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Filmspotting Message Boards => No Movie Talk Allowed => Idle Chatter => Topic started by: Sandy on June 23, 2012, 04:00:11 PM

Title: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 23, 2012, 04:00:11 PM
This is a work in progress, so will add to this post as I go. Feel free to use the thread as you like.


What I wish filmspotters could teach me:

1SO: How to live with and love the limitations of others.
AAAutin: How to think outside the box.
Antares: How to be brave with cooking.
Bondo: How to speak with conviction.
Clovis: How to play cards.
Corndog: How to have a sense of wonder.
Dave and Lobby: How to dance.
flieger: How to embrace being an INFP.
FLY: How to not dismiss seemingly unimportant things too readily.
Junior: How to really see what's in front of me.
Martin: How to focus, how to follow through.
Monty: How to be gracious.
OAD: How to really see the meaning in words.
oldkid: How to see beyond the here and now.
OmNom: How to be whimsical:
pixote: How to see the big picture.
sdedalus: How to think critically.
smirnoff: How to ride a bike, I mean how to be a skilled bike rider.
spoko: How to have an ear for listening to music.
Totoro: How to be fearless.
verbALs: How to be alive while living.
worm@work: How to see life cinematically.


I really hate to submit this incomplete. Patience, I just need time. :)

Part II (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11313.msg761795#msg761795)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: MartinTeller on June 23, 2012, 04:05:58 PM
Martin: How to focus, how to follow through

You're asking the wrong guy.  I'm incredibly unfocused and abandon most of my big plans.  Last night I was going to see my old band play.  I'd been telling myself all week I would go.  Half an hour before the show I changed my mind.

I think I'm more suited to 1SO's assignment
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 23, 2012, 04:07:33 PM
 :D I'd take that too. I can learn from you when it is important to follow through and when it is good to let it go. :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on June 23, 2012, 04:27:24 PM
Quote
verbALs: How to be alive while living.

Alcohol.

OK there's a better answer, give me time.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 23, 2012, 08:25:09 PM
Quote
verbALs: How to be alive while living.
Alcohol.

 :))

Is that the secret?


 shoot.



I used to be an INFP. Having children have switched me over to INFJ.  :)

I may be in the same boat, since I'm scheduling whether I want to be or not.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Bondo on June 23, 2012, 09:39:50 PM
Bondo: How to speak with conviction.

I find a generally negative view of mankind helps.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Totoro on June 23, 2012, 11:52:04 PM
Sandy, teach me how to be an optimist?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 24, 2012, 12:02:26 AM
Sandy, teach me how to be an optimist?

 :) I don't like the alternative.

Really seeing people makes me optimistic--filmspotters especially. This is a good place to regenerate.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Junior on June 24, 2012, 01:51:26 AM
I'm afraid this is the only thing I feel qualified to teach. Mild language: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJxYiIfr4WM
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on June 24, 2012, 03:09:03 AM
Quote
verbALs: How to be alive while living.

Sorry for the flippant answer, last night.

No jokey comments I swear, I'll be serious for 5 seconds.

I think truly tough people are the ones who don't allow their enthusiasm, empathy, humour or sensitivity to be worn away by other people, or circumstances or the generally emotionally rough place that the world is. That also means you don't contribute to the cynicism of the world by blocking other people from expressing themselves (especially your kids). Sometimes it means stepping up and bumping back, when others bump you, and I find people are amazed at some of the things I won't allow them to say to me without getting a reaction. It means I make mistakes, but I tend to think if you aren't making mistakes, it might be a sign you aren't learning or prepared to learn by doing.

The image of one bad apple spoiling the barrel is an apt one. Act to remove those bad thoughts (the ones that stop you getting on with life), be conscious of avoiding negative people who will end up making you feel negative- the negative ones tend to make up about 10% of the population so why let a minority ruin the fun for the rest of us (that's not aimed at anyone here- we are the little overachievers in my mind).

I think you already know what I'm talking about Ms. Sandy. I think you are very much alive.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Monty on June 24, 2012, 11:00:53 AM
This feels like an assignment, are we gonna get marked for this?

I'll have to get back to you on this.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Lobby on June 24, 2012, 11:10:55 AM
Well, I'm afraid my knowledge of dancing is limited. I only know about historical dances, such as Branle Double, Sherewsbury Lasses and Estampie Real no. 5. Not exactly something you can use an ordinarly night out.

As of modern dances, I'm clueless.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: OmNom on June 24, 2012, 11:52:32 AM

I think truly tough people are the ones who don't allow their enthusiasm, empathy, humour or sensitivity to be worn away by other people, or circumstances or the generally emotionally rough place that the world is. That also means you don't contribute to the cynicism of the world by blocking other people from expressing themselves (especially your kids). Sometimes it means stepping up and bumping back, when others bump you, and I find people are amazed at some of the things I won't allow them to say to me without getting a reaction. It means I make mistakes, but I tend to think if you aren't making mistakes, it might be a sign you aren't learning or prepared to learn by doing.

The image of one bad apple spoiling the barrel is an apt one. Act to remove those bad thoughts (the ones that stop you getting on with life), be conscious of avoiding negative people who will end up making you feel negative- the negative ones tend to make up about 10% of the population so why let a minority ruin the fun for the rest of us (that's not aimed at anyone here- we are the little overachievers in my mind).


On Thursday, my son (he's 9) and I were talking about what makes a man "tough".  Yes, Chuck Norris came up, because I was after all having a conversation with a 9 year-old boy.  Your definition is wonderful, verbAL, and I'm going to use it.  Thank you!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on June 24, 2012, 12:03:54 PM
Your welcome, I'm glad it even made sense. :o ;D
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 24, 2012, 06:09:06 PM
Bondo: How to speak with conviction.

I find a generally negative view of mankind helps.

I was thinking more on the lines of your ability to study and analyze information before coming to a conclusion.  :)

I'm afraid this is the only thing I feel qualified to teach. Mild language: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJxYiIfr4WM

 :D I think I've mastered it. Thanks Junior!

This feels like an assignment, are we gonna get marked for this?

I'll have to get back to you on this.

Monty! Not an assignment. Maybe I should have called the thread. "Attributes of filmspotters that I wish I possessed." What I meant to convey is that you've already taught me what it is to be gracious. Now, if you have more insights to share, I'd take the advice. :)

Well, I'm afraid my knowledge of dancing is limited. I only know about historical dances, such as Branle Double, Sherewsbury Lasses and Estampie Real no. 5. Not exactly something you can use an ordinarly night out.

As of modern dances, I'm clueless.

Those are the exact dances I was referring to. Dave and Junior can take care of the modern stuff. If you've ever recorded your dances or have links to what they look like, I'd love to see them.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 24, 2012, 07:02:33 PM
Quote
verbALs: How to be alive while living.

Sorry for the flippant answer, last night.

No jokey comments I swear, I'll be serious for 5 seconds.

I think truly tough people are the ones who don't allow their enthusiasm, empathy, humour or sensitivity to be worn away by other people, or circumstances or the generally emotionally rough place that the world is. That also means you don't contribute to the cynicism of the world by blocking other people from expressing themselves (especially your kids). Sometimes it means stepping up and bumping back, when others bump you, and I find people are amazed at some of the things I won't allow them to say to me without getting a reaction. It means I make mistakes, but I tend to think if you aren't making mistakes, it might be a sign you aren't learning or prepared to learn by doing.

The image of one bad apple spoiling the barrel is an apt one. Act to remove those bad thoughts (the ones that stop you getting on with life), be conscious of avoiding negative people who will end up making you feel negative- the negative ones tend to make up about 10% of the population so why let a minority ruin the fun for the rest of us (that's not aimed at anyone here- we are the little overachievers in my mind).

I think you already know what I'm talking about Ms. Sandy. I think you are very much alive.

I understood the idea of thriving as being fully alive, but the very act of withstanding and bumping back against the difficulty around me is too? That's a big concept to perceive. I've tried to not tear others down, but wasn't good at protecting myself, so had to learn to toughen up and bump back. It doesn't come naturally to me so that's definitely something to work on.

Do you ever grow weary of being tough or wish that you could just have a soft place to land? This place is the closest facsimile of that to me. I'm taking your advice and am sorting through my barrel. :) I knew I asked you the right question.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Bondo on June 24, 2012, 08:59:32 PM
The logic of my previous statement goes something like this: if you have a positive view of people, you're liable to trust them/take their word for things/worry about disagreeing and it shall compromise your independence of thought when considering things.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on June 24, 2012, 09:14:16 PM
Antares: How to be brave with cooking.

Brave in what way?

Brave enough to try new foods and recipes or
brave enough to experiment with herbs and spices or
brave enough to wing it without recipes and create your own culinary masterpieces or
brave enough to tweak recipes rather than follow them exactly or
brave enough to try new ways of cooking foods from different ethnic regions?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 24, 2012, 11:49:56 PM
The logic of my previous statement goes something like this: if you have a positive view of people, you're liable to trust them/take their word for things/worry about disagreeing and it shall compromise your independence of thought when considering things.
:D Liberation!

I really don't see you this way though. I think you may be able to compartmentalize and be objective, but you seem to have a pretty decent view of people in general--I mean just look at how your are an advocate for women. :)


Antares: How to be brave with cooking.

Brave in what way?

Brave enough to try new foods and recipes or
brave enough to experiment with herbs and spices or
brave enough to wing it without recipes and create your own culinary masterpieces or
brave enough to tweak recipes rather than follow them exactly or
brave enough to try new ways of cooking foods from different ethnic regions?
:)) Yes!

I'll try and explain the best way I can. I've been cooking all my life. Since both my parents worked, I was in charge of the meals from my early teens for our large family. I don't worry about following recipes very closely and am able to look in a fridge and make a meal with what is available, but I'm afraid I may have the finesse of an army cook. I love to go to a restaurant and enjoy the creation of others, but I've never created a signature dish, or have taken the time to tweak a recipe until it was just right. Since cooking has always been a task, I've never experienced the passion of it. To hear you talk so lovingly about what you create is just so darn cool.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 25, 2012, 07:18:29 AM
What I wish filmspotters could teach me:

Dave and Lobby: How to dance.


I would love to, unfortunately I am on the wrong side of the world and I am not willing to film myself dancing. Still I see dancing as something that should be taught in-person. One thing I will say find a busy dance floor, wiggle into the middle (so you are well shielded from external viewers) and dance.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 10:10:26 AM
What I wish filmspotters could teach me:

Dave and Lobby: How to dance.


I would love to, unfortunately I am on the wrong side of the world and I am not willing to film myself dancing. Still I see dancing as something that should be taught in-person. One thing I will say find a busy dance floor, wiggle into the middle (so you are well shielded from external viewers) and dance.

Will do Dave.  :D
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on June 25, 2012, 12:26:10 PM
I love to go to a restaurant and enjoy the creation of others, but I've never created a signature dish, or have taken the time to tweak a recipe until it was just right. Since cooking has always been a task, I've never experienced the passion of it. To hear you talk so lovingly about what you create is just so darn cool.

So it boils down to this... you want to find that passion, but unfortunately, it can not be taught to you. You must find it yourself. I learned how to cook because I was never home at meal times. Back then, the microwave oven was still on the horizon, so if i wanted a hot meal, I had to learn to do it myself (That old necessity is the means of invention saying). But, I was lucky enough to have a mother and grand mother who were excellent cooks, so when they were cooking, I'd watch and they'd let me put in the spices. It was like chemistry with food. The passion came later when I would take standard recipes and tweak them slightly to make them even better. Food can be a sensual experience. I love seeing someone take a bite of something I whipped up, and that look of almost orgasmic expression appears on their face.

So if I can teach you one thing when it comes to cooking it is this... To be a great cook you must have an arrogance that says, Nobody can make this recipe better than me. There are certain recipes that I make, that I know that Wolfgang Puck, Emeril Legasse, et al, could not make any better. You give me a recipe and I'll make it step by step the first time. But the next time, I'm going to tweak it slightly to give it more flavor and I'll continue to tweak it until I'm sure that is the best it can possibly be, and that no one has ever made it that good before. Once you have achieved this, make your final recipe for friends, but don't tell them it's something special that you've been working on. Just serve it like it's no big deal, and watch their faces when they take a bite. If it goes suddenly quiet, and then you start to hear them emitting low moans of pleasure, look up to see if anyone is rolling back their eyes in pleasure, if so, then you've been successful *. Soak in the moment and don't look for a compliment (because sometimes they just say it's great to be nice ;) ), be thankful for the visual evidence of their happiness. The first time this happens for you, a seed of culinary passion will be sown in you. It is then up to you to nurture that passion and expand upon it.

One thing my wife hears me say a lot is this... I pity people who don't know how to cook, they don't know what they are missing. If you're going to have to eat everyday to survive, you might as well make it a king's feast, every chance you get.

* - Like my grand mother, when I'm feeding a group of people, I always come up with some excuse to go back into the kitchen when we start the meal. I don't want them to feel obligated to compliment. You miss the initial expressions on their faces, but you'll hear the moaning if they like it. That expression returns with each bite if they like it anyway.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Lobby on June 25, 2012, 02:19:05 PM
Sandy! You wanted links with examples of what kind of dances I dance.

Here you are.

http://dineth.forodrim.org/movies.html

Unfortunately I'm not in any of the films, but this is the dancing guild I belong to. Most of the time we dance in ordinary clothes in a basement, like in one of the films. But sometimes we dress up in old looking clothes, which certainly adds a bit of atmosphere.

But actually just hearing those songs playing up is enough for me to move hundreds of years back in my imagination. It's great fun!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: AAAutin on June 25, 2012, 06:24:41 PM
What I wish filmspotters could teach me:
AAAutin: How to think outside the box.

Stay away from John Doe, thereby avoiding the box altogether.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 07:00:19 PM
I love to go to a restaurant and enjoy the creation of others, but I've never created a signature dish, or have taken the time to tweak a recipe until it was just right. Since cooking has always been a task, I've never experienced the passion of it. To hear you talk so lovingly about what you create is just so darn cool.

So it boils down to this... you want to find that passion, but unfortunately, it can not be taught to you. You must find it yourself. I learned how to cook because I was never home at meal times. Back then, the microwave oven was still on the horizon, so if i wanted a hot meal, I had to learn to do it myself (That old necessity is the means of invention saying). But, I was lucky enough to have a mother and grand mother who were excellent cooks, so when they were cooking, I'd watch and they'd let me put in the spices. It was like chemistry with food. The passion came later when I would take standard recipes and tweak them slightly to make them even better. Food can be a sensual experience. I love seeing someone take a bite of something I whipped up, and that look of almost orgasmic expression appears on their face.

So if I can teach you one thing when it comes to cooking it is this... To be a great cook you must have an arrogance that says, Nobody can make this recipe better than me. There are certain recipes that I make, that I know that Wolfgang Puck, Emeril Legasse, et al, could not make any better. You give me a recipe and I'll make it step by step the first time. But the next time, I'm going to tweak it slightly to give it more flavor and I'll continue to tweak it until I'm sure that is the best it can possibly be, and that no one has ever made it that good before. Once you have achieved this, make your final recipe for friends, but don't tell them it's something special that you've been working on. Just serve it like it's no big deal, and watch their faces when they take a bite. If it goes suddenly quiet, and then you start to hear them emitting low moans of pleasure, look up to see if anyone is rolling back their eyes in pleasure, if so, then you've been successful *. Soak in the moment and don't look for a compliment (because sometimes they just say it's great to be nice ;) ), be thankful for the visual evidence of their happiness. The first time this happens for you, a seed of culinary passion will be sown in you. It is then up to you to nurture that passion and expand upon it.

One thing my wife hears me say a lot is this... I pity people who don't know how to cook, they don't know what they are missing. If you're going to have to eat everyday to survive, you might as well make it a king's feast, every chance you get.

* - Like my grand mother, when I'm feeding a group of people, I always come up with some excuse to go back into the kitchen when we start the meal. I don't want them to feel obligated to compliment. You miss the initial expressions on their faces, but you'll hear the moaning if they like it. That expression returns with each bite if they like it anyway.

Antares! The first thing I want to say is that I wish I could go to one of your dinner parties. :D I love how you are so nonchalant about serving the meal and even leave the room so they can have a personal experience with it.  --so well orchestrated! To be able to make food that pleases at that level is astonishing and I can see why success would compel you to continue to create.

My cooking is nurturing, satisfying and well liked (Ha! Are we still talking about food? :)) The line's gotten all blurry.), but arrogance is a new idea to me as is using that arrogance to produce food at that level. It's scandalous. :) I better start out with something simple so since I make a decent pico de gallo, I'll use your formula and try and make it fabulous! Thank you so much. Your post was a lot of fun to read.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 07:12:43 PM
Sandy! You wanted links with examples of what kind of dances I dance.

Here you are.

http://dineth.forodrim.org/movies.html

Unfortunately I'm not in any of the films, but this is the dancing guild I belong to. Most of the time we dance in ordinary clothes in a basement, like in one of the films. But sometimes we dress up in old looking clothes, which certainly adds a bit of atmosphere.

But actually just hearing those songs playing up is enough for me to move hundreds of years back in my imagination. It's great fun!

I can see why you enjoy this. :) It's nice to think that these dances are being preserved. Some of the best scenes in costume dramas are dances where the characters go through the steps while having flirty, biting conversations. Thanks for linking for me.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 07:14:26 PM
What I wish filmspotters could teach me:
AAAutin: How to think outside the box.

Stay away from John Doe, thereby avoiding the box altogether.

 :o Are you referring to Shade Sheist? Otherwise, I'm going to need some help. :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: AAAutin on June 25, 2012, 09:49:32 PM
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7268/7445040878_d80806084c.jpg)

(Be wary of the strangers 1SO attracts.)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 10:04:58 PM
(Be wary of the strangers 1SO attracts.)

 :) Two questions answered. I was wondering what his avatar was from. I've conveniently missed Se7en all these years.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: AAAutin on June 25, 2012, 10:10:20 PM
I've conveniently missed Se7en all these years.

SEVEN can teach you more than I ever could.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 10:12:36 PM
I've conveniently missed Se7en all these years.

SEVEN can teach you more than I ever could.

I might never sleep again. *shudder*
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: AAAutin on June 25, 2012, 10:14:50 PM
I might never sleep again. *shudder*

Well, prolonged sleep deprivation will certainly have you thinking outside the...everything.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 10:19:10 PM
Well, prolonged sleep deprivation will certainly have you thinking outside the...everything.

Your teaching methods are very strange, yet effective.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on June 25, 2012, 10:56:41 PM
I better start out with something simple so since I make a decent pico de gallo,

OK, so here's a thought...

Do you have a good seafood market in your town? If so, then buy some Halibut steaks, but makes sure the halibut is fresh. It should be paper white in color, no off coloring on the edges. You'll also need one lime. You saute the steaks in butter, and when the fish is almost done, your going to squeeze lime juice over them. Then place the steaks on a plate and top them with your Pico de gallo.

For accompaniments, you'll need a small amount of chorizo sausage, red and green peppers, garlic and onions. Depending on how many people you will be feeding, you'll take 1 cup white rice, 1-3/4 cups chicken broth, 2 tbsp. Sofrito, 1/2 teaspoon smoked Spanish paprika, 1 small Jalapeno pepper finely minced (remember to wear gloves when you do this!!!!). Saute the sausage, peppers, onions and garlic in EVOO, add rice and saute for a minute longer. Add chicken broth and spices, cover and simmer for twenty minutes. After twenty minutes, let sit covered for 5 minutes to make sure all moisture is absorbed by the rice. This is enough rice for 3 people, so if you have more showing up, adjust accordingly. The great thing about this rice is that it reheats well, so don't be afraid to make extra.

For the vegetable, blanch some fresh green beans. Take 6 tomatillos and removes the husks, and slice into 1/4 inch pieces. Take a couple of slices of salt pork and render a bit of pork fat in a saute pan. Remove the pork pieces and add the green beans and the tomatillo slices. When the tomatillos start to wilt, the beans should be done.

Now you have the option of making a bed of the rice, then placing the fish steaks on top with your Pico de gallo, and you can border the rice and fish with the green beans. It will look great on the plate, very colorful. Now you have a Southwestern series of items which will meld together nicely. You have the cool freshness of the Pico de Gallo, the spiciness of the rice, and the citrus flavor of the tomatillos with the green beans. I'd serve a white Sangria, and watch your friend's reactions!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 11:14:34 PM
I better start out with something simple so since I make a decent pico de gallo,
OK, so here's a thought...

My own personal culinary school! Except for the Sangria, I think I can pull this off, or at least have fun trying. :) Do you use homemade Sofrito, or does it come in a jar? I might have some time this weekend and will report back with the results. Antares, you're the greatest!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on June 25, 2012, 11:27:45 PM
My own personal culinary school! Except for the Sangria, I think I can pull this off, or at least have fun trying. :) Do you use homemade Sofrito, or does it come in a jar?

If you can find all the ingredients, then do make it from scratch. You can make it in a batch and then portion it into ice cube trays and freeze it for later uses. But you can use the sofrito in a jar.

Also, white sangria is easy to make. Take 1 bottle of white wine (I like to make it with either a Riesling or a Gewurtztraminer), 1 lime, 1 lemon, 2 oranges, 1 cup cointreau, 1/2 cup brandy, 1 pint orange juice, and 1 can of sprite. Slice up the fruit and put into a pitcher, muddle the fruit slightly and add everything else, except the sprite and chill covered for at least 24 hours. Just before you're ready to serve, shake well, and pour your mixture over ice in big wine goblets, and top with a little of the sprite. One word of warning!!!! These go down so easy, and they will kick you like a mule if you drink too much. You've been warned. ;)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 11:38:32 PM
Also, white sangria is easy to make. Take 1 bottle of white wine (I like to make it with either a Riesling or a Gewurtztraminer), 1 lime, 1 lemon, 2 oranges, 1 cup cointreau, 1/2 cup brandy, 1 pint orange juice, and 1 can of sprite. Slice up the fruit and put into a pitcher, muddle the fruit slightly and add everything else, except the sprite and chill covered for at least 24 hours. Just before you're ready to serve, shake well, and pour your mixture over ice in big wine goblets, and top with a little of the sprite. One word of warning!!!! These go down so easy, and they will kick you like a mule if you drink too much. You've been warned. ;)

 :)) Yeah, that would kick me like a mule. What I meant to say is that I don't drink, so maybe I could still pull together the fruit, juice and sprite.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on June 25, 2012, 11:46:29 PM
Also, white sangria is easy to make. Take 1 bottle of white wine (I like to make it with either a Riesling or a Gewurtztraminer), 1 lime, 1 lemon, 2 oranges, 1 cup cointreau, 1/2 cup brandy, 1 pint orange juice, and 1 can of sprite. Slice up the fruit and put into a pitcher, muddle the fruit slightly and add everything else, except the sprite and chill covered for at least 24 hours. Just before you're ready to serve, shake well, and pour your mixture over ice in big wine goblets, and top with a little of the sprite. One word of warning!!!! These go down so easy, and they will kick you like a mule if you drink too much. You've been warned. ;)

 :)) Yeah, that would kick me like a mule. What I meant to say is that I don't drink, so maybe I could still pull together the fruit, juice and sprite.

OK...modification... take 1 lime, 1 lemon, 2 oranges, 3 red papayas, 1 quart pineapple juice, 1 quart orange juice, 1/4 cup agave nectar and 1 quart soda water. Skin papayas, and puree the pulp. Slice fruit and muddle in a pitcher, then add papaya, agave nectar and juices. Cover and shake well. Fill halfway into goblets over ice and top with soda water. Refreshing tropical fruit spritzers.

If you want, you can also add some pureed mango, but if you do, you'll want to cut the agave nectar in half.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 25, 2012, 11:54:40 PM
OK...modification... take 1 lime, 1 lemon, 2 oranges, 3 red papayas, 1 quart pineapple juice, 1 quart orange juice, 1/4 cup agave nectar and 1 quart soda water. Skin papayas, and puree the pulp. Slice fruit and muddle in a pitcher, then add papaya, agave nectar and juices. Cover and shake well. Fill halfway into goblets over ice and top with soda water. Refreshing tropical fruit spritzers.

If you want, you can also add some pureed mango, but if you do, you'll want to cut the agave nectar in half.

Thank you. :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: oldkid on June 26, 2012, 03:11:20 AM
What I wish filmspotters could teach me:
oldkid: How to see beyond the here and now.

Hmmmm....  I'm not sure this is something one teaches. My wife suggests a Magic 8 Ball.  Verbals might suggest alcohol.

There are two ways to go with this, at least three ways that I know how: futurism, deep focus and mysticism.

1. Jesus futurism
(Those who consider Christian stuff to be mumbo jumbo, you can skip this paragraph.  Or you can read it if you want to be entertained.  Whatever.)
In the teaching of Jesus, the secret to living a right life here is to constantly be considering the future, especially one's future with God.  Jesus' ethical teaching is constantly referring to the future state-- not necessarily "heaven", but the final judgment of God and one's eternal state.  There are three basic principles he refers to:
    a. How we treat others (especially those under our authority) is how God will treat us
    "Judge not lest you be judged" "Forgive and you will be forgiven" "By whatever measure you measure, by that measure you will be measured."  "Enter into the kingdom prepared for you... for when I was a stranger you invited me in."
    b. Whatever we take for ourselves, we will be given the opposite
    "Those who exalt themselves will be humbled, those who humble themselves will be exalted."
    c.  Whatever kind of suffering/comfort we find ourselves in now, we will be living the opposite
     "In your life you received good things and Lazarus evil; even so, now he is comforted and you are in agony."  "Blessed are you who mourn, for you shall be comforted." "Woe to you who are rich for you have already received your comfort; woe to you who laugh now for you shall mourn and weep."
In the end, Jesus' recommendation for us to live beyond the present is to remember the future.  He told us clearly what the future holds (in general terms), if we can remember the future, it will actively change the present.  And this is the most important thing: the point of looking beyond the here and now is to change the here and now.  Because if we do not change the here and now, then our "beyond" will always look the same.

2. Deep focus
This is a paradoxical piece of advice to look beyond the here and now, and that is to look deeply into the here and now.  This doesn't mean take up particle physics (unless that is your deepest desire), but instead to be so "here" that other "heres" are relatively insignificant.  Another way of saying this is in a phrase in an old tract: Don't be caught up by the urgent, but instead focus on the important.  What are the one or two most important things in your life?  I know your kids are one.  So deeply focus on caring for and loving them that other things fade away.  Yes, you will miss opportunities.  There will be so many "good" things that seem important.  And for someone without a focus, they may very well be important.  But once you have the one or two things that are really important to you, let everything else go.  To everyone else, you will seem to be "in another world" or "unrealistic" or "obsessed."  And they'd be right.  My two focuses are the homeless and my immediate family.  Everything else is but shadow to me.  People tell me that I need a break or that I need to focus on my health more or whatever.  But I can't do that (unless I'm watching a movie).  I've got more important things to do than to measure my life by someone else's standard.

3. Mysticism
There are two things that are essential ingredients to a happy, productive life: love and silence.  We must give and receive love, which can keep us very busy.  But we must balance out our love with silence.  In silence is prayer, it is rest, it is renewal, it is peace.  More often than not, we can find both God and ourselves in the silence.  For those full of fear or anxiety or guilt or doubt or pain, silence is frightening.  But it is still essential because without silence we cannot properly process and move past these issues.  In order for silence to do it's work, we must trust the Spirit in the silence.  Trust that the Spirit will heal us, and will empower us to keep living.  Trust that if we listen, the Spirit will speak.   And in an age of the internet and iPods and social networks, silence is hard to achieve.  There are so many things we "need" to do.  And our minds are so busy.  We need to stop and allow our minds to rest and allow the Spirit to do some work for us.  So, at times, we desperately need to shut our computers off, take our headphones out, get in the shower and turn on the water.  Or I like to occasionally go to a monastery and take a few days of silence (Trappist monasteries are good for that, and many have lodging for men and women).

Sermon's done. I think I'll go to the silence of sleep now.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 26, 2012, 01:00:02 PM
oldkid! What a wonderful gift. Thank you. I'll be back home later today to reply, but wanted you to know that I read it and love it!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Totoro on June 26, 2012, 08:51:16 PM
Totoro: How to be fearless.

On this forum, we have a certain level of anonymity. I have thus broken this level of anonymity by meeting 1SO in real life which is something I was both equally excited and scared of to do, but it happened, and quite frankly, I am happy that it did.

However, with the rest of you, people that I may or may never meet, this level of anonymity is armor, armor that protects me from getting too involved personally and thus losing a part of myself. As the internet expands and becomes bigger and bigger, a dilemma begins to arise. How do we recognize deep relationships? I believe that the relationships can only develop when there are no barriers protecting us from being vulnerable to each other.

Take for example this post. I am typing. I could write something, then delete it if I feel that it doesn't represent me. Through written word, I can edit the representation of myself. Hell, I could delete this post if I wanted to. I could edit it. I have full control over evidence of myself. I have full control over representation of myself. Thus, I am different person than I am in real life. Ask 1SO. Ask me! While there are characteristics, hobbies, and opinions that 1SO has that are similar to his expressed in this forum, I still wouldn't have expected him to be like the man I met in real life. And I bet 1SO feels the same way.

The thing is, Sandy, is that I am not the same person in real life that I am on this forum. Sure, you get my opinions, thoughts, and feelings, but all of these things are filtered through the process of writing. I use this fact, this level of anonymity, to achieve this fearlessness I believe you see as me, Totoro, on this forum. I don't believe you can reach any kind of deep relationship over the internet like you can in real life. I don't think you ever will be able to either. I am part projection, part real. This allows for more fearlessness (that so many here can find annoying) than usual.

Or is it another kind of fearlessness you want me to teach you about?

Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 26, 2012, 10:18:48 PM
I was just working on a post to oldkid, but will save that so I can talk with you. First, I'll tell you what I meant when I said fearless. You are very able to go after the things that matter to you in a forthright fashion. I see it in your posts and I infer it in what I hear about your schooling. This doesn't come easy to me as I am uber aware of the people around me and I get caught up in how I fit into the mix and what the ramifications of my actions could be. Sometimes it immobilizes me. I don't think I will be able to be less aware, but I was interested in how your thought processes work to see if I could learn something to improve my mobility.

Anonymity has served me well here. I come and go as I please. I speak when I want and I also can delete when the wording isn't right. It does lend itself to a type of fearlessness that I haven't had the pleasure of elsewhere. I'm glad you brought that to my attention because it helps me realize that I can do it. But there is something else going on here that has been very much personal and deep. Because I am free to speak, I have said things I don't have the opportunity to say in the "real" world and because there are like minded people here who are interested in exploring the experiences of life, I get to listen and talk with people that I can't find in the "real" world. The people on this forum are in many ways more real to me than those that are "half awake" out here. As pathetic as this may sound, some of my dearest acquaintances are here. The internet has given me freedom to be vulnerable--that's a huge gift.

I'm wondering what part of you you are worried about losing. I hesitate to say it, but I probably see you more than you think I do. You can take off that armor here. I know that when you have voiced concerns and worries, filmspotters have been wonderfully supportive and interested in your welfare. I know they would do the same for me.

As for the fearlessness I see in you, there is something very focused and determined that helps you overcome obstacles. I'm interested in that.   Thanks for writing to me. :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Totoro on June 26, 2012, 11:14:16 PM
I was just working on a post to oldkid, but will save that so I can talk with you. First, I'll tell you what I meant when I said fearless. You are very able to go after the things that matter to you in a forthright fashion. I see it in your posts and I infer it in what I hear about your schooling. This doesn't come easy to me as I am uber aware of the people around me and I get caught up in how I fit into the mix and what the ramifications of my actions could be. Sometimes it immobilizes me. I don't think I will be able to be less aware, but I was interested in how your thought processes work to see if I could learn something to improve my mobility.

Anonymity has served me well here. I come and go as I please. I speak when I want and I also can delete when the wording isn't right. It does lend itself to a type of fearlessness that I haven't had the pleasure of elsewhere. I'm glad you brought that to my attention because it helps me realize that I can do it. But there is something else going on here that has been very much personal and deep. Because I am free to speak, I have said things I don't have the opportunity to say in the "real" world and because there are like minded people here who are interested in exploring the experiences of life, I get to listen and talk with people that I can't find in the "real" world. The people on this forum are in many ways more real to me than those that are "half awake" out here. As pathetic as this may sound, some of my dearest acquaintances are here. The internet has given me freedom to be vulnerable--that's a huge gift.

I'm wondering what part of you you are worried about losing. I hesitate to say it, but I probably see you more than you think I do. You can take off that armor here. I know that when you have voiced concerns and worries, filmspotters have been wonderfully supportive and interested in your welfare. I know they would do the same for me.

As for the fearlessness I see in you, there is something very focused and determined that helps you overcome obstacles. I'm interested in that.   Thanks for writing to me. :)

The certain kind of fearlessness I addressed is the certain kind of fearlessness I believed that you could find from my "forum personality". Now let me note - whether you're conscious about it or not, everyone has a "forum personality" that is part projection and part real-life self. It is true that I can reveal some things to strangers (sorry, but that's what the majority of you guys are) that I cannot reveal to friends and family, however that field of things is relatively small even though they can be very important.

The vulnerability I am speaking of is of a different kind. Vulnerability through communication of words of thoughts and feelings is very different than the unpredictable vulnerability of a person standing across from you, talking. This could be where my theatre experience comes in. It is the difference between a book and a film.* A book is a collection of words to give you a certain kind of description that you can imagine and project in your head as an image. A film is the opposite. It is a collection of images that you decipher from in order to get a description. A picture is worth a thousand words that bubble up from your reaction the picture.

What I am getting at is this - you have significant less power to control what people think of you when you are talking to them to their face. Your body language, for the most part, has a mind of its own. This is true vulnerability, seeing something that you yourself cannot see. It has happened very rarely to me on these boards. Perhaps it has happened more than I know! But I doubt it has happened to me as much as it has in my personal life. None of us will ever know you as well as your friends and family know you.

What am I afraid of losing? Being generally likable, I guess. But as time grows, perhaps I will be less afraid of it. However, this is a forum at the end of the day. I still find most of my happiness and comfort outside of this place. What I use filmspotting (mostly) for is to keep myself sharp with film analysis whether it is reading or writing.

---

Anyway.

Other kinds of fearlessness of myself? Hmmm. Well, I have about 10 years of acting experience. A lot of that taught me to just not care what others think about you because what matters is that you know yourself, first and foremost. It was a lot of crock in high school (my flamboyant theatrics mixed with my awkwardness around girls and my general movie-loving nerdiness in high school led to many girls to believe that I was gay), but as I have grown, I have found that the ideas imbued upon me do work generally. I have moved around to several different places in the country which could of taught me that home isn't a place, but an idea and that people can forget you as easily as you can forget them. Why care if my location is only temporary? You can extend that to life itself if you want to.

Did that help?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 26, 2012, 11:22:58 PM
What I wish filmspotters could teach me:
oldkid: How to see beyond the here and now.

1. Jesus futurism
(Those who consider Christian stuff to be mumbo jumbo, you can skip this paragraph.  Or you can read it if you want to be entertained.  Whatever.)
In the teaching of Jesus, the secret to living a right life here is to constantly be considering the future, especially one's future with God.  Jesus' ethical teaching is constantly referring to the future state-- not necessarily "heaven", but the final judgment of God and one's eternal state.  There are three basic principles he refers to:
    a. How we treat others (especially those under our authority) is how God will treat us
    "Judge not lest you be judged" "Forgive and you will be forgiven" "By whatever measure you measure, by that measure you will be measured."  "Enter into the kingdom prepared for you... for when I was a stranger you invited me in."
    b. Whatever we take for ourselves, we will be given the opposite
    "Those who exalt themselves will be humbled, those who humble themselves will be exalted."
    c.  Whatever kind of suffering/comfort we find ourselves in now, we will be living the opposite
     "In your life you received good things and Lazarus evil; even so, now he is comforted and you are in agony."  "Blessed are you who mourn, for you shall be comforted." "Woe to you who are rich for you have already received your comfort; woe to you who laugh now for you shall mourn and weep."
In the end, Jesus' recommendation for us to live beyond the present is to remember the future.  He told us clearly what the future holds (in general terms), if we can remember the future, it will actively change the present.  And this is the most important thing: the point of looking beyond the here and now is to change the here and now.  Because if we do not change the here and now, then our "beyond" will always look the same.


Having been taught well by your words, my first inclination is to refrain from commenting and merely reflect--which I've happily been doing today, but it leaves no avenue for all the thoughts that have bubbled up and it keeps you from seeing what I've learned (which you may be just fine with). You've already given me much of your time with your post so please don't feel obligated to answer my questions (some are rhetorical anyway.), but writing down these thoughts will help me sort them out.

I am at home with #1. The language is familiar and it speaks truth to me. I do have a circular thought process with it though. The more I try and live by these concepts, the less the future "reward" feels like the goal and in truth I'm not sure I've really been able to conceptualize it. Part of it is I'm impatient and I want to find it here and now--I'll even take glimpses of the divine--which I do and it is enough. I'm also happier living by His teachings, so it still is ultimately self serving. Is it even possible to lose your life? Because I keep getting it back ten fold. ("Cast your bread upon the waters...") Is the happiness I'm finding today, my sorrow for the future? It makes my head spin. I've been thinking about your congregation; people in the direst of circumstances. Do they find comfort in this concept? How do they have the patience? Do they teach you patience?


Quote
2. Deep focus
This is a paradoxical piece of advice to look beyond the here and now, and that is to look deeply into the here and now.  This doesn't mean take up particle physics (unless that is your deepest desire), but instead to be so "here" that other "heres" are relatively insignificant.  Another way of saying this is in a phrase in an old tract: Don't be caught up by the urgent, but instead focus on the important.  What are the one or two most important things in your life?  I know your kids are one.  So deeply focus on caring for and loving them that other things fade away.  Yes, you will miss opportunities.  There will be so many "good" things that seem important.  And for someone without a focus, they may very well be important.  But once you have the one or two things that are really important to you, let everything else go.  To everyone else, you will seem to be "in another world" or "unrealistic" or "obsessed."  And they'd be right.  My two focuses are the homeless and my immediate family.  Everything else is but shadow to me.  People tell me that I need a break or that I need to focus on my health more or whatever.  But I can't do that (unless I'm watching a movie).  I've got more important things to do than to measure my life by someone else's standard.

Your #2 could not be more timely. I've been struggling with a decision that has come to a head this week and your words have given me peace of mind about what I know is the right answer. Borrowing Frodo's words, "I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter, scraped over too much bread." I can't do it all and I don't think I want to. I've chosen to postpone my Master's prep indefinitely and focus on those few priorities that matter most at this time (and yes, immersion back into film is one of them. :) ) School and a degree will  be there if I so choose and there is a class I still may take this fall--because it sounds so fascinating, but I am really more interested in the journey than the destination.  My mantra for a good six months has been, I'd choose a simpler life. I've changed that today to I choose a simpler life and it has made all the difference. Thank you for putting into words what my heart has been telling me. I'm curious where you learned it. I don't think it is a new idea for you, since you embody this so wholly.


Quote
3. Mysticism
There are two things that are essential ingredients to a happy, productive life: love and silence.  We must give and receive love, which can keep us very busy.  But we must balance out our love with silence.  In silence is prayer, it is rest, it is renewal, it is peace.  More often than not, we can find both God and ourselves in the silence.  For those full of fear or anxiety or guilt or doubt or pain, silence is frightening.  But it is still essential because without silence we cannot properly process and move past these issues.  In order for silence to do it's work, we must trust the Spirit in the silence.  Trust that the Spirit will heal us, and will empower us to keep living.  Trust that if we listen, the Spirit will speak.   And in an age of the internet and iPods and social networks, silence is hard to achieve.  There are so many things we "need" to do.  And our minds are so busy.  We need to stop and allow our minds to rest and allow the Spirit to do some work for us.  So, at times, we desperately need to shut our computers off, take our headphones out, get in the shower and turn on the water.  Or I like to occasionally go to a monastery and take a few days of silence (Trappist monasteries are good for that, and many have lodging for men and women).

Sermon's done. I think I'll go to the silence of sleep now.

I long for silence. I don't think those around me understand how deeply I wish for this. If my life isn't conducive to this concept, I don't know how you ever find time to be alone. I didn't fully understand why I felt it so keenly until I read this about me:

Devoted to those in their inner circle, INFPs guard the emotional well-being of others, consoling those in distress. Guided by their desire for harmony, INFPs prefer to be flexible unless their ethics are violated. Then, they become passionate advocates for their beliefs. They are often able to sway the opinions of others through tact, diplomacy, and an ability to see varying sides of an issue.

INFPs develop these insights through reflection, and they require substantial time alone to ponder and process new information.


This knowledge helped me so much because I stopped feeling guilty for wishing for it and am learning how to give myself permission to have time alone. Your words build my arsenal of resolve. I can point to them and say, "See! This is important!" The monastery is a very intriguing idea. Are you surrounded by other silent people? I think I might be more comfortable by myself in a cabin somewhere. :)

I can't thank you enough oldkid.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: oldkid on June 26, 2012, 11:47:47 PM
Well, I get a little nervous with you putting the responsibility/blame for life decisions on something I wrote past my bedtime.  However it sounds like you've already been thinking this way, so I'm glad to tip you in a direction you were already leaning toward.

I'm only going to respond to one thing:

I'm also happier living by His teachings, so it still is ultimately self serving. Is it even possible to lose your life? Because I keep getting it back ten fold. ("Cast your bread upon the waters...") Is the happiness I'm finding today, my sorrow for the future? It makes my head spin. I've been thinking about your congregation; people in the direst of circumstances. Do they find comfort in this concept? How do they have the patience? Do they teach you patience?

(Warning: Explicit Christian speech happening below.  Censor your reading as needed)
We need to remember that Jesus didn't say that our happiness today is our sorrow later.  Even when he said to accept persecutions, the word he used is "rejoice".  We are to obtain happiness now, if we can.  The real issue is comfort to the detriment of others.  I think he put it most clearly in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus.  It wasn't just that the rich man was happy-- it was that he could have easily allowed Lazarus to participate in his happiness as well.  He said in Luke 14 that those who have a party shouldn't invite friends and neighbors, but the poor and others who couldn't pay them back.  The point is not that we shouldn't be happy.  The point is that whatever wealth we have--happiness, money, power, entertainment, our DVD collection-- should be shared with those who do not have it. 

If we do this kind of radical sharing, then our happiness both increases and decreases.  It increases, because it is shown that meeting someone else's need gives us a serotonin boost.  So, giving is addictive.  But our happiness also decreases because we will be helping people who really need help, who have many sorrows in their lives.  In helping them, we take on their sorrows as our own and increase stress and emotional struggle in ourselves.  This is compassion and empathy.  And this is the secret: to take on their sorrows is to not only lighten their load a little, but it gives us the sorrow that we need to have lifted.  The eternal kingdom is a second chance at life, because this life really sucks.  And the more this life sucks, the more right it is that we have a second chance.  So the more we share in the sorrows of others, the more we increase our future happiness (but we can also increase our own happiness, because we are feeding our giving addiction). 

Paradox?  Oh yeah.  I love it.

(Christian talk done now)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 27, 2012, 12:50:16 AM
The certain kind of fearlessness I addressed is the certain kind of fearlessness I believed that you could find from my "forum personality". Now let me note - whether you're conscious about it or not, everyone has a "forum personality" that is part projection and part real-life self. It is true that I can reveal some things to strangers (sorry, but that's what the majority of you guys are) that I cannot reveal to friends and family, however that field of things is relatively small even though they can be very important.

The vulnerability I am speaking of is of a different kind. Vulnerability through communication of words of thoughts and feelings is very different than the unpredictable vulnerability of a person standing across from you, talking. This could be where my theatre experience comes in. It is the difference between a book and a film.* A book is a collection of words to give you a certain kind of description that you can imagine and project in your head as an image. A film is the opposite. It is a collection of images that you decipher from in order to get a description. A picture is worth a thousand words that bubble up from your reaction the picture.

What I am getting at is this - you have significant less power to control what people think of you when you are talking to them to their face. Your body language, for the most part, has a mind of its own. This is true vulnerability, seeing something that you yourself cannot see. It has happened very rarely to me on these boards. Perhaps it has happened more than I know! But I doubt it has happened to me as much as it has in my personal life. None of us will ever know you as well as your friends and family know you.

What am I afraid of losing? Being generally likable, I guess. But as time grows, perhaps I will be less afraid of it. However, this is a forum at the end of the day. I still find most of my happiness and comfort outside of this place. What I use filmspotting (mostly) for is to keep myself sharp with film analysis whether it is reading or writing.

---

Anyway.

Other kinds of fearlessness of myself? Hmmm. Well, I have about 10 years of acting experience. A lot of that taught me to just not care what others think about you because what matters is that you know yourself, first and foremost. It was a lot of crock in high school (my flamboyant theatrics mixed with my awkwardness around girls and my general movie-loving nerdiness in high school led to many girls to believe that I was gay), but as I have grown, I have found that the ideas imbued upon me do work generally. I have moved around to several different places in the country which could of taught me that home isn't a place, but an idea and that people can forget you as easily as you can forget them. Why care if my location is only temporary? You can extend that to life itself if you want to.

Did that help?

Thanks for expounding on that. I like the analogy of book versus film and I'm glad that you really see and are seen by your family and friends. That is how it should be and you are fortunate. I think the key to your focus and determination is that you are clear about who you are-- "know yourself, first and foremost". This along with your life experiences has added dimension to your internet persona and maybe that is what I see coming through. So yes, it did help. I can work on clarity. :)

And Totoro, even thought we are only part real here, I hope you find that it's enough to make worthwhile connections.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 27, 2012, 01:00:40 AM
Well, I get a little nervous with you putting the responsibility/blame for life decisions on something I wrote past my bedtime.  However it sounds like you've already been thinking this way, so I'm glad to tip you in a direction you were already leaning toward.

I should have worded that better. I had made my decision, but it was nice to see a confirmation of it this morning.

Quote
(Warning: Explicit Christian speech happening below.  Censor your reading as needed)
We need to remember that Jesus didn't say that our happiness today is our sorrow later.  Even when he said to accept persecutions, the word he used is "rejoice".  We are to obtain happiness now, if we can.  The real issue is comfort to the detriment of others.  I think he put it most clearly in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus.  It wasn't just that the rich man was happy-- it was that he could have easily allowed Lazarus to participate in his happiness as well.  He said in Luke 14 that those who have a party shouldn't invite friends and neighbors, but the poor and others who couldn't pay them back.  The point is not that we shouldn't be happy.  The point is that whatever wealth we have--happiness, money, power, entertainment, our DVD collection-- should be shared with those who do not have it. 

If we do this kind of radical sharing, then our happiness both increases and decreases.  It increases, because it is shown that meeting someone else's need gives us a serotonin boost.  So, giving is addictive.  But our happiness also decreases because we will be helping people who really need help, who have many sorrows in their lives.  In helping them, we take on their sorrows as our own and increase stress and emotional struggle in ourselves.  This is compassion and empathy.  And this is the secret: to take on their sorrows is to not only lighten their load a little, but it gives us the sorrow that we need to have lifted.  The eternal kingdom is a second chance at life, because this life really sucks.  And the more this life sucks, the more right it is that we have a second chance.  So the more we share in the sorrows of others, the more we increase our future happiness (but we can also increase our own happiness, because we are feeding our giving addiction). 

Paradox?  Oh yeah.  I love it.

(Christian talk done now)

 :D That's it! All is clear. I can get behind that 100%.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 30, 2012, 08:48:49 PM
I better start out with something simple so since I make a decent pico de gallo,
OK, so here's a thought...

My own personal culinary school!
Update.

Antares, I ended up being out of town today, but have started to gather ingredients and will get to it this coming week. I'm really looking forward to see if I can pull it off. :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 06, 2012, 07:32:12 PM
OK, so here's a thought...

Antares! I finally found a free day. :) I could use some plating instructions and my picture is a little fuzzy, but I had a wonderful time making your recipe.

(http://i45.tinypic.com/noa737.jpg)

Everything tasted great and even my non-fish eaters gave it a shot. Thank you for writing it up with such great detail. It was like you were standing there helping me in the kitchen. :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: MartinTeller on July 06, 2012, 07:36:01 PM
That looks yummy
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: smirnoff on July 06, 2012, 07:48:16 PM
What's are those things canoodling with the beans?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 06, 2012, 07:52:51 PM
That looks yummy

Thanks Martin! My son just showed me the picture he took on his better camera, so I'll put that up and the food will look even yummier. :)

What's are those things canoodling with the beans?

Those are tomatillos. :D I wasn't sure how to slice them and I didn't have Antares' phone number, so I guessed.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 06, 2012, 08:08:35 PM
(http://i45.tinypic.com/2ex8y94.jpg)

Hmm, maybe not better. The tomatillos aren't very pretty--maybe I just needed to cook them longer so they looked less slimy. They tasted good though.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: smirnoff on July 06, 2012, 08:28:25 PM
Your countertop looks like the same type I just put in. Corian, Flint.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 06, 2012, 08:39:41 PM
Your countertop looks like the same type I just put in. Corian, Flint.

 :D Good choice. Easy to clean, especially since my last counter top was tile--who thinks up those things?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on July 06, 2012, 08:43:28 PM
I could use some plating instructions.

(http://i45.tinypic.com/2ex8y94.jpg)

You got it right, that's exactly how it should look. It looks fresh and eye catching, I'd be proud to place that in front of someone at a restaurant. Hell, you'd get $25.95 for it. Congratulations!

The tomatillos aren't very pretty--maybe I just needed to cook them longer so they looked less slimy. They tasted good though.

You don't want to cook them any longer than what you did, because they'll fall apart. Tomatillos aren't the most aesthetically pleasing looking fruit when you cook them, but they have a wonderful citrusy flavor that goes well with salt pork.

Now come the questions, if I may, because I whipped up that recipe in my head the day I posted it....

1. Did the lime juice go well with your Pico de Gallo on the fish?

2. How did the smoked paprika and sofrito blend together in the rice and was it spicy good, not spicy hot?

3. Did you like the taste of the salt pork, together with the citrus taste of the tomatillos on the green beans?

4. Overall, did all three items meld well together, or did one item seem out of place, from a taste standpoint? What I basically mean is, was one thing overpowering, or did anything not seem to fit the character of the meal?

5. What were your friends responses? Thumbs up, thumbs down or meh!

6. Did you also wind up making those citrus spritzers?

I just want you to know that this completely made my day. I'm going to go crack open a bottle of port and have myself a little celebration. If you ever want any more ideas, just let me know. I hope this sews the seed of culinary passion in you.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 06, 2012, 09:24:45 PM
You got it right, that's exactly how it should look. It looks fresh and eye catching, I'd be proud to place that in front of someone at a restaurant. Hell, you'd get $25.95 for it. Congratulations!

 :)) I'm glad I have a marketable skill in case I need it. Though, working in a restaurant must be one of the most demanding of jobs.

Quote
The tomatillos aren't very pretty--maybe I just needed to cook them longer so they looked less slimy. They tasted good though.

You don't want to cook them any longer than what you did, because they'll fall apart. Tomatillos aren't the most aesthetically pleasing looking fruit when you cook them, but they have a wonderful citrusy flavor that goes well with salt pork.

Now come the questions, if I may, because I whipped up that recipe in my head the day I posted it....

I cooked for my family so there were adults and children at the meal.

1. Did the lime juice go well with your Pico de Gallo on the fish?

First, one of the ingredients in my Pico de Gallo is lime juice and since I love limes, between the fish and the pico, it was perfect.

2. How did the smoked paprika and sofrito blend together in the rice and was it spicy good, not spicy hot?

This is what I had the most comments on. Everyone loved it, so I'm glad I doubled the recipe. I'm really happy to get to use the paprika and sofrito more often. They are a great combination with the peppers, onions and garlic. I used a small jalapeno and nobody commented on the heat--I could detect a little and it added to the dish.

3. Did you like the taste of the salt pork, together with the citrus taste of the tomatillos on the green beans?

I had never cooked with tomatillos before and had fun trying to figure out what they were supposed to look like. I liked the mixed flavors. My kids gave me their tomatillos. :) They loved the beans a lot.

4. Overall, did all three items meld well together, or did one item seem out of place, from a taste standpoint? What I basically mean is, was one thing overpowering, or did anything not seem to fit the character of the meal?

They all worked together really well. Nothing was too strong or took attention away from anything else. You created a great combination. I especially loved the heat of the rice against the cool of the pico de gallo.

5. What were your friends responses? Thumbs up, thumbs down or meh!

For those that love fish, it was thumbs way up. For those that don't, they still were impressed with the fish, so it was still thumbs up.

6. Did you also wind up making those citrus spritzers?

Oops, I didn't take a picture. My kids preferred these over the meal. :) I couldn't find red papaya, so used yellow papaya, which still worked, but I bet the color would have been even better with the red.  I think I'll try the mango version sometime to see how that works.

Quote
I just want you to know that this completely made my day. I'm going to go crack open a bottle of port and have myself a little celebration. If you ever want any more ideas, just let me know. I hope this sews the seed of culinary passion in you.

Antares, you helped me be brave with my cooking and success begets success, so I now look forward to trying new things. Thank you so much for writing to me about passionate cooking and creating that recipe for me to try out. It was so nice of you. Many, many thanks.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 06, 2012, 11:19:02 PM
OK...modification... take 1 lime, 1 lemon, 2 oranges, 3 red papayas, 1 quart pineapple juice, 1 quart orange juice, 1/4 cup agave nectar and 1 quart soda water. Skin papayas, and puree the pulp. Slice fruit and muddle in a pitcher, then add papaya, agave nectar and juices. Cover and shake well. Fill halfway into goblets over ice and top with soda water. Refreshing tropical fruit spritzers.

If you want, you can also add some pureed mango, but if you do, you'll want to cut the agave nectar in half.

Antares, I poured some more, so you can see the color with the yellow papaya--still pretty.

(http://i49.tinypic.com/16peo6.jpg)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on July 07, 2012, 08:40:12 AM
Damn, it's going to be 90+ today here, I could go for a couple of those, they look so thirst quenching.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 07, 2012, 03:17:42 PM
Damn, it's going to be 90+ today here, I could go for a couple of those, they look so thirst quenching.

 :D   90+ here as well and I just came in from a day of pruning. I'm so glad I have a glass left.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: pixote on July 13, 2012, 06:53:38 PM
pixote: How to see the big picture.

Like this? (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11349.msg688038#msg688038)  :)

pixote
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 13, 2012, 07:08:01 PM
pixote: How to see the big picture.

Like this? (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11349.msg688038#msg688038)  :)

pixote

Holy Cow pixote! Yes, just like that. :D
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on February 21, 2013, 06:22:03 PM
Giving Sandy a nudge...  ;)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 21, 2013, 07:03:26 PM
Giving Sandy a nudge...  ;)

 :))

I do love this thread. I've been slowly building another list, but other projects keep grabbing my attention. If you're interested Antares, here's one that I wanted to ask you.

With a limited amount of time available daily, could you teach me how to create a program that would help me build strength and endurance?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on February 21, 2013, 07:35:28 PM
With a limited amount of time available daily

I have to know how much time a day you have for this, before I can create something.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 21, 2013, 07:59:57 PM
I have to know how much time a day you have for this, before I can create something.

I could commit to an hour, at least to start with. More than that would take some organizing of priorities. Weekends are tricky. Sunday's a bust, but Saturdays, I could find time somewhere and come spring, I do yard work for a couple of hours.


Thanks!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 10, 2014, 03:55:53 PM
I've missed this thread!

There are some dinner ideas and instructions that I've been compiling from different filmspotters and want to try them out. I'll post my experiments as I go:


Antares - Camarão à Moçambique (Shrimp Mozambique) and Spicy Portuguese Rice (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=2680.msg722766#msg722766)     There are ingredients to this that I haven't found at the stores I normally frequent, but will get them on line so I can finally make it.

colonel_mexico - Carne Guisada

don s. - Pork Chops over Polenta (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=2680.msg759131#msg759131)

ses - Pickled Onions (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=2680.msg759059#msg759059)

smirnoff - Raspekaker (http://www.instructables.com/id/Raspekaker/)

verbALs - Pan-fried salmon fillets, cooked with sweet chilli sauce; laid on a bed of steamed pak choi. (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=2680.msg748226#msg748226)

WillMunny - Pasta with Olives and Mozerella

Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Junior on February 10, 2014, 04:19:40 PM
To seriously answer your initial question, Sandy, the real key to noticing the world around you is to, um, notice things. Look, don't glance, at the people walking by, or the way a tree's shadow climbs up a building at a stop light, or how the people in the car behind you respond if you have a silly bumper sticker (mine says volkSWAGen, thanks to my little brother, and I get a lot of points and laughs). I've heard people say that you should not listen to music or podcasts while out an about to really connect to what's going on, but I think they're often useful to disconnect from all the noise and really see what's happening. You can focus on the loud and the quiet things alike when you're not being shouted at by passing traffic or whatever.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 10, 2014, 07:59:35 PM
 :)

Very good advice indeed, Junior. I tend to be in my own head too much and need to focus outward, and slow down. I'll practice!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on February 10, 2014, 10:07:48 PM
Or just watch lots of Malick. That's what I do.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on February 11, 2014, 01:08:02 AM
If I drive without the radio on, I start talking to myself. After a few minutes I realise I'm doing it and it freaks me out. Genuine, jump scare, as in "jesus, where's that voice coming from". Especially when I'm chanting "get out of my way, get out of my way" in a scary 16th c. monk's voice.........just me though right?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on February 11, 2014, 07:15:03 AM
I talk to myself a lot and don't always notice, especially when I'm waking up. Also hum to myself a lot and don't realize it.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 11, 2014, 09:28:14 AM
I talk to other drivers when they're annoying me, as if they'll listen and my children look at me like, "Seriously?"













Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: JakeIsntFake on February 11, 2014, 11:20:48 AM
I don't talk to myself (or my mom next to me for that matter) when I drive, which would probably be better because I just completely zone out.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on February 11, 2014, 11:24:30 AM
I talk to other drivers, when they're annoying me as if they'll listen and my children look at me like, "Seriously?"
Oh, I do that a ton, but I'm usually in the car alone. Sometimes I even mocking clap as if they can hear me. I'm a very judgmental driver.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 11, 2014, 12:33:41 PM
 :D

I'd love to see that.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 13, 2014, 09:19:54 PM
Carne Guisada

This is a dish that colonel_mexico recommended to me. I had never heard of it before, so asked how it was served and what toppings went with it. He said he liked it as a taco with a layer of Spanish rice, the meat mixture and spicy salsa. I made my pico de gallo, but added some jalapeno for a little kick. I'll get more adventurous as I go. :) His mom likes it with avocado and my kids like cheese, so I added those. I didn't have time to make Spanish rice, so will come back and make a variation on this recipe again some day.

I found the recipe on the Food Network site.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/carne-guisada-recipe0.html


It was from an episode of Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives and is a recipe from Bob's Taco Station in Rosenberg Texas.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zg4vE3xUp5U


The recipe is adjusted down from the vast amounts they make at the restaurant and then I had to double it to feed my family. The things I would change are, I'd double the meat and not the vegetables and gravy. I ended up taking out the vegetables and meat from the gravy with a slotted spoon and will use the extra for a soup. The taste is great, but I did not put 2 oz. of cumin seeds in! I didn't even have that much on hand (I used a 1/2 oz), nor did I double the pepper. Anyway, it's hard to see the details, but this is what it looks like:

(http://i60.tinypic.com/25yxdgk.jpg)

It was well received at the dinner table, so with a few adjustments, this will be used often. Thanks for the recommendation Col.!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Antares on February 14, 2014, 06:07:08 AM
That looks good Sandy!

Oh, and isn't ironic that the video you linked to, has a superimposed statement stating that Guy Fieri is one of the worst cooks in America. For me, he's a talentless hack, who just eats his way across the country. He's been one of the reasons the Food Channel has been dying a slow death over the last couple of years.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: oldkid on February 14, 2014, 10:46:39 AM
Everyone's invited to Sandy's house for dinner!  Looks wonderful!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on February 15, 2014, 11:01:16 PM
Everyone's invited to Sandy's house for dinner!  Looks wonderful!

:))

I'd love that! Potluck though! So many great cooks around here, including the spouses. (I'm looking at you Mrs. oldkid and you Mrs. mañana!)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: 1SO on May 23, 2014, 08:13:05 PM
...how to apologize on the Forum.
...how to help promote the community and not turn the Forum into your own personal blog.
...how to get along better with others.
...how to do all of the above with humility and truthfully.
...how to not make it look like I'm fishing for hugs and pats on the back.


I will admit to some posts I had no right posting. Both on the Boards and in Chat.
I admit to having a thin skin.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: MartinTeller on May 23, 2014, 08:28:21 PM
I feel like I missed something.  This is what happens when you take an afternoon nap.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: JakeIsntFake on May 23, 2014, 11:17:28 PM
I feel like I missed something.  This is what happens when you take an afternoon nap.

Yeah, but aren't those the best?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: saltine on May 24, 2014, 03:08:27 PM
Is 1SO 12-stepping us?
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on May 24, 2014, 06:47:18 PM
... how to let 1SO know that his posts are invaluable. :) As is his friendship.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on June 05, 2014, 05:44:28 PM
Carne Guisada

It was well received at the dinner table, so with a few adjustments, this will be used often.

I came across another recipe and tried it last night. I really like this one much more! Easy to make and the flavor and texture are worth giving it a try. :)

(http://i61.tinypic.com/331jguc.jpg)

http://www.girlichef.com/2011/02/carne-guisada-to-celebrate-2-years-of.html

Mine doesn't look like her picture, but part of the reason is I cut the meat in 1/2 inch cubes for easier taco filling and the sauce in my pic hasn't cooked down all the way yet. Besides, I doubt hers looks like that either. It's food art, so it's probably shellacked. :)

Girlichef's version will definitely become a staple here.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on July 25, 2014, 06:38:53 PM
WillMunny - Pasta with Olives and Mozerella

While playing a game of chess with WillMunny, he found he had plenty of time and mental capacity available to make dinner at the same time. He walked me through one of his favorite dishes and then sent me a translation of his recipe. It's very simple, yet has a great combination of flavors and is disappearing fast. Thanks Will!

(http://i57.tinypic.com/2me4wh0.jpg)

 

Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on March 07, 2015, 04:54:50 AM
This is related to some of the discussion raised in this thread but spurred by a recent discussion I was involved in out in the real world.

The basic idea is that we tend to engage in negative self-talk (the conversation we have with ourselves in our own heads). We mull over events and conversations in a way that tends to reinforce negative ideas. Perhaps it can lead to blaming others for past disappointments. A new situation arises and that bit of negative self-talk comes raging out of our head and makes us react in a disproportionate way to the new situation.

I should give an example. My partner likes to be asked how she feels rather than being someone who will tell me without prompting; it's nice to be asked. In the past it has made me feel that she wouldn't be open with me and I ended up feeling she didn't care about me. So that piece of negative self-talk has set firm in my head. It means that when a new situation happened and she hadn't told me how she felt I would instantly blame her and tell her she didn't care. In effect going from 0 to 100 mph in 1 second. An emotional ambush. When you tell someone that they don't want to talk openly to you, then it doesn't encourage them to open up. The opposite in fact. Imagine doing that for 20 to 30 years and how much less open someone is prepared to be with you. Bad.

I thought I had better give an example because otherwise it looks as if I'm pontificating. If you accept the idea that the conversation in ones head tends to negatively reinforce past insecurities or disappointments, it leads to some interesting conclusions.

One is that the more you sit around mulling these things over then the less positive your actions will be in life. Thoughts are the parents of action. Acting on disappointment leads to blame and to anger. Anger is a bit like drunkenness. It controls your actions instead of you being in control. A drunk can stop drinking. An angry person doesn't have that easy excuse.  Also angry words and actions never get forgotten and they reinforce. So the lack of respect you get for being angry once aggregates over time until respect has diminished to nothing.

Another conclusion is that negative thoughts hold you back when you act. If those thoughts weren't there then how much more positive would you be when you act? I'm not even talking about thinking positively just not negatively. I'm not inferring that the less you think the better you will act. I actually did have this feeling before, as if I could blame poor outcomes on thinking too much. It now feels like a cop out as if I had no choice. The thought that negative self talk has held me back is difficult to take but it's an obvious conclusion. Have I said things out of anger because I've let negative conclusions form in my head; which come out at the wrong moment? Yes definitely.

The hope that you will dispel negative self-talk from your head is a vain hope I think. Let's be humans. We aren't that perfect. It is a more reasonable expectation to understand that these negative thoughts will occur. Just be aware of them when they happen. Then the obvious conclusion will be that those thoughts will hold us back; and may lead to anger- the great Satan. Sense prevails. Short circuiting negative thinking and realising where those bad thoughts are coming from; why you feel disappointed about something or that you are quietly blaming someone for your situation. At least you are dealing with these things internally and not spewing bad feelings over other people. That is enough of a goal for any one lifetime. As I mentioned, it's good to be positive and that would be the ultimate goal. Some are more positive than others. This is about not holding yourself back by natural negative thinking. It's about respecting those around you by not blaming them for how you feel.

Believe me, I'm at the start of this process. My respect kudos quotient with people around me is slowly going back up. If I get as far as vocalising something negative now; I'm much quicker to apologise for it.

This is a great place to write this. Sandy seems to innately understand this. I wrote her recently just to say what a "really nice person" she is. I'm not the only one who thinks that around here. Her beliefs might be a spur to act so well to others but there are plenty of really angry religious people out there so it's not as simple as that.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on March 07, 2015, 10:45:11 AM
I miss this thread. :) Thanks for resuscitating it, verbALs. And, thank you for your very kind words.

You are teaching me so much here in your essay. Negative thinking is something I wrestle with too and I've come to many incorrect conclusions. I will work on short circuiting them. I read somewhere to dispute negative thoughts, so between these two strategies, I will be able to be much more objective.

I don't want to be held back! :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on March 07, 2015, 11:29:12 AM
I think I subscribed to being quite aggressive to negative attitudes around me. This feels a step forward from there. Other people can't and don't decide how you feel, you do. If you feel irritated then you have decided to feel that way. Also just because you feel that way doesn't mean you have to express it by blaming others, because if you do you are saying that they can decide how you feel. But you can decide whether you get annoyed or say nothing or maybe you could tell them how you feel articulately. It might be complete surprise to them that they are irritating you or disrespecting you or upsetting you. Plus you are respecting them by sharing how you feel without blaming. Of course if they react as if they don't care how you feel; well you can draw a conclusion from that can't you? At least you have dealt with the situation calmly and articulately. The higher ground isn't a bad position to take if the alternative was screaming and ranting.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: MartinTeller on March 07, 2015, 11:55:28 AM
One of the many things I love about my relationship with Carrie is that we are able to express the things that a lot of couples suppress.  That doesn't mean we're letting our raging ids take control, but if one of us is having a negative thought, we can put it out there.  If you preface it with "I know this is unfair, but..." or "I'm having an irrational reaction to this" then it helps alleviate the blame factor.  It's not "I'm feeling this way and you caused it" but rather "I need you to know that I'm feeling this bad thing and it's not your fault but I'd like to talk it out".  We still have conflicts (especially when we don't express those things and let them fester instead), but they never last that long and at the end of it we understand ourselves and each other better, strengthening our love.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on March 07, 2015, 12:12:46 PM
Exactly and I'm delighted for you. We've gone through a stage where she thought I was blaming her however I tried to say that I wasnt blaming her; just because our relationship had gone that way for too long and I had been blaming her for a lot of things. Can't really believe it now. We had a reset on our relationship- started again.

Thanks for that Martin.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: oldkid on March 07, 2015, 08:55:14 PM
I love this conversation. 
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on March 08, 2015, 12:55:40 PM
Have you got these Facebook ads that say;

"Your real friends tell you what you need to hear, not what you want to hear?"

It's a Facebook ad but I can't express how much I agree with this statement.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on March 08, 2015, 01:44:36 PM
I'm trying to think what you need to hear. :))

It reminds me of another quote I've been hearing and it could be my comeback answer to when a friend tells me what what I need to hear.

"I'd rather people hate me for who I am, than love me for who I'm not."


...Okay, verbALs, what do I need to hear? You can tell me. :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on March 08, 2015, 01:46:03 PM
I love this conversation.

me too  :)
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on March 08, 2015, 01:48:47 PM
Errrrrrrrrrm!!
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on March 08, 2015, 01:54:49 PM
 :))

I can take it.
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: verbALs on March 08, 2015, 02:07:27 PM
Can I wait till there's something worth saying.  :o
Title: Re: Teach Me...
Post by: Sandy on March 08, 2015, 02:14:34 PM
Yes! I'll take that as a good sign for now - no news is good news. :)