold and Maude!  Great choice!
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: jbissell on February 04, 2015, 01:48:26 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
The Rocketeer. It's the first non-animated film I remember seeing in the theater. I remember begging to see it multiple times. Le Samourai was my big push into branching out beyond American films. When I first saw it in 8th grade Alain Delon was the coolest person I'd ever seen.

2. The film that defined your generation?
I never have a good handle on these things. Probably something like Fight Club (sadly)?

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
Pee-Wee's Big Adventure. This was around the time Paul Reubens had his theater situation and my mom didn't want me to watch anything by "that pervert". Of course that just made me seek it out more (especially Pee-Wee's Playhouse)

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
My dad is mostly just into Westerns/cop films and my mom loves The Sound of Music. I don't know much about their movie knowledge beyond that. My best friend in junior high had a cool brother in film school at NYU so that was mostly how I got into a lot of my foundational music, TV, and movies.

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
For a long time it was Ghost World, mostly because I wasn't sure what the hell I was doing (although not to Enid's degree). Now I have a slightly better idea of what I'm doing but can't think of a film parallel.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
Kind Hearts and Coronets. Because it's about a serial killer?

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
Chris Morris' brilliant terrorist comedy Four Lions dares to go to places I didn't expect.

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
I don't like this question. Making things like they used to is boring.

10. A film that made you rethink your life?
I'm sure this happened in my teenage years, though I can't recall anything specific. Haven't had that experience as an adult.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: keefey45 on February 04, 2015, 04:04:37 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
Right now I can't think of what movie sparked my obsession with what goes into making a film. Probably just influence from my best friend that I've been writing movies with since 5th grade. It was my mom's collection of Disney Black Diamond Classics that made me love watching movies.

2. The film that defined your generation?
American Pie

3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
American Pie. I wouldn't say it was great but it was popular. When it came out my sister was a senior in high school and I was 8 years old. So it was in the house but I wasn't allowed to see it.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
Cannibal Holocaust? I'm not really sure if this is the kind of answer your looking for but I'm pretty sure my parents don't know about it.

5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
Punch-Drunk Love. I hope I never call what I'm doing now a career.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
This question went over my head. Drax the Destroyer I am not. #DRAX4BESTLINE2014

8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
Grosse Point Blank

"So what's your business?"
"Professional killer."
"You get dental with that?"

9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
Pass.

10. A film that made you rethink your life?
I don't know if any movies have made me rethink my life. When I was in high school I saw 28 Days Later. I walked out of my room and my dad asked me how it was. I said "It changed me." That's probably the closest I've come.
Title: Movie Questions For You to Answer - jbissell & keefey45
Post by: 1SO on February 04, 2015, 09:44:48 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
The Rocketeer. It's the first non-animated film I remember seeing in the theater. I remember begging to see it multiple times.

Ahead of the comic book curve. I keep waiting for them to announce some kind of reboot on Rocketeer. How would you feel about that? Did you notice similarities with the first Captain America movie?

Le Samourai was my big push into branching out beyond American films. When I first saw it in 8th grade Alain Delon was the coolest person I'd ever seen.
I was that way about Chow Yun-fat when I saw The Killer.

7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
Kind Hearts and Coronets. Because it's about a serial killer?
Another good choice. I'm starting to think this could be a Top 5 List.



1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
Right now I can't think of what movie sparked my obsession with what goes into making a film. Probably just influence from my best friend that I've been writing movies with since 5th grade.
This is a whole side of you I'd love to hear more about. Do you two still work together? Can you pinpoint where you think the writing started getting good? (Where modern you can go back and the material still holds up.) Is this a goal for either of you?


3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
American Pie. I wouldn't say it was great but it was popular. When it came out my sister was a senior in high school and I was 8 years old. So it was in the house but I wasn't allowed to see it.
Growing up, I couldn't watch Porky's. My brother (older by 5 years) could watch Porky's, but I couldn't. 3 years later, I was allowed to watch Revenge of the Nerds on HBO. I watched Porky's years later. It's terrible.

4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
Cannibal Holocaust? I'm not really sure if this is the kind of answer your looking for but I'm pretty sure my parents don't know about it.
Exactly the kind of answer I was looking for.


10. A film that made you rethink your life?
I don't know if any movies have made me rethink my life. When I was in high school I saw 28 Days Later. I walked out of my room and my dad asked me how it was. I said "It changed me." That's probably the closest I've come.
Do you remember what you meant by that?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - jbissell & keefey45
Post by: jbissell on February 05, 2015, 12:44:04 AM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
The Rocketeer. It's the first non-animated film I remember seeing in the theater. I remember begging to see it multiple times.

Ahead of the comic book curve. I keep waiting for them to announce some kind of reboot on Rocketeer. How would you feel about that? Did you notice similarities with the first Captain America movie?

I'm not too prone to nostalgia so a reboot wouldn't bother me, though I wouldn't have much interest in it. While it's a vivid early film memory, it's certainly not a film I've felt any need to revisit (I caught the last act on cable a few years ago and Dalton Nazi-ing it up was still hammy fun). It did come to mind when watching Captain America (which left me with the same lukewarm feeling I have with almost all the Marvel films), though I'm only now putting together the fact that Joe Johnston directed both. Along with Labyrinth, it's definitely responsible for Jennifer Connelly being my first actress crush.

Le Samourai was my big push into branching out beyond American films. When I first saw it in 8th grade Alain Delon was the coolest person I'd ever seen.
I was that way about Chow Yun-fat when I saw The Killer.

Funny you mention him because he was my 2nd coolest person. My best friend at the time was Korean and would get all sorts of weird imported VHS versions of Jackie Chan and John Woo movies. We spent many a weekend re-enacting scenes from Hard Boiled and The Killer with Airsoft guns.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: keefey45 on February 05, 2015, 01:01:08 AM
There's nothing exciting to tell but if you're genuinely interested...

We haven't done much lately. Last August he sent me every unfinished script we had from over the years. There's one in particular I'd like to finish but it's hard. Since then we did a few table reads for a series we were gonna make but that's it.

I can pinpoint when the writing became actual writing and when it became good (in my opinion). We made "Jackass"-style tapes with our own b&w cover art (and illegally used Bloodhound Gang songs) and sold them out of our lockers at middle school. The profits became the "budget" for the first script we put effort into. That movie was awful but it was my first film. Years later we wrote a short that was by far more mature than anything we'd done before. That's the earliest work modern me is proud of. We never made it but I still have my copy. Someday...


28 Days Later freaked me out quick. It sucked me into the point of view of Jim and the idea of waking up from a coma to find everyone's gone affected me for days. I'd like to watch it again very soon and see if it's as good as I remember.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on February 05, 2015, 09:00:52 AM
Unusual for me to read someone downplaying their filmmaking skills. It's all something I'd love to know more about.
Title: NEW Movie Question For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on February 21, 2015, 10:05:00 PM
When did the Academy Awards first break your heart?

You may still watch the Academy Awards but by now everyone had their moment when they thought of the Oscars as a B.S. awards show. What was that moment for you? A film or director shut out of recognition, or a movie that lost to something else. (Brokeback Mountain losing to Crash might be a popular choice.)

For me it was 1981 and Raiders of the Lost Ark losing to Chariots of Fire. A selection that has never failed to baffle me. That was re-enforced the following year when E.T. lost to Gandhi. I realized the Oscars and me had entirely different qualifications for what makes a great movie.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on February 21, 2015, 10:24:09 PM
Well, in 2007 I was incensed that Children of Men didn't win for cinematography, but maybe the worse sin is Best Picture where the nominees were The Departed (won), Babel, Letters From Iwo Jima, Little Miss Sunshine and The Queen. Not nominated in that category but nominated in others were Children of Men, The Prestige, United 93 and Pan's Labyrinth, four movies that are arguably better than any of the nominated films.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on February 21, 2015, 10:35:33 PM
When In The Deep lost out to It's Hard Out Here For A Pimp. (2005)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Antares on February 21, 2015, 11:05:36 PM
For me, it was this moment...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zn-fPM4KS0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zn-fPM4KS0)

She puts life into a perspective that made the awards ceremony seem trifling. By the time she finished her speech, I was bawling like a baby and from that moment on, I never looked at the Oscars the same way again.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on February 21, 2015, 11:09:27 PM
In 2004, Seabiscuit lost Cinematography to Master and Commander and I lost my pool. Totally heartbreaking. Same story in 1999 when I thought Denzel was going to win Best Actor. Both of these picks haunt me.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on February 22, 2015, 03:15:34 AM
When In The Deep lost out to It's Hard Out Here For A Pimp. (2005)
I think by the time Oscar was considering it for awards then Pimp out of context looked like a tokenistic joke. The performance within the film is electric and Hustle and Flow feels like a forgotten gem. I saw it on my shelf of DVDs yesterday and wanted to watch it again. I think that director showed a handle on communicating musical power that Damien Chazelle is showing now.
I watched that other video you just mentioned. I can see why the song appeals to you. What I don't appreciate is that it reminds me Crash exists. Thanks for the memory. Yuck.
Title: Re: NEW Movie Question For You to Answer
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on February 22, 2015, 08:16:29 AM
When did the Academy Awards first break your heart?
What heart?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on February 22, 2015, 08:28:10 AM
:)



When In The Deep lost out to It's Hard Out Here For A Pimp. (2005)
I think by the time Oscar was considering it for awards then Pimp out of context looked like a tokenistic joke. The performance within the film is electric and Hustle and Flow feels like a forgotten gem. I saw it on my shelf of DVDs yesterday and wanted to watch it again. I think that director showed a handle on communicating musical power that Damien Chazelle is showing now.
I watched that other video you just mentioned. I can see why the song appeals to you. What I don't appreciate is that it reminds me Crash exists. Thanks for the memory. Yuck.

:D

oops, sorry.

I haven't seen either film, so it was a blind "taste test." One felt evocative and the other, seemed edgy for the sake of being edgy. I didn't feel challenged or moved in anyway, except to say bleh. You said it best, "tokenistic joke."

It's a good reminder to me that a song should be not taken out of context, but, should be judged on how it bettered the movie.

Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on February 22, 2015, 08:35:03 AM
Best way to compare the two films. Terence Howard is in both. In one he is powerful conflicted and totally owns the role right down to the rapping. The other he looks uncomfortably like he is being used for the colour of his skin. 
Title: Re: NEW Movie Question For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on February 22, 2015, 11:44:07 AM
When did the Academy Awards first break your heart?

You may still watch the Academy Awards but by now everyone had their moment when they thought of the Oscars as a B.S. awards show. What was that moment for you? A film or director shut out of recognition, or a movie that lost to something else. (Brokeback Mountain losing to Crash might be a popular choice.)

For me it was 1981 and Raiders of the Lost Ark losing to Chariots of Fire. A selection that has never failed to baffle me. That was re-enforced the following year when E.T. lost to Gandhi. I realized the Oscars and me had entirely different qualifications for what makes a great movie.

I can't remember a time when I cared enough about the Academy Awards to have my heart broken by them.  And certainly not in 1981 when I was 10 years old... as were you, if your forum profile is correct.  Does this mean that a 9-year-old 1SO was totally psyched and on board with Ordinary People's win?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on February 22, 2015, 11:55:50 AM
It did make me sad when Michael Moore got booed off stage. It was a good speech. :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on February 22, 2015, 12:10:04 PM
I definitely watched Oscars prior to it, but the one I first remember having a real connection to was 1998 because I was old enough at that point to watch most of the films (not legally per se, wasn't 17 yet). Wasn't heartbroken by Titanic winning everything, even though all the other stuff was better.
Title: Re: NEW Movie Question For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on February 22, 2015, 12:21:39 PM
I can't remember a time when I cared enough about the Academy Awards to have my heart broken by them.  And certainly not in 1981 when I was 10 years old... as were you, if your forum profile is correct.  Does this mean that a 9-year-old 1SO was totally psyched and on board with Ordinary People's win?

It was the 1981 awards, which aired in Spring of 1982. So yes, I was 10 when I watched Raiders lose. Considering I have no memory of the Ordinary People/Raging Bull controversy, I would say '82 was the first year I ever watched too. So I guess I was disappointed right off.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: colonel_mexico on February 23, 2015, 11:31:11 AM
Best way to compare the two films. Terence Howard is in both. In one he is powerful conflicted and totally owns the role right down to the rapping. The other he looks uncomfortably like he is being used for the colour of his skin.

Agreed
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on February 23, 2015, 01:01:24 PM
The Academy never broke my heart.  But they bored me a number of times.   Now I just look at the results the next day and shake my head.  At least Ida won.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: The Deer Hunter on February 23, 2015, 04:05:44 PM
They never broke my heart but they lost me when they changed it to 10 best picture nominees a few years back.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on February 23, 2015, 04:31:17 PM
There wasnt really a Star Wars/Raiders equivalent to a person who is now 30. Id seen an occasional Best Picture nominee in the theaters....Babe, Beauty and the Beast, etc. but never the winners. Early 90s had some pretty R rated content and I was in elementary school/early jr high.
 
I got to say the first actual Best Picture winner I had seen at the time of the time of the ceremony was Titanic (and at that time I probably hadnt seen any of the other nominees).

Id say the first time Id seen half the BP nominees at the time of the ceremony was probably 2004. Guess I was old enough by then to see how the game works and not be too invested.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Corndog on February 23, 2015, 05:47:19 PM
I was probably most upset when The King's Speech beat out The Social Network, because, while I really liked The King's Speech and thought it was a deserving nominee, I knew The Social Network would be the lasting film, the one the file under classic, whereas King's Speech would be filed under, "oh yea, that was a good movie".

But then I started to realize to not put any stock into who won awards, since, you know, film is art and art is subjective, which makes it a bit hypocritical to name a "Best" anything. So now I just watch awards as celebration and not competition.
Title: NEW Movie Question For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on March 06, 2015, 04:42:02 PM
When somebody asks you when/what was the first film ever made, what do you say?

This debate came up at work today. I asked for a clarification because it could be...
Sallie Gardner at a Gallop (1880) - the earliest film according to IMDB. "not filmed but instead consists of 24 individual photographs shot in rapid succession"
Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory (1895) - often referred to as the first real motion picture ever made, although Louis Le Prince's 1888 Roundhay Garden Scene pre-dated it by seven years. There are a number of other shorts that also pre-date this, but it's a popular answer.
L'Arroseur arrosé aka. Tables Turned on the Gardner (1895) - the first use of film to portray a fictional story.
The Great Train Robbery (1903) - used a number of innovative techniques including composite editing, camera movement and on location shooting. The film is one of the earliest to use the technique of cross cutting.

There are other possibilities, like The Story of the Kelly Gang, depending on what someone is looking for. What do you say to this question?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on March 06, 2015, 04:55:21 PM
The sneeze one.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on March 06, 2015, 05:15:05 PM
Fred Ott's Sneeze (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Ott%27s_Sneeze) (1894) aka. Edison Kinetoscopic Record of a Sneeze. The first motion picture to be copyrighted in the United States.

Why that one?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: oldkid on March 06, 2015, 05:38:08 PM
When I first saw the question, (before reading your answers) the first one that came to mind was the Great Train Robbery.  But once you reminded me of it, I would certainly give it to the factory workers.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Junior on March 06, 2015, 05:40:59 PM
I'd go with the factory workers too.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on March 06, 2015, 06:21:57 PM
Whatever Alice Guy's first film was. Men don't count in my book.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on March 06, 2015, 06:25:31 PM
No one's ever asked me that question.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on March 06, 2015, 06:42:08 PM
Thomas Edison electrocuting an elephant. :(
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: PeacefulAnarchy on March 06, 2015, 06:42:35 PM
Roundhay Garden Scene
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Jared on March 06, 2015, 06:54:02 PM
Just watched the marvelous Passage du Venus (1874). Prompted by this question, I went for the oldest thing on icheckmovies.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on March 06, 2015, 07:53:07 PM
Well played. That seems to be the earliest footage, but is it a film?

Martin, that's a governmental answer.
"Is the glass half empty or half full?"
"I don't think that's a glass."
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on March 06, 2015, 08:46:10 PM
Back then Oscars were whittled out of wood.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on March 06, 2015, 09:29:15 PM
Martin, that's a governmental answer.

Well, I thought it nicely summed up how I felt about the question.  What difference does it make and who cares?  It's putting things into arbitrarily defined boxes.

Which is what I do all the time with stuff (what is "film noir" but an arbitrarily defined box?) so I'm aware of the hypocrisy.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on March 06, 2015, 09:39:44 PM
Thomas Edison electrocuting an elephant. :(

Apparently done because of the spat he and Telsa were having, Edison must have been a wonderful man.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: verbALs on March 07, 2015, 03:32:46 AM
No one's ever asked me that question.
Yeah. The answer is "let's look that up on the Internet shall we?" All hail the internet. I've got a head full of spurious facts that I'd be better off not knowing so there's room for more useful thoughts. Have you ever answered a question and thought wtf is that information doing in my brain wasting space? ;D
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on March 07, 2015, 07:41:53 AM
I've got a head full of spurious facts that I'd be better off not knowing so there's room for more useful thoughts. Have you ever answered a question and thought wtf is that information doing in my brain wasting space? ;D
Why not post this in Movie Quizzes and shame those who are playing 100 Directors?

This isn't a question with a definite answer. When did cinematic life begin? Opinion enters into it.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Bondo on March 07, 2015, 07:51:14 AM
Well, in that case I'll restate my original position, but now actually seriously. Guy was the first person doing narrative work with film rather than just pointing a camera at something.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: jdc on March 07, 2015, 10:10:11 AM
No one's ever asked me that question.
Yeah. The answer is "let's look that up on the Internet shall we?" All hail the internet. I've got a head full of spurious facts that I'd be better off not knowing so there's room for more useful thoughts. Have you ever answered a question and thought wtf is that information doing in my brain wasting space? ;D

For sure, if I ever remember anything from school before high school  (any maybe half the stuff after)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: mañana on March 09, 2015, 09:05:22 AM
Fred Ott's Sneeze (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Ott%27s_Sneeze) (1894) aka. Edison Kinetoscopic Record of a Sneeze. The first motion picture to be copyrighted in the United States.

Why that one?
Because I remember it from the history of film survey class I took 10 years ago. It's not a topic I know much about.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on April 17, 2015, 06:02:35 AM
Patton Oswalt released a book about his cinema addiction called Silver Screen Fiend. Promoting it he named 10 Movies that Changed His Life. What titles fit these descriptions for you?

1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
2. The film that defined your generation?
3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
10. A film that made you rethink your life?

Finally got my arms around this:

1. Duel (Steven Spielberg, 1971). Saw it on television together with my brother when we were kids. The description "flabbergasted" has never been more fitting.
2. Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, 1977). Though I wasn't the disco boy, mind you.
3. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974). And it remains unseen 'til this day....
4. These would be too numerous to mention, I'm afraid, so I'll pass on this one.
5. The Parking Lot Movie (Meghan Eckman, 2010). Yeah!
6. Distant Drums (Raoul Walsh, 1951). Have to go with this one from last month's Western marathon.
7. The Women (George Cukor, 1939). The dialogue was written with venom, I believe.
8. Life Is Beautiful (Roberto Benigni, 1997). You could tell that to the prisoners.
9. The Good German (Steven Soderbergh, 2006). Actually under appreciated.
10. Trois couleurs: Bleu (Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1993). I'm still thinking.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Sandy on April 17, 2015, 12:06:55 PM
Great answers Knocked Out Loaded! The Women is on my list to see when your month comes around.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on April 17, 2015, 03:34:53 PM
Yeah. Thanks for answering the questions. Feel like I know you a little bit better.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: smirnoff on June 17, 2015, 12:19:25 PM
Yes, let me fix that. :)
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: DarkeningHumour on June 17, 2015, 03:00:04 PM
1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
2. The film that defined your generation?
3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
10. A film that made you rethink your life?

1) Earliest would probably have to be a Disney, no idea which one though. As for my origin story, it involves Star Wars as a wee child and The Godfather some years later (I think).

2) The Social Network may define my generation ; The Avengers defines today's entertainment industry.

3) None thankfully.

4) Any shocking movie made recently.

5) Hannibal

6) Brick ; I now little about noir and it completely changed my perception of it.

7) Would Some Like it Hot have been considered naughty ?

8) Adam's Apfel - you have to see it to understand

9) There are enough movies that are as good as the classics, but like them I would have to say Chinatown or There Will Be Blood.

10) The Matrix - Weird to discover Descartes at 9.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: 1SO on June 17, 2015, 09:42:48 PM
The Avengers defines today's entertainment industry.
This comes up quite a bit, but don't you think the formula to The Avengers success owes a lot to Harry Potter. Years of smaller films building up to an epic showdown that doesn't need so much backstory or character building because that was taken care of in the earlier films.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: DarkeningHumour on June 18, 2015, 03:06:08 AM
The Avengers defines today's entertainment industry.
This comes up quite a bit, but don't you think the formula to The Avengers success owes a lot to Harry Potter. Years of smaller films building up to an epic showdown that doesn't need so much backstory or character building because that was taken care of in the earlier films.

That is quite true, but The Avengers does it one better by creating for the first time a universe of related franchises tied together by cameos and crossover stories. The franchises also cement otherwise well established actors into the skins of their characters with whom they become inseparably associated, whereas the HP stars had no other movie roles during their Hogwarts filled youth.

Another way the Avengers is remarkable is in how it encapsulated the revenge of the nerds prevailing in today's entertainment industry. It makes The Avengers, an intrinsically uncool thing just a few years ago, into a mass market world spanning success. Comic book stories, sci-fi and similar geek culture elements have been popularized for years and never quite so much as in this instance.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: Paul Phoenix on June 18, 2015, 05:43:14 AM
Patton Oswalt released a book about his cinema addiction called Silver Screen Fiend. Promoting it he named 10 Movies that Changed His Life. What titles fit these descriptions for you?

1. Your earliest movie that probably started your love of movies?
2. The film that defined your generation?
3. The great film your parents didn't want you to see?
4. The great shocking film your parents didn't even know existed? One you came across on your own.
5. The film that you closely identify with your career or what it is you wanted to be?
6. A genre breaker, that opened up narrow definitions of that genre?
7. An unsafe comedy from the classic era?
8. A comedy about a subject that shouldn't be funny?
9. A modern movie that proves they still make 'em like they used to?
10. A film that made you rethink your life?
1. Toy Story 2, probably. Back then, I merely enjoyed movies like Terminator 2 for their cool special effects and clever premise. It wasn't until Pixar came along that I started to learn movies can be life-changing experiences.

2. The Matrix, unfortunately.

3. None. If anything, they made me watch a lot of bad movies that I would rather not watch today...

4. Truth be told, I've never really connected with my parents that closely to know the history of films they knew about. Pass, but I've got a feeling I discovered Casino Royale before my father did, despite being a big Bond fan.

5. None that were close, at least none that I've seen so far. The closest one would be Stranger Than Fiction on the life of a writer. I aspired to be a scriptwriter once, so I might watch Adaptation someday to respark that interest.

6. Toy Story 2 again. That film contributed to my life in a lot of ways, including giving me an insight to the storytelling capabilities of movies. The Dark Knight would be a close second, changing my perspectives on superheroes.

7. None, if your definition of "classic" goes back to the grayscale movies. Even the movies that I've seen from the '70s were mostly drama or action, never comedies. The oldest unsafe comedy that I know of would be around the time of Billy Madison. There's also Joe Dirt if that counts.

8. None that I've enjoyed, if that's what you're asking. Even Jackass got old for me fast. Worst example I could think of is I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry with their homosexual/racist jokes. At least Joe Dirt's toilet humor can be generally considered funny by many people.

9. I could name two, but I think I prefer Nightcrawler. A no-prize for guessing the other one.

10. Fight Club. Yep. The film that made me go on a crazy spiritual enlightenment journey, emphasis on "crazy". Didn't last long, thankfully.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: DarkeningHumour on June 18, 2015, 05:54:44 AM
6. The Dark Knight would be a close second, changing my perspectives on superheroes.

Good pick. I think that movie redefined what the genre could do for everyone.

9. I could name two, but I think I prefer Nightcrawler.

This is my favourite of your picks. There is something distinctively old fashioned about how the movie is filmed and the light is handled. There are many callbacks to old noirs. And to piggyback on what 1SO was saying about dialogue, every line in the movie is well written and thought through and matters.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer - Your Life in 10 Movies
Post by: Paul Phoenix on June 18, 2015, 06:00:18 AM
This is my favourite of your picks. There is something distinctively old fashioned about how the movie is filmed and the light is handled. There are many callbacks to old noirs. And to piggyback on what 1SO was saying about dialogue, every line in the movie is well written and thought through and matters.
I think it's because of how almost every moment in the movie contributes to the story in significant ways that made my viewing experience such a joyride. Man, I'd love to watch this again.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 29, 2018, 07:12:54 AM
Way back in the 1980's (and earlier and later) there was Harry Dean Stanton an actor who was rarely (if ever) lead, but he had a particular screen presence he brought to all his roles. Time rolled on and he started appearing less often as Steve Buscemi rose up and seemed to take the sort of roles HDS used to get. Now SB seems to be appearing less, so my first question is who do you see as being the replacement HSD/SB? The second question is was there a person that HDS replaced (i.e. was doing the sort of roles before HSD was doing them)?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Teproc on June 29, 2018, 07:38:31 AM
My first thought was Michael Shannon, but I guess his roles tend to be higher profile than Stanton's and Buscemi's roles were.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 29, 2018, 08:00:24 AM
I was thinking Sam Rockwell, but I am not sure.
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on June 29, 2018, 08:09:41 AM
The second question is was there a person that HDS replaced (i.e. was doing the sort of roles before HSD was doing them)?

Warren Oates?
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: 1SO on June 29, 2018, 09:28:56 AM
Funny that you posted here. I came across my Ebert book yesterday and was thinking of reviving this thread.


who do you see as being the replacement HSD/SB?
JK Simmons was on his way, and then he won an Oscar.
John Turturro
William H. Macy
James Cromwell
William Fichtner
John Hawkes
Tom Noonan
Brad Dourif
Gary Cole
Michael Rooker


The second question is was there a person that HDS replaced (i.e. was doing the sort of roles before HSD was doing them)?
Ward Bond
Barton MacLane
John Carradine
Frank McHugh
Title: Re: Movie Questions For You to Answer
Post by: MartinTeller on June 29, 2018, 10:48:37 AM
who do you see as being the replacement HSD/SB?
JK Simmons was on his way, and then he won an Oscar.
John Turturro
William H. Macy
James Cromwell
William Fichtner
John Hawkes
Tom Noonan
Brad Dourif
Gary Cole
Michael Rooker

Hawkes, I can see. The others are all contemporaries of Buscemi (or even predate him).