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Filmspotting Message Boards => Overlooked Films => Topic started by: esoterikfilmfanatik on January 17, 2013, 09:46:34 PM

Title: Australian Cinema?
Post by: esoterikfilmfanatik on January 17, 2013, 09:46:34 PM
Hey Filmspotters,

A few days ago I watched Animal Kingdom and was utterly impressed. As I reflected, I realized how little Australian cinema I have seen even as I actively search out foreign films. Yes, I recognize there was that slight spike in the 80's with Crocodile Dundee and Gallipoli, and there has been great actresses and actors to come out of the Land Down Under. However, I was wondering if anyone could suggest their favorite Australian films.

Thanks.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: MartinTeller on January 17, 2013, 10:06:35 PM
I'm not especially familiar with it myself, but I recommend An Angel at My Table (New Zealand, but hey, close enough), Picnic at Hanging Rock and Rabbit-Proof Fence.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 17, 2013, 10:06:50 PM
The Road Warrior  8)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Devil on January 17, 2013, 10:26:21 PM
The Road Warrior  8)

Hells yeah


Would also recommend The Proposition, Mary and Max, Walkabout(Though it's been years since i've seen that one so can't recall it all that well but it has some critical acclaim)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: george96 on January 17, 2013, 10:27:21 PM
Mary and Max

Seconded.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 17, 2013, 10:32:33 PM
Walkabout is a good film, it's a UK production, but it was shot in Australia.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: 1SO on January 17, 2013, 11:28:44 PM
My Top 10 Favorite Australian Films (I can think of)

1. Babe
2. The Road Warrior
3. Breaker Morant
4. Dead Calm
5. The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
6. Romper Stomper
7. Walkabout
8. Angel Baby
9. Flirting
10. Proof (1991)

Excluded Gallipoli, since you mentioned it.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: FLYmeatwad on January 18, 2013, 08:04:45 AM
Isn't "Australian Cinema" an oxymoron?  :P

Killed it, FLY. That was a good one.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: RazorRamon on January 20, 2013, 07:39:28 PM
Patrick (Richard Franklin, 1978). Wonderful Aussie genre work - Carrie in a Coma in Canberra.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: FLYmeatwad on January 21, 2013, 09:38:56 PM
Isn't "Australian Cinema" an oxymoron?  :P

Killed it, FLY. That was a good one.

What was edited here? The world (and FLY) may never know.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 22, 2013, 05:46:02 AM
Apart from those already mentioned I will plug some of my favourites

Bad Boy Bubby
10 Canoes
The Castle
Kenny

Look forward to reading about your opinion of the movies suggested.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: orangutangle on February 01, 2013, 06:34:24 PM
There's been some good stuff coming out of Oz in the last few years. Animal Kingdom has been mentioned, but I also really liked:

Van Diemen's Land (2009) - very dark historical drama set in Tasmania
The Hunter (2011) - Willem Defoe tries to find the last Tasmanian tiger in this thriller/drama
Sleeping Beauty (2011) - disturbing mystery with Emily Browning
Snowtown (2011) - excellent but very bleak story of the Snowtown murders, with a riveting performance from Daniel Henshall
The Tree (2010) - touching drama with Charlotte Gainsbourg

For older stuff, check out

The Last Wave (1977) - kind of a modern urban twin of Picnic at Hanging Rock
Newsfront (1978) - nice portrayal of reporting in the 50's from Philip Noyce
Next of Kin (1982) - effective mystery with a good creepy atmosphere
Long Weekend (1978) - a couple's relationship goes sour on a remote Australian beach

There's also the great 2008 doc "Not Quite Hollywood: The Wild, Untold Story of Ozploitation!".
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Rowland_Howard on February 04, 2013, 11:08:47 AM
Wake In Fright!  Hopy crap, what a film.  Still shocking after all these years, recently excavated, rediscovered and re-released.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: íKeith! on February 04, 2013, 01:18:25 PM
http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/australian-screen-legends/n28598/
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Tim on February 04, 2013, 08:35:35 PM
The Tree (2010) - touching drama with Charlotte Gainsbourg

I totally missed this, and never even realised that there was an Australian film starring Charlotte Gainsbourg! Now I will have to go find it.

Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Eldog on October 14, 2013, 06:28:01 AM
My three favourite home grown movies are:

1. Chopper

2. The Boys

3. The Interview
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on October 25, 2013, 03:57:35 AM
New Zealand has a few good films too, I really enjoyed Eagle vs Shark, Boy, and Love Birds though I admit the latter was kinda silly/dumb, but I like Rhys Darby so whatever.  If there's a Kiwi thread I apologize for posting in here
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: oneaprilday on October 25, 2013, 04:07:48 AM
I really enjoyed Eagle vs Shark, Boy, and Love Birds
These are all on Netflix instant - nice! Been curious about both Eagle vs Shark and Boy. Will have to check 'em out soon.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Monty on October 25, 2013, 04:23:18 PM
I watched Mary And Max yesterday, very good :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on October 26, 2013, 03:15:07 AM
Glad you found it so good. Would you put it in your top 50 animated films?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: corvaxmuzzy on March 05, 2014, 04:07:52 PM
The Castle
Romper Stomper
Chopper
The Quest (aka "Frog Dreaming") ...as a kid...
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: The Q Filmcast on March 18, 2014, 03:04:16 PM
If you have NOT watched the Ted Kotcheff film "WAKE IN FRIGHT" from (1971), I can't recommend it enough!

Defines the best of Australian Cinema... It's currently streaming on NETFLIX here in the states. WATCH THIS FILM!

We recently reviewed this on our show. that what we do - we pull out films from NETFLIX INSTANT and let you know what we thought

Check it out  www.theqfilmcast.net
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: oneaprilday on March 18, 2014, 04:49:11 PM
If you have NOT watched the Ted Kotcheff film "WAKE IN FRIGHT" from (1971), I can't recommend it enough!

Defines the best of Australian Cinema... It's currently streaming on NETFLIX here in the states. WATCH THIS FILM!
Added to My List! Thanks!
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 02, 2014, 10:04:18 AM
WAKE IN FRIGHT (1971)- Well, it feels intense, but for me never quite delivers.  I do love the music and Donald Pleasance is excellent (he was great in the HALLOWEEN series as Dr. Loomis!).   The kangaroo scenes are brutal and I think I'd prefer to have not known they were filmed live.  The most frightening part of the film is the thought that these things actually occurring.   Having spent a bit of time in the American south and a few interesting experiences in southern Alabama and around the college town of Auburn, I can only imagine being in a remote place like Australia with lots of booze and guns leading to bouts of insanity.  Not quite DELIVERANCE in the outback, but definitely eerie and something you won't forget. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: tinyholidays on July 02, 2014, 10:51:56 AM
I'd be interested to know, colonel, what part doesn't deliver for you? To me, Wake in Fright is a masterpiece.

And I second the statement absolutely no one should miss seeing it while it's streaming on US Netflix, if they have the chance.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 02, 2014, 11:30:11 AM
I guess I just felt something looming that never happened, just a story of a guy on a bender in some out of the way town in Oz.  I guess in my mind (before viewing) I felt I was comparing it to something like DELIVERANCE so I probably am being unfair.  Just my opinion, I did love the music and Pleasance, and am very interested in Australian films.  My preference would be WALKABOUT over this, but just a personal preference. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 04, 2014, 09:24:17 AM
THE HUNTER- I really, really long to go visit my friend Russell in Tasmania, though I hope his pals are friendly to Americans than the Tassies found in this film.  The sheer beauty and mystery of that strange little island of Australia just amazes me and this film highlights much of it.  The story of the Tassie Tiger is really interesting too, again hitting a personal longing to take on my own personal search for this extinct creature.  The story of the movie, however, feels a little strange and the talk of cloning and the appearance of Sam Neill finds me thinking Jurassic Park in a really weird way.  Willem Dafoe delivers and I enjoyed his strangely meticulous character who scrubs a tub to enjoy a bath before embarking upon a rugged hunt.  Absolutely love little Morgana Davies, a few moments of her colorful dialogue and anyone can see why.  The ending I won't give away, but head scratching and unsettling selfish.  A recommend if only for the beauty of Tasmania.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 08, 2014, 08:07:32 AM
BAD BOY BUBBY Well, ok where to begin.  It's as if this was part RED DRAGON meets BEING THERE.  The guide to creating a sociopath is illustrated here and then finding the simpleness of Bubby to be innocence dressed up as insanity.  This film left me equally frightened, disgusted, and intrigued.   As Bubby becomes Pop you can see a transformation from darkness to light, but the pathway leading up to the light is horribly wretched.  At one moment when Pop joins the band I wondered if this was Nick Cave's life story :)  I doubt that I would ever watch this again, but it is undoubtedly imprinted in my mind in a frightfully endearing way. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 08, 2014, 02:40:17 PM
Glad you liked (?) it. I can see how at the beginning it is "the guide to creating a sociopath", but Bubby's underlying character comes through once he escapes and has a chance to break out of the shell his mother created for him.

Have you seen Romper Stomper, another fun packed film from about the same time?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: SmashTheTV on July 09, 2014, 12:01:21 AM
I am from New Zealand, so have pretty easy access to good Aussie films. I wish our films were as good as the Aussies.

Chopper
Wake in Fright
The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
Stone
Mad Max
Dogs In Space
Romper Stomper
The Proposition
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 09, 2014, 03:20:25 PM
Hi SmashTheTV, welcome to the forum, New Zealand has some great cinema:

UTU
The Quiet Earth
Once Were Warriors

and more recently

Eagle vs Shark was quite good

or what about
Whale Rider
or the films of Peter Jackson and Jane Campion

You did list some great Australian films though, if you liked Dogs In Space you should check out Pure Shit (1975) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pure_Shit), it has had a DVD release, but it still may be hard to find.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: SmashTheTV on July 09, 2014, 03:52:54 PM
Oh I am very proud of NZ films and have seen and enjoyed every movie you have mentioned. Especially UTU. Though im not to sure how they would go down with an international audience. For example Boy is my most favourite recent NZ film. But it is very very NZish if you know what I mean?

But I have always found Aussie films to be that much better. Will definitely try find some Pure Shit!

Other good NZ films:

Goodbye Pork Pie
Smash Palace (I think this would hold up internationally)
Black Sheep



Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 09, 2014, 09:20:54 PM
Hey Davy I did see ROMPER STOMPER and enjoyed it!  Smash don't worry about what people outside NZ think, NZ films are cool, love EAGLE VS SHARK and BOY so much.  BLACK SHEEP was interestingly strange. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 09, 2014, 09:55:49 PM
Oh I am very proud of NZ films and have seen and enjoyed every movie you have mentioned. Especially UTU. Though im not to sure how they would go down with an international audience. For example Boy is my most favourite recent NZ film. But it is very very NZish if you know what I mean?

But I have always found Aussie films to be that much better. Will definitely try find some Pure Shit!

Other good NZ films:

Goodbye Pork Pie
Smash Palace (I think this would hold up internationally)
Black Sheep

I still have not seen Boy, must get around to it. I have seen Goodbye Pork Pie, it was fun, and it has one of my all time favourite actors in it (Bruno Lawrence).
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 09, 2014, 09:57:04 PM
Hey Davy I did see ROMPER STOMPER and enjoyed it!  Smash don't worry about what people outside NZ think, NZ films are cool, love EAGLE VS SHARK and BOY so much.  BLACK SHEEP was interestingly strange.

I am glad you did, it seemed like a film to match your viewing tastes.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: saltine on July 10, 2014, 08:48:53 PM
Smash, you live in the most beautiful country!  Where in NZ?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 19, 2014, 08:44:16 AM
STONE (1974)- What an interesting pulpy little film.  I enjoyed many of the scenes throughout the film like the funeral procession, the bike with the coffin in the sidecar groovy and the ear piercing with a syringe yikes!  A film that guys like Tarantino and Rodriguez would love, I'm surprised Danny Trejo didn't make an appearance!  Before Sons of Anarchy there were the Gravediggers!  What I found interesting was some of the philosophy expounded by the Gravediggers leader the Undertaker when he is discussing law and violence.  Not brilliant by any means, and the music I found to be just confusing at times, but something fun to watch for anyone who loves a good pulp fiction.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 19, 2014, 10:12:23 PM
GOODBYE PORK PIE (1981)- A New Zealand film!  The Blondini Gang in their little mini making their way across New Zealand raising havoc in the silliest manner possible. I love that our young Blondini wears a Pork Pie hat that resembles nothing like a pork pie hat lol.  The haircut of our female protag looked eerily similar to Elizabeth Shue in ADVENTURES IN BABYSITTING, weird and attractive.  Some of the chase scenes echoed Malick's BADLANDS, but the kookiness of our characters is more akin to Groucho Marx playing in a tame CLOCKWORK ORANGE.   Tony Barry was really cool in this.  I've never heard of picking up gas station flags before, pretty interesting hobby.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 20, 2014, 03:00:04 PM
Stone is low budget, but still managing to be interesting. Gravediggers is a great bikie group name.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: SmashTheTV on July 20, 2014, 08:34:37 PM
Smash, you live in the most beautiful country!  Where in NZ?

The North Shore of Auckland, I tried taking a photo of my neighborhood but it came out a bit dark.

(http://i.imgur.com/N1zrX2H.jpg?1?3753)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: SmashTheTV on July 20, 2014, 08:38:13 PM
GOODBYE PORK PIE (1981)- A New Zealand film!  The Blondini Gang in their little mini making their way across New Zealand raising havoc in the silliest manner possible. I love that our young Blondini wears a Pork Pie hat that resembles nothing like a pork pie hat lol.  The haircut of our female protag looked eerily similar to Elizabeth Shue in ADVENTURES IN BABYSITTING, weird and attractive.  Some of the chase scenes echoed Malick's BADLANDS, but the kookiness of our characters is more akin to Groucho Marx playing in a tame CLOCKWORK ORANGE.   Tony Barry was really cool in this.  I've never heard of picking up gas station flags before, pretty interesting hobby.

Apparently this film is a re-telling of a story from the bible.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: saltine on July 20, 2014, 09:17:05 PM
Gorgeous photo.  I love NZ, travel there as often as I can. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on July 20, 2014, 09:55:36 PM
Envious!

Would love to see New Zealand.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: SmashTheTV on July 20, 2014, 10:49:21 PM
Gorgeous photo.  I love NZ, travel there as often as I can.

Funny that, I travel to the states when I can! So far been to Hawaii, LA, San Fran, New York, Orlando and Fort Lauderdale I guess those would be the big tourist places?

Next time I want to go to Austin (For SXSW) Chicago, New Orleans and somewhere not so touristy in the mid-west, any suggestions?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 21, 2014, 11:04:31 PM
DIRTY DEEDS 2002- One of those silly little films in the same vein as THE WHOLE NINE YARDS, but not as quirky or funny.  I kept waiting to hear something about Coghlans Law, but Bryan Brown's Barry wasn't so clever.  Toni Collette was tough, Kestie Morassi was cute, and Sam Worthington was as ridiculous as his wardrobe.  I did enjoy the parallel between the hopelessness of Vietnam and the American mafia's attempt to establish a foothold in the outback, though I'm not sure how much sense it actually made. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 22, 2014, 02:11:27 AM
Check out Two Hands a similar film to Dirty Deeds, but a bit better.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 22, 2014, 08:55:41 AM
Ah I've seen TWO HANDS, don't remember it exactly, but have seen it.  Might need to give it another spin.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 23, 2014, 04:19:26 PM
THEY'RE A WEIRD MOB 1966-  The awkardness of an Italian in Australia seem like a good recipe for lots of laughs and insightful pondering of cultural differences, but the  film itself is too awkward to be anything serious or funny.  Walter Chiari is likeable as the Italian down under and Clare Dunne is particularly beautiful and perfectly snobbish as a wealthy Sheila.  However, the movie drifts all over the place from scenes of racism to un-funny slap stick scenes. It also tries to throw in a romantic comedy angle the last 30 minutes between Chiari and Dunne, but it is so unbelievable it feels like a section of the movie was just cut out and forgotten to be edited back in.  The real sad thing is Chiari and Dunne have chemistry and there was such potential that was never even remotely realized.  Did enjoy seeing John Meillon of CROCODILE DUNDEE fame and the legend Chips Rafferty as Dunne's tough, brickie father, but even his part was so bad it was sad to watch. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: verbALs on July 23, 2014, 04:37:10 PM
Yeah, must have been another Michael Powell.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 23, 2014, 09:26:28 PM
The film does have its weaknesses, however the film which I enjoy has that great helicopter shot at the end where you can see them building the opera house.

The book it is based on is also enjoyable.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 24, 2014, 09:45:33 AM
RABBIT-PROOF FENCE 2002-  Australia's dark past known as 'The Stolen Generations was something I had never heard of, but after reading a bit about it and viewing this film leaves me more than a little shocked.  It is amazing to me how arrogant a race can be when they feel superior to another and they truly believe they are helping a people by trying to conform them into their so-called civilized society.   For those who are unaware apparently there were laws setup removing half-caste (half-aboriginal half-australian) children from their aboriginal parents and put into schools where they would learn to be citizens of Australia.  Kenneth Branagh plays the real life 'Aborinigal Protector' (what a title) A.O. Neville who selects the children who are to become 'real' Australians, remarking that no one wants a 3rd race of people that are part Aboriginal and part Australian.  The story follows 3 real life children Molly, Daisy, and Gracie who are 'stolen' from their home and sent to a 'school' where they immediately decide to escape and return.  Another interesting Australian fact comes from the title of the film, there is a set of actual rabbit proof fences that run thousands of miles long across the continent.  Not exactly the Great Wall of China, but really, really interesting fence.  Our protags use the fence as a guide to find their way back home.  The film is touching, but it felt lacking in the brevity of how the girls survived their 'walkabout'.  The music is great throughout.  The young cast is great particularly Everlyn Sampi playing the eldest girl Molly.  David Gulpilil one of my personal favorite actors makes an appearance as does Jason Clarke as Constable Riggs whose sleaziness he works to a tee.  A film that shed light on a subject I had no idea about and worth a watch. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 24, 2014, 04:51:49 PM
LITTLE FISH 2005-  Cate Blanchett is one of the really extraordinary actress of our time and watching her is always enjoyable.  Her turn as an ex-heroin addict trying to make a new start despite the lead weight  of her past and the depravity around her is depressingly captivating.  The film includes a strong cast with Hugo Weaving, Noni Hazelhurst, and Sam Neill, but Cate steals the show.  I'm not sure if I actually liked this movie, but I definitely felt an emotional rift within myself.  So much easier to live a lie then to face the truth and it's harsh reality.  As with all lies though, they tend to catch up with everyone eventually.  I had expected the climax to be much different and darker for this type of film, leaving a feeling of wanting.  It was interesting to see Joel Tobeck (of Eagle vs Shark cast) in a serious role, but his character seemed confused.  For fans of Miss Blanchett a definite recommend. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 25, 2014, 07:18:01 AM
The are many dark goings on from Australia's recent past. Another similar event to those in Rabbit Proof Fence is the stolen monies, where Aboriginal people were told to work in different places, then had 3/4 of their wage held by the government, and decades later that money is still being kept from them, no film I know of about that one.

Another film, this time about British mistreatment of there own is Oranges and Sunshine, which came out last year or the year before. About 'orphaned' children sent out to Australia. Also in the bleak line, but more about individuals doing bad things to others is Black Rock, one of Heath Ledgers first films.

For lighter stuff from the 70s try The Club or Don's Party.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 25, 2014, 07:26:48 AM
Hey Davey thanks for the recommends and the info.  I really appreciate it as I have found myself of late immersed in Australian cinema.   Australia's past seems to be filled with all kinds of skeletons!
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 25, 2014, 09:25:14 AM
ROMULUS, MY FATHER 2007-  Raimond Gaita is a philosopher and writer whom I'm unfamiliar with and this film doesn't elaborate on any of it either.  Instead this story is about Raimond's strange and depressing childhood with his reckless mother, a devoted father, and a couple of really good friends that serve as men of the village helping to raise the boy.  As much as I love Franka Potente (very pretty as a blonde) and Eric Bana I really couldn't buy what they were selling.  Franka didn't seem to carry the weight needed to pull off the Opheliaesque character in this film and at one point Bana goes from his real life native Aussie accent back to his character's Romanian immigrant speech that is really confusing.  There were a few bright spots particularly young Kodi-Smit Mcphee as the boy and Marton Csokas as a family friend, though the chicken scene was quite disturbing.  The story itself has some poignant themes, particularly a man being so in love with a woman he would endure anything infidelity, cruelty, even raising another man's child.  There is a kind of nobility through the exquisite agony of loving someone so unconditionally, even if it drives you to madness.  The ending was a bit too tidy.  I'm not sure if I would recommend this to watch, but left me with a bit to think about.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on July 25, 2014, 12:48:05 PM
Really great string of reviews colonel_mexico. I've got Rabbit-Proof Fence on my watchlist now. Thanks. :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 25, 2014, 01:31:59 PM
Thanks for reading Sandy! Think you will enjoy RABBIT-PROOF FENCE :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: JakeIsntFake on July 25, 2014, 08:39:36 PM
I too have enjoyed following along with your marathon, Col. Good stuff.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 27, 2014, 10:10:05 PM
Thanks Jake, really appreciate it!  I am going to continue on with a few more :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 28, 2014, 05:28:11 AM
I caught the middle of Malcolm (1986 Nadia Tass) on TV last night, it is from 1986 and stars Colin Friels, John Hargreaves and Lindy Davies, and as it is from the 80s there is a role for Bud Tingwell, of course. I loved it when it came out and it is still lots of fun.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 28, 2014, 12:13:35 PM
A CRY IN THE DARK 1988 (also known as EVIL ANGELS)- As a fan of Seinfeld I clearly remember the episode where Elaine invokes an Australian accent and says, "Maybe the dingo ate your baby" which was pretty funny even not understanding the context of the joke.  A CRY IN THE DARK is the movie the mis-quoted line is from starring Meryl Streep and Sam Neill as Lindy and Michael Chamberlain parents of the missing child Azaria Chamberlain who went missing at Ayers Rock and was said to have been carried off and killed by a dingo.  The correct line being "The dingo took my baby" is said many times as the movie unfolds the story of this horrifying situation.  Throughout the film the feel of witchhunt and mass hysteria became evident because the Chamberlains were members of an 'odd' religion and Lindy in particular was not likeable by the public.  Much like DEVIL'S KNOT (2013), the public outcry for someone being guilty because they are different and unlikeable permeates the entire film. Unlike DEVIL'S KNOT I was unfamiliar with the case and hadn't seen any documentaries or background pieces regarding this, so found the movie a bit more enjoyable than my experience with DK.  Sam Neill delivers a solid performance as Michael Chamberlain who is trying to hold onto his sanity by a thin thread and is finally pushed to and over his brink while on the stand.  Enjoyed this, though feel slightly guilty for smirking a bit when 'The dingo took my baby' line was being delivered.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 28, 2014, 03:07:47 PM
The Azaria Chamberlain case was huge here at the time and there was a strong sense around that a dingo would not have done such a thing, so therefore it must have been the parents. Lindy in particular. More recently sentiment has moved more to believe that a dingo took the baby. The film when it came out here was not popular, in particular because it was an American playing Lindy. There was talk of cultural cringe and such. Actually I should not say the film was not popular, because I am not certain that it correct, what I should say is there were many complaints about the film.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 31, 2014, 01:49:20 PM
DON'S PARTY 1976- Well, I suppose this film was trying to pose interesting thoughts on the banality of adult married life.  With the backdrop of an Australian election as a reason to get boozed up with friends we meet a group of friends having a party at Don's.  DON'S PARTY failed to interest me on any level probably because I have never married nor have anything much in common with the men who make up the guests attending the party.  I probably have missed the point trying to be made and with cultural differences in respect to men, women and relationships I failed to be intrigued.  I mostly felt sorry for everybody. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on July 31, 2014, 03:18:48 PM
 :-\ A comedy?

Sounds like a wilder version of Abigail's Party with just as much nastiness. How about a Man From Snowy River or Strictly Ballroom antidote? :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on July 31, 2014, 03:20:41 PM
:-\ A comedy?

Sounds like a wilder version of Abigail's Party with just as much nastiness. How about a Man From Snowy River or Strictly Ballroom antidote? :)

I could use one :)  Haven't seen MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on July 31, 2014, 03:30:12 PM
Oh! That's like a rite of Australian passage.  :D
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 31, 2014, 04:09:12 PM
A passage I have not passed.

Sorry to hear that Don's Party was a bust.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on July 31, 2014, 06:00:15 PM
A passage I have not passed.

 :D

I should rephrase that.

An American teenage girl's rite of Australian passage.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 01, 2014, 01:55:35 AM
Sandy, it was huge here as well, and also much bigger for women than men. Tom Burlinson was a big reason for this.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: oneaprilday on August 03, 2014, 02:15:44 AM
An American teenage girl's rite of Australian passage.
Indeed.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 04, 2014, 10:33:46 PM
THE LAST WAVE 1977- With Richard Chamberlain and David Gulpilil I thought this one might be one of the cool Australian gothic films of the 70s, and while it has the flavors of this type of treat it doesn't quite complete the dessert.  I enjoyed the opening scene with the freak storm and there were a lot of allusions to Aboriginal tribal beliefs and rituals, but nothing is ever really explained.  Nor is Chamberlains connection to the tribals and his wild dreams of giant waves.  Lots of tension filled shots and freak occurrences, but again I felt wanting for something to happen or be explained.  One interesting line of dialogue that stuck out to me was Chamberlain's wife saying she was a 4th generation Australian and had never met an Aborigine, I wonder if this was common? 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 05, 2014, 04:38:39 AM
I could see someone growing up in Australia and not meeting an Aboriginal person. You might see one on the street, but actually meet one, may not happen. Using myself as an example, I can not think of any social conversation, I might have had, with a full blooded Aboriginal. I may have talked to someone with Aboriginal ancestors, but they would have only had a small portion of their heritage as indigenous. How could this be you are probably wondering. Well there are about 23 million people in Australian, but less than 700,000 identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (an island off the north coast of Australia), so that is 3% of the population, and most of that population is concentrated in the north. In Victoria (the state I live in) only 0.9% of the population identifies as indigenous. So there could be plenty of people who have never met an Aboriginal person. I am taking 'met' as had a conversation with, rather than seen on the street.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 05, 2014, 08:00:27 AM
Ah, thanks Dave for the info!  That's pretty interesting to know and with such a small population of Aboriginal descent it makes sense that not many Ozlanders are friends with or know any Aborigines. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: The Deer Hunter on August 05, 2014, 08:05:29 AM
I can't recalling many conversations with aboriginals. Especially outside of work which usually revolves around the lower classes. So without that I doubt I would encounter them often.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 05, 2014, 10:45:07 PM
THE DEVIL'S PLAYGROUND 1976- An early Fred Schepisi work that is about the insane severity Catholics can be about the natural desires of sex.  The film revolves around Tom Allen a young boy in a Catholic school for boys and the way they are made to believe their bodies are dirty and full of sin. I'm glad I wasn't raised with the brothers or the nuns, but did have some of those taboos put into my head at an early age.  It can be all summed up from one line in the movie, "Our religion is based on love and we spend all our time hating ourselves."  Simon Burke as the young Tom Allen is exceptional going from innocent to brooding and raging against God as quickly as his lust for a magazine turns into the sign of the cross.  An interesting film with a too cute ending.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Tim on August 16, 2014, 09:24:33 AM
I used to tutor a couple of Australian indigenous students at uni a few years ago, but outside of that I can't remember ever having a conversation. If you lived in Alice Springs or somewhere similar, you would probably interact on a daily basis, but not Melbourne. My brother actually lives in an Aboriginal community in far northern Queensland.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: oldkid on August 16, 2014, 10:39:19 AM
Only one more week!

(http://msmcclure.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/hairraising.jpg)

Turn in your top 100 movies (or top 40 or top 19) for the
Filmspotting Top 100

Send your top list via message to Bondo this week, preferably in order of ranking (titles only, no numbers)

Good Luck!

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_-Dqntok-aHM/TB07w_o8_hI/AAAAAAAAE0E/eV57iJvS3HE/s400/litFuse.jpg)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 18, 2014, 08:14:45 AM
I'm definitely open for more recommends.  Think I've watched everything that I could find that has been recommended previously. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: 1SO on August 18, 2014, 08:21:38 AM
Let me know if you'd like me to persuade you to watch...

Angel Baby
The Boys
Breaker Morant
Long Weekend
Proof
Romper Stomper
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 18, 2014, 08:29:51 AM
I've seen Breaker Morant (that needs to be in my top 100) and Romper Stomper.  I've heard about Proof, would definitely like to see that.  No persuasion necessary the recommend is enough, let's see what I can find.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 18, 2014, 02:17:31 PM
Try:

Spotswood
Malcolm
The Sum of Us
Kenny
10 Canoes
The Rage in Placid Lake
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 24, 2014, 01:45:31 PM
KENNY 2006-  A mockumentary of a day in the life of a peaceful plumber whose main job is the maintenance of portable toilets.  At first this seemed like something I would not enjoy at all, particularly given the premise, but I found Kenny to be very likeable.  He does his best to do a very dirty job with zero thanks and plenty of user hate.  How he is able to do all this and maintain his cool demeanor is beyond me.  Though I do like his hobby of boxing, in case someone gets out of line you know.  The jokes are pretty subtle and with his accent and lisp some of it was hard to catch for a Yank like me, but I found myself getting the point and chuckling.  Not for viewing during dinner, and not exactly a standout comedy, but worth a watch for anybody who has had to work thankless jobs.  Definitely a perspective changer for anyone who currently hates their job. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: oldkid on August 24, 2014, 05:13:27 PM
(http://sallini.com/rumors/therumors/worstjob/worstJob.jpg)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 25, 2014, 07:25:44 AM
Kenny is a lovely bit of lighthearted fun, and as you say Colonel it has such a positive outlook. it was a surprise hit here in Australia, as Shane Jacobson was an unknown (although he is a very experienced actor). There is also a spin off TV series Kenny's World (just 9 eps were made).
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on August 29, 2014, 08:51:59 PM
Rabbit-Proof Fence

(http://i58.tinypic.com/1fz28y.jpg)


The height of arrogance, shrouding supremacism beneath benevolence. The beauty of a people and worth of a culture, dismissed as something to be "bred out." I'm sick inside as I watch and wonder how A.O. Neville can't see how the girl's tenacity and perseverance and Moodoo's superior tracking skills are direct outcomes of their distinct and valuable heritage. So unsettling, and to realize this practice of removing children from their parents went on for decades and decades. I can only hope a movie like this can bring some healing to those of the Stolen Generations and their relatives. Haunting.


Thanks for the heads up on this movie, colonel_mexico. It's not a movie that will get lost from my memory over time, but will linger and the lessons will remain.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on September 21, 2014, 09:13:11 PM
Quigley Down Under

(http://i61.tinypic.com/213dk0.jpg)

More brutal than I was expecting. The beginning makes me think comedy, but this story is dark and unrelenting. There is humor to be had though and it provides a sense of catching one's breath. Alan Rickman's perfectly timed inflections and Tom Selleck's deadpan delivery and the way he holds his rifle when introducing it to the men, give me the biggest grins.  Laura San Giacomo delivers as well, both the light and the dark. I'd really like to see more of her work. Rabbit Proof Fence seems utterly tame next to this film and I'm grieved to see such inhumanity against a proud and beautiful people. It's a way west Western, that fits nicely in my marathon, but Simon Wincer's distinct direction makes this the place to put my mini review.

Two other things that impress me a great deal with this movie--the excellent score (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAYb30J_UOI#no) and the timing of the rifle sound effects! (whistles) "Gosh almighty!" Writing this makes me recall that smirnoff may have written about this somewhere on the forum. smirnoff, can you find it?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 22, 2014, 03:50:28 AM
Smirnoff's review is here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=1028.msg419703#msg419703)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on September 22, 2014, 09:10:12 AM
Thanks Dave!

Quote from: smirnoff
The most memorable part is definitely when Quigley proves himself as a marksman. I could put that one perfectly crafted scene up there with some of the best moments in the entire history of the Western genre. No joke.

I agree with this!
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Tim on September 22, 2014, 09:51:01 PM
"Samson and Delilah" is in my top 5 Australian films list, so add that to your watching list too, if you get a chance to see it.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: smirnoff on September 24, 2014, 07:42:32 PM
Quigley Down Under

Oh! Howdy! I didn't expect to find this here! I check this thread like once every 2 months. I just happened to do it today because I was going to ask if anyone was familiar with the Australian mini-series Bordertown, but instead I get the pleasant surprise of a Quigley review! :))

Quote
More brutal than I was expecting. The beginning makes me think comedy, but this story is dark and unrelenting.
Four years out now, it's clear things are getting a bit fuzzy for me. This is not an aspect of the film I remembered until you mentioned it.

Quote
There is humor to be had though and it provides a sense of catching one's breath. Alan Rickman's perfectly timed inflections and Tom Selleck's deadpan delivery and the way he holds his rifle when introducing it to the men, give me the biggest grins.
:))

Quote
Laura San Giacomo delivers as well, both the light and the dark. I'd really like to see more of her work.
I'd love to hear about it if you see any.

Quote
Two other things that impress me a great deal with this movie--the excellent score (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAYb30J_UOI#no)
It really is excellent isn't it. It's the first thing you hear in the film I believe... over the opening credits. I swear, a good song to go with the opening credits endears me to a movie quicker and better than just about anything. It's kind of like "whoa now, what's this! Here we go! I'm loving this already!" It's all about fostering good will towards your movie... get the audience on board, charm them! Get them in a headspace to give your film the benefit of the doubt and stick with it. Quigley does that I think. :)

Quote
and the timing of the rifle sound effects! (whistles) "Gosh almighty!" Writing this makes me recall that smirnoff may have written about this somewhere on the forum. smirnoff, can you find it?

Ah, I believe you're referring to my review of Gun Glory (1957) (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11122.msg670459#msg670459). It's funny, I'd just been thinking about this film recently having watched rewatched Buck (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1753549/reference). In Buck there's a whole sequence where Buck's friends and family attempt to keep own cow separated from the heard. They last 10 or 15 seconds and then the cow scampers 'round them. Then Buck does it and it's something else entirely. The level of control is astonishing. Anyways, Gun Glory has, if anything, an even MORE impressive display of horsemanship. I talk about that in the review as well. Watching Buck again made me wonder how many people and horses in the world could do something like that.

As for the gun sounds here's the relevent bit. :)

A very strong western whose attention to small details pays big returns.

For instance, the sound of a gun fired in a wide canyon...  it should sound different than a gun fired in a closed cabin, am I wrong? Well I'm sorry to say that most westerns I've seen from '57 don't care about such things. Even the great ones. Gun Glory is an exception, and a very good one. It's only one scene, an it would've been easy for someone to say "eh, lets just use the sound effect from the last shootout", but they didn't. Instead they captured something real, distinct, and wonderful. They gave an entire scene a deep and affecting authenticity. The sound is unmistakable; after the initial concussion, an echo returns sounding like a whip crack. One other film I know of has captured this sound correctly: Tremors.

Listen for yourselves if you like: Gun Glory (http://noffload.net/uploader/files/1/gun%20glory%20canyon%20shot.mp3) and Tremors (http://noffload.net/uploader/files/1/Tremors%20canyon%20shot.mp3).

I look forward to rewatching Quigley now to pick up this detail and add it to the list of "superior gun sound effects in westerns". 8)

Smirnoff's review is here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=1028.msg419703#msg419703)

Thanks for hunting that down Dave! :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: smirnoff on September 24, 2014, 07:44:37 PM
So yea, has anyone watched this?

(http://i.imgur.com/etLLFHM.jpg)

I'm trying to get a sense of it.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 25, 2014, 03:57:55 AM
Missed that one, sorry
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on September 25, 2014, 12:44:37 PM
Oh! Howdy! I didn't expect to find this here! I check this thread like once every 2 months. I just happened to do it today because I was going to ask if anyone was familiar with the Australian mini-series Bordertown, but instead I get the pleasant surprise of a Quigley review! :))

 :))

I wasn't sure if you ventured over to this neck of the woods, but it seemed fittin' to put the review here.

Quote
Quote
Laura San Giacomo delivers as well, both the light and the dark. I'd really like to see more of her work.
I'd love to hear about it if you see any.

I'll for sure let you know if I do.

Quote
Quote
Two other things that impress me a great deal with this movie--the excellent score (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAYb30J_UOI#no)
It really is excellent isn't it. It's the first thing you hear in the film I believe... over the opening credits. I swear, a good song to go with the opening credits endears me to a movie quicker and better than just about anything. It's kind of like "whoa now, what's this! Here we go! I'm loving this already!" It's all about fostering good will towards your movie... get the audience on board, charm them! Get them in a headspace to give your film the benefit of the doubt and stick with it. Quigley does that I think. :)

Ha! yes, so well said. I had heaps of good will towards the movie from the get go.

Quote
Ah, I believe you're referring to my review of Gun Glory (1957) (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11122.msg670459#msg670459).

Yes! That was it.

Quote
It's funny, I'd just been thinking about this film recently having watched rewatched Buck (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1753549/reference). In Buck there's a whole sequence where Buck's friends and family attempt to keep own cow separated from the heard. They last 10 or 15 seconds and then the cow scampers 'round them. Then Buck does it and it's something else entirely. The level of control is astonishing. Anyways, Gun Glory has, if anything, an even MORE impressive display of horsemanship. I talk about that in the review as well. Watching Buck again made me wonder how many people and horses in the world could do something like that.

Buck goes directly to my watchlist! Gun Glory is on my Western marathon list, so I'm really looking forward to the guns and the horses!

A very strong western whose attention to small details pays big returns.

For instance, the sound of a gun fired in a wide canyon...  it should sound different than a gun fired in a closed cabin, am I wrong? Well I'm sorry to say that most westerns I've seen from '57 don't care about such things. Even the great ones. Gun Glory is an exception, and a very good one. It's only one scene, an it would've been easy for someone to say "eh, lets just use the sound effect from the last shootout", but they didn't. Instead they captured something real, distinct, and wonderful. They gave an entire scene a deep and affecting authenticity. The sound is unmistakable; after the initial concussion, an echo returns sounding like a whip crack. One other film I know of has captured this sound correctly: Tremors.

Listen for yourselves if you like: Gun Glory (http://noffload.net/uploader/files/1/gun%20glory%20canyon%20shot.mp3) and Tremors (http://noffload.net/uploader/files/1/Tremors%20canyon%20shot.mp3).

That was a memorable review! I just couldn't remember which movie it went to. :D I read this the other day and it made me want to re-watch Quigley to take more notice.

Authenticity is everywhere in this movie, including the time it takes for a heavy 45 caliber bullet to travel 1,000 yards AND the fact that it gets there a noticeable few moments before the sound of the shot can be heard by the bad guy who's getting shot!

Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: smirnoff on September 26, 2014, 07:02:13 PM
Buck goes directly to my watchlist! Gun Glory is on my Western marathon list, so I'm really looking forward to the guns and the horses!

What a cool double feature! I was thinking of rewatching GG myself. I'd love to tag along if you give me a few days notice. :)

Quote
I read this the other day and it made me want to re-watch Quigley to take more notice.

Authenticity is everywhere in this movie, including the time it takes for a heavy 45 caliber bullet to travel 1,000 yards AND the fact that it gets there a noticeable few moments before the sound of the shot can be heard by the bad guy who's getting shot!

Look at that, details making the difference. :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on September 26, 2014, 09:15:03 PM
Quote from: smirnoff link=topic=11831.msg783267#msg783267

What a cool double feature! I was thinking of rewatching GG myself. I'd love to tag along if you give me a few days notice. :)

That would be so great! :) It's not at my library, so I was going to order it from Amazon.com and will let you know when it arrives. Can't wait to see the equine choreography!
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on October 27, 2014, 11:37:26 AM
TRACKS 2013-  The beauty and rugged splendor that is Australia is wonderfully showcased in this story about real life Robyn Davidson and her camel journey across the Oz desert to the Indian Ocean.  Mia Wasikowska is excellent and portrays the odd, but likeable, strange, but determined Davidson as she endures the brutal near-2000 mile journey.  As a film I was a bit disappointed or maybe just tired as I've seen this done before and was just underwhelmed because she had some help along the way (water drops, a guide, etc) and while it had to be tough it just wasn't anything that really had me interested.  The love for her camels was missing, even though it appeared from the photographs she had deep feeling for them.  Or at least spent a great deal of time with them in order for her to make her trip, they were tools nothing more.  I appreciated Adam Driver and the aboriginal guide played by Roly Mintuma.  Great music throughout.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on October 28, 2014, 02:24:36 PM
The love for her camels was missing, even though it appeared from the photographs she had deep feeling for them.  Or at least spent a great deal of time with them in order for her to make her trip, they were tools nothing more.

This turns me off to the movie more than anything else. You've observed something that, I think, would bother me a lot. Does it ever come clear why she felt so compelled to make the journey?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on October 28, 2014, 02:28:36 PM
Not really, she alludes to having that adventurer spirit from her father, but it seems more than anything that she was a misanthrope and preferred being alone. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on October 28, 2014, 02:34:13 PM
So strange. I can think of a million things I'd rather do if I wanted to be alone. :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on November 10, 2014, 11:40:53 AM
Thanks Sandy, lol @ burro boy! :)

Thanks Davy, hit me up with some more Aussie films some time!

I did a little searching and here is a list of stuff more available.

Hulu Plus

The Rage in Placid Lake
Malcolm
Oranges and Sunshine
The Cars that Ate Paris
Sweetie

Netflix DVD
Long Weekend
Mad Dog Morgan

Netflix Streaming
Muriel's Wedding
The Club
The Horseman
Snowtown (The Snowtown Murders)
Gettin' Square
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: smirnoff on November 10, 2014, 05:48:51 PM
A lot of Jackie Chan's First Strike (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116704/reference) takes place in Australia. It's one of his very best.

(http://i.imgur.com/okBapfv.jpg)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on November 10, 2014, 11:25:47 PM
 ???

Koala bear? Souvenir?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: smirnoff on November 11, 2014, 06:59:16 AM
Koala bear underwear. I'm assuming that's standard issue down under.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on November 11, 2014, 01:29:58 PM
They are also used as backpacks for school children.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: verbALs on November 11, 2014, 01:36:39 PM
Where does one insert one's packed lunch?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on November 11, 2014, 07:50:14 PM
Sorry that is a state secret.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 05, 2014, 02:37:40 PM
Hey Davey for LONG WEEKEND I'm guessing you're recommending the 1978 one over the 2008? Or both?  Not sure if I can find either...
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on December 05, 2014, 03:03:10 PM
Yes the 1978 version. Apart from the Netflix DVD I am not sure where you could find it in the US.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: 1SO on December 05, 2014, 03:10:04 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLUaOfj54k4
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on December 05, 2014, 03:18:39 PM
And 1SO charges forward to kick the goal for team Filmspotting. (thanks)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 05, 2014, 06:59:42 PM
Thanks 1SO and Davey.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 05, 2014, 09:30:45 PM
SWEETIE 1989-  The music spoke to me from beginning to end in this kind of cute, kind of dark, kind of lost little film about two sisters who are on opposite ends of mental crisis.  Karen Colston as Kay is likeable at first demure, quiet, unassuming before descending into her OCD of things that don't fit into her comfort zone are wrong and must be done away with (her sister, a certain tree). Genevieve Lemon as our rambunctious bipolar or schizo or I'm not sure which psychological term is correct, or maybe they all are, free spirit that you want to love, but only a demented love of a parent could.  I appreciate Aussie film for being itself and not force feeding me any agenda or even trying to evoke sympathy for anybody, it just is.  Interesting, dark, thoughtful in it's quiet moments, and brooding as hell for anyone who has felt that turmoil of am I crazy too?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 06, 2014, 10:04:44 AM
ORANGES AND SUNSHINE 2010- Wow, another one of those Australian scandals that I had no idea about, of course the English are equally to blame.  Apparently during the late 1800s and on orphaned and children born out of wedlock to poor girls were shipped off to Australia (and Canada) with the hopes of oranges and sunshine everyday, instead forced labor and other abuses.  A social worker played by a pretty boring (though I enjoyed her in other things) Emily Watson, uncovers these atrocities through her work with reconnecting families separated by this child migration scheme.  It lacks the power of something like Philomena, but the story of Len (played by a very strong David Wenham) really reaches into the stomach and twists at something so awful.  I enjoyed this only for having some light shed on the subject, but the film lacks any real force.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 07, 2014, 09:00:25 AM
THE CARS THAT ATE PARIS 1974- A devilishly confusing story of a town that organizes wrecks to collect the car parts for the young hooligans and body parts/human subjects for the hospital.  The movie has a haunting feeling throughout and the accident scenes are pretty cool, but until the creepy ending it just sort of follows our protag Arthur, an accident victim who for some reason has been allowed to live as long as he doesn't leave.  Arthur is played really well by Terry Camilleri and he is pretty likeable in a Squeak from Baseketball kind of way, 'just call me b*tch one more time'.  The ending is worth the watch and I won't spoil it here, it definitely had the feel of MAD MAX meets HOUSE OF A THOUSAND CORPSES.  Watched this with a cousin who as a car freak really appreciated it, even if just for the thought of a town where cars are collected at all costs.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 07, 2014, 04:32:22 PM
GETTIN SQUARE 2003- Now that was a fun ride with a great cast.  Too convenient to be taken seriously, but worth the watch for those who like a happy ending.  And I really am getting a man crush on  David Wenham, he's superb in this as greasy Johnny Spit, this guy has got some range.  Movie centers around Sam Worthington's character Barry Wirth who has just gotten out of prison to take care of his younger brother after their mother passes away.  Young Wirth is just trying to 'get square' and get away from the life of crime that put him away.  Surrounded by his old gangster boss and all kinds of trouble Wirth finds himself in the middle of something that might either put him away for life or end his life.  Timothy Spall makes a very cool appearance as an older mob guy trying to get himself 'squared' away too.  Very enjoyable, thanks Davey for the recommend, I guess since I'm on this Wenham ride I need to get THE BOYS out of the way.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 07, 2014, 09:15:43 PM
THE BOYS 1998- Dark and brooding, a side for David Wenham that I find just as intriguing as his greasy Johnny Spit or even his LOTR Faramir.  Playing a just released convict named Brett Sprague, Wenham comes home to his mother and brothers and the definition of dysfunctional, tight-knit, and enabling is found in the Sprague home.  A very young Toni Collette plays Brett's girlfriend who is just as tough as he is and she's the lone person in this house of paranoia who isn't afraid of Brett.  Wenham steals this dark show that is told in a series of flashfowards that keep you wondering how far will Brett drag his brothers into his deviant rabbit hole.  There are some very strong scenes between the characters that really embody how twisted love can be in a family.  Blind to insanity, loving in depravity, trapped forever in blood ties and lies. 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on December 08, 2014, 02:31:08 AM
Some lovely little reviews their colonel. I particularly like the last sentence of The Boys review.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on December 08, 2014, 07:58:58 AM
Thanks Davey!  Yeah I have moments I guess when writing, half the time it's just my inane pondering, but I love the films.  Please more recommends!  I really have been trying to find that Jemaine Clement vampire film (I know it's Kiwi work, but love them too!). 
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Jeff Schroeck on December 12, 2014, 07:07:34 AM
THE CARS THAT ATE PARIS 1974- A devilishly confusing story of a town that organizes wrecks to collect the car parts for the young hooligans and body parts/human subjects for the hospital.  The movie has a haunting feeling throughout and the accident scenes are pretty cool, but until the creepy ending it just sort of follows our protag Arthur, an accident victim who for some reason has been allowed to live as long as he doesn't leave.  Arthur is played really well by Terry Camilleri and he is pretty likeable in a Squeak from Baseketball kind of way, 'just call me b*tch one more time'.  The ending is worth the watch and I won't spoil it here, it definitely had the feel of MAD MAX meets HOUSE OF A THOUSAND CORPSES.  Watched this with a cousin who as a car freak really appreciated it, even if just for the thought of a town where cars are collected at all costs.

I just watched this last night. I'm about 5 films into his filmography but I'm starting to think that Peter Weir just can't do anything that isn't great.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on January 03, 2015, 02:12:32 PM
MYSTERY ROAD 2013- If the wild west still exists it certainly is alive and well in the small outback towns of Australia.  This interesting little film checks a lot of boxes, but ultimately I think winds up being slightly forgettable.  It has great camera shots (hard to not have really good ones filming in that beautiful continent), strong lead from an unknown to me Aaron Pederson who really is strong even if his part is a bit weak.  Pederson is a good cop trying to find out what happened to the death of a young girl, but everything and everyone around him seem to not notice much of anything that goes on in their small town.  Pederson has that bit of dark past that he's trying to make good on, he drives a car that is completely Australian muscle (a Holden sports car I believe, love the logo), and is ready to be the man in the white hat bringing justice to those without a voice.  The story fails him though and things get kind of confusing all around.  Hugo Weaving makes an appearance as a bad cop that's still good?? I was lost at the finale shootout.  Such potential just unrealized, but I enjoyed it  because it has all the elements of things I love about movies, fast cars, guns, mystery, good and evil battling each other on both sides of the law.  It has sweeping shots of things that you've seen in inner city movies with young, poor non-whites with their hands up and white cops searching them, lots of themes, but no stance, no argument or fulfilled story.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Monty on January 03, 2015, 04:38:23 PM
RE: Mystery Road

Good review colonel. Have you seen The Rover, the Guy Pearce and Robert Pattinson movie? Also there's an Austrialian mini-series called The Code, with Pederson. These both have a similar theme, they might be of interest to you.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on January 03, 2015, 06:38:00 PM
Thanks Monty, I have seen THE ROVER, but I seem to have failed to review it.  I think actually because I wanted to rewatch it, which is what I'll do and then post.  I am not familiar with THE CODE, but sounds interesting if I can find it would love to check it out.  I appreciate the reading and the recommend, my fascination with Australia knows no bounds :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: filmnoter on January 13, 2015, 02:13:34 PM
Cactus (with Isabelle Huppert) (slowly blind woman contemplates surgery)
The Horseman (father's revenge story)
Red Hill (modern Western with new deputy)
Good For Nothing (old Western/romance, indie film)
A Town Like Alice (tv miniseries version starring Bryan Brown) (WW2 story)
Everything We Loved (drama about couple and their child)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on January 13, 2015, 06:19:54 PM
Welcome filmnoter and thanks for the recommends, I shall endeavor to find them.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: filmnoter on January 14, 2015, 05:20:13 PM
You're welcome Colonel Mexico I know I borrowed Cactus and Good for Nothing from Netflix. I also found Cactus from this book, which I got from the library.  http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0195535847/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?qid=1421276455&sr=8-3
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: 1000 on August 25, 2015, 08:38:13 PM
Australian cinema that either hasn't been mentioned in this thread, or skipped over quickly:

KISS OR KILL
Saw this as a double-bill back in 1988 with Lynch's LOST HIGHWAY and it was a very good pairing. It's a road movie blended with "who-dunit", or more accurately "which one dun-it". A great film and very strong performances. You won't see the end coming.

THE SQUARE
One of the seminal Australian films in recent years, it's an incredible, Hitchcockian thriller. One of my all time favourite Aussie films.

TWO HANDS
A more populist choice, but it is such a remarkable story it's hard not to mention.

I'll also go into bat for WAKE IN FRIGHT as an honourable mention - it really is an incredible film and it's one of the few films I've seen that really makes you feel like you are living in another person's nightmare.

One more to mention, it's actually a very "under the radar" film from our Neighbours in New Zealand called "IN THE WINTER DARK". It's a suspense thriller set in remote Australia that centres on the changes that an older couple go through following some young neighbours moving into the area and some seemingly strange deaths of the local wildlife - the two of which may or may not be related. An outstanding art-house "slow burner".

1000
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 25, 2015, 10:29:17 PM
Great post 1K!  I'll def give WAKE IN FRIGHT another chance sometime soon.  I do need to get to THE ROVER, I had it all queued for my Italy trip and I didn't watch i, but I will very soon.  TWO HANDS is great.  Haven't seen the others, but will be on the look out, thanks for reviving this, I've missed my Oz tour.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 01, 2015, 08:20:17 AM
The Infinite Man (2014 Hugh Sullivan)

Trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoFv9eezboI)

This small film has a feel to it that is very Australian. The location is so isolated that the characters could be the last one left in the world. It is an aspect that creates a very spare feeling. Films like Incident at Raven's Gate make very good use of it. The Infinite Man is Hugh Sullivan's first feature, as either writer or director, and it is a reasonable beginning, that still has the lack of polish that is so prevalent in Australian film.

Unfortunately the film comes off as Primer lite, with characters that it is hard to get attached too. Such flawed characters are also very much an Australian film staple. Yes plenty of films around the world have characters that are difficult to connect to, but there is a particular strain of such characters in Australian films that are just very much Australian. Ok that is 5 times I have written the word Australian in this short review, enough now.

Dean (Josh McConville) wants a perfect romantic weekend away, and when things go astray, he uses a time machine to try and get it right. Things do not go to plan.

This is a film worth a look as it does have fun with time paradoxes.

Rating: 68/100
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on September 01, 2015, 11:42:04 AM
The trailer looks promising. Wish the film could have delivered more for you.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 01, 2015, 04:12:43 PM
It was a bit of a bummer that it was not better, but time travel movies are always interesting.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: chardy999 on September 01, 2015, 06:52:07 PM
I still haven't seen The Infinite Man which is pretty bad seeing Josh McConville (or Connie as he's known) is a mate of mine.

On the other hand, I am seeing him play Hamlet at Cate Blanchett's Sydney Theatre Company in a month. :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 02, 2015, 04:13:24 AM
If he is playing at that level the performance he put in for The Infinite Man is a little less surprising (I had not heard of him before). Will it be the first time you have seen Hamlet live?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: chardy999 on September 02, 2015, 07:00:25 AM
Will it be the first time you have seen Hamlet live?

Yes! Can't wait.

Do you find Hamlet particularly good for stage in this age? My theatre experience is limited, and zero for Shakespeare come to think of it. :(
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 02, 2015, 07:33:25 AM
I have only seen a theatre group production of a Shakespeare play, nothing like the level you will see it at. It was still most enjoyable. Wait I have seen a professional production of Shakespeare, A Midsummer Nights Dream, which was outdoors and heaps of fun. Live theatre is something differently special compared to film.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on February 03, 2016, 10:59:39 PM
SON OF A GUN 2015-  Really glad to see Ewan McGregor doing something again, and glad to catch an Oz film!  This is good, even with a campy, overused plot line of heist, shootouts, and double and triple crosses.  Brenton Thwaites is a really good son/protege to McGregor's father figure/master criminal.  Alicia Vikander is the very cute love interest and she is equally excellent as a sleazy, waitress, both parts angel and devilish temptress.  Certainly a film for people who root for the bad guys, but it is pretty predictable.  I get what they were trying to do at the ending, but it didn't work very well and overall affected the film.  I loved it though, action packed and Thwaites is far better than the Taylor Lautners of the world.  Also, what a terrible title, again I get it, but it hurts the film.  I would have passed if I hadn't seen Ewan's name attached to this.  The prison scenes hint at a severe intensity that work well, but not overly graphic.  Not ANIMAL KINGDOM by any means, but certainly a fun ride.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on February 06, 2016, 11:41:09 AM
I've missed this thread!

I'm always more inclined to want to see a film, if Ewan McGregor is in it. :) Glad you got a chance to see it and that it was overall a good experience.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on June 27, 2016, 12:51:28 AM
I've missed this thread too, finally got to see an Oz film and it was a great one....

THE YEAR MY VOICE BROKE 1987- A very young Noah Taylor as Danny co-stars with his adult doppleganger Ben Mendelsohn as Trevor and a very cute Loene Carmen as Freya in this tale of Australian teenage angst that is part American Pie (but way better/serious, if much less funnier) part Rebel Without a Cause, and even some splashes of Almost Famous. Danny and Freya are best friends who are blossoming teenagers that are drifting apart as they blossom into their pre-adult selves. Danny's adoration for his best friend is not returned as she has fallen for local bad boy and football hero played by Mendelsohn/Trevor.  There are some interesting tropes here explored by the relationship between Trevor and Freya, especially as he plays this macho type that is mean to her, and she plays off his more-brutal-than-playful antagonism that reflects some of that idea of bad guys get the girls.  But the movie doesn't veer off into this and Trevor is actually more than just a ne'er do well who loves action and violence, he is part drag racing teenager and part wild shooting star who are usually the life of the party and death at a young age in the real world. Danny is great character here as well as his love for Freya exists even as he sees her slipping away, even fighting to protect her despite the broken heart.  Certainly this movie reflects a morality of the bad characters are punished and while an interesting ending, pretty predictable.  Still, this is a teenage classic that I've never even heard of, but recommend highly if anything for the fantastic music.  The Everly Bros, Ray Peterson give us renditions of Temptation and Corrina, Corrina that join a host of other songs that bring to life the period of time in that small corner of Oz that could be a small corner of Anytown USA.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 27, 2016, 07:31:33 AM
Colonel thanks for the reminder about this thread. I saw The Year My Voice Broke for the first time a few years ago, not sure why I missed it when it was released, it was an enjoyable film and your review eloquently covers my view of it. There is also a sequel called Flirting with Taylor and Kidman. Writing of Noah Taylor I would also recommend his performance as Hitler in Max

Wyrmwood: Road of the Dead (2014 Kiah Roache-Turner)

The zombies are here and it is time to survive (or not). This is a bit of a splatter fest, but they have clearly understood the limits of their budget and as a result the effects are really well done. There are a couple of new1 concepts to the zombie genre in this film. Basically this is a imaginative, gory, fun zombie romp.

Rating: 76/100

1 New to me, someone who has not seen a lot of zombie films.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Sandy on June 27, 2016, 08:32:12 AM
For someone who's zombie repertoire is basically Warm Bodies, Night of the Living Dead, I am Legend and the first Resident Evil, it's basically all new concepts to me! :)



haha! Just saw the hypnotism scene from The Year My Voice Broke. Looks like a cute movie. :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on June 27, 2016, 09:20:06 AM
@Dave- Thanks for the recommend on the sequel, I would love to continue Danny's story, if I can find it I'll be viewing soon!  Max sounds interesting too.  Wyrmwood, my brother was telling me about this and the preview looks really tempting!  Enjoyed the review and I will certainly try to give that a shot as well.

@Sandy- Ha, yes there are several cute scenes like that, I believe you would enjoy this one :)
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on June 29, 2016, 11:29:29 PM
LUCKY MILES 2007- I've only heard stories about what it is to cross the border and seek a new place to live and work.  And it certainly is a perilous journey across the deserts of California, New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas, but can you imagine how it would be to be dropped off by a boat in a desert in Australia? This story of immigrants being dumped on the northwest coast of Oz is one I hadn't even realized was an issue.  This is certainly a movie with a lot of heart and an interesting mix of cultures as an Asian man and an Iraqi man are thrust together in survival and become friends in spite of themselves. This is billed as a comedy and has plenty of lighthearted moments and interesting travel tales as the evil boat guys end up sinking their boat and finding themselves hiking into the Pilbara desert.  I enjoyed this immensely, but also wonder at the plights of so many people in the world seeking out better lives and willing to face death to find that life.  The movie does end on a high, cliff-hanging note and even if bittersweet. There is hope for this world with the knowledge of some good Aussies on the other side of the world willing just to give someone a ride.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: brianivory on January 18, 2017, 02:23:33 PM
For me, "Walkabout" is timeless. "The Proposition" is a great film. I watch "Japanese Story" at least a couple times a year. Love the soundtrack as well. Most recently, I really liked "Tracks." It did not get much attention at the cinemas, but a great retelling of a true story. "Rabbit Proof Fences" is very good for a lot of reasons. In all of these movies, the landscape is so important to the story. "Animal Kingdom" was also outstanding.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: jdc on January 19, 2017, 05:02:24 AM
Japanese story a couple times a year?  It's good but I'm not sure I can imagine that.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Tim on February 04, 2017, 03:10:34 PM
If you want authentic Australian landscape then also try Samson and Delilah (2009, Warwick Thornton)

Trailer is a bit crap - I don't even recall that music in the film, it is mostly a very quiet film, except for when the band is practicing.

https://youtu.be/N69RgtW6S8o
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 26, 2017, 07:24:06 AM
Turkey Shoot (1982 - Brian Trenchard-Smith) 

(https://horrorpediadotcom.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/turkey-shoot-severin-films-blu-ray.png?w=269&h=313)



A classic 'Ozplotaition' film from the 1980s. Brian Trenchard-Smith sets the scene, then just gets on with the fun. Lots of familiar faces from Australian TV in the film, notably Noel Ferrier (the visiting camp inspector), Gus Mercurio (guard with the whip), and Michael Craig (the camp captain). There is also Olivia Hussey (star of 1968's Romeo and Juliet).
I liked how the camp captain is Captain Thatcher (definitely a dig and the UK PM of the time).
This is a prison camp movie, with what you would expect from a exploitation film.
Things I am impressed with at the camp: the huge amount of space the prisoners get, bunk beds must have been too expensive. How bad the auto-guns were at hitting anything. How many guards turned up at the end to be shot.

Best bit, the introduction to the "werewolf".

A definite recommend from me.

Rating: 78/100
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on June 26, 2017, 02:03:16 PM
Olivia Hussey nice! I'll have to see if I can track that one down. Haven't seen much Oz stuff lately, though I did catch THE DRESSMAKER, but haven't written anything.  Cool review Dave!
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: 1SO on June 26, 2017, 03:47:32 PM
I know of Turkey Shoot, but it seems like a cheesy version of Most Dangerous Game. That's probably what it is and the Ozplotaition cheese is probably part of the fun, but I feel like I'll be groaning more than enjoying. Your positives make it sound like this is more a movie to laugh at than laugh along with.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 26, 2017, 03:55:53 PM
I was not laughing at the film, because its silliness is intentional. It is a most dangerous game plot. There are some crazy characters in the film, but also 1 scene where you go WTF, then a reveal has it all nicely make sense.

You may be groaning, but for those wanting a good taste of Ozploitation this is a film to think about.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: aewade90 on August 03, 2017, 08:03:10 PM
I was not laughing at the film, because its silliness is intentional. It is a most dangerous game plot. There are some crazy characters in the film, but also 1 scene where you go WTF, then a reveal has it all nicely make sense.

You may be groaning, but for those wanting a good taste of Ozploitation this is a film to think about.

Turkey Shoot is the nadir of Ozploitation weirdness, for me. It's the product of this decade-long build and pretty shamelessly apes a bunch of earlier ideas of the genre and ramps them to extremes...but it still doesn't make it a good film, to be honest. It's as subtle as a brick to the face and thankfully about half as pleasant, and while there's a lot of fun to be had at the ridiculousness it never really offered anything other than cheap thrills. The camp director is called Thatcher, for christ's sake.

If anyone's interested in a crash course in Australian cinema, I'd recommend checking out David Stratton's new series: https://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/the-screen-guide/t/david-strattons-stories-of-australian-cinema-2017/34223/ - not sure of it's availability outside of Australia online however. It's fairly fleeting around everything but a few milestones, but it does provide some nice insight and fodder for a list of must-sees from the silents to contemporary cinema.

I'd also really recommend anyone interested in Australian film to check out the works of Raymond Longford - he was a bit of a forgotten pioneer within the silent era, and although a bunch of his stuff has been lost forever, "The Sentimental Bloke" and "On Our Selection" are fantastic works. https://aso.gov.au/ is a great streaming resource as well, but again I'm not too sure how it goes outside of Australia.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 04, 2017, 02:30:40 AM
I did not know about the aso site. It looks great.

I like Turkey Shoot's lack of subtlety, but I am weird that way.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: aewade90 on August 04, 2017, 09:14:08 AM
Again, unsure of geoblocking or whatnot but there's also https://www.ozflix.tv/ if you're into paid streaming.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: colonel_mexico on August 05, 2017, 03:05:00 PM
Lots of interesting titles on that site, I have a number of them reviewed in this thread.  Sadly, the ones I haven't seen are not available in my country :(
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: aewade90 on August 11, 2017, 05:32:59 AM
Vinegar Syndrome have released their 2K restoration of Snapshot, which I snapped up as quick as I could. Not enough Australian exploitation films are getting any love release-wise locally; if they're lucky enough to have one, it's generally a very quick and nasty barebones release with little love put into it. Hopefully VS take charge on more stuff like this, especially as Australia's film industry wouldn't be anywhere near what it's like today after the ozploitation boom of this era. Quality of the films aside (and there are some really, really terrible films) they're a true landmark for national cinema.

https://vinegarsyndrome.com/shop/snapshot-ltd/
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: aewade90 on September 05, 2017, 01:28:12 AM
Watched a little-known film called Stir last night, and boy. Based around the Bathurst 1974 Prison Riot, it features constant cursing (enough so that Scorsese would likely blush) and a healthy serving of police brutality. Bryan Brown (who'd go on to Cocktail and Gorillas in the Mist) is awesomely unhinged, and there's a frankness surrounding prison sexual politics that's not something I expected in a movie from 1980. It's far from revolutionary, but it's a hard hitting film.

Also, the ozploitation doco Not Quite Hollywood is finally getting a blu-ray release with a buttload of new special features in October via Umbrella Entertainment. No link yet, and I don't know if it'll be available outside of Australia, but it's well worth watching if you've ever had a passing interest in Australian genre films.
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 05, 2017, 02:23:30 AM
Interesting sounding film. Is it available on any of the Australian streaming services (SBS, etc)?
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: pixote on September 05, 2017, 05:01:59 PM
Bryan Brown (who'd go on to Cocktail and Gorillas in the Mist) is awesomely unhinged ...

Sold! Though I firmly believe the proper reference points for Bryan Brown to be Breaker Morant and F/X.

pixote
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: aewade90 on September 05, 2017, 06:14:48 PM
Interesting sounding film. Is it available on any of the Australian streaming services (SBS, etc)?

Not that I found - it's available for rent/digital purchase on Vimeo https://www.umbrellaent.com.au/on-demand/3058-stir.html?#search_query=stir&results=13
Title: Re: Australian Cinema?
Post by: aewade90 on November 24, 2017, 01:42:29 AM
So apparently Umbrella Entertainment, an Australian label specialising in releasing local films, is expanding to the US for home video releases, starting with Attack Force Z: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irmTdMQZFbw

While Attack Force Z is a bit of a footnote in the careers of both Mel Gibson and Sam Neill, it's not terrible. It's just not good, either. But hopefully this is a good step for Umbrella into an overseas market, because they're also responsible for distribution of ozploitation doco Not Quite Hollywood, a large swathe of Brian Trenchard-Smith films including a recent release of The Man From Hong Kong that includes Deathcheaters, Stunt Rock, Kung-Fu Killers, Dangerfreaks, and The Stuntmen all on the same disc, and releases of genre classics like Long Weekend, Body Melt, Road Games, Mad Dog Morgan, and even more "legitimised" Australian film history such as Jedda. One to keep an eye out for, if you've any interest in Australian cinema.