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Filmspotting Message Boards => Marathons => Topic started by: 1SO on August 02, 2016, 12:24:41 AM

Title: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 02, 2016, 12:24:41 AM
399 films listed by IMDB as Horror and recommended for some reason or another on I Check Movies. Some of these are cult, some of these are so bad they're good and some push  into highly controversial territory. I plan to watch these in Chronological Order, my current favorite way to Marathon. I will aim to give a brief paragraph or two. I may choose not to finish some of them and some I may skip altogether once I catch on to where they are headed.

Here is the ranked list (http://letterboxd.com/1so/list/horror-watchlist-full/by/release-earliest/).
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 02, 2016, 01:00:36 AM
The Queen of Spades (1916)
* * * - Okay
There are 17 filmed versions of this short story by Alexander Pushkin. The most famous one is from 1949, stars Anton Walbrook and is coming up later in the Marathon. It's a supernatural story with a gimmick twist performed like a magic trick. You know there going to be magic and you even know when to expect it, so it's all about the 'what', which generates enough suspense. At 64 minutes, this thing is padded and then the padding is padded. I'm interested to see what the 1949 version does to justify feature length.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: pixote on August 02, 2016, 02:09:06 AM
I'm not sure whether I'm more excited to read reviews of J'Accuse (I wonder if either version really fits under the umbrella of horror), Silent Night, Deadly Night, or The Slumber Party Massacre.

pixote
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 02, 2016, 08:45:12 AM
I've seen SNDN and I thought I reviewed it for Shocktober but I can't find my review anywhere. (It's terrible.) The title on the list is Silent Night, Bloody Night aka Night of the Dark Full Moon.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Corndog on August 02, 2016, 09:56:24 AM
Great project!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 02, 2016, 10:22:19 AM
Nice marathon. Getting through the They Shoot Zombies, Don't They? list is one of my bucketlist items.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 02, 2016, 02:45:30 PM
I still think TSZDT is flawed and skewed too modern, but it's as good a list of Horror recommendations as I've seen and the Top 100 are all essential for the genre. I have about 250 of those left to see, but I expanded to include other lists like Cult Movies and Tim Dirk's Most Controversial Films.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 04, 2016, 01:36:56 AM
Genuine: The Tragedy of a Strange House (1920)
* *
From the makers of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, released the same year. Picture has a similar heightened dream-like Art Direction, but the story is a lot harder to follow. There's an interesting idea of gender battling for control at the center. A captured princess has gone feral and is considered dangerous to men because she can seduce them into doing anything, including suicide. One man decides to keep her locked away in his mansion. Some curious men find their way in and the woman escapes her room. Largely of interest because of its aesthetic connection to Caligari and only worth watching if you want to see a lesser version of that style.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 04, 2016, 02:54:11 PM
Following.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 04, 2016, 09:31:22 PM
J'Accuse (I wonder if either version really fits under the umbrella of horror),

J'Accuse! (1919)
* * * - Okay
It never looked Horror to me, but I've seen many sights classify it as tangental Horror so I included it to see why. Plus the two films are supposed to be excellent. I figured there would be a nightmare sequence in the story or that it would take a literal view of war as hell, which it does, but Gance also uses magical realism to really drive home the way war is soul destroying and a place where people easily believe in sacred imagery. I get why this comes up even though it is not a Horror film.

I've seen 3 films by Abel Gance and he is one of the most original designers of stylish shots. In the world of silent cinema, he can be seen as the eras David Fincher, with a dose of David Lynch. He doesn't get discussed as much as Murnau because Gance's films are intimidatingly long. J'accuse! runs 166 minutes and he has 3 acclaimed films that are longer.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 05, 2016, 11:46:13 PM
The Haunted Castle (1921)
* 1/2
This is from F.W. Murnau, but early in his career before he found his style with Nosferatu. It's more of a murder mystery, with the castle haunted by a murder in the past and not a supernatural force, though there is one cool shot from a nightmare in the middle of the flat, sluggish chamber drama.


(http://imgur.com/Nx1VpC3.jpg)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 08, 2016, 12:11:40 AM
Doctor X (1932)
* *
Last Shocktober, I was hugely let down by Mystery of the Wax Museum (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13496.msg818552#msg818552), made by many of the same people including director Michael Curtiz, producer Hal B. Wallis and actors Fay Wray and Lionel Atwill. This film includes Lee Tracy, who is to comedy what Jim Carry is to comedy today, relentless and unfunny. Until the end this plays more like a black comedy and it takes forever to introduce everyone and get going.

The film doesn't get mired in the logic problems of Wax Museum. Curtiz wisely leaves reality behind quickly which is great for the early Technicolor look and the freaky climax which contains the strongest horror imagery of the marathon so far.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 12, 2016, 01:48:44 AM
Kongo (1932)
* * 1/2
A number of films in this Marathon were added because they star my favorite classic actors. Such is the case with this tale of depravity and revenge in the African jungle starring Walter Huston. He's the best thing about the film, ruling over the jungle from a wheelchair with the same levels of firm command and "don't give a f---" crazy that he displayed in The Furies. His plan involves hiring the daughter of the man who crushed his spine for missionary work, where he immediately sets about hooking her on drugs and subjecting her too all sorts of sadistic humiliations. Unlike torture porn, we never see what he does, but the film wallows in the emotional toll, leaving us to imagine the horrors. Sleazy and theatrical, with a lack of much joy, except the pleasure of watching Huston.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 12, 2016, 07:04:53 AM
Following.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 13, 2016, 09:46:00 PM
Before The Thin Man deservedly made Myrna Loy a star, she was a vamp AND a bit of a freak.

Mask of Fu Manchu (1932)
* 1/2
Archaeologists race against evil Fu Manchu (Boris Karloff) to find relics belonging to Genghis Khan that can be used to resurrect the spirit of the ancient conquerer and wipe out the white race. Casting Karloff as the Chinese madman and Loy as his daughter is typical pre-code racism. Aside from that the film is boring. Recommended by Jonathan Rosenbaum, who calls it "magnificent, imaginative stuff: bombastic pulp at its purple best." I rarely agree with Rosenbaum.

Of course there's always the option of saying "screw Rosenbaum, I'm going to watch this anyways", but why would I disregard the advice of such a reliable compass? His words are like a foghorn, warning my ship away from unnavigable waters.

Thirteen Women (1932)
* *
Slightly better because it plays like one of the earliest examples of a slasher film, with a mostly female cast. Myrna Loy plays a half-Javanese Eurasian woman who was snubbed by a sorority because of her mixed-race heritage. She takes them out one by one using unbelievable hypnotic powers. Irene Dunn plays the Final Girl. I liked a lot of this but the phony murder scenes makes it a musical with terrible singing and dancing. Loy acts like she's in a trance most of the time.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 15, 2016, 08:58:20 AM
The Black Room (1935)
* *
#837 on They Shoot Zombies and most notable for Boris Karloff's dual performance as twin brothers. One innocent and the other evil. There's a prophecy about the innocent one killing his twin that manages to come true in an unsurprisingly surprise way. Though I don't seek him out, I like Karloff and don't think of him as a bad or limited actor, so watching his range here isn't much of an eye-opener. The plodding story is a bit of an eye-closer.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 15, 2016, 02:24:53 PM
That's a shame. The premise sounds pretty cool to me.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 15, 2016, 02:35:10 PM
I could see it working better as a 42-minute Twilight Zone episode. It's a horror fable, too thin to support even a 70-minute feature length.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 17, 2016, 01:06:47 AM
Dracula's Daughter (1935)
* * * - Okay
This direct sequel to the 1931 Dracula starts with police apprehending Van Helsing who stands over the body of his defeated foe. Van Helsing could stay alive with an insanity plea, but wishes to prove himself sane even though it would make him a murderer. This very interesting idea is never developed because there's the mysterious woman who is the daughter of Dracula and looks to a psychiatrist in the hope her urges can be cured. Unlike Count Dracula, when she gives in to the urge, her victim is of the same sex, giving the scene lesbian overtones. The vampire also acts her age while on the attack, giving the scene the even more overt feel of a sexual predator corrupting a young innocent. None of this is properly developed or explored either, but it's all very intriguing. Not the formula Universal monster movie I was expecting, though the moments of comedy are terrible.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 20, 2016, 12:40:08 AM
The Boogie Man Will Get You (1942)
* 1/2
I will watch Peter Lorre in anything, including this horror comedy where Boris Karloff plays a meek scientist who is politely piling bodies in his basement. (Much of the film smacks of being a cheap knock-off of Arsenic and Old Lace.) Lorre and Karloff are charismatic and play well together, but they can only do so much. The supporting cast and flat direction made me feel like I was watching a failed TV pilot aimed at the Bewitched crowd.

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
* *
From the director of many Sherlock Holmes films, and featuring a supporting cast pulled from that series including Lastrade (Dennis Hoey) again playing a clueless homicide Inspector. There's initial promise, and the way the story combines the two horror icons into the same universe makes sense, but as it stretches logic to create an inevitable monster vs. monster showdown I started wishing for more of a team-up where the two take on all the stupid villagers. As I feared, the climactic fight looks like a bad wrestling match. Atmospheric potential squandered.

Carnival of Sinners aka. The Devil's Hand (1943)
* * * - Okay
Directed by Maurice Tourneur, acclaimed for his silent films and father of Jacques Tourneur. (You find a lot of writing about how 70-year-old Maurice released this the same year as young Jacque's Cat People.) The basic story is a routine "sell your soul to the devil for greatness" involving a cursed hand. I like the portrayal of Satan as a mild-mannered accountant and there's a knockout sequence where all of the hand's previous owners gather to tell their story. Filmed like an German Expressionist version of You're Next, it's easily the best single scene of the Marathon so far. Takes a while to get there though.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 20, 2016, 11:45:10 PM
Phantom of the Opera (1943)
* *
One of the more well-known films in this Marathon, from the Universal Horror Collection and starring Claude Rains as The Phantom. It's one of the more beautiful movies I've ever seen, with an attention to the color palette that shames most other films. Unfortunately, it's light on the Phantom and heavy with Opera, more of a Musical than a Horror film, and I still have yet to see an Opera scene I'm glad I sat through. A real shame because I liked the use of shadows and images of the Phantom running through the opera house with his thick cape trailing behind.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 21, 2016, 01:17:01 AM
I have yet to see a version of Phantom that I was thrilled by, although this one had a lot of potential.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 21, 2016, 02:21:48 PM
Between the color photography and Claude Rains I debated watching this again with Mrs. 1SO for Shocktober. Then came the lengthy opera during the 3rd Act only occasionally cutting away to follow the Phantom.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 21, 2016, 02:28:48 PM
Son of Dracula (1943)
* * 1/2
Like Ozu, the Universal Monster movies are all very similar, leaving you to either admire the small differences or rebuke the entire body of work. Like with Ozu, the differences aren't enough for me. Universal is to slavish to the mythology, so instead of some genuine scares or creeps we get all the expected imagery. This Dracula tale moves to the Gothic south, but tells the same exact story as Dracula. Lon Chaney Jr. plays the Count this time. I like his tortured soul performance as The Wolfman, but he's too genteel and low-key to fill the shoes of the charismatic Count. Louise Allbritton steals the film as a dark-haired vampy belle fascinated by death.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 22, 2016, 12:50:34 AM
Bluebeard (1944)
* * 1/2
I've heard this story mentioned in a lot of old movies, usually as a pop culture reference, so it's weird to finally watch the classic tale and discover it's so... uninspired, (and that's forgiving the ridiculous psychological motivation.) I was hoping for something more supernatural or just more memorable. The backstory on Bluebeard's compulsion is already slipping my mind and I just watched the film. It's good to see legendary character actor John Carradine shine in a showcase lead role and the direction by Edgar G. Ulmer (Detour) often dips into the unusual, but not enough to give this ultra low budget film the lift (or perhaps grime) it so needs.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 22, 2016, 12:55:13 AM
Did you ever see the 2009 version?  I thought that was interesting.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 22, 2016, 01:00:33 AM
Never seen it. The closest I've come to seeing an actual Bluebeard movie is Bluebeard's Eights Wife, which is a screwball comedy that uses the story as a reference point.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 23, 2016, 12:02:43 AM
House of Frankenstein (1944)
* *
The promise of a Universal monster mash-up gave me hope for awhile, with mad scientist Boris Karloff tying together Dracula (John Carradine), the Wolfman (Lon Chaney Jr.) and Franenstein's Monster. Plus there's Sig Ruman and I believe every actor who ever played Moriarty in the Basil Rathbone Sherlock Holmes films. How quickly it all falls apart. Dracula is only the warm-up story, concluding before Karloff ever gets to castle Frankenstein. The story beats are business as usual, with a particularly abrupt ending. I'm left thinking the actors were the only ones who cared.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 24, 2016, 12:39:25 AM
Isle of the Dead (1945)
* * 1/2
Mark Robson's horror films (The Seventh Victim, Ghost Ship) always have a strong psychological pull, enough to be more Noir and less Horror than their titles suggest. This one is less successful, but it's good to see Karloff in a more original story. He gets one of his strongest characters, an overly-rigid general caught up in an outbreak of the plague, a foe he doesn't know how to fight. The disease kills indiscriminately, fanning the flames of supernatural superstition. Unfortunately, the storytelling isn't as clear as it should be, blunting the horror until the final 15 minutes, at which point it manages some solid hair-raising atmosphere.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 25, 2016, 01:37:49 AM
House of Dracula (1945)
* *
The last of the Universal Monster Movies before Abbott and Costello joined in is one of the dumbest, with some nonsense about spore gas that can cure The Wolfman while turning the helpful doctor into a Mr. Hyde-ish type. I wonder why Universal kept all their icons separated, with Dracula only appearing in the beginning and The Frankenstein Monster not coming to life until the climax. I continue to be most entertained by Lon Chaney Jr. as Wolfman and he's the bulk of the film, so that's good, but the franchise is running on fumes at this point.


The Mask of Diijon (1946)
* *
Erich von Stroheim gives a wonderfully serious and commanding performance as a magician who plots revenge after he believes a failed performance was actually sabotage by those close to him. I wish he was allowed to play it even more insane, because the story is completely broken by a lack of understanding about how hypnotism works. I tried to go with it as silly fun, but it can't even entertain on that level. This actually came to me from a Noir list and while it's mostly Horror, there are some strong Noir elements.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 25, 2016, 09:34:25 AM
I keep waiting for an amazing movie to pop up in this marathon. Do you think it's just because you've seen everything you're likely to be interested in?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 25, 2016, 09:47:06 AM
I'm expecting most of the films to fall between 2 stars and Okay. I'm casting a very wide net with over 400 titles, hoping to sift through the sand and find some treasure. I'm happy to do it because of my love for the genre. Also, the type of Horror I prefer didn't come in until Psycho changed the game and the safe feeling started to go away.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: MartinTeller on August 25, 2016, 10:49:24 AM
The ones I've seen from this marathon that I rate 8/10 or higher are all post-Psycho.

My favorite is Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary, which I suspect you won't like very much.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 25, 2016, 11:28:12 AM
Yea, this thread so far has been me going "well, that sounds interesting...too bad Chuck thinks it sucks."
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 25, 2016, 11:39:01 PM
The ones I've seen from this marathon that I rate 8/10 or higher are all post-Psycho.
I came upon your Isle of the Dead review after I watched it. That's how I connected it was Robson, who you got me into with The Seventh Victim.

My favorite is Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary, which I suspect you won't like very much.
Yeah, Guy Maddin is hard for me to get into. I'm guessing it's only Horror because of the subject matter.


Yea, this thread so far has been me going "well, that sounds interesting...too bad Chuck thinks it sucks."
I've been mixed on most of them, with only 3 titles I would call Bad. Balances out the 3 I recommend: Carnival of Sinners, Dracula's Daughter and The Queen of Spades (1916). I hate the word choice of 'sucks' because I don't feel like I'm wasting my time with terrible movies. They've been largely watchable with good qualities, just not successful overall outside of the three.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 26, 2016, 01:46:59 AM
The Queen of Spades (1949)
* * * - Okay
The film is a favorite of Martin Scorsese and Wes Anderson, and while I see why, it's such a rigid and cold film. The direction is classy and elegant with occasional moments of deep shadow or heightened cinematic fantasy. There are scenes that reminded me of Joe Wright's Pride & Prejudice, with music and imagery setting the world free... before the story fastened everything down like a tight corset.

This is the 2nd version of Queen of Spades in this Marathon. Already a thin story, this longer version is better paced because we get to live more in the moments. The heartbreaking hustle by Anton Walbrook's soldier is allowed to slide into the moral whirlpool instead of having to dive in with the silent version's "and then this happened". It's a film where the Queen of Spades story is what drags the film down. It's another version of The Monkey's Paw or any such deal with the devil and the Rosemary's Baby pulp doesn't suit the packaging, which is closer to Hitchcock's Rebecca.

I read a review comparing the film to Aronofsky's Black Swan, but again that one had the right mix of over-the-top story and overheated filmmaking. I'm aware that I'm one del Toro reference away from Junior watching this tomorrow. So let me conclude with praise for the way GDT's best work can bring fantastical characters and stories into our world. That's what I'm wrestling with in The Queen of Spades. The style is more interesting than the substance even though the substance is what's more appealing to my tastes, and the two rarely find an agreeable middle ground.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 27, 2016, 01:13:46 AM
The Strange Door (1951)
* *
Period revenge, selected for Charles Laughton, who is his usual fussy, selfish and perverse self as his character attempts an elaborate revenge against his brother. There's a lot of deception and surprise reveals, but very little in the way of intrigue or suspense. Boris Karloff has a key supporting role.

The White Reindeer (1952)
* * 1/2
Finnish story of witchcraft and vampirism. One of those films that's steeped in the culture of a rarely-filmed group, a fairy tale with documentary aspects. That's not going to satisfy many horror junkies, but the unique art direction and foreign customs definitely has its own appeal.

It Came From Beneath the Sea (1955)
* 1/2
One of those Ray Harryhausen creature features, and the effects are impressive. Many shots of the giant octopus are as good as the Kracken from Pirates: Dead Man's Chest. The human characters though are as bad as I've seen them for this type of film. They're only occasionally laughable, mostly just dull.

Day the World Ended (1955)
* 1/2
I've learned that Roger Corman isn't as bad a director as his reputation, but this is a film that proves the reputation. A post-nuclear survivor film, the most clever bit is that the opening title says 'THE END' just before the bombs fall while the optimistic finale says 'THE BEGINNING'. In between are bad actors playing stupid characters who slowly get on everyone's nerves, particularly mine. I was pretty well done when an old coot prospector shows up at the house with his mule asking if there's a place where they can stay till the radiation blows over.

(http://imgur.com/eQwWHXX.jpg)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 28, 2016, 01:46:23 AM
(http://imgur.com/ZkeCL7p.jpg)

Looking at the next batch of films in my Marathon, a number of titles I didn't have high hopes for, but I didn't want to NOT watch them either. So, it was binge night at my house. 5 movies in 7 hours.

The Black Sleep (1956)
* *
This is the one I was most looking forward to because it stars Basil Rathbone and features Lon Chaney Jr. with brief appearances by John Carradine and Tor Johnson (Plan 9 From Outer Space). Lots of promise early on with Rathbone as a brain surgeon conducting illegal experiments. He's like Sherlock Holmes playing Moriarty. The story degenerates into a freak show, trading in strong acting and characters for cheap shocks and surprisingly disgusting violence.

I Vampiri (1957)
aka. Lust of the Vampire
* *
Italian arthouse vampire film, shot by Mario Bava, who took over as director at some point. Widescreen photography is expert, but I never cared about the story, aside from it being sexist, equating vampirism with a woman's need to remain young and beautiful so that men will continue to be around her.

The Giant Claw (1957)
*
This one really kicked off the night. From what I read, this was a major studio effort to get in on the giant monster movie craze. However, Ray Harryhausen was either busy or too expensive, so Columbia Pictures hired someone else and what they got was a ridiculous-looking buzzard marionette that looks like something from Jim Henson's Dark Crystal. The rest of the film might have been okay, but every time they show the creature - which you should Google - this becomes one of the All Time Laughably Bad Movies. Despite the low rating, I'd be interested in seeing this in a theater full of unsuspecting viewers.

The Monster that Challenged the World (1957)
* * 1/2
Another creature feature. This time it's a giant mollusk, and the movie is surprisingly well-made in spots. The creature's fakeness comes from its large dead eyes, which make it creepier when people happen upon it. There are some terrible effects, but also some really good ones. In fact, this has two of the scariest moments in the Marathon so far and the climactic battle is really exciting, perhaps because the filmmakers don't try to go beyond the scope of the budget.

The Brain from Planet Arous (1957)
* 1/2
A disappointing conclusion to the evening with a film that's nowhere near good, but not quite entertainingly bad. It involves two aliens that look like giant brains with eyes. One is bad and plans to conquer Earth with nuclear power while the other tries to stop him. The bad one possesses a scientist - lots of cheap super-impositions as the creature disappears inside - the good one possesses the scientist's dog (yup, that happens), but it's the girlfriend who does all the work. These last three films all came from Badmovies.org Best B-Movies, but this one doesn't have enough good or bad to seem worthy of inclusion.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 30, 2016, 01:22:33 AM
(http://imgur.com/n7RNxWQ.jpg)

El Vampiro (1957)
* * * - Good
Mexican vampire story that works because it sticks to the basics and does very little that's illogical or stupid. For a time I thought this was going to be another remake of Dracula. The film's problem is that it doesn't offer a unique spin on the material, but this is a well-shot and well acted no-nonsense vampire tale.

The Haunted Strangler (1958)
* *
Boris Karloff doing his thing. (He truly was better than his material nearly every time.) Takes a while to get to its Jekyll and Hyde story - though Karloff amusingly is looking for the real killer of 'Martha Stewart' - and doesn't have much to offer beyond that besides some interesting make-up. Seems to me a better writer could've done something interesting with this.

I Married a Monster From Outer Space (1958)
* * 1/2
Not as good as Vampiro, but the highlight of the evening for me. The special effects are as bad as the title, as is some of the acting, but get past that and this film's got interesting ideas. It's a Body Snatcher plot, but one that builds sympathy for the aliens. The lead (Gloria Talbott from All That Heaven Allows) gets more to do besides play frightened as we see the aliens are trying to deal with the bad situation they've been given. This isn't cute suburban satire though, the film is brutal on dogs.

Corridors of Blood (1958)
* *
Completely fabricated history of the invention of surgical anesthesia is just an excuse for Boris Karloff to play a drug addict. More of a social drama about addiction. Christopher Lee is in this. I found it largely uninteresting and easily forgettable.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 02, 2016, 11:05:36 PM
I like this format for the Marathon, though I should keep notes of what I want to say instead of hoping for recall days later.


(http://imgur.com/eo5t17J.jpg)

Lake of the Dead (1958)
* *
Lots of good atmosphere surrounding this haunted lake next to a cabin in the woods, but like it ghost it drifts around looking spooky while never building towards anything. The bland ending only confirms this as a film with mood but no point.


Experiment in Evil (1959)
* 1/2
Another Jekyll and Hyde story, directed by Jean Renoir, who makes some truly baffling decisions. It opens with Renoir entering a TV studio and introducing the picture (like Alfred Hitchcock Presents?) The story begins deep into the plot, which might be seen as refreshing. Who needs another origin story, right? However, we get to the finale and Renoir has Hyde narrate all that early stuff he skipped, so anything good about starting deep in goes right out the window.

The portrayal of Hyde is easily the most bizarre I've ever seen. He moves with the agile, twitchy physicality of Chaplin's little tramp, even while beating up on unsuspecting people. I discovered this recommendation is from FranÁois Truffaut's The Films of My Life, and everything suddenly made sense. I can see the cinematically experimental Truffaut enjoying the fractured narrative and cine-meta/comic take on the classic horror tale. So maybe it is okay to see this as a comedy?


First Man Into Space (1959)
* *
Overly-cocky, a-hole space pilot goes too far into orbit where he's changed into a hideous, murderous creature. This was one of the worst films of the Marathon so far, with terrible acting, laughable science and lots of stock footage. Towards the end it actually gets kind of good as a sad drama, effectively Frankenstien-ing the monster.


Horrors of the Black Museum (1959)
* * * - Okay
The modern horror film starting to wake in this sleazy slasher that was heavily edited for violence by the BBFC. (The version I saw was 78min. The complete 93min version is believed lost.) Great premise built around The Black Museum, or The Crime Museum of Scotland Yard, a collection of criminal memorabilia. Michael Gough (Alfred in 1989's Batman) shows John Hurt levels of intensity as a maniac who uses unique weapons and an assistant to commit some terrible murders.

Horrors of the Black Museum is available for free on YouTube and I hope it gets checked out by some of you this Shocktober. It's ridiculous, illogical and some of it is in poor taste, but it's also kind of fun and Gough is really good.


Black Pit of Dr. M (1959)
aka. Misterios de ultratumba
* * 1/2
A dying doctor tries to keep his promise of showing his best friend the afterlife, or maybe it's something more like life after death. Things get complicated. From the director of El Vampiro, this one is certainly more original but the writing is often unsure, unfocused or trying too hard to be clever. The great gothic atmosphere is still there, but the film needed half the twists and twice the scares.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 05, 2016, 01:21:25 AM
(http://imgur.com/xJaK5Zm.jpg)

Terror in the Midnight Sun (1959)
aka. Invasion of the Animal people
aka. Space Invasion of Lapland
Ĺ
A number of films from this Marathon are courtesy of Badmovies.org Best B-Movies. Previous films have been mixed to bad, but I get why theyíre interesting from a B-movie perspective. This one is just terrible. A meteor crashes in Northern Sweden. Scientists arrive and get caught up in skiing and romancing a local figure skater. Itís a couple of days before they even go near the crash site. Thereís a ridiculous-looking giant creature and some Conehead/Devo aliens that show up for one scene. Mostly, this is a film about skiing.


Beast From Haunted Cave (1959)
* Ĺ
Another one from Badmovies. Worth noting this is directed by Monte Hellman, which means lots of dull, existential conversations. The monster only makes brief appearances until the end, and while it looks fake thereís something upsetting about the human-spider design.


Circus of Horrors (1960)
* * Ĺ
Third in a trilogy of films by the same studio who along with the previous films Ė Horrors of the Black Museum and Peeping Tom Ė are excessively sleazy with a focus on sadism, cruelty and sexual undertones. The other two films have fascinating, strong anti-hero performances. This one not so much. Heís more of a jerk who youíre just waiting to get his due. The circus performances continually interrupt momentum, but the setting allows for a high amount of startlingly skimpy costumes. For a film with no actual nudity itís highly skin-centric.


Skeleton of Mrs. Morales (1960)
* * Ĺ
Recommended by Guillermo del Toro and on several lists of hidden gems, this is more of a black comedy with a sick sense of humor and the occasional bit of strong violence. A taxidermist trapped in a terrible marriage finally takes some drastic action. Itís that simple and the humor, subtle as it is, wavers between clever and stupid. Iíd be more interested in a GDT remake, or perhaps Almodovar, who did this type of horror comedy much better with The Skin I Live In.


Mill of the Stone Women (1960)
* *
A mash-up of House of Wax and Eyes Without a Face, this Italian film isn't giallo, but it makes as much sense as Italian films so often do. Some creepy atmosphere and haunting, beautiful women, but I would gladly trade disorienting visuals for some narrative coherence.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: verbALs on September 07, 2016, 02:24:10 AM
Re Hellman. Is it those westerns that you find dull? I smiled because Two Lane Blacktop is monosyllabic apart from Warren Oates and who wouldn't want to listen to Oates rambling; but then Oates is mute through most of Cockfighter.
I approached this horror movie but I could see it was crap. I don't feel liking a director is a good enough reason to torture myself with completism.  :D However Nicholsons presence makes those Hellman back to back war films watchable. However I'm prepared to view Hellman as only worth watching for 2LB and CF.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 07, 2016, 07:29:31 AM
The Shooting and 2LB are the dull ones to me. Nicholson shines in Whirlwind, and the story is more about muddling the lines between good and evil instead of pondering what it's all about. Unpopular Opinion: I don't see what the big deal is about Warren Oates. (Opinion formed during Bring Me the Head...) He's the worst mannerisms of Joaquin Phoenix - grunts, mumbles and scowls - with little of the character. It's why I haven't seen Cockfighter.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: verbALs on September 07, 2016, 09:15:11 AM
I agree about ....Alfredo Garcia.

I don't see 2LB as dull in that existential sense. I was surprised how down to earth it is given it seems to have a cienaste reputation before I saw. But I'm not pushing Hellman as an all out great director. In fact a director who makes one good film is a good director and all the crap they might also make doesn't change that one good film. It might be the opposite of the one good scene in every film that you have mentioned as making any film worth a look. I think making one good film is hard enough to establish any director. No disrespect to your own amazing film knowledge intended. Just seeing you watch so many has made me question my own approach over the years.
Title: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 07, 2016, 11:45:17 PM
(http://imgur.com/f6kfuSO.jpg)

Blood and Roses (1960)
* Ĺ
I had doubt that in the modern age Roger Vadimís 60s style of sexually suggestive storytelling could have any fans, but of course every filmmaker has their fans. Itís a beautifully shot film with some great colors, but for me Vadim is like watching late night cable Ė Showtime After Hours for my generation Ė with all the good stuff replaced by more talking about the good stuff.

Oh, this is about vampires and lesbian vampires. Or maybe itís about insanity. (Open-ended narrative.) Vadim fans write about psychological complexity and sexual neurosis, but I couldnít get past Vadim teasing the audience into thinking they might see a breast.


The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960)
* * * - Good
One of the better Hammer Horror and the best version of Jekyll and Hyde Iíve seen, though the definitive version still eludes. This features a strong dual performance by Paul Massie and a colorful supporting performance by Christopher Lee. The original twist is that Hyde isnít monstrous in form, but actually the more dashingly handsome persona. Classy and colorful Art Direction and Costume Design, with some strikingly colorful lighting, the film also features sexuality in a way that isnít sleazy like Blood and Roses.


Night Tide (1961)
* * Ĺ
Wonderful low-budget atmosphere (described perfectly on Letterboxd as Val Lewtonís Carnival of Souls), and an earnest performance by a very young Dennis Hopper as a sailor who falls for a mysterious woman. Everything points to her being a deadly mermaid or some type of killer sea creature, so much so that Hopperís character is sometimes frustratingly naÔve. The mysterious and spooky direction is undone by a final explanation thatís worse than the psychiatrist in Psycho.


The Horrible Dr. Hichcock (1962)
* Ĺ
A mash-up of many a Hitchcock film, with direct references to Suspicion, Psycho and Rope and a plot about a dead wife and the 2nd bride being positioned to replace her thatís Rebecca meets Vertigo. Not meant as a parody or satire, it took me awhile to realize this is a deliberate attempt to emulate the master and not just rip off his ideas. What it ultimately shows is that you have to understand what makes Hitchcockís techniques work. They donít here, so the film is a barely coherent mess.


The Brain That Wouldnít Die (1962)
*
A cheat. This contribution from the Badmovies.org list is one of the few MST3K episodes I've never seen, and the first episode of Mike Nelson. So I didn't watch the pure cut, but I'm sure I had a much better time doing it this way. It's classic bad movie with a large dollop of female objectification that the MST crew relentlessly mocks for being creepy. One of their better efforts and one of this Marathon's worst movies.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 08, 2016, 11:21:11 AM
The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll sounds like something I'd probably enjoy. I'll have to check it out.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 08, 2016, 01:21:08 PM
That's another one currently available on youtube. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zL8F4eHOOvM/#noembed)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 08, 2016, 04:00:07 PM
Cool, I might watch it this evening.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 11, 2016, 12:26:29 AM
(http://imgur.com/eG7SvkU.jpg)

The Awful Dr. Orlof (1962)
* *
I never knew there were so many versions of this type of story, a doctor who kidnaps women, using their skin to fix his daughterís horribly scarred face. The mad doctor here has a henchman with a repulsive (but fake enough looking) bulging eye. The director Jess Franco, is known for sleazy exploitation, hardcore nudity and a lot of bad films. This is early work so itís more a dull, average chiller with the occasional interesting shot and a strange, noisy soundtrack that reminded me of Eraserhead.


Panic in Year Zero! (1962)
* * 1/2
Just as a family leaves the city, the bombs drop. Father (Ray Milland), Mother (Jean Hagen) and the kids (Frankie Avalon, Mary Mitchel) witness the crumble of social order while they look for a way to survive. I like the initial scenes of panic, but it mellows out instead of becoming increasingly savage. Milland directs, but it looks like a TV show more than a movie. He gives himself some nice character moments, but Hagen comes off as naÔve, wanting to help and trust everyone while wondering why her husband is being so overly-protective. Thematically you can see this as symbolic for the destruction of the family unit by lawless individuals. The ending is a joke.


The Girl Who Knew Too Much (1963)
aka. Evil Eye
* * Ĺ
Regarded as the first Italian giallo, I cannot get past the sub-genreís general disdain for narrative coherence. For directors like Mario Bava (who made this) a good moment of sensation or shock is worth any cost. Better to surprise, even if that surprise flies in the face of everything else. That said, this oneís a pretty good thriller in the Hitchcock mode with some great use of placing actors in the frame very deep or incredibly close. (Not close-ups of faces but things like arms and hands.)


The Sadist (1963)
* Ĺ
Three people find themselves trapped in a junkyard with the title character and his giggly girlfriend. An important step in the evolution of Horror, the launch point for torture porn and bleaker horror fare. Also a really bad film, though it is largely well-reviewed. Cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond makes his debut and the super low-budget film, which is professionally photographed, but everything hinges on the performance by Arch Hall Jr. as the title character and I thought he was terrible. Other reviews compare him to Perkins in Psycho and Ann Savage in Detour. *shrug*


The Day of the Triffids (1963)
*
Silly nonsense about most of the world going blind just in time for an invasion by killer plants. Cult film is most interesting for casting Howard Keel in a non-musical role. The effects are overall lousy, the story is obviously condensed from longer source material. In this case a book, which differs vastly from this film. I can see where this might work given more time to develop logic. (The story's been remade twice as a mini-series.) Abrupt ending is a joke here too, but there are many laughs to be found throughout. That said, this is much blander a good/bad time than The Giant Claw.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 11, 2016, 05:06:32 AM
Have you seen either of the mini-series for Day of the Triffids? The 1981 mini-series was very good, especially in a single viewing. The book is really good as well.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 11, 2016, 07:59:19 AM
This was my first experience with Triffids, outside of a reference in Rock Horror Picture Show's opening song. While the premise sounds ridiculous, I could see the DNA of a good idea. The triffids are not plants, but plant-like, much like the giant bugs in Starship Troopers. So it isn't about killer plants from outer space.

I read that in the original story Triffids are not aliens but a genetic mutation, perhaps advanced by the strange blinding lights in the sky. In the film, the lights and the triffid invasion come off like two strange occurrences unconnected from each other. A case of fortunate timing for the invaders. An excellent case in point for how little these filmmakers cared, the day after everyone is blind, Keel hears a radio report from another part of the world and the news also refers to the creatures as triffids. If these are aliens from outer space, how come disconnected groups are giving this new breed the same unusual name?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 11, 2016, 03:49:36 PM
In the book, Triffids are a venomous plant species that can move around (I do not remember where they were originally found, but probably in some jungle somewhere). They are breed and harvested for something useful and 'defanging' them makes the product not as good. There is an atmospheric event, one evening, that makes those who watched it blind, the Triffids make use of this. No aliens.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 11, 2016, 09:44:36 PM
That makes a lot more sense. This film doesn't make any sense at all.


PROGRESS REPORT:
I couldn't possibly do a ranked list of all 400+ movies, but here are the 10 Best and Worst so far.

Top 10
1. The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960)
2. El Vampiro (1957)
3. Dracula's Daughter (1935)
4. Horrors of the Black Museum (1959)
5. Carnival of Sinners (1943)
6. The Queen of Spades (1949)
7. The Queen of Spades (1916)
8. Night Tide (1961)
9. The Monster that Challenged the World (1957)
10. Kongo (1932)


Bottom 10
10. Blood and Roses (1960)
9. The Sadist (1963)
8. The Boogie Man Will Get You (1942)
7. Beast From Haunted Cave (1959)
6. The Brain from Planet Arous (1957)
5. Day the World Ended (1955)
4. The Giant Claw (1957)
3. The Day of the Triffids (1963)
2. The Brain That Wouldnít Die (1962)
1. Terror in the Midnight Sun (1959)

The Giant Claw earns special mention for being the best unintentionally funny film.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 14, 2016, 11:33:18 PM
This description of giallo made me laugh. Funny because it's true.

"...their casual acceptance of metaphysics as a component of medical science, cops whoíll believe anything but the heroís eye-witness account, people doing everything they can to find a killer, and are then shocked when they run across the killer.Ē Ė Tim Brayton, Antagony & Ecstasy
Title: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 15, 2016, 01:30:06 AM
(http://imgur.com/IMB3QxN.jpg)

These Are the Damned (1963)
* * Ĺ
I donít know what to make of this one, which has a From Dusk Till Dawn style plot shift. It begins with a young woman and her over-protective, sociopath brother (Oliver Reed), but eventually throws in some strange children who are part of a government experiment. Instead of building tension and raising stakes, thereís discussion about what will man evolve into when the world ends and who should be the childrenís guardians, now and for generations to come. Thatís a lot for one film, especially one thatís open-ended.


Matango: Attack of the Mushroom People (1963)
* * * - Okay
Japanese weirdness, but maybe not so much if youíve seen Hausu, Tetsuo and Naked Lunch. Itís a silly creature feature along the lines of Land of the Lost, but with some serious undertones from a country living through atomic fallout and urban crowding. You can see the mushrooms as a metaphor for something like drug addiction or you can just enjoy the group dynamics as they face off against a creature like The Thing, (not the cool 80s Thing, but the carrot-looking 50s version.)


The Whip and the Body (1963)
* *
More Mario Bava. I am 0 for 9 with him. (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=4650.msg753390#msg753390) You think even I would pack it in by now, but I often donít realize itís Bava until too late. Itís not that heís relentlessly terrible, just continually disappointing. This time, even his bold use of color Ė often his saving grace Ė appears to be phoned in. Same with Christopher Leeís performance, and thatís just sad. The score is the same four bars humped over and over.


Kiss of the Vampire (1963)
* * * - Okay
Comfort food from Hammer. No name stars here, but some original ideas, which is so rare when it comes to vampires. Some things donít work, but I appreciate the effort. Best scenes may be the opening where a solemn funeral becomes the spot for a vampire staking and the finale featuring an army of vampire bats. (It gets very Snakes on a Plane.) Wouldíve been better with a stronger cast.


Blood is the Color of Night (1964)
aka. The Blood Drinkers
* Ĺ
The first color horror picture produced in the Philippines gains cult/strange points because you can tell the filmmakers donít have much experience. Iím sure there are fans, every film has fans, but donít try to convince me the visuals were carefully planned out. Night scenes are heavily tinted in red and blue, sometimes to the point of being washed out. The rest looks like 8mm little Billy took while the family was on vacation. (I think thatís Aunt Eileen as the concerned villager.) Story is simple enough, but scenes often donít flow into each other.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 17, 2016, 12:15:38 AM
(http://imgur.com/ujVHnZQ.jpg)

Olgaís Girls (1964)
* Ĺ
One of the more interesting lists is The Deuce, which has since clarified its name to the Grindhouse Cinema Database. I didnít want to ignore this dark corner of the genre, though I was selective about which to include. You just have to proceed with caution.

Olga plays less as a horror than an S&M film. Itís a super low-budget, sleazy version of Salo, with milder doses of torture and sleaze and none of the art. The entire soundtrack has two voices, a narrator and Olga, who even voiceovers her dialogue, which she does with all the passion of a Siri. At first it was interesting to see how far a 1964 film was able to go with nudity and violence and by the end there was a small semblance of a story. So, definitely bad, but not completely terrible.


Castle of Blood (1964)
* * 1/2
Haunted house film thatís as much psychological as spooky. The script is a cut above the norm with events from the past setting the table for the ghostly encounters in the present. The dual time lines would appeal to a number of modern filmmakers. Iím certain this was an influence on Crimson Peak. However, the story here becomes less clear as it goes and the acting more melodramatic. Barbara Steele has amazing presence and sheís the spitting image of Krysten Ritter.


The Flesh Eaters (1964)
* *
One from the Badmovies list, but itís not THAT bad. Sure the acting is terrible and the beatnick hippie character is so annoying, but the villain is a flesh-eating virus that cuts people down in creative ways. The effects are real cheap, but they're sometimes ingenious within limitations. Iíve been interested in seeing how the genre progresses in terms of graphic violence and this film is a major leap forward.


Nightmare (1964)
* * * - Good
One of Hammerís best, a pulpy overload of the Gaslight scenario, where a close and trusted family member manipulates the lead to make them think they are going insane. Typically thatís the entire movie, and if that were the case here it would still be a good film because even though itís obvious who is doing what to whom, the nightmares are effective, unnerving and creepy. Where these films usually end, this one hits somewhere around the midpoint, and then gets more interesting by having the characters turn on each other so that you have to figure out whoís gaslighting who and who might be just going insane from guilt.

The director is Freddie Francis, who most of you know as a Cinematographer (The Innocents, The Elephant Man). The B&W lighting here is excellent, especially in the nightmare(?) sequences. The soundtrack leans on loud hysterical screams, but I found them more effective than annoying. Iím not sure the logic is sound, but with the layers of deception, itís a fun one. Iíll see how it holds when I show it to Mrs. 1SO for Shocktober.


At Midnight Iíll Take Your Soul (1964)
* *
First film in a series about an atheist gravedigger named Zť (aka. Coffin Joe), who uses the townís religious and supernatural beliefs for his personal gain. The bearded creep has the particular look of a franchise character: a large top hat, black cape, really long fingernails and an odd pipe. Zť also has a terrible temper, which he unleashes at the heavens when he thinks about how nobody wants to bear his children and lets loose on the rest of town when he doesnít get his way.

Written and directed by star Josť Mojica Marins, the film is over-stuffed with under-developed ideas and largely amateur level in all three of Marinsí jobs, but there is something interesting about this character when he dares the spirit world to come and get him. The climactic sequence is genuinely spooky.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on September 17, 2016, 12:24:14 AM
Nightmare sounds like one to catch during Shocktober.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 17, 2016, 12:30:29 AM
I've been very lucky with finding a lot of these films online. Nightmare is on Dailymotion.

In some ways, this is similar to Burn Witch Burn, which I know you didn't like, but there's no hypnosis here and it's also similar to The Innocents, though like I said, more pulp than class.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on September 17, 2016, 04:27:46 PM
I'm going to try to catch up with Nightmare this weekend.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 20, 2016, 12:05:42 AM
(http://imgur.com/ffhnKT5.jpg)

The Long Hair of Death (1964)
* *
The first sub-genre Iím growing tired of is Italian castle stories of witchcraft and revenge. Though this one has a small twist, an interesting opening and closing and the presence of Barbara Steele itís all very routine. I wish I knew the quality of Steeleís acting, but the Italian voice dub leaves me with nothing but her interesting face. I guess thatís the same with Spaghetti Westerns too.


Dr. Terrorís House of Horrors (1965)
* * Ĺ
Horror omnibus with Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Michael Gough and Donald Sutherland. Less silly than others of this type, but not scary either. Too generic despite the cast. The filmís biggest failure is the premise. The stories are predicted futures, but each contains surprises that would go differently now that the characters know what to expect. Trying to explain this away just widens the plot hole.


The Skull (1965)
* Ĺ
Peter Cushing is a legit great actor, but even he cannot make this ridiculous premise work. The skull of the Marquis de Sade is so evil that whoever owns it turns into a killer. Christopher Lee gets the more interesting role, as a fellow collector of gothic art, but all the two stars do is elevate the film from laughable bad to forgettable bad.


Planet of the Vampires (1965)
*
Even for Bava - now 0 for 10 - this is amazingly bad. The costumes and cardboard sets are laughable, with colorful monitors and control panels that only add to the cheap-looking atmosphere. The plot is nonsensical and camp. I canít tell if the comedy is deliberate cheese or if the straight-faced performances and amateur direction just came out that way. Itís like watching a youtube video by a director with ambitious vision and no idea how to express it. This has a cult reputation, but I imagine Gods of Egypt is about the same level of quality.


The Psychopath (1966)
* *
From the writer of Psycho, and similar in tone without directly lifting anything. Inexplicably (especially considering the poster) they try to make this a whodunit when no other possibility even makes sense. That crippling decision makes the dramatic developments largely uninteresting. Oddly structured film completes its murder spree with a lot of film to go and catches the killer well before the ending too. However, the (allegedly) redone final scene is one of the creepiest moments so far in this Marathon.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 21, 2016, 10:07:38 PM
(http://imgur.com/nwiR2PP.jpg)

The Reptile (1966)
* * Ĺ
Not a lot of monster, but thatís probably for the best in the end because the actors are given a lot of story and what little of the monster we do see is undercut by the cheesy make-up. Contrastly, the makeup that shows the spreading infection from the Reptileís bite is done very well.


Daimajin (1966)
* * * - Okay
Japanese giant monster movie, the first in a trilogy set among samurai instead of a modern city. Slightly more serious too, with the monster being a stone statue that comes to life to take vengeance on an evil warlord. It takes a long time to get to the rampage, but the drama is interesting instead of killing time. Still, not really interested in completing the trilogy, which I hear is just more of the same.


Island of Terror (1966)
* Ĺ
Another invasion by strange creatures, terribly designed this time. Inpenetrable shells with a tentacle attached. They move slow and look like lifeless bits of set dressing in groups, not exactly something to fear. Even Peter Cushing seems bored with this one.


Terror Beaneath the Sea (1966)
*
A cross between Creature From the Black Lagoon and a James Bond film as Sonny Chiba takes on a madman who is creating an army of Water Cyborgs. Iím starting to feel I should have been more picky in my selections. After making the list, I watch each one without reading an IMDB or Letterboxd summary. I donít know if the film is supposed to be serious or camp or Ďso bad itís goodí. So there comes a point where I go ďanother one of theseĒ and even I am starting to wonder why I venture through to the end.


The Undertaker and His Pals (1966)
Ĺ
A day off between films and conditions have not improved. I hadn't realized we've moved into the Blood Feast type of ultra-gory horror, but this is a lesser-known example of one of those. A mixture of silly comedy and fake-looking graphic violence. The last scene is the best, an inspired idea to have all the murdered rise from their place of death to smile, wink and nod at the camera.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 21, 2016, 10:30:35 PM
Monster movie with samurai? I'm solid.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2016, 12:04:08 AM
The director of Daimajin made several Zatoichi films, so it's largely a samurai film, with very clear good and evil. When it gets into Kaiju, the samurai time period just becomes the setting and everyone runs for their lives as usual. I would love to see a film like this where the samurai clan take on the giant creature as a group, with lightning attacks and retreats from all sides.

Somebody get me Takashi Miike on the phone.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2016, 08:53:31 AM
Started my morning with a roujin recommendation that's under and hour and reminded me of Angst. That makes it one of the best of the Marathon so far.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: roujin on September 22, 2016, 09:29:42 AM
I can't remember what this is!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2016, 09:33:23 AM
It's from KŰji Wakamatsu.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: roujin on September 22, 2016, 09:50:42 AM
Oh, he's definitely made some horrific stuff (Violated Angels was genuinely upsetting!). Can't wait to read your writeup.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2016, 11:20:41 AM
Looking through his filmography for other titles to add, he seems to specialize in trauma caused by sexual repression or too much sexual liberation. He also connects this freedom/repression to political activism, which I'm guessing he views as extremely similar. All very interesting considering I've only seen Violated Angels and United Red Army.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2016, 11:21:19 PM

(http://imgur.com/qKOqie6.jpg)(http://imgur.com/a5q5rZP.jpg)(http://imgur.com/vZDRfLw.jpg)

War of the Gargantuas (1966)
* *
Japanese Kaiju. Itís interesting to watch some of these that are not about Godzilla or Gamera, but itís the same basic story so in the end you have guys in rubber outfits wrestling on miniature sets. Opening where Yeti-looking Gargantua wrestles a giant octopus gave me hope this would be a more inspired film.


The Frozen Dead (1966)
* *
A Nazi doctor conducting experiments to bring the dead back to life, but his biggest success is reviving the head of a woman. The premise sounds real silly (essentially a remake of The Brain That Wouldnít Die (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg847402#msg847402)), but the tone is straight-faced drama, making this a welcome change of pace from the last few films. The doctor is played by Dana Andrews, in one of his more animated performances, but the film is perhaps too serious and over-stuffed with story and characters. It has moments and ends on a genuine note of sadness, but couldíve used another edit to trim down the set-up.


Violated Angels (1967)
* * * - Good
In less than an hour, director Kōji Wakamatsu throws down an art house challenge to the entire genre. A roujin recommendation (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11117.msg667933#msg667933), and a plot as simple as Angst. (Disturbed young man kills women in a house.) This isnít about watching women get killed, their sexuality is the filmís confrontational point and their most effective defense against this attacker. Manages to fill the running time with nudity and sadistic violence without coming off like an exploitation picture. A lesson to all the others here.


This Night Iíll Possess Your Corpse (1967)
* * Ĺ
Follow up to At Midnight I Will Take Your Soul (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg848072#msg848072) has a slightly bigger budget, more time for writer/director/star Written and directed by star Josť Mojica Marins to develop those ideas, and a much more willing leap into all out weirdness, which makes this a more watchable experience. I now understand the cult around this character and am interested in watching more. Marins is the undisciplined punk relative of Jodorowsky. His technicolor vision of Hell is one of the great scenes of this Marathon. You can find it online, but it plays much better in context. The closest I can come to distilling what's good about Marins imagination is this NSFW trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-qOnx9-hOE#noembed).


Frankenstein Created Woman (1967)
* * Ĺ
Hammer with Peter Cushing once again playing the mad doctor. Like the monster, this outing is stitched together from bits of different stories. Nothing that stands out, but the expected Hammer class is in effect. Watching other countries go down fast on heaps of blood and sex, it's interesting to see the British be just as effective with a more suggestive approach.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 26, 2016, 12:22:23 AM
(http://imgur.com/rZ3DxtE.jpg)

The Shuttered Room (1967)
* * * - Okay
An inspiration to Straw Dogs and one of The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror, starring Gig Young, Carol Lynley and Oliver Reed and centering on an old house where in the opening scene itís revealed someone or some thing is being kept locked away. (A pinch of Jane Eyre.) The slow burn and the constant threat of sexual assault will try the patience of many. I felt like I was waiting mainly to see whether or not Lynley was going to get raped, which is not my idea of a good time. However, the constant tension over what is in that attic kept me interested. Canít spoil, but the reveal creates a huge cheat with the opening scene.


Quatermass and the Pit (1967)
aka. Five Million Years to Earth
* * * - Good
The foundation of the Quatermass films is ingenious, constantly shifting their preposterous plots while fighting each supernatural threat with science. The films seem more intelligent than others in the genre because the characters convincingly come off as smart. The constant twists unfold the story like a grand mystery. The end result is something like a solid episode of Doctor Who or The X-Files. Of the series (which can be experienced in any order), I have a special fondness for the pulp thrills of 1957ís Enemy From Space, but this one has the best mystery, the best effects and the best Quatermass.


Succubus (1968)
* * 1/2
Filmmaker Jess Francoís blend of horror, softcore and art house experimentation dodges simple genre labels. Reminds me of Ashes of Time or something by Godard. Itís interesting and certainly unique if not the type of film Iím drawn to. My problem isnít the sex but the vague psychology, which teeters the film between daring and silly.


Even the Wind is Afraid (1968)
* *
Mexican ghost story set in a girls boarding school with similarities to The Devilís Backbone. Unfortunately, the title is the best thing about it. The plot is too simple, lacking in twists it becomes like a year at Hogwarts with some threat and a lot of school. Subplots go nowhere and thereís an awkward striptease involving one of the students.


Brides of Blood (1968)
* Ĺ
The first an allegedly best of a series of Filipino horror known as Blood Island Vacation, where nuclear testing has mutated plants, animals and some humans. Cheap effects give it the feel of a kids film - if you know H.R. Pufnstuf, think that - but bits of gore, nudity and implied rape and virgin sacrifices say otherwise. Your basic bad movie with small bits that I found unexpected interesting, in particular the luau/mating ritual ending that looks like it was created shot-for-shot for the opening of Firefly episode "Our Mrs. Reynolds". I couldn't find any verification, but they're so similar I was calling edits before they happened.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 26, 2016, 10:44:23 AM
First two sound intriguing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 26, 2016, 12:08:14 PM
Quatermass is fun for all, blending a number of different horror sub-genres and about no scarier than an episode of Doctor Who. It's also currently on Youtube in HD (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbDrBSpLeJY#noembed).
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: roujin on September 26, 2016, 12:13:03 PM
Glad you liked Violated Angels. Wakamatsu is possibly the most critically successful of the pink film directors. He uses the sex/violence in his films as political tools.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 26, 2016, 12:24:18 PM
Looking forward to Violent Virgin (Gewalt! Gewalt: shojo geba-geba) coming up in about 7 films.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: roujin on September 26, 2016, 12:33:28 PM
Haven't seen that one, unfortunately.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 27, 2016, 05:40:24 AM
Quatermass is fun for all, blending a number of different horror sub-genres and about no scarier than an episode of Doctor Who. It's also currently on Youtube in HD (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbDrBSpLeJY#noembed).

Speaking of Dr Who and horror, have you even seen the Tom Baker 4-parter The Horror of Fang Rock. It is very much a creature feature story.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 27, 2016, 07:36:15 AM
I haven't. I'll add it to my Master List, but Letterboxd doesn't include most TV episodes so I hope to remember this when I get to 1977.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 29, 2016, 06:53:19 AM
There is one other 'horror' Dr Who story I would suggest (other than all of the classic episodes, but that is a much bigger commitment). And that is "The Brain of Morbius" which is a Frankenstein story. It originally aired in 1976.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 12, 2016, 09:55:51 AM
(http://imgur.com/pNLT98s.jpg)

Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell (1968)
* * * - Okay
Like Quatermass, this is a sub-genre mash-up hayride, but more Lost than Doctor Who and Japanese, so itís super nutty. Thereís a plane crash and the survivors (which include not one but two killers) must face tension within the group and an alien invasion. Wildly inconsistent in every way Ė technically, creatively, thematically Ė but thereís enough here to keep it constantly interesting and the ending is really fine.


Genocide (1968)
* *
Japanese horror with an infidelity sub-plot and an insect apocalypse that delivers heavy-handed messages about living in a nuclear world. Itís all over the place, sometimes in a good way but the lack of focus doesnít appear to be a deliberate choice.


The Living Skeleton (1968)
* * Ĺ
More Japanese weirdness. This time itís a ghost story involving a massacre that makes this a supernatural Kill Bill. (If Tarantino says he hasnít seen this, heís lying.) Slow, at times confusing and overly moody and thereís a 3rd Act twist thatís unbelievable, but the visuals are stylish and many of the ghost scenes are well directed.


A Quiet Place in the Country (1968)
* Ĺ
This Italian film starring Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave was a pain in the ass to watch. Full of symbolic visuals and twitchy editing, but short on thematic connections. It reminded me of Valerie and Her Week of Wonders, which has fans, so consider it if youíre a fan of Valerie. (So disappointed that I couldnít find a review by goodguy to confirm or deny this.) Was surprised to learn this is from the director of Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion, which is as focused as this is chaotic. Perhaps the most bizarre score by Ennio Morricone, which is quite something. Imagine his version of Jon Brionís Punch-Drunk Love score.


Violent Virgin (1969)
* * * - Okay
My 2nd Kōji Wakamatsu horror following Violated Angels. I've watched it twice because his blend of art-house/horror/softcore is so unique to me and so intriguing. The nudity is plentiful, but I don't see how it can be called arousing within the context, and the style keeps it from being a satisfying experience for fans of the two genres. (A cinematic rock-paper-scissors.) The story is bizarre, but incredibly intriguing. It's not overly obscure, like some of the other arty films here (like the one right above). While outrageous, it's more realistic by comparison. A time when my rating of the film doesn't match my fast rising opinion of the filmmaker.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: ses on October 12, 2016, 02:11:30 PM
Steve, I moved your Aliens review to the Shocktober group marathon.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: roujin on October 13, 2016, 09:54:17 AM
Haven't seen that Wakamatsu, but I'm excited for it now. The last one I saw was a little heavier on the politics than I would've preffered (Ecstasy of the Angels).
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on October 13, 2016, 12:20:24 PM
Did I put it here?  Sorry.  I've been distracted with overboard stress.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 11, 2016, 09:32:18 PM
(http://imgur.com/GlTaM2u.jpg)

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969)
* * * - Okay
Largely decent Hammer Horror because it lets Peter Cushing do anything and everything and he delivers one of his most commanding performances, with intelligence, charisma and a small bit of knowing comedy. If only the rest of the cast could match him. Also, thereís a terribly out of place rape scene. It comes out of nowhere and has no lasting effect on any of the characters, because it was added later against the wishes of the filmmakers. Wonderfully gothic finale that I wish was longer.


Satanís Sadists (1969)
Ĺ
From The Deuce, which has a number of interesting Exploitation/Grindhouse titles, but this is just terrible. A biker flick with ugly scenes of violence and sexual aggression, oodles of filmmaking incompetence and one over-baked ham of a performance by Russ Tamblyn.


Horrors of Malformed Men (1969)
* * Ĺ
Full Review Here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12547.msg852483#msg852483)


Daughter of the Mind (1969)
* * Ĺ
Ghost drama starring Ray Milland and featuring Gene Tierney as grieving parents whose daughter starts reappearing from the other side. Almost works, but crams in too many angles. The heavy message about people having the technology to play God doesnít work alongside the new age spiritualism, just like the spooky ghost drama loses its effectiveness with so much time spent Sherlocking how this paranormal activity may actually be happening. The final explanation is especially preposterous


I Drink Your Blood (1970)
* *
When I first joined I Check Movies and looked at their Horror list, I swore I would never waste my time on this trashy-looking piece of junk. That was then. This Grindhouse film was famous in its time, and made by people with some knowledge of how movies work. The plot is initially reminiscent of Last House on the Left, but with a lot less rape and a novel twist. The good family takes revenge on the evil hippies by infecting their food with rabies. The contamination spreads, turning the film into a zombie movie, the fast moving 28 Days Later type. That makes it a lot better than Satanís Sadists, but itís still thoroughly exploitation, which is my least favorite type of horror.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 15, 2016, 09:59:54 AM
(http://imgur.com/aSJZU9a.jpg)

A TERRIBLE batch this time.

Awakening of the Beast (1970)
* Ĺ
Third Coffin Joe film and clearly Josť Mojica Marins has been heavily involved in drug-fueled narcissism in the three years since This Night Iíll Possess Your Corpse. Not a horror film. In fact, itís hardly a film at all with Marins presenting a number of pointless short stories (none of which have Joe in them) followed by a lengthy drug trip. That final sequence contains some imagery that reminds me of the artistic talent Marins uses to possess.


Mumsy, Nanny, Sonny and Girly (1970)
* Ĺ
Annoying family of immature, immoral cuckoos runs its one joke Ė murder is just a game - into the ground fast and then keeps going until it achieves some amount of interest from its unbending one-note performances.


Scream and Scream Again (1970)
* Ĺ
An indestructible serial killer who behaves like a vampire created by a mad scientist funded by Neo-Nazis, and unlike the last film this one isnít aiming for laughs. Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, a brief cameo by Peter Cushing and Michael Gothard (The Devils) as the club-cruising killer kept me from hating this more.


Mark of the Devil (1970)
* Ĺ
So glad this batch was spread out over a week. This is an exploitation knock-off of The Witchfinder General, and I didnít like that film either (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10545.msg629747#msg629747). Uses the real-life horror of spoiled men with power who declare witchcraft to gain land and sexual favors, but is mostly just an excuse to show numerous scenes of graphic torture. What it lacks in not having Vincent Price it makes up for with Udo Kier.


Eden and After (1970)
* Ĺ
Thank you, roujin. (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10545.msg629747#msg629747) Proof that even the most obscure review can come in handy years later. From the writer of Last year at Marienbad comes a film thatís just as baffling but much less artistic. Right when I was starting to understand things, he moves away from the art deco modern city to Tunisia and baffles me all over again. Thereís an audience for this and itís not me.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: roujin on November 15, 2016, 10:16:58 AM
How did that film even get into any horror list?  ;D

I kinda like it. I'd be curious to see it after all these years, along with Alain Robbe-Grillet's other work.

Mostly I'd be curious to do a double feature with N. a pris les dťs... , which is like an alternate edit of (maybe) the same footage and scenario that's basically a completely different movie.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 15, 2016, 12:43:17 PM
Looks like this selection came from The ICM Horror movie list voted on by its members. A quick filtering shows that 65 titles on the list are not classified as Horror, so there may be more mistakes like this. I also saw it as Horror only in the tangental sense, but I was curious to see Alain Robbe-Grillet and this one is also on the list of 366 Weird Films. He also has La belle captive coming up, which at least is considered Horror.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 15, 2016, 04:05:31 PM
I kinda want to see it now. Sounds like a hot mess. And a horror film by the writer of Marienbad sounds amazing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 15, 2016, 04:43:10 PM
Eden and After is a film with some Horror elements, but I wouldn't call it a Horror film. I can see the similarity in the writing, but Alain Resnais gives Robbe-Grillet's mind puzzle an amazing amount of elegance. Absent of that artistry, the film is a grab bag of New Wave tricks looking for something to talk about. It is The Monkeys to Marienbad's The Beatles.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter - Update
Post by: 1SO on November 15, 2016, 04:50:43 PM
My Watchlist (http://letterboxd.com/1so/list/horror-watchlist-full/by/release-earliest/) of 426 films is 28% complete. I have watched 99 titles from the first page. (Universal's Spanish language Dracula from 1931 still eludes me.) Of those, I recommend...

Nightmare (1964)
Violated Angels (1967)
Quatermass and the Pit (1967)
The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960)
El Vampiro (1957)
 

I enter the 2nd phase of the Marathon still in 1970, and after 100 titles I will only be as far as 1980. I am somewhat concerned about the level of violence of the next batch now that restrictions have been lifted. There are a number of highly-recommended titles, like The Signalman, but also about a half-dozen that could easily rate lower than the last five I just watched. I feel the best is still ahead, but unfortunately so is the worst.

Onward!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 16, 2016, 11:56:20 PM
(http://imgur.com/oXOnKz5.jpg)

Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970)
* * * - Okay
Hammer to the rescue, delivering the goods when the Marathon is on a downturn. Stretching for a sequel, this ends up one of the more inspired ideas for a Dracula film. I wasnít impressed with young Christopher Leeís first Dracula performances, but he owns the part now. Too bad heís still just supporting the rest of the cast and often has to compete with Hammerís heaving bosoms. Two common Hammer negatives lower the grade here: Powerful Dracula becomes awfully vulnerable and easy to defeat in the last five minutes and the end credits come up in a terrible hurry.


Even Dwarfs Started Small (1970)
My predictions:
Even Dwarfs Started Small - * 1/2, maybe **
* *
And thatís giving it latitude knowing this is Herzog so there must be meaning to the allegory and not just the rough early work of somebody creating and then capturing a societal microcosm collapsing into chaos. Never mind that this doesnít really count as Horror, itís too experimental for me as a feature-length movie. I do like one reading I found about the cast being dwarfs because social order has mutated to unmanageable proportions, and I love the image of the car forever moving in an endless circle.


Hatchet For the Honeymoon (1970)
* * Ĺ
Calling this Top 5 Bava isnít saying much. Mostly a bland early variation of American Psycho that becomes an even more bland ghost story with a largely expected ending. I donít think Bava is always bad, he just only has a few good qualities most of the time and hasnít made a single good film. Not giving up


Count Yorga, Vampire (1970)
* * Ĺ
Bringing vampires into the 1970s and Los Angeles, though it doesnít get lost in period detail, playing out as a small town suburbia vampire story. This is refreshing, the acting is pretty good and I liked the PG-13 approach to sexuality, realizing that teasing can sometimes be more appealing than graphic nudity. The downside is there isnít much to the film, with lots of sitting around and talking about vampires. Itís amazing to realize that because of cinema, books and plays most people already know more about vampires than most other subjects.


House of Dark Shadows (1970)
* * Ĺ
I was hoping I didnít need deep knowledge of the Dark Shadows TV Series to follow this. All I can say is Iím glad I saw the Tim Burton movie. Even though I was somewhat lost and confused, I could recognize the show was doing something different with vampires, playing down the gothic trappings and giving them real-world anxieties. Also, Joan Bennett has a small role and Iím always down for some Joan Bennett.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 19, 2016, 03:12:20 PM
Recommended.
Left me thinking...

(http://imgur.com/NUe3mjx.jpg)


Will review later.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 24, 2016, 10:39:19 PM
(http://imgur.com/eWieAIG.jpg)

The Vampire Lovers (1970)
* *
Somebody at Hammer said ďlesbian vampireĒ and the whole room got excited. Too bad that was the end of inspiration. The usual Hammer film production values are there and thereís a lot of beauty for the male gaze to enjoy, but this is a really routine vampire film and not even that perverse about its subject matter.


Scars of Dracula (1970)
* *
Hammer is starting to lower their standards. There are some surprising moments of brutality, but aside from Christopher Lee, the acting is a lower quality and the situations often teeter on unintentionally funny, especially when it involves Draculaís ability to command some silly-looking bats.
 

Robin Redbreast (1970)
* * * - Okay
Full Review Here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12547.msg853220#msg853220)


Malpertuis (1971)
* *
Very strange, very surreal Alice in Wonderland type story. I forgot to write about this when I first watched it a week ago and while I remember the imagery being distinct and bold, the only thing that sticks in my brain is Orson Welles lying and dying in a big plushy bed. Iím finding myself less interested in this sub-genre of surreal filmmaking (Valerie and Her Week of Wonders, Eden and After) that falls into Horror on technicality.


The Blood on Satanís Claw (1971)
* * * - Good
Full Review Here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12547.msg853696#msg853696)

Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 27, 2016, 01:24:25 AM
(http://imgur.com/W7WsMRI.jpg)

Blade of the Ripper (1971)
aka. The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh
* * * - Good
A Good giallo film?!? And from the director of the incompetent Torso. Embraces the gimmicky plots of Italian Horror with a twist followed by a double surprise reveal and then another double twist. Obviously, plot logic canít possibly survive all these turnabouts, but thereís a fun to the boldness of it. Fast moving thriller thatís mostly a series of suspense set pieces in the back half. Film is also gleefully sleazy, which helps in this rare instance.


10 Rillington Place (1971)
* * * - Okay
Docu-thriller that aims for factual information over suspense or thrills, making it more of a dramatic play than a Horror film. Directed by Richard Fleischer and very similar to the way he presented The Boston Strangler back in 1968. Other side of the pond, same type of trouble.
 

Lizard in a Womanís Skin (1971)
* Ĺ
Much as I grumble about Mario Bava, heís an artist compared to Lucio Fulci, who by now I only stumble on by accident. (I like Martinís generous description that Fulci ďshows some admirable Ė though not exceptional Ė directorial flair.Ē) Iíve seen 6 films by Fulci and only one isnít terrible. He has three more films in this Marathon. Iíll decide in the moment.


The Shiver of the Vampires (1971)
aka. Le Frisson des Vampires
aka. Sex and Vampires
aka. Strange Things Happen at Night
aka. Terror of the Vampires
aka. Thrill of the Vampire
aka. Vampire Thrills
* *
Jean Rollin walks the line between Horror and Softcore Porn. Heís visually more interesting than expected, but in the battle between telling a story and getting characters naked, storytelling doesnít even put its hands up. They Shoot Zombies has 5 films by Rollin. Iím curious to know how he rates so highly.


Cuadecuc, Vampir (1971)
Ĺ
The problem with most any Watchlist is youíre usually not taking a list of titles from someone who knows you but more likely a general list of films considered worthy. Thatís how a non-narrative, experimental film like this slips in. It makes me angry that there are genuine sleepers and buried treasure but people like Jonathan Rosenbaum would rather champion something that makes the deliberate choice to have a sound mix that only matches the picture at one point.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: verbALs on November 27, 2016, 04:16:57 AM
10 RP is a lot more like Fleischers Compulsion than Boston Strangler but you only think the films worth a line so who knows what you really mean. If only the film had had dragons, there'd be pages.  :D All 3 discuss real psychopaths and all had a cultural impact; Christie created the same shudder to the psyche in London that those American psychos did. It's very interesting for one director to handle well known crime cases in 3 different ways. So how is a police procedural similar to a film that nails its focus inside one house and stays with the killer, unnervingly so? That might explain the feel of a play but that idea of what wierd things go on behind respectable curtains  ;D is peculiarly appealing. Oh yeah and Richard Attenborough and John Hurt are in it, which is possibly worth mentioning.

Not a horror film, feels like you buried the lead there.  ;D If Fleischer were a schlock director then Mandingo wouldn't be such an unhandleable challenge. He fascinates me. The guy gets blockbuster type movies to make, and laces these examinations of psychology into his work over 20 years like Spielberg popping off to make Zodiac in his spare time or Steve MacQueen making a slavery movie before helming the next JK Rowling movie.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 27, 2016, 09:04:44 AM
I deliberately buried the lead. Psychologically, saying a film doesn't belong within the strict confines of the genre gives genre fans a reason not to watch. You'll notice I often say "not a horror film" when it's not and I Don't like it. That said, the Marathon seems to be flooded with serial killers right now, this one just happens to be a true story.

I forgot about Compulsion, which gives Fleischer a trilogy of films I recommend.

I should've mentioned Attenborough at least. This is some amazing work, up there with Brighton Rock and Seance on a Wet Afternoon.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: pixote on November 28, 2016, 01:28:21 PM
I forgot about Compulsion, which gives Fleischer a trilogy of films I recommend.

Available to stream from Netflix in December!

pixote
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 01, 2016, 12:09:27 AM
(http://imgur.com/PZ7iR5m.jpg)

The House That Dripped Blood (1971)
* * * - Okay
One of the better omnibus British Horrors, which usually treat the genre like comedy, setup followed by punchline. This one has only 4 stories and takes more than 90 minutes so the characters and situations get to develop. That said the twists are still pretty silly.


They Have Changed Their Face (1971)
* * Ĺ
This one Iím going to remember because it blends several genres Ė horror, mystery, fantasy, science fiction Ė into a satire on capitalism, where the CEOs are all financial vampires draining the planet of all its resources, from wealth to mortality. Being Italian, the whole thing barely holds together as logic quickly flies out the window, but the ideas are extremely interesting and it gets through the mess of a plot to deliver its message. Film nerds will also enjoy commercials done in the style of Godard and Fellini.
 

Requiem for a Vampire (1971)
* * Ĺ
My 2nd Jean Rollin film combining sex and vampires (but not sexy vampires). This one is more up front about the sex, with a 7-minute sequence in the middle. Itís also quite a bit goofier, with some New Wave plotting. I hope Rollin goes further in this direction. I almost didnít notice the more serious ďRequiemĒ aspect with Vampires dying out because of their strict rules for survival.


The Black Belly of the Tarantula (1971)
* *
Iíll admit, this may be victim of watching too much Italian giallo in too short a time span, but Iíve started becoming more forgiving of the sub-genreís shortcomings and I still found this very routine within those lower standards. This one has recently started to pop up as a buried treasure, largely due to its precise, Hitchcockian edits, but the mystery doesnít deepen with each murder, it just repeats the cycle over and over until the predictably surprise finale.


Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde (1971)
* *
Hammer take on J&H with a gender twist, also throws in body snatchers Burke & Hare and Jack the Ripper. Smart ideas for a good horror film, but it hardly develops the tremendous potential. Is Hydeís attraction to men an indication that Jekyll might be homosexual? Is her all female murder spree connected to Jekyllís suppression of sexual urges? The film never even considers what itís presenting, which is a real shame. 
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on December 01, 2016, 08:05:50 PM
The House That Dripped Blood (1971)
* * * - Okay
One of the better omnibus British Horrors, which usually treat the genre like comedy, setup followed by punchline. This one has only 4 stories and takes more than 90 minutes so the characters and situations get to develop. That said the twists are still pretty silly.

Quality box art though eh? Even though I've never seen it before, it's of a style that takes me back to the horror isle at that rental shop, where judging a film by its cover was quite as useful as reading the blurb on the back.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 03, 2016, 12:44:38 AM
(http://imgur.com/2fpSzCe.jpg)

Short Night of Glass Dolls (1971)
* *
Another routine giallo. It has the interesting framing device of being narrated by someone everyone thinks is dead, so thereís the mystery of how he ended up in such a state, the question of will he be discovered in time and the expected murder mystery. The climactic scene is bonkers, but getting there is bland.


The Third Part of the Night (1971)
* *
Film debut of notorious Andrzej Zulawski is reported to be his most Ďnormalí film, though it was still difficult for me to get through. There are only a couple of screaming fits, but the surreal/twisty plot and dialogue that had me questioning the accuracy of the subtitles left me mostly befuddled. Wanting to get into Zulawskiís particular madness, I focused on some of the interesting imagery, where he can be most memorable. Iíve added his 2nd film, Diabel, to this Marathon, which shows that even if Iím not satisfied, Iím still curious.
 

Four Flies on Grey Velvet (1971)
* * Ĺ
A parade of mediocre giallo is one way to get me to appreciate Dario Argento. You can spot the difference in cinematic skill immediately, even if the script is just as bland, with some terrible comedy. Positives include an interesting mask worn by the killer (https://hotdogcinema.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/four-flies-mask.jpg), a terrific shot following a body falling backwards down stairs with its head banging against every step, and a clever explanation for the title.


Blood Freak (1972)
Ĺ 
A guy does too much drugs and turns into a giant turkey monster. According to Letterboxd, there are 30 worse films in this Marathon, but that would surprise me. It surpasses Terror in the Midnight Sun as the worst Iíve seen so far, though still slightly better than Night of the Lepus (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12547.msg825336#msg825336), also released in 1972. This barely qualifies as a film with occasional cutaways to a guy sitting at a desk to fill in story gaps. Big laugh for the sound of a turkey gobble to attempt suspense.


Raw Meat (1972)
aka. Death Line
aka. Sub-Humans
* * Ĺ
Donald Pleasence plays a Scotland Yard Inspector investigating a series of disappearances in the London Underground connected to a collapsed train tunnel and an aborted rescue of the survivors. Despite a cameo by Christopher Lee, this is grittier and grislier than Hammer Horror. Also less fun, though I begrudgingly respect bringing a darker tone to U.K. Horror.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 04, 2016, 09:33:12 PM
After blazing through the first half-century, my chronology appears to be stuck in the mud. Here's how my Watchlist breaks down by Decade.

1910s - 1 film
1920s - 3
1930s - 7
1940s - 11
1950s - 20
1960s - 52
1970s - 106, inc. 21 films from 1972
1980s - 79
1990s - 34
2000s - 75
2010s - 46
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 08, 2016, 08:58:53 AM
(http://imgur.com/Z6uEvIh.jpg)

Morgiana (1972)
* * Ĺ
Garish Czech New Wave film from the director of The Cremator. I initially thought the film was burying itself in too much style, but I can accept it as a choice by the director. I donít know how the substance would hold up without it. What appears at first like a murder plot involving slow acting poison, takes some drug-fueled twists and turns involving duality and deceptions within deceptions. It has all the crazy of giallo, but there appears to be more logic if you analyze it afterwards.


Diabel/The Devil (1972)
* * * - Okay
Full Review Here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11043.msg855271#msg855271)


Baron Blood (1972)
* *
Mario Bava may now be 0/12, but heís got style and there are a few very interesting moments in terms of framing and lighting. The story though is slight and silly. Joseph Cotton is a terrible casting choice for the sadistic Baron.


All the Colors of the Dark (1972)
* *
Blade of the Ripper (1971)
* * * - Good
A Good giallo film?!? And from the director of the incompetent Torso.
From the same director, this one lands in the middle. Gets right to the heart thematically with a woman whose sexual encounters often involve visions of her and/or others being stabbed. Thereís a bit of Rosemaryís Baby with a secret satanic cult and a lot of style, but it isnít very good style, mostly a distraction so you donít notice thereís little suspense in the suspense sequences.


The Night of the Devils (1972)
* Ĺ
This comes from 50 Amazing Films Youíve Probably Never Seen, which is funny because Ďamazingí is the last word I would use to describe this routine, family vampire tale which is derivative of so many other Vampire and Zombie films.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on December 08, 2016, 10:33:08 AM
Doing the Devil's work.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 08, 2016, 03:23:49 PM
Only 4 films in this Marathon have 'Devil' in the title, so that was half of them in that last group. 22 films with 'Death' or 'Dead', 18 with 'Blood' 12 with 'Vampire', 12 with 'House' and 20 that contain the word 'Night'
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Corndog on December 08, 2016, 09:09:43 PM
This needs a wordle.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 08, 2016, 09:21:44 PM
(http://imgur.com/sTJtxbw.jpg)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on December 08, 2016, 09:25:04 PM
Black Night of Dr. Dead Blood at the House of the Evil Vampire.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: ProperCharlie on December 09, 2016, 03:07:24 PM
Cannibal Baby Brain Party
Beyond the Honeymoon Claw Pit Massacre
Jack York and the Glass Grave Nightmare
Samurai Tarantulas Knock Within
A Sequence of Strange Museum Corridors

I can feel several scripts coming on.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 15, 2016, 09:54:31 PM
(http://imgur.com/lFmRAjv.jpg)

Children Shouldnít Play With Dead Things (1972)
* *
With terrible production values, hammy acting and a script heavy with dumb jokes, this has all the symptoms of a terrible film. However, its bad qualities are so consistent it stops being annoying. Not a good movie but an easily watchable one that opens with one of the biggest scares of the Marathon so far.


Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972)
* * Ĺ
Horror sequel has many of the same pleasures and problems as the original (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11565.msg700526#msg700526). Bigger and crazier than the first film, but no better because now nobody is taking it seriously. I canít imagine watching this one without the first film to prep you for its weirdness, which is taken more for granted here.


The Thing With Two Heads (1972)
* Ĺ
Not Horror but a racism comedy with a lengthy chase scene. The comedy isnít funny and the chase is dull despite the many wrecked police cars, but as far as horrible movies go itís fairly watchable. Could be because I think Ray Milland is always entertaining. Sudden ending smacks of a troubled production or maybe they ran out of money.


The Legend of Boggy Creek (1972)
* * Ĺ
Very unique film, made on the lowest of budgets and highly successful at the time. Story of a Bigfoot-like creature is told in a loosely documentary style with no main cast, but lots of people and shots of landscapes. It looks like true found footage and the poor technical qualities had me convinced this is a bad film, but even though thereís nothing to give the events forward momentum, it has many qualities that stand apart from the rest of the genre.


Your Vice is a Locked Room and Only I Have the Key (1972)
aka. Gently Before She Dies
aka. Eye of the Black Cat
* *
Highly-rated giallo has an artistic side but the plot is such a mess, typical of giallo. The mysterious killer can only be one person, no other character would make sense, so of course it turns out to be someone else. The middle of the film is a procession of murders with no suspense because we donít care about the characters. (A beautiful woman will be introduced and then die in the very next scene.) The back section becomes a remix of popular Edgar Allan Poe stories, the kind of shambling storytelling too typical of giallo.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on December 15, 2016, 11:53:18 PM
Your Vice is a Locked Room and Only I Have the Key (1972)

Great title, sounds like the film is not a match to it though.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 16, 2016, 12:27:20 AM
Giallo titles are typically bonkers, but that is one of the best. It comes from one of the director's previous films, a note from the killer to his next victim.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 23, 2016, 12:22:52 AM
(http://imgur.com/wkqsa2l.jpg)
Blacula (1972)
* *
Blaxploitation films are overwhelmingly terrible with only about a half-dozen exceptions. Lacking studio resources, the end product is so shabby that anything artistic or technical thatís good is a miracle. There are some interesting ideas here regarding vampirism and racial tension, but thereís nothing in the film as clever as the title. Some of the songs are great. At least they never made Blackenstein (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069795).  :P


Endless Night (1972)
* Ĺ
This Marathon has produced a lot of crap, but this is surprisingly bad because itís from a novel by Agatha Christie and stars Hayley Mills and Britt Ekland, with George Sanders in a supporting role. Characters are stupid or terribly mean. Nothing develops until a person turns up dead in the last 15 minutes and then all the twists burst out in such a rapid succession it throws everything into confusion. Suspense scenes, often take on Horror imagery, but itís all hokey and stupid.


Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972)
* Ĺ
Hammer usually doesnít make such a schlocky film. Aside from the unintentionally comedic presentation of hippie culture, there are groan-inducing puns in the dialogue and a blaring soul score undercutting the class of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. This also has the first example of the Marathon of one of Horrorís worst tropes, the obnoxious friend you wish would get killed early.


Silent Night, Bloody Night (1972)
aka. Night of the Dark Full Moon
Aka. Death House
* *
Early slasher shows sparks of being good but never catches fire. Thereís a rather detailed mystery, with a family estate that was temporarily used as an insane asylum. Events arenít discovered, but revealed through a series of journal entries. Still, itís interesting backstory, and mightíve made a good film by itself. Biggest problem is the death scenes, terribly filmed with the camera never in a good spot. Worth noting, the cast includes John Carradine (who never speaks a word) and Holiday Innís Walter Abel as the town mayor.


The Asphyx (1972)
aka. Spirit of the Dead
aka. The Horror of Death
* *
Two scientists learn how to capture and lock up death, making a person immortal. When I was young, I enjoyed Flatliners. The idea was preposterous, but the filmmaking sold it. This doesnít have the exciting filmmaking so itís just the idea, which is intriguing, and the Asphyx is like a screeching version of Slimer from Ghostbusters, but they the film needed more imagination. Itís closer to a filmed play.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 28, 2016, 10:27:06 AM
(http://imgur.com/uDb1OSa.jpg)

The Last House on Dead End Street (1973)
aka. At The Hour Of Our Death
aka. The Cuckoo Clocks of Hell
aka. The Fun House
Ĺ 
I understand people finding unusual films and declaring them art, but there has to be a line in the sand. A handful of artistic shots and meta touches doesnít change the fact that this is absolute garbage. Large parts of it donít make sense, leaving you with a laundry line of immoral imagery and a cast of repellent people. I read a review that calls it a masterpiece of ďno-budget, underground, amateur gore films.Ē Letís not be encouraging this.
 

Messiah of Evil (1973)
aka. Dead People
aka. Deep Swamp
aka. Night of the Damned
aka. Return of the Living Dead
aka. Revenge of the Screaming Dead
* * * - Okay
This is an unusual horror film I can get behind, though at first I thought it was pretty terrible. The weirdness is too on-the-nose, the first murder after the credits is needlessly bloody and the script wasnít making any sense. (All those titles, I wouldnít know what to call this film either.) Thereís vampirism, zombie-like behavior, a possible cult and a dark figure that might be Satan. None of these are called by their name, theyíre just thrown into the mix. Because characters never get a grasp of whatís going on, thereís an atmosphere of the unknown. Itís like trying to get across a floor that wonít stop shifting, and thatís good for horror. Also, some individual scenes are remarkable, including one inside a movie theater that shamelessly rips off the Birds, but is just as effective because the context is different.


The Death Wheelers (1973)
aka. Psychomania
* *
Biker gang learns that the secret to immortality is you just have to believe. This was a lot sillier than I expected, downright Groundhog Day in places. Too much biker footage and pandering to the youth market, and more of a fantasy than a horror film. George Sanders made over 100 films, and this was his final one. Still, better than Endless Night made right before.


The Creeping Flesh (1973)
* *
Peter Cushing plays a scientist who believes evil can be biologically removed (o Ė kay) by using a primitive skeleton that regrows flesh when wet (what the what?) I guess back then a studio would bankroll any excuse to put Cushing and Christopher Lee in a movie together. Both actors are great, especially Lee. Itís surprising to think I found his early performances lacking. Heís all legend here. Too bad the storyís such a preposterous mess.


The Baby (1973)
* Ĺ
A recommendation from Matt Singer (http://www.ifc.com/2011/06/the-baby-is-one-freaky-deaky-f), who certainly makes it sound interesting. I was quickly turned off by the performance of a grown man acting like a hyper-emotional baby, which destroys any campy fun the film is going for by being deliberately annoying. Singer found it "supremely creepy" and "unsettling", but I just saw a feature film where the actors were performing at the level of a high school theater.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on December 28, 2016, 03:14:17 PM
[The Last House on Dead End Street (1973)
aka. At The Hour Of Our Death
aka. The Cuckoo Clocks of Hell
aka. The Fun House
Ĺ 
I understand people finding unusual films and declaring them art, but there has to be a line in the sand. A handful of artistic shots and meta touches doesnít change the fact that this is absolute garbage. Large parts of it donít make sense, leaving you with a laundry line of immoral imagery and a cast of repellent people. I read a review that calls it a masterpiece of ďno-budget, underground, amateur gore films.Ē Letís not be encouraging this.
Even worse than Cuadecuc, Vampir?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 28, 2016, 11:26:12 PM
No. Dead End Street has some good shots and at times there appears to be a plot. Cuadecuc, Vampir is my least favorite type of film, non-narrative. I'm a story person so non-narrative filmmaking, where you often have to open your mind to or make your own connections regarding the picture and the sound, which often aren't working together in any direct way, is the cancer of movies for me.

The next batch of films gives me 150 titles and I plan to do an progress report. I will try to remember to post all the Ĺ star films together and rank them if I can.

There's also Blood Freak (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg854884#msg854884) where the guy becomes a turkey-headed monster, creeping people with his ominous *gobble*.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on December 28, 2016, 11:41:11 PM
I am not into horror so much, except for vampires who are a soft spot, sort of. I too think Cuadecuc Vampir is an ordeal to sit through, so I got a little curious. Very much looking forward to the half star rank!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 30, 2016, 12:12:14 PM
Spoiler Alert: I had a very difficult time writing honestly about Ganja & Hess. Not the worst film of the Marathon, but I actually stopped it to be sad about my cat for a while, which was a more preferable use of my time.

Finished it this morning after doing some reading, watching some videos and listening to the Filmspotting Podcast review. Adam nailed it really well.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on December 31, 2016, 01:16:17 AM
(http://imgur.com/U2sj7Hh.jpg)

Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell (1973 or 1974)
* * 
I read a comment about how Universal Frankenstein movies are about the monster while Hammer Frankenstein is about the Doctor. Having Peter Cushing play the doctor all these years is certainly a benefit to the series, but itís a largely disappointing series. The horror doesnít rise above anything more than some creepy atmosphere and the theatrical characters can only give melodramatic emotions.


The Iron Rose (1973)
* * Ĺ
After having sex in a cemetery crypt, a couple cannot find their way out of the graveyard. My 3rd Jean Rollin film, and while I have yet to fully like one, I understand why his fans are so passionate. The grungy atmosphere casts a unique mood. Rollin is so much more than vampires (noticeably absent here) and graphic nudity (only two instances). I still have my fingers crossed for a good one that can be a gateway drug into his world.


Ganja & Hess (1973)
* Ĺ
Iíve been aware of and afraid of this film for decades. Aware that it is a film like no other, with a singular vision that has created a rabid cult following. Afraid because itís been described as ďa jagged film with surreal flourishes, and long dialogue scenes that go nowhere.Ē You have to decide how much is the creation of the directorís vision and how much is an ambitious filmmaker with limited skill and an even more limited budget. I found the film inexplicable and pretty much unendurable, but Iíll admit that could be because of the binge-and-purge style of this marathon, which could be taken as me not having the patience to give the film a proper chance, and maybe one day I will read a passionate endorsement that will get me to try this film again.


Lemora: A Childís Tale of the Supernatural (1973)
aka. Lady Dracula
* * Ĺ
Iíd never heard of this one, though it certainly deserves to be less obscure, much like the nutty Russian horror Viy. In look and tone, this also reminded me of those nutty New Zealand horrors where the production value is low, the camerawork is bold and it works as often as it doesnít. Despite the aka, this also has a lot of elements from zombie and witchcraft films, and itís one of the more properly scary titles in the Marathon so far.


Terror in the Wax Museum (1973)
* Ĺ
A remarkable cast of stars from decades ago (Ray Milland, Broderick Crawford, Elsa Lanchester, Patric Knowles and John Carradine) in the most unremarkable film set in a wax museum film Iíve seen yet. So timid with the frights and so flat in the direction, I assumed this was a TV Movie. Bing Crosby was a Producer, which may explain everything.
Title: Horror: The Final Chapter - Progress Report
Post by: 1SO on December 31, 2016, 01:39:52 AM
Another 50 titles down.

My Watchlist of 428 films is 38% complete.
Of the last 50 films, I recommend...
1. The Blood on Satanís Claw
2. Blade of the Ripper
3. 10 Rillington Place
4. Messiah of Evil
5. Diabel/The Devil
6. Taste the Blood of Dracula
7. Robin Redbreast
8. The House That Dripped Blood


For the entire Marathon, the Top Five Ranked are...
1. Nightmare (1964)
2. The Blood on Satanís Claw (1971)
3. Violated Angels (1967)
4. Quatermass and the Pit (1967)
5. Blade of the Ripper (1971)



Here is a look back at the worst of the Marathon so far...

The Giant Claw (1957)
*
This one really kicked off the night. From what I read, this was a major studio effort to get in on the giant monster movie craze. However, Ray Harryhausen was either busy or too expensive, so Columbia Pictures hired someone else and what they got was a ridiculous-looking buzzard marionette that looks like something from Jim Henson's Dark Crystal. The rest of the film might have been okay, but every time they show the creature - which you should Google - this becomes one of the All Time Laughably Bad Movies. Despite the low rating, I'd be interested in seeing this in a theater full of unsuspecting viewers.

The Day of the Triffids (1963)
*
Silly nonsense about most of the world going blind just in time for an invasion by killer plants. Cult film is most interesting for casting Howard Keel in a non-musical role. The effects are overall lousy, the story is obviously condensed from longer source material. In this case a book, which differs vastly from this film. I can see where this might work given more time to develop logic. (The story's been remade twice as a mini-series.) Abrupt ending is a joke here too, but there are many laughs to be found throughout. That said, this is much blander a good/bad time than The Giant Claw.

The Brain That Wouldnít Die (1962)
*
A cheat. This contribution from the Bodmovies.org list is one of the few MST3K episodes I've never seen, and the first episode of Mike Nelson. So I didn't watch the pure cut, but I'm sure I had a much better time doing it this way. It's classic bad movie with a large dollop of female objectification that the MST crew relentlessly mocks for being creepy. One of their better efforts and one of this Marathon's worst movies.

Terror Beaneath the Sea (1966)
*
A cross between Creature From the Black Lagoon and a James Bond film as Sonny Chiba takes on a madman who is creating an army of Water Cyborgs. Iím starting to feel I should have been more picky in my selections. After making the list, I watch each one without reading an IMDB or Letterboxd summary. I donít know if the film is supposed to be serious or camp or Ďso bad itís goodí. So there comes a point where I go ďanother one of theseĒ and even I am starting to wonder why I venture through to the end.

Planet of the Vampires (1965)
*
Even for Bava - now 0 for 10 - this is amazingly bad. The costumes and cardboard sets are laughable, with colorful monitors and control panels that only add to the cheap-looking atmosphere. The plot is nonsensical and camp. I canít tell if the comedy is deliberate cheese or if the straight-faced performances and amateur direction just came out that way. Itís like watching a youtube video by a director with ambitious vision and no idea how to express it. This has a cult reputation, but I imagine Gods of Egypt is about the same level of quality.

Satanís Sadists (1969)
Ĺ
From The Deuce, which has a number of interesting Exploitation/Grindhouse titles, but this is just terrible. A biker flick with ugly scenes of violence and sexual aggression, oodles of filmmaking incompetence and one over-baked ham of a performance by Russ Tamblyn.

The Undertaker and His Pals (1966)
Ĺ
I hadn't realized we've moved into the Blood Feast type of ultra-gory horror, but this is a lesser-known example of one of those. A mixture of silly comedy and fake-looking graphic violence. The last scene is the best, an inspired idea to have all the murdered rise from their place of death to smile, wink and nod at the camera.

Terror in the Midnight Sun (1959)
aka. Invasion of the Animal people
aka. Space Invasion of Lapland
Ĺ
A number of films from this Marathon are courtesy of Badmovies.org Best B-Movies. Previous films have been mixed to bad, but I get why theyíre interesting from a B-movie perspective. This one is just terrible. A meteor crashes in Northern Sweden. Scientists arrive and get caught up in skiing and romancing a local figure skater. Itís a couple of days before they even go near the crash site. Thereís a ridiculous-looking giant creature and some Conehead/Devo aliens that show up for one scene. Mostly, this is a film about skiing.

Blood Freak (1972)
Ĺ 
A guy does too much drugs and turns into a giant turkey monster. According to Letterboxd, there are 30 worse films in this Marathon, but that would surprise me. It surpasses Terror in the Midnight Sun, though still slightly better than Night of the Lepus (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12547.msg825336#msg825336), also released in 1972. This barely qualifies as a film with occasional cutaways to a guy sitting at a desk to fill in story gaps. Big laugh for the sound of a turkey gobble to attempt suspense.

The Last House on Dead End Street (1973)
aka. At The Hour Of Our Death
aka. The Cuckoo Clocks of Hell
aka. The Fun House
Ĺ 
I understand people finding unusual films and declaring them art, but there has to be a line in the sand. A handful of artistic shots and meta touches doesnít change the fact that this is absolute garbage. Large parts of it donít make sense, leaving you with a laundry line of immoral imagery and a cast of repellent people. I read a review that calls it a masterpiece of ďno-budget, underground, amateur gore films.Ē Letís not be encouraging this.

Cuadecuc, Vampir (1971)
Ĺ
The problem with most any Watchlist is youíre usually not taking a list of titles from someone who knows you but more likely a general list of films considered worthy. Thatís how a non-narrative, experimental film like this slips in. It makes me angry that there are genuine sleepers and buried treasure but people like Jonathan Rosenbaum would rather champion something that makes the deliberate choice to have a sound mix that only matches the picture at one point.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 04, 2017, 01:30:23 AM
(http://imgur.com/f16baj4.jpg)

Lisa and the Devil (1973)
* *
Mario Bava strikes(out) again with another story full of ideas and empty of explanation. I read a review that defends Bava as a master of Dream Logic, but I call B.S. on that because Dream Logic still requires logic, something symbolic or layered. This is incomprehensible and pretty damn boring until the more insane back half because thereís no style to wallpaper over the lack of substance.


The Cannibal Man (1973)
aka. Week of the Killer
* *
A young cattle butcher accidentally kills a cab driver, slowly descending into madness and more murders. Not a sleazy slasher, but a more thoughtful drama from an openly gay socialist filmmaker. So itís a more respectable horror film in that regard, but the extreme violence and tepid direction ruin any good intentions.


Dying Room Only (1973)
aka. Where is My Husband?
aka. The Disappearance
* * * - Good
A wildcard pick from one of my favorite genre writers Richard Matheson (Duel, I Am Legend, The Night Stalker) with the wonderfully simple premise of a couple (Cloris Leachman and Dabney Colman) who stop at a roadside diner where the husband mysteriously vanishes. It plays out just fine and is a nice vehicle for Leachman, plus thereís Ned Beatty. Perhaps itís all too simple, with a limited location, and TV Movie production values. Much as I like this, it had me wishing I was watching Breakdown (1997) instead. Not only is that a better film, it appears to have also fallen into obscurity, which is odd because who doesnít love a good Kurt Russell film?


The Bell From Hell (1973)
aka. The Bell of Hell
* *
Railroaded by his family into a psychiatric hospital, a young man is released and sets out for revenge. Old story has a few wrinkles, including the leadís love of make-up effects and some artistic juxtaposition of past and present, but the experimentation removes interest from the main story and characters. In an unusual real-life tragedy, the director fell from the bell tower on the last day of filming and died.


Isnít It Shocking? (1973)
* *
TV Movie with an amazing cast: Alan Alda, Edmond OíBrien, Lloyd Nolan, Louise Lasser and Ruth Gordon. Directed by John Badham, story has Alda as a sheriff searching for a killer who uses a defibrillator. Too bad the film is sorely lacking in intensity or urgency (something you canít say about Dying Room Only), with too much time spent on the townfolk and not enough on the manhunt. ĒMyronís dead. I donít have time for the carrot cake,Ē sums up the movie really well.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on January 04, 2017, 07:04:09 AM
ĒMyronís dead. I donít have time for the carrot cake,Ē
Quotes like these makes the day worthwhile.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: MartinTeller on January 04, 2017, 10:27:25 AM
Very accurate description of Lisa and the Devil.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 04, 2017, 12:38:26 PM
Very accurate description of Lisa and the Devil.

Thanks. I'm making extra effort to not phone in my Bava reviews. At this point (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=4650.msg753390#msg753390) it's become ridiculous that I'm still watching his work. I believe he has one more in the Marathon. Who knows, maybe it's his best one.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 08, 2017, 01:48:38 AM
(http://imgur.com/2Qj8biD.jpg)

Scream, Pretty Peggy (1973)
* *
TV Movie with a very predictable twist comes from Total Filmsí 50 Amazing Films Youíve Probably Never Seen and I would like to read the notes from the meeting that got this un-amazing title included. Homicidal by William Castle is a similar story, more amazing, just as obscure. Bette Davis is in this and the more I see of her 30s and 40s work, the more I weep for her career after Baby Jane.


Flesh For Frankenstein (1973)
aka. Andy Warholís Frankenstein
* *
Outrageous and perverse version of Frankenstein has a number of original ideas, with Baron F. (Udo Kier) building both a perfect male and female to Adam and Eve a master race. Even though the film is aiming for decadent thrills, it actually wouldíve been better if they toned down the sex and violence, saving them for key moments. The amateur performances lower the film down to Human Centipede levels of camp


Lost Hearts (1973)
* * Ĺ 
Short, from the British anthology A Ghost Story For Christmas that also produced A Warning to the Curious, The Signalman and Whistle and Iíll Come to You. I can see this working fine for some as a bite-sized chiller, but despite a couple of decent scares it was too simple and the ghosts just look like children in Halloween makeup.


Vampyres (1974)
aka. Blood Hunger
aka. Satanís Daughters
* *
Vampire lesbian lovers are brutally murdered and continue to haunt the area, luring men and a camping couple to their final (un)resting place. Combining vamps with ghosts, and a fractured, circular storytelling that reminded me a little of Last Year at Marianbad is what gives this movie its appeal. Either that or the numerous, sex scenes. Rated ĎRí in 1974, though based on what I saw, Iím doubting IMDB. The violence is also pretty gruesome in places. So itís a filmmaker with some artistic ambition laid low by the need to have sleazy material to market.


Deranged: Confessions of a Necrophile (1974)
* * * - Okay
Click Here For Review (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=14226.msg859556#msg859556)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 12, 2017, 09:55:40 AM
(http://imgur.com/geeqikM.jpg)

Bram Stokerís Dracula (1974)
* * Ĺ
Recommended by a friend and with a script by the great Richard Matheson I was up for it. This is perhaps an overly-faithful adaptation with Mathesonís contribution largely limited to deciding what to cut from the book. What remains is too much like Coppolaís Dracula film without all the visual spectacle. Jack Palance plays the Count. The casting is unusual but the performance is effective.


From Beyond the Grave (1974)
aka. Tales From the Beyond
* * * - Okay
Collection of 4 short tales tied together by an antiques shop run by Peter Cushing, whose final scene is one of the most delightful moments of his career. Among the better collections Iíve seen, which is faint praise. More fun than the stories themselves is seeing where all the usual suspects turn up, actors like David Warner and Donald Pleasence.


The Perfume of the Lady in Black (1974)
* *
Giallo about a woman being driven crazy by everyone she knows for reasons she doesnít understand. More Polanski than Argento, with liberal references to Alice in Wonderland. The lack of a reason why makes this an empty exercise until the very last scene when we finally get an answer that makes no sense, but itís audacious on a Sleepaway Camp final scene level.


Symptoms (1974)
aka. The Blood Virgin
* * Ĺ
I never saw Alex Ross Perryís Queen of Earth, but this seems very similar, two women at a lake house, one might be be losing their sanity. From there itís a fairly unexceptional ride on the Repulsion express, but thereís something interesting going on with lead actress, Angela Pleasence, who resembles a cross between Tori Amos and her father Donald Pleasence. An odd and interesting face for the camera to gaze on and try to get inside of.


The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974)
aka. The 7 Brothers Meet Dracula
aka. 7 Brothers and a Sister Meet Dracula
* * * - Okay
Iíd heard the title, but I didnít know this is a collaboration between Martial Arts film studio The Shaw Brothers and Hammer Horror. I didnít realize among the Asian action stars would be Peter Cushing swinging a mean torch. While neither side put forth their best work, the two compliment each other like a peanut butter cup, and while I outgrew Shaw Bros. years before I got into Hammer, I had a smile on my face the whole time.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 12, 2017, 05:24:15 PM
No surprise with a title like The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires is from the Shaw Brithers. Such a HK title.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 12, 2017, 07:19:36 PM
Sure, but then there's Hammer...

(http://imgur.com/O99HacT.jpg)

That shade of green is the unifying element, a lighting style common with both studios.


Also, this woman is awesome...

(http://imgur.com/E3TpIwG.gif)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 13, 2017, 04:51:11 AM
Szu Shih is very good in a number of movies (she is in 6 Chang Cheh films, which is why I recognise her). She has a very good sorrowful, I am going to get my revenge look.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 14, 2017, 10:11:09 PM
(http://imgur.com/Lyhdlj5.jpg)

The Stranger Within (1974)
* *
A woman (Barbara Eden) becomes mysteriously pregnant and starts exhibiting bizarre behavior. Written by Richard Matheson, based on his own short story, I have to think something went wrong along the way. Itís hard to tell because the TV Movie direction and brief running time cloud the issue. People donít become alarmed enough by Edenís behavior, which is both hyper-intellectual and primitive, or the baby which is growing at twice the normal rate. In the debate about a womanís rights over her body during pregnancy, this film takes the view that a man should have some say because a woman isnít in a clear mental state. Thatís provocative, but handled so poorly it makes the film unintentionally offensive.


Frightmare (1974)
aka. Cover Up
* *
I was constantly out of rhythm with this film, which has a story Ė itís not ďdream logicĒ Ė but it never commits to any of its points. Thereís family trauma, serial killing, insanity, cannibalism, bold moments of blood and long dry stretches of dreary tedium. The acting is solid, but scenes end right when theyíre getting interesting.


Night Train Murders (1975)
aka. Last Stop on the Night Train
aka. Donít Ride on Late Night Trains
aka. The New House on the Left
* Ĺ
I donít know how many remakes there are of Last House on the Left Ė which is itself a remake of Bergmanís The Virgin Spring Ė so I never know when I accidentally back into one. (Even IMDB and Google Search provide different titles. Iíve found no definitive list.) The problem is the original Last House managed to create some effective (though wholly depressing) moments of horror out of detestable material. These remakes have all the depressing story points but none of the effective horror. They are all varying degrees of bad, this one fares slightly better for not containing exploitative nudity and having a score by Ennio Morricone that includes harmonica.


Poor Pretty Eddie (1975)
aka. Heartbreak Motel
aka. Massacre at Redneck County
aka. Black Vengeance
* Ĺ
This filmís existence makes no sense to me. The junkyard car of a famous black celebrity (Leslie Uggams) breaks down in the deep south. She is dismissive of the folk (led by Shelly Winters and cop Slim Pickens) and naÔve about their hostility towards her presence. What follows are some bizarre/surreal scenes of sexual exploitation, racism and sadistic but only slightly bloody violence by a cast of familiar faces who should be nowhere near such low material. Iíve seen more offensive films in this Marathon, though if you were to read a detailed plot synopsis you would find that hard to believe.


Assault! Jack the Ripper (1976)
* *
Japanese ďViolent PinkĒ film, which means itís full of sex and violence but not intended in a way thatís morally vacant or depressingly dark and disturbing. The constant sex and violence is joyful compared to Poor Pretty Eddie, even though this has a lot more actual blood and nudity. The story foreshadows Natural Born Killers with a couple who get turned on after accidentally taking a life. Murder becomes their foreplay, but then the man starts finding the killing more exciting than the sex, while the woman sees it as being unfaithful when he starts killing without her. Thatís an interesting idea, but itís stretched very thin even over the 71 minute running time.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: roujin on January 15, 2017, 12:11:11 AM
I wanna see the last film. I think POOR PRETTY EDDIE is on my 70s list.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 15, 2017, 12:33:08 AM
I saw you had an image from it on your Pink Marathon thread. Couldn't tell if that meant you had seen it or were planning to see it.

Much as I'd love another opinion on PPE, I can't find a reason not to try to warn you off it.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on January 15, 2017, 10:52:35 PM
Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires sounds too wonderful to miss.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 15, 2017, 11:02:01 PM
Hopefully this Marathon will lead to a number of Shocktober selections. It's also surprising how many of these films are on YouTube or DailyMotion.

I'm kind of extra excited for my next batch which includes...
a British short I've been wanting to see for many years
A Doctor Who recommended by Dave the Necrobumper
one of the most notorious, most controversial titles in the deep, dark cave of horror
a movie about killer earthworms
The Oily Maniac, a Shaw Brothers horror film that has some interesting screenshots on Google.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 18, 2017, 08:48:04 AM
(http://imgur.com/aD01hAl.jpg)

The Signalman (1976)
* * Ĺ
Short film from a Charles Dickens short story has plenty of creepy atmosphere and the acting from the two leads is quality, but I wish there was more follow-thru to go with all the nice build-up.


The Brain of Morbius (1976)
* * Ĺ
I was looking forward to seeing some classic Doctor Who. My letdown is this isnít any more Horror than typical Doctor Who, even with the Frankenstein plot and the coven of women. With the 70s BBC TV production budget, thereís no atmosphere and no real attempt at scares or chills. Morbius doesnít belong in this Marathon.


Snuff (1976)
Ĺ
A terrible exploitation film thatís sometimes hilariously bad. (Among the dubbed cast is a young girl clearly voiced by a male doing a high, squeaky voice.) Then at the end comes the filmís reason for being, an alleged actual murder of one of the cast. Thereís a smartly-done edit from the movie to a wide shot of the crew filming the movie, and this could have been harrowing stuff. I was only planning to watch as much as I cared to. However, the sequence is over-edited, the gore is clearly fake and it all happens way too fast. Iím thankful for the incompetence of the filmmakers, but it only points up the cheap gimmick Ė William Castle spins in his grave Ė and the cynical approach towards achieving cinema immortality.


Squirm (1976)
* Ĺ
Much as there are hidden gems in every genre, I donít think weíre at the point where 1000 good horror movies exist. I did IMDB searches using a number of parameters, and based on that I would theorize that there are 700 at most, which means 60 years before we might be at a list of 1000. Much like Snakes on a Plane, if youíre looking for a killer earthworm movie this one definitely has that. It also has an ensemble of overly southern accents and if youíre a Rick Baker completionist, he was the makeup designer. Other than that, this is pretty dull.


The Oily Maniac (1976)
* Ĺ
More horror from Shaw Brothers, though you might confuse it for a Japanese film because, as the title suggests, this one is plain nutty (super happy fun). It's not AS fun as it should be with a subplot about a raped woman and so much disregard for logic, it becomes more frustrating than it should.

I'm quoting this review from Letterboxd because it sums up the experience in a positive way rather nicely.

Quote from: MDF
Not to be confused with "Maniac" starring Joe Spinell who is also oily. Oily Maniac doesn't quite live up to what one might hope for given the films title, plot, and poster, but it's still a very fun Shaw Brothers offering. The studio has produced far better films, this one is a little sloppy in every regard, but I'd still recommend it to anyone who would watch a film called Oily Maniac in the first place. My favourite moments in the film involve Oily Maniac essentially parkouring around town. Also this is the best movie I've ever seen that takes place in a coconut oil factory.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 18, 2017, 02:00:42 PM
Oh well. Still I am glad you did not hate it. In the classic Doctor Who The Horror of Fang Rock would be the most atmospheric/scary, but it is still unlikely to cross this marathons bar. Thanks for checking out my suggestion of The Brain of Morbius.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 20, 2017, 11:53:36 PM
JUNIOR!
I couldn't wait to post this one because...
As you may know, I love it when movies get big and weird. While subtlety is nice, there's nothing quite like an over-the-top, toss all the rules out the window and see what happens kind of movie.

(http://imgur.com/Phx9jDn.jpg)

Alucarda (1977)
aka. Innocents from Hell
aka. Sisters of Satan
* * * - Okay
Mexican horror is crazy. Think Robert Rodriguez, Guillermo del Toro and Alejandro Jodorowsky. Now throw in Paul Verhoeven, Ken Russellís The Devils and Hausu and you have some idea what to expect from this film. Convent girls give their souls to Satan and then proceed to send everything around them to hell. No deep meanings, just an all-out button-pushing blitz on religious imagery, with a gleeful abundance of blood and nudity.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on January 20, 2017, 11:56:43 PM
Heh, I didn't even read the top part because I was intrigued by the picture. As I read the review I thought it sounded right up my alley. Then I read the top part and it all falls into place. It's on the list.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 21, 2017, 04:29:10 AM
Alucarda (1977)
Mexican horror is crazy. Think Robert Rodriguez, Guillermo del Toro and Alejandro Jodorowsky. Now throw in Paul Verhoeven, Ken Russellís The Devils and Hausu and you have some idea what to expect from this film.
Sounds like the equivalent of putting your brain into a blender, sounds awesome.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: DarkeningHumour on January 21, 2017, 04:42:50 AM
This is why our tastes will never perfectly match. It sounds awful.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 21, 2017, 05:21:38 AM
We will always have Deadpool
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 21, 2017, 10:22:21 AM
When you go looking for it, know this...
Alucarda is a Mexican film, but it was shot with the cast speaking English. The cast then dubbed it into Spanish. The version I watched was Spanish with English subtitles. I listened to some of the English language track and the performances sounded less natural.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 23, 2017, 11:23:13 PM
(http://imgur.com/tQg17KG.jpg)

Burnt Offerings (1976)
aka. Killhouse
* *
Stephen King acknowledges this as a major influence on The Shining, which is putting it mildly because for the first hour this IS The Shining as directed by someone whose filmography is almost exclusively television. (The 70s soft gauze, soap opera lighting is particularly distracting.) Whatever might have worked back in 1976 was neutered a few years later, except for the climactic scare, which works way better than the rest of the film.


Eaten Alive (1976)
aka. Horror Hotel
aka. Legend of the Bayou
aka. Starlight Slaughter
aka. The Devilís Swamp
* * Ĺ
Tobe Hooperís follow-up to Texas Chainsaw exaggerates the black comedy and weird behavior even further, in both the visual style and the performances. While Hooperís ability to capture realistic people is M.I.A., his ability to deliver on the horror is still pretty strong, making it hard for me to completely trash the film, even though I can understand others despising this. Interesting cast includes Neville Brand, Robert Englund (who opens the film with a line from Kill Bill, ďMy nameís Buck, and Iím hereÖĒ), Marilyn Burns and DePalma regular William Finley improbably cast as a family man, (who canít help acting like heís completely insane.)


Alucarda (1977)
aka. Innocents from Hell
aka. Sisters of Satan
* * * - Okay
Mexican horror is crazy. Think Robert Rodriguez, Guillermo del Toro and Alejandro Jodorowsky. Now throw in Paul Verhoeven, Ken Russellís The Devils and Hausu and you have some idea what to expect from this film. Convent girls give their souls to Satan and then proceed to send everything around them to hell. No deep meanings, just an all-out button-pushing blitz on religious imagery, with a gleeful abundance of blood and nudity. Some of the details are hard to follow but the overall hyperactive sensationalism is exciting.


The Car (1977)
aka. Wheels
aka. DeathMobile
* * * - Okay
Sounds like a rip-off of Spielbergís Duel, but actually a version of Jaws with people being killed by an unstoppable supernatural car with fully tinted windows and the local sheriff out to stop it. (James Brolin, doing an amazing Josh Brolin impression, right down to the Texas moustache.) Silly idea, but the director has a real zest for the genre and comes up with a number of exciting moments including a long take out a window at night that may be my favorite shot in this entire Marathon. (I tried to gif it, but I donít know how to do that.)


Shock Waves (1977)
aka. Death Corps
aka. Almost Human
* Ĺ
The moments of zombies in Nazi uniforms and dark goggles calmly rising out of the water or walking along the bottom completely submerged is a consistently interesting image. The rest is completely disposable. John Carradine sets things up as a salty sea captain and Peter Cushing eventually explains it all too you, not that any explanation was needed. In between are a bunch of disposable characters and a lot of padded exploration.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 26, 2017, 11:49:25 PM
(http://imgur.com/0cWHpD4.jpg)

Rituals (1977)
aka. The Creeper
* * Ĺ
Grindhouse Deliverance. There was a time when I had no reaction to old Hollywood legends slumming it in something like this, and now Iím like, ďHal Holbrook! No!Ē A little time is taken to build character and I like how everyone is a doctor, but without the proper equipment they can only diagnose how their bodies will physically shut down. Thereís a bit of mystery, but the finale needed something more.


Schock (1977)
aka. Suspense
aka. Beyond the Door II
aka. The Demon is Nuts
* *
My new house is haunted. No wait, itís my son. No, itís my 2nd husband. My first husband ainít dead. Back to the son. Maybe itís me. Yep, itís me. Nope, itís the kid. Mario Bavaís last film and hopefully the last one of his Iíll watch considering Iím now 0/14 (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=4650.msg753390#msg753390) and I donít see anything on IMDB or ICM that might accidentally make its way to my Watchlist.


Kingdom of the Spiders (1977)
* * * - Okay
Spiders are my nightmare fuel, so this 1970ís Arachnophobia starring William Shatner had a number of sights I hope donít stick in my mind too long. (Shots of everything from live rats to light bulbs are covered in real spiders.) Halfway through I was checking my suddenly itchy skin a lot. Another film clearly riding the wave of Jaws, though this is more like The Birds and Shatner does what he does, so nothing out of the ordinary but it sure gets the job done.


The Shout (1978)
* * * - Okay
Enigmatic drama of seduction and black magic starring Alan Bates, John Hurt, Susannah York and Tim Curry. I donít want to say too much because maintaining the mystery is important, but Bates claims to know a special kind of shout powerful enough to kill. The build-up to that scene increases the dread ever so slightly and what happens afterwards has a Mulholland Dr. brain puzzle quality to it. So, I liked it, but I didnít quite get some of it and I donít recommend it lightly.


Empire of Passion (1978)
aka. The Ghost of Love
* * Ĺ
At first I thought this was a Japanese Double Indemnity with the two lovers plotting to kill the womanís husband. Not Horror but similar to a number of thrillers. Then they off the husband and the film becomes a ghost story too. None of this is too exciting because the leads have little chemistry. More of a lesser companion piece to director Nagisa Oshimaís previous film, In the Realm of the Senses. Less divisive but also less thought provoking.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on January 28, 2017, 12:19:55 PM
(http://imgur.com/0cWHpD4.jpg)

Schock (1977)
aka. Suspense
aka. Beyond the Door II
aka. The Demon is Nuts
* *
My new house is haunted. No wait, itís my son. No, itís my 2nd husband. My first husband ainít dead. Back to the son. Maybe itís me. Yep, itís me. Nope, itís the kid. Mario Bavaís last film and hopefully the last one of his Iíll watch considering Iím now 0/14 (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=4650.msg753390#msg753390) and I donít see anything on IMDB or ICM that might accidentally make its way to my Watchlist.


Your persistence is noble.  And this description is hilarious.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on January 28, 2017, 12:31:34 PM
That's Bava in a nutshell. He's all about making the scene in front of you do something, but he doesn't care about connecting it to any of the scenes that come before or after. That's why the definitive Bava movie is A Bay of Blood. Tagline: 13 Characters, 13 Murders, it's essentially a collection of murder set-pieces with a surprise at the end about who is doing the killings. No arc that carries you from A to Z, but you can see how that sets the template for the 80s slasher film.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: pixote on February 03, 2017, 06:11:24 PM
I just stumbled upon this list (http://w-cinema.blogspot.com/2011/10/another-15-overlooked-horror-films-for.html) while getting a screenshot for Hangover Square. Seems like a very interesting set of films, though the placement of Brahm's film at #1 calls the list's genre definition into question.

pixote
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 03, 2017, 08:53:32 PM
Also The Queen of Spades, which is only kind of horror. There are some interesting titles - #15 is next for me to watch - but overall the list doesn't have me too excited. I did recently find a list of interesting titles, though I'm now hesitant to add to this project, which is already incredibly long. So, I guess true to the spirit of the title of this Marathon there will eventually be A New Beginning.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 07, 2017, 01:19:17 AM
(http://imgur.com/EBZ1I97.jpg)

The Toolbox Murders (1978)
* Ĺ
The genre is changing, looking for a new direction. This one looks like a TV Movie and indeed the director comes from TV, but the amount of blood and gratuitous nudity starts high, with four murders in the first 15 minutes. Then, the film changes into a psychological kidnapping thriller. I accept that horror crosses moral lines, especially with respect to women, but I donít condone it. Thereís a sexual assault towards the end that cuts away early but still crosses my line of tolerance.


The Manitou (1978)
*
Classic example of a film so bad itís good. Tony Curtis as a psychic helping a friend who seems to be growing a child out the back of her neck. Turns out that kid is an evil Native American spirit. Thereís Curtis fighting with an elderly woman and losing, the birth scene and a finale that involves outer space (inside a hospital) and firing psychic lasers. I admire the ambition of the effects, but the execution is hopelessly cheesy.


The Grapes of Death (1978)
aka. The Raisins of Death
* *
Jean Rollinís bare-bones zombie film moves quickly through an episodic format, the best part being an exploration of a village already destroyed, with bodies in various states of death sparsely littering the area. The minimalism also exposes whatís lacking from Rollin, a sense of style.


Patrick (1978)
aka. Coma
* *
One of the most famous Ozploitation films (with an ending ruined by the documentary on the subject) is hard to appreciate. Thereís interesting material about the rights of a comatose patient and abusive relationships. This goes unexplored and yet the film is nearly two hours long. Instead, thereís a bit of Psycho and a lot of Carrie and a surprising amount of adult content for a film rated PG, including full-frontal nudity. The cheap thrills are more icky than exciting.


Someoneís Watching Me (1978)
aka. High Rise
* * * - Okay
Written and directed by John Carpenter just before he made Halloween. Story of a woman being driven mad by a tormenting stalker isnít fresh, but there are a number of shots and sequences where Carpenter elevates this TV Movie with his skill, especially the last 5 minutes, which is some of the best imitation Hitchcock. Last line is terrible as is star Lauren Huttonís mental breakdown scene, but definitely of interest to any fan of early Carpenter.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on February 07, 2017, 01:37:57 AM
Yo, how many of these have different titles? Seems kinda like a part of the genre. Just seeing what will make people watch it.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 07, 2017, 01:57:16 AM
It was more common during the drive-in/exploitation times when they would sell the same film to different markets by using different titles. Or in Italy, they would try to tie a film into a successful film that was recently released. I started adding them in for fun. Sometimes the alternate title describes the film better or the poster will show a different title than the IMDB/Letterboxd listing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on February 07, 2017, 11:47:46 PM
It's an interesting bit of film history, I think. Similar to translated titles that aren't just the same words in different languages. Reveals a little bit about what they think will sell in certain places (or times) and what won't.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 10, 2017, 12:26:23 AM
(http://imgur.com/eA7u7sH.jpg)

Fascination (1979)
* * Ĺ
Another Jean Rollin already. Though this has some of that style I noted as missing in Grapes of Death (especially the costumes), Iím now getting that Rollin is better with softcore titillation than the goosebumps of horror. Thereís blood and death, but it's a distraction to keep this from being labeled straight up porn. On those terms, itís not bad, very thin in story but Brigitte Lahaie - who was in Grapes of Death and is physically perfect Ė is an interesting actress and the scene where she attacks with a scythe wearing only a cloak is Rollinís most iconic moment.


The Plumber (1979)
* * * - Good
Full Review Here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10086.msg863820#msg863820)


Driller Killer (1979)
Ĺ
I lost interest in this pretty quick. It wasnít the filmís violent reputation that put me off, I just donít like director Abel Ferrara (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10209.msg601136#msg601136) and casting himself as a pretentious jerk artist doesnít make it easier. Some of it is an interesting time capsule of the late 70s New York art scene, but Iíd rather watch the b-roll footage as a documentary than anything where Ferraraís on screen. The kind of trash where someone would turn to a horror junkie like me and say, ďyou actually like this crap?Ē NoÖ I donít. Very similar to American Psycho, which is a masterpiece by comparison.


The Butterfly Murders (1979)
* *
Directing debut of Hong Kong madman Tsui Hark (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=9260.0) (Once Upon a Time in China) is a martial arts mystery about killer butterflies. Yep, the title is literal and this film has shades of The Birds with large swarms of deadly butterflies. Harkís style is frenetic and full of more ideas than the film can hold. Some people love this about him, but Iím not much of a fan.


The Amityville Horror (1979)
* *
Saw this when I was a kid, so technically a re-watch but I remember the remake more. A lot of it was very familiar, but that's because of the script more than my memory. That and comedians who would make fun of this family's determination to stay long after the flies and the voices and the walls dripping blood. A couple of big scares, but this is also the first film in the Marathon to use *quiet*quiet*BANG! jump scares, and being an early version, the loud was annoyingly loud.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 10, 2017, 12:29:05 AM
5 more films gets me to the 200 mark (chronologically. I'm keeping the Shocktober titles separate.) I'll post some stats, comparisons with the first 100, and most importantly a Watchlist of recommendations.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on February 10, 2017, 12:49:13 AM
I will much appreciate that watchlist.

As for the movies you watched this time, The Butterfly Murders sounds like the coolest one of the bunch. I haven't seen any of his films, but your description is intriguing. The Amityville Horror is too darn long (and, as you said, silly in the family's decision making), but damn there are a few great scares. My favorite is the pig head in the window. Really freaks me out!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 10, 2017, 09:34:50 AM
That one got me too. I rewound to get a better lock at what it was (without the shock), and the way it's framed in the window is like an early digital effect. Another great one that's similar is when she looks out the window at night and sees two red eyes staring back at her.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 13, 2017, 12:15:08 AM
(http://imgur.com/lckNx7i.jpg)

Beyond the Darkness (1979)
aka. Blue Holocaust
aka. The Final Darkness
aka. Buried Alive
Ĺ
Joe DíAmato is one of Italyís most prolific directors, and one of their sleaziest. For a former cinematographer, he has a terrible lack of style. Even worse, he has no self-imposed restraint regarding sex and violence. So he doesnít cross over the line with gusto, which can be fun with horror, but instead shows no feeling for the level of gore and casual nudity. A real turnoff, I have another of DíAmato film in my next batch of five, but will probably skip it. The one good part of this is the Score by The Goblins.


Schalcken The Painter (1979)
* * 1/2
BBC Ghost story that gets all kind of praise around the internet. Thereís a lot of atmosphere, even in the washed out print I found on Veehd, with backgrounds that often vanish into black (much like the paintings by the real Schalcken.) However, this is more of a dry study of Schalckenís technique (complete with extensive narration) with the ghost story taking up about 15 minutes. Too bad, because those few scenes are very creepy and full of dread.


Weíre Going to Eat You (1980)
aka. Hell Has No Gates
aka. Kung Fu Cannibals
aka. Cannibal Kung Fu: Burn! Cannibal Fist
* * Ĺ
A slapstick comedy, kung fu, gorefest set on an island full of cannibals. The comedy is as wild as Stephen Chow, though rarely as inspired, but the kung fu is reminiscent of Jackie Chan, with extensive use of props and furniture. The horror takes a backseat to it all, but the blood does pour in buckets not pints. Directed with more control than usual by Tsui Hark, which is surprising since this is one of his wilder stories.


Donít Go in the House (1980)
aka. The Burning
* Ĺ
One of the most forgettable titles Iíve come across in this Marathon. Even the terrible films usually have a reason for their reputation, but this is just a guy with a mother complex who burns women. Going chronologically, Iíve been fearing the number of slasher films infesting the 80s, which are often repetitious and tedious. This is one of those.


Humanoids From the Deep (1980)
aka. Humanoids of the Deep
aka. Monster
aka. Beneath the Darkness
* * Ĺ
Part Jaws rip-off, part Alien, part 80s slasher, a lot of old time monster movie mayhem, with a side order of sexploitation, small town racism and some joyfully extreme gore. From Roger Corman and directed by a woman named Barbara Peeters, it took a while for me to realize this wasnít just another run through the mill. Thereís a particular glee to it all that reminds me of early Peter Jackson and Sam Raimi films. As far as bad films go, the final 15-minute carnival massacre made this more enjoyable than I expected.
Title: Horror: The Final Chapter - Update
Post by: 1SO on February 13, 2017, 12:30:43 AM
I keep adding and removing titles, but the current list is nearly 50% complete. Here are some stats from the first 199 titles.

Top 15 of this 100
(http://imgur.com/wFP3Auq.jpg)

1.   The Blood on Satanís Claw (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12547.msg853696#msg853696)
2.   The Plumber (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10086.msg863820#msg863820)
3.   Dying Room Only
4.   Blade of the Ripper
5.   10 Rillington Place
6.   Alucarda
7.   Someoneís Watching Me
8.   The Shout
9.   Kingdom of the Spiders
10.   The Car
11.   Deranged (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=14226.msg859556#msg859556)
12.   The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires
13.   Messiah of Evil
14.   Diabel/The Devil (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=11043.msg855271#msg855271)
15.   From Beyond the Grave


Favorite Titles So Far
1.   Even the Wind is Afraid
2.   Weíre Going to Eat You
3.   The Monster that Challenged the World
4.   Your Vice is a Locked Room and Only I Have the Key
5.   Scream and Scream Again
6.   Short Night of Glass Dolls
7.   At Midnight Iíll Take Your Soul
8.   Horrors of Malformed Men
9.   Blood is the Color of Night
10.   (TIE) The Oily Maniac / The Grapes of Death
Title: Horror: The Final Chapter - The Gems
Post by: 1SO on February 13, 2017, 12:36:30 AM
The Best Finds, Ranked

Nightmare (1964)
The Blood on Satanís Claw (1971)
Violated Angels (1967)
Quatermass and the Pit (1967)
The Plumber (1979)
Dying Room Only (1973)
Blade of the Ripper (1971)
The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960)
El Vampiro (1957)
10 Rillington Place (1971)
Alucarda (1977)
Draculaís Daughter (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg846006#msg846006) (1935)
Horrors of the Black Museum (1959)
Someoneís Watching Me (1978)
The Shout (1978)
Kingdom of the Spiders (1977)
The Car (1977)
Deranged: Confessions of a Necrophile (1974)
The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974)
Kiss of the Vampire (1963)
Messiah of Evil (1973)
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969)
Diabel/The Devil (1972)
From Beyond the Grave (1974)
Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970)
The Shuttered Room (1967)
Daimajin (1966)
Violent Virgin (1969)
Matango: Attack of the Mushroom People (1963)
Robin Redbreast (1970)
The House That Dripped Blood (1971)
Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell (1968)
Carnival of Sinners (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg846229#msg846229) (1943)
The Queen of Spades (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg846635#msg846635) (1949)
Horrors of Malformed Men
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 19, 2017, 12:32:49 AM
(http://imgur.com/Ed8zVxo.jpg)

Prom Night (1980)
* Ĺ
Wildly over-popular 80s slasher staple, because it stars Jamie Lee Curtis. Director Paul Lynch brings the whodunit mystery to the subgenre, where a past crime gives everyone a solid motive to be the killer. There are some style points in the beginning, but the actual stalk-and-slash scenes are crushingly routine, and the acting by the unknowns in the cast is terrible. The guy trying to be John Travolta is as distancing as the disco music trying to be hit songs they didnít want to pay for.


The Night of the Hunted (1980)
* *
6th Jean Rollin film in this Marathon, and while I canít recommend one Iíve enjoyed them more than anything by Mario Bava. This one has such a unique take on the zombie film Ė with people whose brain cells are slowly dying off, causing loss of memory and some motor functions - I didnít even recognize it as horror initially. I wish his directing skills were better developed. This one is visually bland and poorly paced, but it stars Brigitte Lahaie again and she still looks amazing.


Motherís Day (1980)
Ĺ
Three amateur actresses cannot convince me theyíre life-long friends. The bigger problem is that this production is from Lloyd Kaufman and Michael Herz, better known as Troma Pictures. I donít despise Troma-style exploitation outright. Done right, their films can be campy fun. The tone here is a disaster, with a tale of kidnapping, torture porn and revenge thatís mostly played for laughs. The horror needed to be less cruel, as-is the humor leaves a very bad taste.


Christmas Evil (1980)
aka. Terror in Toyland
aka. You Better Watch Out
* *
A man traumatized as a boy by something he saw at Christmas becomes unhinged and starts a murder spree while dressed as Santa. My expectations were low, compounded by the super low budget, but the film manages to do some interesting things. The man doesnít JUST kill. He gets involved in some of the warm-hearted holiday events too, creating an interesting ying-yang of Christmas being about people who are Nice as well as Naughty. The story goes into magical realism at times. So, in the end I didnít hate it, and I think this one is going to nestle in my brain for a while.


House on the Edge of the Park (1980)
zero stars
(http://imgur.com/5My9GlA.jpg)

Here it is, the worst film in the Marathon (so far?) I heard about this one years ago and debated even including it because it's crude exploitation built off the success of Last House on the Left, from the director of Cannibal Holocaust. I see the class warfare angle that somebody might have put in at one point, but this is just a lot of indefensible rape and cruelty from a director whose angry, neanderthal view of humanity didn't need to be shared with the world.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on February 19, 2017, 12:37:41 AM
Yikes. And here I thought Cannibal Holocaust was bad.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 21, 2017, 01:45:51 AM
(http://imgur.com/jqQKvX7.jpg)

Mystics in Bali (1981)
*
Indonesian horror about voodoo, known for its over-the-top strangeness and gore, featuring a womanís head that separates from her body and flies around, taking most of her major organs with her. In the manner of Hausu and Evil Dead, but minus the style.


Burial Ground (1981)
aka. The Nights of Terror
aka. The Zombie Dead
* Ĺ
At a secluded estate, the dead rise and they kill. Thatís literally all there is for 85 mind-numbingly tedious minutes.


The Black Cat (1981)
* *
Man, I donít appreciate Italian horror. This one is from Lucio Fulci, who is bad but compared to the inexperienced filmmakers Iíve come across heís a cut above. Still, this is a ridiculous story about an immortal cat with magical powers like hypnosis and self-multiplication. It also has claws sharper than a straight razor. So silly. So dumb.


Cannibal Ferox (1981)
aka. Make Them Die Slowly
aka. Woman From Deep River
Ĺ
At least Iíve had a ton of warning about this one and the acting and technical filmmaking (especially the score) are actually pretty good, though that makes the sadism and violence even harder to deal with. I kept watching because itís a well-made film, easily better than the last few titles, maybe even more polished than Cannibal Holocaust, though that one is more interesting to discuss. I enjoyed when the guy jumped off the canoe to escape only to discover piranha in the water.


Bloody Birthday (1981)
aka. Creeps
* *
A rather innocuous story of killer children in suburbia. Being early 80s, this has a strong Spielberg-ian vibe. Nothing scary about it, I can't think of a single moment where they even try. It's more about the shock of pre-teens shooting guns and beating adults. If not for the peeping tom bits of nudity this might've been rated PG, but maybe that's because of the films I'm coming off of.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 25, 2017, 12:43:39 AM
(http://imgur.com/tZAdnX2.jpg)

Happy Birthday to Me (1981)
* * Ĺ
Iíve been thinking about how I need to keep a list of films I donít fully recommend but theyíre definitely more interesting than your average horror film. Malformed Men would be the top of that list and this one would go on it too. Itís an 80s slasher, but as directed by J. Lee Thompson (Cape Fear, The Guns of Navarone) the emphasis is on the mystery and not the kills. There are a lot of twists and they are wild, probably donít hold up to logic but make for somewhat entertaining pulp. Not the typical slasher I was expecting.


Samurai Reincarnation (1981)
* * * - Good
Like Dawn of the Dead, this is an action movie disguised as horror, but itís got strong direction from Kinji Fukasaku (Battle Royale), swordfights a-plenty and a layered story about a vengeful Samurai who returns from the dead and does the same for a small band of allies. These demons, each with their own developed story, come up against one-eyed Sonny Chiba. Itís very interesting to see a culture where Christianity is portrayed as an evil akin to witchcraft. A few 80s lighting and sound effects, but I wouldnít call the film cheesy.


The House By the Cemetery (1981)
* Ĺ
Lucio Fulci does his version of ďDonít Go In the BasementĒ, which means the focus is on extreme violence and logic is largely absent. You can do a drinking game for how many times someone goes in the basement and ends up having difficulty using the door to get out. Fulci is like the continuation of Mario Bava for me, Iíve seen 8 and can recommend none.


Hell Night (1981)
* *
This one just boringly checks off the boxes. Four college kids, including Scream Queen Linda Blair pledge to spend the night in a haunted house where a deranged killer still dwells in the basement. In the shadow of Halloween (the movie) the whole way, or I guess you could say Alien too. Nothing to see here.


The Pit (1981)
aka. Teddy
* *
From Canada, a strange and stranger mix of hungry trolls, talking teddy bears and sexual perversion. The acting is bad, but you get used to it. Still, it never comes together as a complete movie, trying desperately to get to feature length beginning in the middle for no reason other than to repeat the scene later, the tone leans heavy into comedy in the back half and the main character disappears for a long time towards the end. The final moment is pretty great.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2017, 11:33:33 PM
(http://imgur.com/Oglwbge.jpg)

Dark Night of the Scarecrow (1981)
* * * - Good
A re-watch of a TV Movie I first saw as a kid thatís built a strong cult following. I was worried about the subject matter, involving a mentally handicapped man killed in a hate crime. The setup where heís on the run from a bunch of locals (led by mailman Charled Durning) had me cringing. This is probably a film that shouldnít have been made, especially as a genre B-movie. However, it doesnít feel exploitive and it sets up a situation few slashers can claim. When the mysterious scarecrow shows up to take revenge, I had no sympathy for what happens to his victims. Against steep odds, the film works. I think thatís because the TV guidelines would only allow a respectful approach that relies more on acting and less on exploitation.


The Beast Within (1982)
* Ĺ
This one gets everything wrong without being so bad it can be remembered for its terribleness. The script has too many characters and too much conversation, which not only over-explain but does so to the point of making the plot hard to follow. Thereís some heavy gore from stylish makeup effects, but the makeup looks so fake itís like watching behind the scenes of The Thing. Then there are the rapes, which bookend the film and make it more of a project worthy to stay in the gutter of obscurity.


The New York Ripper (1982)
aka. Psycho Ripper
* Ĺ
Lucio Fulci again and while aggressively stylish, this one is especially nasty with lots of graphic violence against women, who are often nude and vulnerable. You just know the surprise killer and their motivation is going to make no sense.


Madman (1982)
aka. Madman Marz
aka. The Legend Lives
aka. Madman, el loco
* *
An uninspired killer in the woods premise, but this gets off to a likable and promising start with a campfire scene thatís well-directed, setting up everything nicely. As it plays out, the lack of inspiration becomes more apparent and the film becomes increasingly as mundane as the title. Not even any good scares in it.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2017, 11:33:39 PM
(http://imgur.com/LaPTcod.jpg)
Trance (Der Fan) (1982)

A film most effective if you go in cold, but also more divisive because many will object to decisions the director makes. Even including it in a Horror thread will throw you for a while because it's more of an indie teenage drama about a schoolgirl with an unhealthy crush on a pop star. (Being 1982 and German, the pop idol has a heavy Kraftwerk look and sound.)

A couple of important things I feel are worth knowing about before you choose whether to watch:
1. The pacing is glacial. I actually didn't have the big problem with this I usually do because I was interested to know where the story was headed and if it was even real. (Slight spoiler: the girl and the pop star do eventually connect.) The girl's delusion is strong enough to give credibility to this all being a fantasy, but there are numerous hardships along the way that wouldn't be part of any teenage girl's delusion. Then again, most of the hardships take on a sexual context so maybe it's connected to the fear of her inexperience.

2. The film created a huge controversy at the time because lead actress Dťsirťe Nosbusch was not yet 18 and there is a considerable amount of nudity towards the end, much more and for a longer time than I would've thought necessary for the story. There is a purpose to it, though it's more the director pushing buttons in some shots than claiming it as necessary to the story.

This is a film where it's unfortunate to not be able to discuss the last 20 minutes because that's where all the good talking points are, and also all my other concerns. The actions taken towards the end are a memorable path, but I'm not sure they're the logical conclusion for these characters. I would agree what happens is the more interesting choice, but also one that raises a number of questions in the final minutes.
Rating: * * Ĺ
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: goodguy on February 28, 2017, 12:10:03 PM
At the time of filming, Nosbusch was pretty much the equivalent of a wholesome Disney girl, so countering that image was part of the intended "shock" effect. While the film mostly got bad reviews in the (West) German press, the controversy wasn't about the age of Nosbusch, but the fact that she later wasn't happy with the amount of nudity in the final film and unsuccessfully tried to legally prevent the release.


Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on February 28, 2017, 01:21:33 PM
Fascinating information. Sometimes you never know what a film's reputation is based on.

If you know...
1. What is the reputation of filmmaker Eckhart Schmidt?

2. I notice this was made around the same time as Angst. I know there was a film movement called German Underground, but was this a part of that, like 1987's Nekromantik, or did it happen after?

3. Can you recommend any similar German films from this time?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: goodguy on February 28, 2017, 04:02:33 PM
Sorry, I don't know much about Eckhart Schmidt beyond Der Fan, and I can't even remember if I have seen some of his other 80s films. I wouldn't associate him with what you refer to as "German Unterground", which was mostly ultra-low-budget horror and didn't start until the late 80s/90s with films by JŲrg Buttgereit, Olaf Ittenbach, Christoph Schlingensief, and a couple of others I have forgotten, since this never really was my are of interest.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 06, 2017, 11:51:51 PM
(http://imgur.com/tFzaCO1.jpg)

Next of Kin (1982)
* *
Aussie gaslight film takes a long time to get up to expected Ozploitation nuttiness and even then doesnít quite make the build up worthwhile. By the time all is revealed, I really didnít care who was behind it or why.


The Sender (1982)
* *
Troubled young man shares his nightmares with those he comes into contact with. Classy studio production with an interesting idea, but the execution is lacking. Too calm when itís not trying to frighten you and some of the scare scary visions are overdone, almost funny.


Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982)
* * Ĺ
I was around when this bombed because itís not about Michael Myers. Since then itís gained a reputation as a pretty good film on its own. Itís easy to watch and the series retains cinematographer Dean Cundy and some music by John Carpenter. There are big problems, like the belief that every kid would desire one of only three mask options and the love affair between the male lead and a woman literally half his age. Not terrible, but not quite a discovery to champion.


The Living Dead Girl (1982)
* *
Another by Jean Rollin and this late into his career, the familiar themes are starting to work against him. The story is original enough Ė woman wakes to realize she has the hunger of a zombie Ė but it feels too familiar now.


The Slumber Party Massacre (1982)
aka. Sleepless Nights
aka. The Slumber Party Murders
aka. Donít Open the Door
* Ĺ
This slasher is written and directed by women, so whatís with all the male gaze? I guess blame producer Roger Corman, but Amy Holden Jones seems to be over-compensating. Itís such a routine slasher I spent the time trying to find a feminist angle. I guess thereís the drill being the weapon of choice, but Brian DePalma did that in Body Double and nobody was calling it a feminist move then.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 14, 2017, 08:29:37 AM
(http://imgur.com/BZu473l.jpg)

The House on Sorority Row (1983)
aka. House of Evil
aka. Seven Sisters
* * Ĺ
Slasher filmÖ yawn! Only maybe itís not as routine as it first appears. Things get pretty good towards the end, with some interesting technique and an ending that made me exclaim ďHoly S**tĒ for possibly the first time in this marathon. I wouldnít say the ending saves it, but it has me rethinking my original opinion that there was nothing unique with this one.


Curtains (1983)
* *
Instead of killing teenagers this slasher goes about murdering actresses. Suspects include Samantha Eggar as a former star who went insane researching a role about madness. The depiction of mental illness is insensitive, the depiction of actresses is broad but mostly accurate. The killer wears a memorable old hag mask.


The Deadly Spawn (1983)
aka. Return of the Alienís Deadly Spawn
* * * - Okay
Think of this as a straight take on Little Shop of Horrors, with toothy aliens looking to be fed. The budget is around the same low level as The Evil Dead, with a similar deep commitment to gore that stops just short of nauseating. The director is not as talented as Sam Raimi, but the effects team is up to the task. Despite the small budget, the creature shots are impressive, and the final image is downright awesome. A lot of problems, but I found myself rooting for this movie.


Lift (1983)
aka. De Lift
aka. Goiní Up
*
This is indeed a movie about a killer elevator. Itís as funny as it sounds and as thin with ideas. I mean, how many ways can you kill someone with an elevator? I was surprised to learn writer/director/composer Dick Maas made the music video ďTwilight ZoneĒ by Golden Earring, easily one of the greatest videos from the early days of MTV.  He also remade this film in 2001 with Naomi Watts. Itís called The Shaft. I tried to find a webpage that says the films are meant to be taken as comedy, but apparently not.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 14, 2017, 08:30:00 AM
(http://imgur.com/KkIo43L.jpg)
The Boxer's Omen (Mo) (1983)

If I was having a bunch of friends over for a Halloween night marathon of bat-crazy Horror, of course Hausu would be on the agenda. I'd introduce people to Alucarda (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.125) and Horrors of Malformed Men (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=12547.msg852483#msg852483), but The Boxer's Omen is the one I think everyone would be talking about the next day because its particular insanity is closest to Hausu, but it doesn't have that film's reputation.

Reading other reviews has convinced me that I don't want to try and describe the plot, because it ends up taking several paragraphs and it doesn't make things any more clear. It's one of the last films by Hong Kong's The Shaw Brothers and opens normal enough with a kickboxing fight. Afterwards there are monks and demons, black magic, zombie animals, spiders who slurp up a strange brew with tiny straws and a nude woman covered in flies who is magically birthed from the sealed corpse of a crocodile.

(http://imgur.com/Wl7YIPF.jpg)

It's rare that I will recommend a film simply for its bizarre imagery, but despite some of the images being rather gross my overall reaction is one of "where has this film been all my life". The endless creativity on display is exhilarating, and exhausting before the end, though as soon as it was over I was looking up other films by this director. Many of the effects are practical and look cheap, but that was part of the fun. I wasn't dazzled by images but admiring the parade of DIY craziness. Easily one of the highlights of this Marathon.
Rating: * * * - Good
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 14, 2017, 06:05:43 PM
(http://imgur.com/h4gOu2X.jpg)
Sleepaway Camp (1983)
"It certainly will be a nice little surprise when Richard comes home to find a little girl in the house.
Yes, I've always dreamed of a little girl just like you."


I think more people know about the final reveal in Sleepaway Camp then have actually seen the entire film. I thought I had seen it because that ending is one of the great twist reveals of all time and the rest of the film seems like typical dead teenagers at summer camp. Not only was this my first viewing, knowing the ending ahead of time makes watching the film a more interesting experience. However, even if I didn't know, there are so many unusual choices, Sleepaway Camp would probably be a cult film anyways. The finale is just the knockout punch, but throughout there are interesting - sometimes subtle, sometimes unintentional - talking points for our modern climate of gender fluidity.

(http://imgur.com/B5QzdG4.jpg)

As a summer camp slasher, the film stands apart by not showing many of the kills. It's still a violent movie, sometimes probably more so than the filmmakers intended. Rather than show us the knives, axes and bees actually going into people, the effects budget is spent on the dead bodies, the aftermath. These corpse shots are often extreme for what was done to the characters, which I guess is a way of making up for not having the money or skill to actually film the murders themselves. I'm not looking to sound morbid, but when you do a massive horror marathon you notice what this particular film chooses to show and not show.

(http://imgur.com/ZUUc1cI.jpg)

The look of the film is very early 80s, which along with a dock on the lake, reminded me of Wet Hot American Summer. The clothing has a heavy homoerotic vibe, something absent from Everybody Wants Some!! This only heightens when the characters and dialogue get into specific gender norms. It's not just typical horny teenager talk, but exaggerated. That can be dismissed as terrible acting, though I find it more accidentally camp. Maybe deliberate, I don't know, writer/director Robert Hiltzik never made another feature. My take is that Sleepaway Camp isn't an 80s teen slasher with some unusual moments, but an amateur filmmaker who wanted to say something personal and disguised it as an 80s teen slasher.
Rating: * * Ĺ
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on March 14, 2017, 06:27:30 PM
Yeah, that movie is quite interesting to watch in our modern context. It's hard to tell what I might have made of it had I watched it in the 80s, but now it seems like Nightmare on Elm Street 2 where it almost makes a lot of very interesting points but also pulls back in weird ways. The whole movie is weird, as you noted, but it's weird in a really interesting and fun way. The end is, of course, fantastic.

I like what you wrote about the way that the violence is not actually depicted but rather shown in aftermath only. It does feel like a budgetary decision, as you pointed out, but I think it also could be an interesting way to make a point about violence or something. Maybe in a better, more thought out movie. Or maybe it's there in this one, we just gotta look harder.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 15, 2017, 01:15:07 AM
I like it a bit more than you but certainly recognize that without the ending it wouldn't be as notable. I still think there are a lot of great moments/kills leading up to that last act. I particularly love the horrible fake mustache the cop has.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 15, 2017, 01:44:19 AM
I kept debating talking about the fake mustache but it seemed like its own paragraph, one of the obvious examples of the director's lack of experience or unintentional oddness. Obviously the actor shaved between shooting days - maybe he had another gig in between - but then he gets a close up with the mustache so fake it gleams in the lights.

When you look up Sleepaway Camp, the 3 things that come up most frequently are the ending, the mustache and some debate about whether the Aunt in the 2nd photo is a drag queen or transgendered person. (I thought for sure she was a man with her voice dubbed by a woman, which fits the theme perfectly, but there's an interview with her on youtube and now I'm convinced that's just her.)

Something that doesn't get talked about is in that first image I use, Angela is crouched just below frame. You can see her standing up to take position for the moment she's supposed to have walked in on.

It's a more interesting film than any Friday the 13th. Despite all its faults, it's not laughably bad because my reaction to all the bad filmmaking isn't to laugh at it but to engage with what the filmmaker was attempting. I can't say that about that killer elevator movie.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 19, 2017, 12:01:25 AM
The last couple of films lifted my spirits, but this batch of terrible titles brought me right back down.


(http://imgur.com/7DMa0u3.jpg)

Poison for the Fairies (1984)
* *
Two girls, witchcraft, the whole thing couldíve been done in 45 minutes. I think this was aiming to be like Spirit of the Beehive, but the visuals are too bland to support the slow pace. A del Toro premise executed with great calm.


Tenement: Game of Survival (1985)
aka. Slaughter in the South Bronx
aka. Game of Survival
Ĺ
A gang takes over the bottom floor of a tenement house determined to kill everyone inside. This has a small cult following thanks to its claustrophobic setting and cast thatís nearly all black or Hispanic, but itís an especially nasty film. Director Roberta Findlay Ė thatís right, this trash is directed by a woman Ė is trying to push buttons with a constant stream of violent acts. Itís worth noting the more transgressive stuff happens off camera so the only line crossed is one of good taste.


Night Train to Terror (1985)
Ĺ 
Producers unable to find distribution for two of their films edited them down into incomprehensibility. They then added a third film, which ran out of money during production and a wraparound story involving God and The Devil on a train while the next compartment has a new wave band playing dumb 80s music. A terrible cheat of a film.


Mr. Vampire (1985)
aka. Hold Your Breath for a Moment
* Ĺ
Hugely successful Hong Kong mix of horror, comedy and fighting, best known here as the one where vampire/zombies hop around. Itís full of ideas, but the comedy drops below ďnot funnyĒ into annoying. The rest isnít great enough to make up for it, but you can understand the popularity and influence this film had in HK.


Terrorvision (1986)
* Ĺ
I like this creature featureís heavy Joe Dante vibe, with gumball lighting and a campy message about television addiction. (The best way to defeat this monster is to not watch TV for 200 years.) Exaggerated performances dumb down the comedy too far, but this isnít a clever film to start with. Heavy violence is offset by the low budget, which can only afford jelly, playdough and silly string for the gore.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 23, 2017, 01:53:49 AM
(http://imgur.com/SEGXJ1Z.jpg)

Killer Party (1986)
aka. The April Fool
Ĺ
What little reputation the film has comes from its willingness to shift gears, taking on meta cred as it goes from slasher to demonic possession throwing in zombies and other sub-genres. While the film looks like a movie with some budget, the direction is frustratingly incompetent, forcing characters to behave in illogical ways, even more than usual for the genre. For example, someone will reach for a knife across a table and rather than take a simple step to get to it, we watch them continue to helplessly reach.


Vamp (1986)
* Ĺ
I actively hated this film. To clarify, Iíve rated many films lower because thereís a basic competency to this story of performance artist Grace Jones as a Vampire stripper, but everything about the way this is filmed rubbed me like sandpaper, from the obnoxious d-bag Frat boy leads to the over-saturated colors that made every location look like the inside of an 80s dance club in Miami. I also find Grace Jones as appealing as Yoko Ono, but sheís not in the film as much as you might think.


Gothic (1986)
* Ĺ
Too often Ken Russellís attempts to film madness Ė which I think is the theme of all his work Ė ends up as off-putting weirdness, as if you could ask him what he was doing with a particular scene and he would just shrug and maybe slap you with some rice pudding. Interesting to see Gabriel Byrne and Timothy Spall so young. A lot of the score is way too loud.


Tales from the Quadead Zone (1987)
Ĺ
Shot for no money and released on VHS, this became famous as an extremely rare film to find, with copies selling on eBay for hundreds of dollars. Some people praise the filmmakers passion over the lack of a sound mix, Casio keyboard score and other horrible qualities. I came up in this era and itís not sour grapes to say there are better examples of Trash Cinema out there. I helped a friend make one called Try a Dull Knife, which I also act in and thereís a crazy one Iíll never forget called God Made Man. Tales is just the lucky one whose hype led to a small and undeserving cult.


Rock Ďní Roll Nightmare (1987)
aka. Arch Angel
aka. The Edge of Hell
Ĺ 
I considered taking a break from this Marathon until my morale improved, but Iím not cramming all five of these down in a day. The Boxerís Omen, Deadly Spawn and Sleepaway Camp rewarded my hunt for the buried treasure, but itís been a pretty crappy time since. This one, with a heavy metal hair band fighting rubber monsters from hell, has a reputation for being laughably bad, but there are not enough unintentional laughs to sustain interest.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on March 23, 2017, 04:06:39 AM
These capsules are for the ages. ;D
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 23, 2017, 04:20:04 AM
These bad films aren't going to watch themselves.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 23, 2017, 09:07:57 AM
And these are the recommended Horror films, though I'm sure once this is done I'll discover a great one on my own and make some comment about how it wasn't part of this Marathon.

Short running times are my great relief. Last night I watched Quadead and Rock 'n' Roll, which combined took less than 2.5 hours. Only 8 films run over 2 hours while half the titles are less than 90 minutes.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: MartinTeller on March 23, 2017, 10:00:39 AM
I also find Grace Jones as appealing as Yoko Ono, but sheís not in the film as much as you might think.

Grace Jones and Yoko Ono are both awesome so I don't know what you're getting at.

I really liked Gothic at the time, but it's been nearly 30 years since I last saw it, so I dunno. I saw Vamp around 2000 and I recall it being not good.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: DarkeningHumour on March 24, 2017, 10:01:30 AM
The last couple of films lifted my spirits, but this batch of terrible titles brought me right back down.

That's probably the worst string of ratings I have ever seen from you. Still going strong?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 24, 2017, 10:28:08 AM
I have a lot of work these next couple of weeks and won't have as much time for movies. So it's a forced slowdown.

The best thing about films like these are reading what put them on my radar and Letterboxd reviews by fans.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 28, 2017, 12:54:19 AM
(http://imgur.com/ndJH8e0.jpg)

Dolls (1987)
* Ĺ
I tried to justify the bad acting as aiming for the simplicity of a kids film because this movie about killer dolls is more gory fairy tale than horror, not that thereís much difference between the two. Surprised to learn Stuart Gordon directed this schlock, completing the downward spiral from Re-Animator to From Beyond to this that he never came back from.


In a Glass Cage (1987)
* *
Frequently appearing on lists of the most disturbing films ever made, this is a grim look at abused people abusing abusive people, who go on to maintain the pattern. Itís competently filmed, but I donít buy the premise, that the characters would run into the people they meet manage to get away with what they do and encounter side characters at exactly the right time for the next story point. The rough subject matter is undercut by its own phoniness. Oddly reminded me of whatís wrong with the DC superhero movies right now.


Anguish (1987)
* * Ĺ
People are in a movie theater watching a horror film, but the events in the film begin lining up with a killer stalking around the theater. There isn't much logic, but thatís not what the mega-meta premise is aiming for, with the viewing audience reminding me of a similar group in Rubber. Constantly intriguing but only mildly successful.


The Gate (1987)
* * 
Below average attempt to cash in on the success of Gremlins, pushing the amount of violence in a film for kids pretty far with melting faces and a murdered family dog that comes back all mangled. (Were we less sensitive to dead pets back then?) A couple of good stop motion effects, including a man who hits the ground and breaks into a bunch of tiny demons, but the characters are super thin, the pace is slack and the adventure is joyless.


Nekromantic (1987)
* Ĺ
I donít seek out transgressive cinema and I donít run from it either, mostly out of curiosity to see what they have to contribute to this art form that I love. Like a cult film, you canít aim to make the most depraved movie ever, itís a reputation that must be earned. So, in the vein of Salo, Cannibal Holocaust and A Serbian Film comes one of the most disturbing films ever made, and you probably already know if you have any interest in ever watching it. Iím rating it low because there are a number of moments I would despise if they appeared in other films, like my 2nd film in a row that lingers on a dead pet. But I knew what I was getting into, so I toughened my resolve and mostly accepted the grotesque imagery.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on March 28, 2017, 01:03:34 AM
I'm surprised Anguish hasn't been revisited. Seems like a perfect opportunity to make a better version, a rare occurrence in horror remakes.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 28, 2017, 01:14:30 AM
I hadn't heard of the film until a couple of years ago I read a very divisive argument about it on another message board. Then I started seeing it on a number of Hidden Gem type lists, still not knowing what it was about except for some screenshots involving eyes. Because it stars Zelda Rubinstein and Michael Lerner, I assumed it was in English. All of this is misdirection.

Maybe it's because I'm doing the Dark Knight Marathon, but the film could work great if the writing was Inception level, where a scene can play on different levels. It's the kind of genre work I would rather see Nolan attempting instead of trying so hard to get an Oscar.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on March 28, 2017, 01:34:18 AM
Nolan isn't exactly who I would go to, though if he was operation on a TDK or The Prestige level of fun having, I could get behind that. Seems like it'd be perfect for Wingard and Barrett, or maybe Jordan Peele, given how great that heckler sketch and Get Out are.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: PeacefulAnarchy on March 28, 2017, 02:03:09 AM
I've put off watching Angustia because for some reason I associated it with Arrebato which was good but not the kind of film I want to seek out. But now your review has me thinking I might like it.

You're much too generous to In a Glass Cage  and Necromantik.



Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 28, 2017, 12:10:42 PM
I've put off watching Angustia because for some reason I associated it with Arrebato which was good but not the kind of film I want to seek out. But now your review has me thinking I might like it.
Man, I did not like Arrebato at all. Reminded me of the directors of Amer who were working in giallo but capturing more of the texture and none of the story. Arrebato does the same for Spanish horror.


You're much too generous to In a Glass Cage and Necromantik.
I re-read your Glass Cage review because I remember commenting on it. The opening had been so built up I was pretty much ready for anything at the start. The worst part for me is something the kid does to the guys face about halfway through. Overall, I was much more turned off by 1964's Lady in a Cage, which has a similar person trapped scenario, but it's Olivia de Havilland and seeing her abused is worse than anything this film had.

As for Necromantik, I was thinking of other films in the Marathon like Snuff and Tenement, and there are moments in Necro where I thought the director might be going for something artistic, like the use of music and the barbed wire around the bed. Gave the film some scuzzy relevance as opposed to say a documentary with a 3-way involving an actual corpse, which I'm sure exists, sadly, and which I will never watch.

For this project I decided to not watch Faces of Death and Ilsa: She Wolf of the SS. I may go back and try Ilsa, and I may not finish Men Behind the Sun, which is coming up in 13 films.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: philip918 on March 28, 2017, 04:42:06 PM
1SO, you still haven't watched There's Nothing Out There have you?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 28, 2017, 07:04:22 PM
Not yet but it's on this list. 27 titles away.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 29, 2017, 10:32:55 AM
The last couple of films lifted my spirits, but this batch of terrible titles brought me right back down.

That's probably the worst string of ratings I have ever seen from you. Still going strong?

Last night's double header of Street Trash and Blood Diner almost broke me. After work I'm probably going to make some changes to my list because the late 80s Troma level trash needs to ease up.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on March 30, 2017, 12:44:19 AM
I reminded myself why I pulled the trigger on this Marathon. Having already seen hundreds of horror films Ė actually over 1000 features according to ICM Ė I thought that instead of picking at the bottom of the barrel for years it could be more fun to scoop up all the sludge at once looking for a handful of recommendable titles. I also knew that there are so many horror films that even after these 400+ titles, I could easily find a number of potential gems.

Game On!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 04, 2017, 01:36:30 AM
(http://imgur.com/3pnMEuT.jpg)

Street Trash (1987)
aka. Horror in Bowery Street
Ĺ
Has anyone here seen Street Trash?  It's been years since a friend brought it over to my house, but the plot's pretty easy to remember: bums drink this stuff called "Viper" and it turns them to goo.  Each one melts in a different, spectacular way.  And some dude gets his wang bitten off.

Sleaze City (films that make you uncomfortable and maybe wanna take a shower)
Here is my defense of not giving Nekromantik a lower rating. This is like some cinematic Fear Factor, disgusting imagery, with little surrounding it. Bad actors fake their way through terrible scenes with no story to connect them besides the toxic drink, so all you have to look forward to are gross out moments of bodies melting
 

Blood Diner (1987)
aka. Blood Feast 2
Ĺ
Low budget, terrible acting and obnoxious comedy is a combination for a really bad time. Thank goodness I have a lot of work coming up because this Marathon is daring me to quit.


Slugs (1988)
* *
Another reminder of what started this Marathon. In Jan. 2016 I watched Frogs (1972), starring Ray Milland. This post by PeacefulAnarchy and Oldkid (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13496.msg818961#msg818961) captures it well, not good but kind of enjoyable. Slugs is a bit like that. Filmed half in America, half in Spain (sometimes for the same scene), this isnít a film with tight story structure or even loose story structure. What it has is killer slugs and lots of them. Some of it is amusing, but none of it is trying hard to be funny or campy. Some of it is gross. It couldíve been a lot worse.


Amsterdamned (1988)
* * 
A fun/sick opening, where school children touring the Amsterdam canal run into a dead body hanging from the bridge that proceeds to streak across the plexiglass roof of the boat. There are some slasher elements, but this is more of a late 80s cop thriller with car and speedboat chases. The canal city setting makes it unique and there are bizarre comedy touches, but the rest of the film is uninspired. Still better than filmmaker Dick Maasí last horror film, Lift, about the killer elevator.


Dead Heat (1988)
*
Towards the end of the buddy cop cycle, filmmakers tried every crazy concept (though Whoopi Goldberg partnered with a dinosaur will never be topped). This one stars Joe Piscopo, whose partner Treat Williams becomes a zombie. The concept comes up with some inspired ideas with the unkillable and slowly decaying partner taking on a mysterious crew of robbing zombies, enough to make me think the idea might work if taken a little more seriously. Unlike Amsterdamned, thereís more than enough scares and gore to qualify this as horror. Piscopo is so annoying, so anti-funny that he drops out of the film after about an hour. The director is Mark Goldblatt, whose editing credits are extraordinary. Too bad he doesnít know how to direct actorsÖ or scenes.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 09, 2017, 12:32:45 PM
(http://imgur.com/LDCi0G2.jpg)

Evil Dead Trap (1988)
aka. Tokyo Snuff
* *
Very little to do with Sam Raimiís similarly-titled series of films, this is Japanese hyper-gore with the expected large dose of weirdness. The visuals are sometimes wicked and sometimes overly hyper, with the emphasis being on creative kills, and on that score the film does pretty well. Too bad it couldnít be shaped into more of a roller coaster and less of a bumper car ride.
 

Pin (1988)
* * * - Okay
Canadian horror is hard to define, but Iím starting to recognize its particular mix of odd and resourceful. (Itís like Ozploitation toned down to the limitations of Hitchcockís filmed plays.) This one follows a brother and sister who are very closeÖ and their fatherís anatomy dummy who becomes the brotherís imaginary(?) companion. To quote Arsenic and Old Lace, insanity doesnít just run in this family, it practically gallops. Too bad the film falls short of big scares or deep chills that would make it a true gem.


Waxwork (1988)
* Ĺ
The problem with this Goosebumps type film is that the comedy is aimed at little kids but the violence is adult stuff. Iím not even sure kids would enjoy the broad humor. Unusual cast includes John Rhys-Davies as a werewolf and David Warner as the owner of the wax museum, and it stars Gremlinsí Zach Galligan and 80s hotties Deborah Foreman and Michelle Johnson.


Scarecrows (1988)
* *  Ĺ
Iím torn because this is the kind of film Iím in this marathon to discover. Set during one night in the woods with killer scarecrows, the film is creepy, scary and told with great economy. Unfortunately the people are dummies and jerks and the production feels straight-to-DVD, which isnít by itself a negative but combined with the other weaknesses I didnít care about the people or the story.


Night of the Demons (1988)
aka. Halloween Party
* Ĺ
Watching this unstylish, unfunny variation of Evil Dead, itís astonishing to learn they made four of these. Most people will have never heard of the one film, but then you learn itís a franchise? Reminded me that Linnea Quigley used to be a thing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 10, 2017, 12:14:05 AM
Do you know if any of these titles been featured on Best of the Worst (Redlettermedia)?

These bad films aren't going to watch themselves.

This made me laugh so much. :))
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 11, 2017, 12:58:24 AM
Do you know if any of these titles been featured on Best of the Worst (Redlettermedia)?
Episode 34's Halloween Spooktacular has Mystics in Bali (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg864710#msg864710)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 11, 2017, 01:37:00 AM
Do you know if any of these titles been featured on Best of the Worst (Redlettermedia)?
Episode 34's Halloween Spooktacular has Mystics in Bali (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=13986.msg864710#msg864710)
Nice, I'll go back and find that episode. I really enjoy the Best of the Worst episodes. God, some of the stuff they watch... it makes me laugh. You're seeing a lot of stuff on that level for this marathon, but finding the odd gem too.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: DarkeningHumour on April 14, 2017, 05:45:39 AM
The last couple of films lifted my spirits, but this batch of terrible titles brought me right back down.

That's probably the worst string of ratings I have ever seen from you. Still going strong?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 14, 2017, 09:39:27 AM
I've been busy with work this week, and two of my most recent films - Men Behind the Sun, Celia - I didn't feel belonged here, so I posted in the main review thread. I'm also balancing this with Bondo's Top 100 month.

My last batch had Pin, which is a mild thumbs up from me. My first recommendation since 1983's The Boxer's Omen.

So still going, but not at a pace of three titles a day. According to Letterboxd, I'm 65% complete.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 17, 2017, 11:50:25 PM
(http://imgur.com/nAacsLG.jpg)

The Church (1989)
aka. Demon Cathedral
* Ĺ 
Italian horror from the director of Cemetery Man, co-written and co-produced by Dario Argento, whose teenage daughter Asia is cast in a major role. Typical of giallo thereís wild imagination and very little logic. The back half is designed like 1985ís Demons, the worst film Iíve ever seen, though this doesnít go deep into the gore like that one. Thereís also a sequence thatís a direct steal from Rosemaryís Baby.


Bride of Re-Animator (1989)
* * * - Okay
So nice to report that this sequel retains the fun of the original film. So many terrible comedy horrors in this Marathon, and while Bride never made me laugh out loud, I was constantly amused by the story and the wonderful performance by Jeffrey Combs, returning as Dr. Herbert West. Thereís a terrible sub-plot involving a room of insane people who arrive without reason for the climax and the last three minutes goes too far with illogical body attachment combinations, including the returning head of evil Dr. Hill flying around on bat wings. Overall however, this is a worthy follow up and Iím now curious in 2003ís Beyond Re-Animator, even if just for Jeffrey Combs.


Laurin (1989)
aka. Laurin: A Journey Into Death
* * Ĺ
A child in the world she barely understands. The mixture of reality and fantasy can be related to Heavenly Creatures or Panís Labyrinth, but this is less fantastical, using real-world surrealism and symbolism instead of imaginative creatures. The approach can produce nightmarish feelings, but this didnít interest me. The atmosphere was more distancing than enveloping.


Baby Blood (1990)
aka. The Evil Within
* * Ĺ
Predating New French Extremity by almost 10 years, this mixture of body horror, rough sex and an over-abundance of blood fits right in with others from the movement. Sometimes it goes too far in a fun way, but just as often it feels like blood and discomfort are its aim. It hits that target, but ends up a rougher watch than it probably needed to be. Typical of NFE.


Grim Prairie Tales (1990)
* * Ĺ
Horror omnibus with a couple of new wrinkles: 1. The film is also a western, with the stories involving settlers, gunfighters and Indians. 2. The best part of the film is the framing device as a married bookworm and a buffalo hunter spend the night telling the stories. Theyíre played by Brad Dourif and James Earl Jones. Itís overhype to say their scenes are great, but theyíre way more interesting than any of the stories.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 18, 2017, 02:36:49 PM
Next up is Troll 2, so to prepare I watched Silent Night, Deadly Night Part 2, aka. "Garbage Day!"
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 19, 2017, 09:01:10 PM
Next up is Troll 2, so to prepare I watched Silent Night, Deadly Night Part 2, aka. "Garbage Day!"

One of the great line readings OF ALL TIME!
TIME!
TIME!
TIME!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 19, 2017, 09:43:13 PM
I'm not even sure which film you mean because Troll 2 has "They're eating her... and then they're going to eat me... OH MY GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOD!"

To paraphrase a podcast I listen to, "Garbage Day" isn't the standout highlight of SNDN2, it's on par with everything that happens before and after.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 19, 2017, 11:34:01 PM
I was thinking of SNDN2. :)

But both sound amazing. I'll try and watch SNDN2 tonight. Experience the legend. And then join you in Trolls 2.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 20, 2017, 11:03:41 PM
Still debating doing a SNDN2/Troll 2 post. They're about equally terrible/enjoyable, but for very different reasons.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 21, 2017, 04:22:07 PM
I'm only about halfway through SN,DL2 after 5 sittings lol. It's actually not as bad as I was expecting and I'm genuinely interested in how they end it. :)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 21, 2017, 04:58:30 PM
Curious about your take since you didn't see the first one and they reuse about 40 minutes of footage creating backstory for this one.

Also... eyebrows.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 21, 2017, 07:00:28 PM
So far I'm kind of empathetic to the brothers Ricky & Billy. Theyexperienced some pretty crazy crap as kids. Maybe the first film would have filled me in as to why Ricky is in the psych ward, though the most obvious explanation is probably the correct one.

I'm enjoying the scenes in the psych ward a lot more than the flashbacks to when Billy is on a murdering spree. Mostly because of Eric Freeman's entertaining performance. And like you say, the eyebrows
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on April 21, 2017, 09:40:08 PM
I watched Bride of Reanimator this week as well. It's pretty fun! I think you hit most of the points, especially how great Jeffrey Combs is. I forgot there was a third one, I'll have to check that out too. Can we talk about the part that makes the least sense to me? It's during the explanation of where all the body parts for the Bride came from. Isn't one of the hands from a lawyer? WTF? Combs says something about "dispensing justice," I think, which is even crazier. Can you make sense of that?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 21, 2017, 10:34:07 PM
I'm enjoying the scenes in the psych ward a lot more than the flashbacks to when Billy is on a murdering spree. Mostly because of Eric Freeman's entertaining performance. And like you say, the eyebrows
Please comment when you get to the move theater.


I watched Bride of Reanimator this week as well. It's pretty fun! I think you hit most of the points, especially how great Jeffrey Combs is. I forgot there was a third one, I'll have to check that out too. Can we talk about the part that makes the least sense to me? It's during the explanation of where all the body parts for the Bride came from. Isn't one of the hands from a lawyer? WTF? Combs says something about "dispensing justice," I think, which is even crazier. Can you make sense of that?
Combs simply says "case dismissed" making a weak tie-in to the lawyer. I like the explanations in general, maybe because West doesn't see how degraded these separate parts have become in his project. The ballerina isn't going to be very agile on those feet, not to mention those tiny feet have to support a much larger body. The capper for me is the legs of the streetwalker, because of the condition of the legs now.

I'm more bothered that Bruce Abbott wouldn't cut his long, wavy 80s hair, making him look not at all like the professional, responsible doctor he's supposed to be playing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 22, 2017, 11:03:30 PM
(http://imgur.com/G7Syvq4.jpg)

Troll 2 (1990)
*
I feel a little bad that this filmís reputation is for being a terrible movie. I mean, they made a movie, which is better than any of us can say. Then I watched it.
Iím sure Iíll be watching the documentary Best Worst Movie later this year.


Childís Play 2 (1990)
* *
Even though the killer is a kidís doll, this is the same type of uninspired adherence to formula that doomed the romantic comedy. The film is more interested in franchise building than creating any genuine scares and lit bright as a TV comedy. The finale, set in a Chucky manufacturing plant, is full of potential, but even that is too bright and colorful. No scarier than a jack-in-the-box.


The Sect (1991)
aka. The Devilís Daughter
* *
From the makers of The Church, this seemed like itís going to dodge the usual Italian horror roadblocks with an apocalyptic mixture of The Omen and Rosemaryís Baby. The satanic imagery is strong and insidious, but eventually thatís all there is while the plot fights to get to the end, ultimately brought down by the need for immediate horror satisfaction.


Thereís Nothing Out There (1991)
* *
Among the friends at this Cabin in the Woods is a horror movie nerd. This shows what would be the downfall of Scream if Jamie Kennedyís Randy was the lead. The film means well, but falls victim to the cheap silliness it tries to transcend through satire. Wes Craven and films like Behind the Mask understand the value of connecting the meta fun to genuine fright.


Hiruko the Goblin (1991)
* *
Added to the Marathon from my watchlist because Iím a fan of filmmaker Shinya Tsukamoto (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=10073.0). His stories are usually dense and layered but this one is just lost in the fog. Through the haze is a rather typical J-Horror about demons in a school. Effects are cheap, but thereís some effective imagery with the goblins, which look like giant spiders with human heads for a body. Maybe itís just because I hate spiders.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 22, 2017, 11:10:21 PM
Is it just me or does this look like a stunt almost gone wrong (http://i.imgur.com/NP647Ws.gif).



The movie theatre... of all the people they decide NOT to show get killed, they choose the super obnoxious movie theatre patron. Weren't you a little disappointed not to see him get dealt with?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 22, 2017, 11:25:35 PM
Is it just me or does this look like a stunt almost gone wrong (http://i.imgur.com/NP647Ws.gif).
Yes. The back end flips closer to the stuntman than expected. It was just reflexes that got him out of the way.


The movie theatre... of all the people they decide NOT to show get killed, they choose the super obnoxious movie theatre patron. Weren't you a little disappointed not to see him get dealt with?
The Horror genre is full of that type of disappointment. Obnoxious characters live on too long or deaths you want to see are where the director has a sudden attack of restraint.

I was wondering more about your take on the decision to have Ricky go see the movie that is based on his brother's murder spree, which would have some major psych ramifications, but is really done to pad this movie out even further with footage from the first film. It would've been interesting if the actor in the movie wasn't also the person in Ricky's flashback, but now it's like he took a trauma of seeing the move and believes it's something that happened to him and his brother... which is another interesting angle this film opts out of.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on April 23, 2017, 04:23:11 AM
1SO, do you take requests?

I recently found Nightmare Weekend (1986) sitting on a watchlist here....
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on April 23, 2017, 05:53:34 AM
Speaking of requests, I am 13 years too late based on the release year, but Long Weekend (1978) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079482/) would fit this marathon.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 23, 2017, 10:15:34 AM
I recently found Nightmare Weekend (1986) sitting on a watchlist here....
Do you have a pitch because it looks terrible, which believe it or not is not my goal here. I found it on Horrorpedia Worst Horror Films of All-Time, which thankfully I've only seen 6% of, including Meet the Feebles, which is excellent.


Speaking of requests, I am 13 years too late based on the release year, but Long Weekend (1978) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079482/) would fit this marathon.
Seen it. (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=9536.msg616232#msg616232) It's Good.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on April 23, 2017, 10:39:06 AM
I recently found Nightmare Weekend (1986) sitting on a watchlist here....
Do you have a pitch because it looks terrible, which believe it or not is not my goal here. I found it on Horrorpedia Worst Horror Films of All-Time, which thankfully I've only seen 6% of, including Meet the Feebles, which is excellent.
I took a piece from the Swedish blog entry that made me put it on my list in the first place, and ran it through Google Translate:

"Directed by a Frenchman in Florida with American actors, "Nightmare Weekend" is a qualifying spin deluxe, with a playful pulp aesthetics a la landmates Robbe-Grillet, Rollin, and Rivette crossed with "Liquid Sky" and pastel colors and 80's flute as early as computers, walkie-talkies, and giant satellite dishes."

I do think your first hand impression above has more validity than that particular blog has in this question, but still.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 23, 2017, 01:46:52 PM
It's easy to talk me into a Horror film, but I think I'm gonna skip Nightmare Weekend.


Interesting story, I started watching the next film last night. It's called The Resurrected, from the H.P. Lovecraft story "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward" and directed by  Dan O'Bannon. Learned it was purchased by a studio that went bankrupt, so it never went into the theaters. The story is so dense - designed like a neo-noir mystery - that I had to stop about 10 minutes in and give it more concentration than the rest of the binge and purge titles that make up nearly all of this list.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 23, 2017, 10:41:10 PM
The movie theatre... of all the people they decide NOT to show get killed, they choose the super obnoxious movie theatre patron. Weren't you a little disappointed not to see him get dealt with?
The Horror genre is full of that type of disappointment. Obnoxious characters live on too long or deaths you want to see are where the director has a sudden attack of restraint.

I was wondering more about your take on the decision to have Ricky go see the movie that is based on his brother's murder spree, which would have some major psych ramifications, but is really done to pad this movie out even further with footage from the first film. It would've been interesting if the actor in the movie wasn't also the person in Ricky's flashback, but now it's like he took a trauma of seeing the move and believes it's something that happened to him and his brother... which is another interesting angle this film opts out of.

The film was getting pretty dull and repetitive by that point for me. Just one scene after another of one of the brothers getting triggered, and then killing people. Occassionally they would also get super strength and be lifting people by the neck with one outstretched arm. It was at least funny when they would say "naughty". But I didn't really have any special takeaway from the theater scene. It was just another instance of him being triggered. Like this was a very crude interpretation of how PTSD works. It turns you into a bomb.

The weakness of the movie to me begins with making Ricky the primary character. You need a Clarice type character in the dynamic. Why did the shrink have to be unlikable? Wouldn't the movie work better if you liked him and felt like he was really trying to help Ricky but died tragically?

It's definitely not a movie that has me interest in seeing any more of the series. I found it kind of lacking in dumb fun to be honest.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 23, 2017, 10:49:33 PM
I found the con job of using so much footage from the first film fascinating, with Ricky as our framing device. His performance was all the dumb fun. The contrast with Troll 2 is the blame/credit falls on the writer/director who clearly had no idea what he was doing, but there's an Ed Wood likability to the fact that he gets a film on screen at all. Troll 2 is what you might get if you deliberately aimed to be an episode of How Did This Get Made. None of the people exist in the real world. Their decisions and the things they say come without a moment of "does anyone else realize what an unbelievable situation this is?" The cast is clearly friends, family and co-workers, unlike Ricky and his eyebrows who I think saw himself as the new Willem DeFoe.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on April 23, 2017, 10:58:15 PM
I was kind of surprised that, given his now legendary "garbage day" line, that he hadn't been an attraction at different conventions, telling stories of making the film. At least I couldn't find anything. It does make me think that maybe he was taking it all very seriously, as you suggest, and that maybe he quite ready to laugh about it yet.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on April 27, 2017, 12:51:23 AM
(http://imgur.com/aqCfuWY.jpg)

The Resurrected (1991)
aka. Shatterbrain
* *
Despite signs of intelligence in the script this neo-noir horror mystery fails to match its ambition, with under-developed characters and uninteresting performances. What ends up being most memorable isnít the attempt to be a classy story, but the extremely gross body horror moments that rival The Thing in terms of gore, but lack the invention and style of Carpenterís film.


Trauma (1993)
aka. Auraís Enigma
* *
Dario Argento is frustrating on a good day and this is not a good day. Serial killer mystery is repetitious with the murders, the plot is shoddy and itís a really pervy decision for the director to have his underage daughter Asia doing nudity and a sex scene. Occasional Hitchcock homages and some good guest casting (Brad Dourif) but the best thing Argento ever did was use bold, lurid colors and that was just a phase.


Body Melt (1993)
* Ĺ
Australian body horror thatís like Street Trash filtered through the cra-zy Oz mentality. Street Trash is  one of the worst films of this Marathon. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg868318#msg868318) This isnít much better, but I prefer crazy, gross Aussies to disgusting, scumbag Americans.


Return of the Living Dead 3 (1993)
* * * - Okay
Quote
Starts off badly on a military base that looks like it's been made from sci-fi film leftovers, but it keeps improving throughout its running time and ends surprisingly strongly, largely thanks to a good script that explores concepts of grief and attachment.

That sums it up nicely.

After Society, Bride of Re-Animator and this I guess Iím a fan of director Brian Yuzna. Being a former Producer, his storytelling is very efficient, sometimes too much so, with stock characters and situations that could be fleshed out. The zombies here are very creative and Yuzna has the Makeup Effects crew to pull it off. The film also boasts a strong performance by Melinda Clarke as a teenager who turns into a zombie over the course of the film. Her reactions to the growing hunger and pain give the genre a fresh insider perspective. The Haunted Maze style finale makes this a fun Shocktober selection.


Nightwatch (1994)
* *
Iíve always heard this was the superior version of the film the director remade in English three years later, but watching this was like re-watching the remake, almost shot-for-shot, and with all of the same problems. The male characters are unlikable in how they treat their girlfriends and the surprises are telegraphed well ahead of time.   
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on April 27, 2017, 06:38:53 AM
The Resurrected (1991)
aka. Shatterbrain
* *
Despite signs of intelligence in the script this neo-noir horror mystery fails to match its ambition, with under-developed characters and uninteresting performances. What ends up being most memorable isnít the attempt to be a classy story, but the extremely gross body horror moments that rival The Thing in terms of gore, but lack the invention and style of Carpenterís film.
We showed this last year at the Lovecraft themed horror film festival we had last year. It does deserve a lot better than what we get. Good Lovecraft movies are hard to find.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 01, 2017, 01:26:04 AM
(http://imgur.com/gfrvQEO.jpg)

Brainscan (1994)
* Ĺ
Some of the best horror films come from filmmakers who are clear fans of the genre. This is thrown together by Producers who think they know the formula for taking money from young adult men. Modern teenagers as described by fathers and a character named Trickster who badly wants to be the new Freddy. Instead heís a Top 5 Poochie (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AySXu8x-RnA#noembed).


Out of the Dark (1995)
* Ĺ
Fast-paced nonsense from Hong Kong that throws everything at the wall. Largely a mixture of Poltergiest, Ghostbusters and Leon, but not nearly as entertaining as this sounds. More exhausting than anything.


Castle Freak (1995)
* * Ĺ
The cheesy poster gave me low expectations, though honestly most of this Marathon is built on low expectations. The director is Stuart Gordon (Re-Animator) and he reunites that filmís stars Jeffrey Combs and Barbara Crampton to play a normal husband and wife who inherit a castle and the feral human living in the basement. A simple premise given an equally cut-and-dry execution. Disappointing to see Combs play a normal dad, but he does a good job of it soÖ range.


The Dentist (1996)
* Ĺ
Strike One for Brian Yuzna. I came for the uncomfortable dentistry, but was let down hardest by the dumbed-down portrayal of men and women. It would be misogynist if Corbin Bernsenís dentist were the least bit sympathetic. Making matters worse is Bernsenís TV Soap Opera performance, but you can also blame the material which demands he go from paranoid husband to psychopath in a matter of hours.


Ebola Syndrome (1996)
* *
Extreme horror tempered by 90s Hong Kong exuberance. Anthony Wong (Hard Boiled, Infernal Affairs) plays one of the most depraved characters Iíve ever seen in a film, a murderer and rapist who spreads Ebola around the city as fast as he can because he just donít care. The character could only be more detestable if theyíd cast someone like Abel Ferrara. Oddly, Wong makes this scum more watchable than he should be. Film is horribly paced and too in love with its icky extremeness.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on May 02, 2017, 12:19:31 AM
Castle Freak sounds freaky! Relatively strong review too. :~)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 08, 2017, 03:06:10 PM
(http://imgur.com/vPbt6HK.jpg)

Leprechaun 4: In Space (1996)
*
My first Leprechaun film and one of the most unintentionally funny films of this Marathon. I know because all intentional moments of humor are terrible. Crazy characters, terrible sets and no money for even basic space effects.


Wishmaster (1997)
* *
Obvious attempt at creating a new Horror icon has a clever idea in the mythology of wish-granting genies being evil and always making the worst of your wish. Beyond that the script is terrible and many of the wish twists are great leaps of logic. On the plus side, Tammy Lauren is a very likable female lead, the evil Djinn has a cool growly voice and the practical makeup effects are superior, probably because the director is Robert Kurtzman of KNB Effects. 


Jack Frost (1997)
*
To its credit, the filmmakers seem to know that a killer snowman is a terrible idea to take seriously. Performances are deadpan and despite the killing, this is much more comedy than horror. Still, this isnít worth any more of your time than a YouTube short. To sustain feature length, there needs to be genuine wit and clever ideas. Killer Klowns from Outer Space is the superior version of this type of film.


Rasen (1998)
* Ĺ
Forgotten sequel to Ringu, from the same source material and produced at the same time as its more famous predecessor. (If you didnít know that, this would have you wondering how many haunted VHS tape films Japan has made.) Where Ringu was a supernatural mystery, Rasen is a drama that tries to explain the mystery using science and logic. Like if George Lucas made a film about the discovery of midichlorians, which gives you an idea how dull this is. Not surprisingly, the filmmakers ditched this and released a more direct sequel, Ringu 2, the following year.


Nang-Nak (1999)
aka. Return From the Dead
* * Ĺ
Supernatural Thai drama. I found it difficult to get involved because of the vast cultural differences, much like the few African films Iíve seen. Closer in spirit to Uncle Boonmee but without the surrealism and with a much more simple plot.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on May 08, 2017, 11:54:03 PM
I want to watch Leprechaun 4 just to find out why a Leprechaun would be in space at all!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 09, 2017, 12:11:14 AM
I read the Wikipedia summary, which is so absurd I wonder how it reads to someone who hasn't seen the film.

Quote
On a remote planet, the Leprechaun attempts to court a princess named Zarina, in a nefarious plot to become king of her home planet. The two agree to marry, with each partner planning to kill the other after the wedding night in order to enjoy the marriage benefits (a peerage for the Leprechaun, the Leprechaun's gold and jewels for the princess) undisturbed.

A platoon of space marines arrive on the planet and kill the Leprechaun for interfering with mining operations. Gloating over the victory, one of the marines, Kowalski, urinates on the Leprechaun's body. Unbeknownst to Kowalski, the Leprechaun's spirit travels up his urine stream and into his penis, where his presence manifests as gonorrhea. The marines return to their ship with the injured Zarina, whom they plan to return to her homeworld in order to establish positive diplomatic relations. The ship's commander, the cyborg Dr. Mittenhand, explains his plans to use Zarina's regenerative DNA to recreate his own body, which was mutilated in a failed experiment. Elsewhere on the ship, the Leprechaun violently emerges from Kowalski's penis after he is aroused during a sexual act. The marines hunt the Leprechaun, who outsmarts them and kills most of the crew in gruesome and absurd ways.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on May 09, 2017, 02:41:00 AM
It reads like, "How the hell did this film get made?"
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on May 09, 2017, 11:12:00 PM
It sounds hilarious!

The choice of names, Zarina and Kowalski, really puts it over the top.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 10, 2017, 12:07:10 AM
It sounds hilarious!
Staying at this level, Shannon Elizabeth's death scene in Jack Frost is the same type of funny but more worth your time.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on May 10, 2017, 12:51:13 AM
Still though, that premise.

Here's some interesting trivia: Hellraiser & Critters also make the leap to space in their fourth films. Something happens at four, lol.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 10, 2017, 02:11:19 PM
They Shoot Zombies Don't They? just posted an update. 19 New films, 10 of which I've seen. I can't get a list of what's dropped out, but from what I've read only Stoker has dropped off of all ICM lists, and I've already seen it.

I'm going to take this opportunity to revise My Watchlist (https://letterboxd.com/1so/list/horror-watchlist-full/) and throw out the trash (anything rated below 2.5 stars). My ultimate goal is to turn this into a list of Horror Gems, adding in some of the good finds I've made over the years that are outside the Horror Canon.

Right now I've watched 294 out of 407 titles, 72%. I'll report back once I've finished the update.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on May 10, 2017, 02:33:03 PM
Seen 4 of the 19 but no idea if that is a gain given I don't know what left.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 10, 2017, 03:20:17 PM
the good finds I've made over the years
Right now I've watched 294 out of 407 titles, 72%. I'll report back once I've finished the update.

Update Complete:
21 New Titles from various lists
16 titles before I'm back to where I left off

Some of these are titles I couldn't find the first time and may not find still. Some are titles I wasn't interested in before.

My Watchlist now shows 106 out of 233 or 45% complete.
The 106 are films I liked or found interesting during this Marathon.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 10, 2017, 03:28:42 PM
Seen 4 of the 19 but no idea if that is a gain given I don't know what left.

Former Entries
967. All That Money Can Buy (1941)
971. Stoker (2013)
972. Darkness (2002)
973. Jeepers Creepers II (2003)
975. La tarantola dal ventre nero (1971)
976. Mutants (2009)
979. A Field in England (2013)
980. Citadel (2012)
982. La campana del infierno (1973)
986. Splice (2009)
988. Kansen (2004)
992. Nadja (1994)
993. Alien Raiders (2008)
995. Gli orrori del castello di Norimberga (1972)
996. Ms. 45 (1981)
997. Shura (1971)
998. Freddyís Dead: The Final Nightmare (1991)
999. TŰkaidŰ Yotsuya kaidan (1959)
1000. The Creeping Flesh (1973)



I'm happiest to see Cheap Thrills (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13051.msg783650#msg783650) now on the list.

The update includes House on the Edge of the Park the worst film so far this marathon (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg864481#msg864481)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on May 10, 2017, 04:12:34 PM
Zero sum gain.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 12, 2017, 01:01:16 AM
My Watchlist now shows 106 out of 233 or 45% complete.
16 titles before I'm back to where I left off
I found a couple of interesting lists that I combed through and added more titles because why not.
My Watchlist now has 141 films left to watch.
28 titles before I'm back to where I left off
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 18, 2017, 12:42:19 AM
(http://imgur.com/tupibLq.jpg)

Dracula (1931)
aka. Spanish Dracula
* * * - Good
Shot at the same time and using the same sets as the more famous Bela Lugosi film, this is the superior film because the direction is more cinematic and more atmospheric than Tod Browningís version. Too bad the actor playing Dracula here doesnít have an idea for the character. (Looking like Nicholas Cage playing Dracula doesnít help.) Bela Lugosi is more theatrical, but he also has an otherworldly presence.


Svengali (1931)
* * Ĺ
John Barrymore does an excellent job playing a character thatís pretty loathsome in a way thatís sympathetic. A man who can manipulate women yet still not get what he wants from them is the spine of this gothic melodrama. Unfortunately, the direction and supporting performances are flat, making this intellectual chiller nowhere near as engaging as its leading actor.
 

The Ghoul (1933)
* *
A bunch of eccentric people acting spooky. Only Boris Karloff manages to make his screen time matter. I couldnít care about the rest of them.


The Man They Could Not Hang (1939)
* * * - Okay
Boris Karloff plays a scientist conducting an experiment to bring the dead back to life when heís arrested and executed for murder. Only his experiment works, so you can probably guess what happens next. A plot so simple it couldíve been written by a child, with people behaving with a childís blunt emotions. However, Karloff knows how to put on the show and the back half thrills are mostly a fun mix of And Then There Were None and Cube.


Tower of London (1939)
* * 1/2
Story of Richard III features the three-headed horror monster of Basil Rathbone, Boris Karloff and Vincent Price (who would play Richard in the 1962 Roger Corman remake.) More of a political drama, only the bald and club-footed executioner played by Karloff acts like itís horror. Rathbone is doing Shakespeare without the poetic language, and itís fun, but routine.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 23, 2017, 12:10:02 AM
(http://imgur.com/CG0M6rm.jpg)

Dr. Cyclops (1940)
* *
Starts with a lot of promise thanks to the look of the mad scientist (bald with thick glasses) and some of the best early color photography since Adv. Of Robin Hood. Then the doctor shrinks down his guests and the film turns into a mostly silly action adventure. A bit Incredible Shrinking Man, but mostly Honey I Shrunk the Kids. Special effects and large props are better than you expect. From the co-director of King Kong.


The Abominable Snowman (1957)
* * Ĺ
Slow burn beginning gives way to Blair Witch adventure of dangerous, camera shy Yeti. If only Val Lewton was around, because itís hard to make shadows in the white snow. Thereís some creepiness involving the noises outside your tent and Peter Cushing stands out as always in his first Hammer Horror, but this is like Aliens if the Aliens keep hiding from the humans.
 

The Man and the Monster (1959)
* * Ĺ
Novel twist on Jekyll & Hyde/werewolf myth with a pianist selling his soul for greatness, but his passion transforms him into a rampaging monster. Neither as atmospheric nor as outrageous as good Mexican horror and the monster makeup makes him look distinctly like a Muppet.


Night Creatures (1962)
aka. Captain Clegg
* * Ĺ
The skeletal ghost riders have a great creepy look (https://68.media.tumblr.com/daf2d2753c37103b1ea49d3e47770f79/tumblr_ohkldsxyJX1tr6ni8o1_500.gif) and Peter Cushing is having a blast as the duplicitous priest with a wicked haircut. Too bad the story is kind of all over the place, unsure if itís supposed to be horror or an adventure story. Oliver Reed is also in this, but just barely.


The Witchís Mirror (1962)
* * * - Okay
More Mexican horror, but this one didnít leave out the crazy. Witchcraft, ghosts, grave robbing, a gothic setting and killer hands all crammed into 75 minutes, which leaves little time for character and story development.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 27, 2017, 12:55:21 AM
(http://imgur.com/N1NqQ3h.jpg)

The Terror (1963)
aka. The Castle of Terror
aka. Lady of the Shadows
* * Ĺ
Roger Corman, gothic castle film starring Jack Nicholson and Boris Karloff. While itís clear theyíre making this up as they go and the story is very muddled, some individual scenes are intriguing. Seven directors worked on this, including Corman, Francis Ford Coppola, Monte Hellman, Jack Hill and Nicholson. I find it amusing that on a thrifty Corman production, Coppola took 11 days to shoot what amounted to ten minutes of the final film.
 

The Curse of the Crying Woman (1963)
* * * Ė Okay
Mexican Horror is proving to be the untapped vein of good movies. This oneís got a bit of the gothic atmosphere and a fair amount of nutty ideas, mostly in the makeup and effects that look cheap, but actually make the film better. The flying corpse is one of the scariest moments of this Marathon because the timing of the camera move and the edit are perfect.


Witchcraft (1964)
* *
Aside from a shout-y performance by Lon Chaney Jr., thereís nothing here to elevate it above any typical film about vengeful witches. Very amusing tagline: Hex Marks the Spot


Die! Die! My Darling! (1965)
aka. Fanatic
* * * - Okay
Baby Jane grand dame goth starring Tallulah Bankhead who abducts her recently deceased sonís fiancť (Stefanie Powers). Script is by Richard Matheson, but if youíre going to watch just one 1965 performance-centric horror about abduction and captivity, make it William Wylerís The Collector.


The Sorcerers (1967)
* * Ĺ
Boris Karloff gets to play both predator and victim as a hypnotist who, along with his wife, learns how to completely control and experience the life of a young man. The wife becomes obsessed with the freedom of action without consequence, holding Karloff captive while continuing to push the moral envelope of experiences. Starts comical, in ways both intentional and not. (The music and lighting of psychedelic, swinging London really dates this.) Effectively grows more serious, while the plot remains preposterous. Karloff and wife (Catherine Lacey) mostly sit around the dinner table exchanging reactions, but they're just as captivating as the young man's world.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 31, 2017, 06:19:55 PM
One more film gets me to 300 titles watched for the Marathon. Hope I have time to work up some stats.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 31, 2017, 10:58:18 PM
(http://imgur.com/Z9zGgAs.jpg)

100 Monsters (1968)
aka. The 100 Ghost Stories
* * * - Okay
Sort of a mix between a monster movie for the whole family and some George Lucas storytelling about land rights and other stuffy/boring grow-up things. Most of the monsters look like people dressed up for Halloween, but there are a handful of memorable ones to make this fun and kind of cute.
 

Blood and Lace (1971)
aka. The Blood Secret
* Ĺ 
An American film that plays like an adaptation of an Italian giallo. Youíve heard of unintentionally funny, this is unintentionally bizarre, with an ending so random I refuse to believe this was the original intent. Itís biggest sin is that itís painfully boring even though the film features Gloria Grahame, an actress Iíll watch in anything.


Tenderness of the Wolves (1973)
aka. Fanatic
* * Ĺ
Though Rainer Werner Fassbinder only produced, this has the look and feel of one of his films. Muted and clinical for a film about a gay serial killer who murders young boys and sells them for meat. That sounds like horror, but the blood is minimal and the story is meant more as a commentary on the fringe people literally living off of the young, pretty and fortunate.


Donít Be Afraid of the Dark (1973)
aka. Gate of Darkness
* *
My interest in this is the cast - John Wayne co-stars Kim Darby (True Grit) and Jim Hutton (Hellfighters) along with William Demarest Ė and word of a potential remake. Creatures in a mansion plot doesnít have many ideas, and the prune-faced tiny creatures can't strike a note of fear. Also really hate these stories where the husband refuses to believe his wife and the mounting pile of evidence until the final minutes, making the guy into a huge jerk.


Sugar Hill (1974)
aka. Zombies of Sugar Hill
* *
Zombie Blaxploitation Female Revenge film sounds like it canít miss, but the problem is the script is too by-the-numbers and mostly a repetitive series of voodoo killings. Well made and better acted than most Blaxploitation, but the lack of inspiration leaves me hoping Jordan Peele has plans to remake this.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter - Update
Post by: 1SO on May 31, 2017, 11:15:04 PM
This batch actually came to 101 titles because Sleepaway Camp got its own spotlight post.

As of now, I have 131 films to go.

Top 15 of this 101
(http://imgur.com/EqVhXPg.jpg)

1.   The Boxerís Omen (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg866687#msg866687) (1983)
2.   Samurai Reincarnation (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg866687#msg866687) (1981)
3.   Dracula (aka. Spanish Dracula) (1931)
4.   Dark Night of the Scarecrow (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg865367#msg865367) (1981)
5.   Bride of Re-Animator (1989)
6.   Return of the Living Dead 3 (1993)
7.   Die! Die! My Darling! (1965)
8.   The Witchís Mirror (1962)
9.   Pin (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg868522#msg868522) (1988)
10.   The Curse of the Crying Woman (1963)
11.   The Man They Could Not Hang (1939)
12.   100 Monsters (1968)
13.   The Deadly Spawn (1983)
14.   Trance (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg865368#msg865368) (Der Fan) (1982)
15.   Anguish (1987)


RATINGS BREAKDOWN:

3 Stars: 13 films
2Ĺ Stars: 20
2 Stars: 31
1Ĺ Stars: 21
1 Star: 6
Ĺ Star: 9
0 Stars: The House on the Edge of the Park
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 07, 2017, 12:20:53 AM
(http://imgur.com/YvpKA5P.jpg)

Bad Ronald (1974)
* * * - Okay
TV Movie has a really unusual premise that leads to a teenage boy hiding within the walls of a house. What happens from there are voyeuristic situations that donít hold back on the creepy, uneasy feeling. Doesnít transcend its TV-ness, but there are a number of scary moments and creepy shots.
 

Ilsa: She Wolf of the SS (1975)
zero stars
Pretty much what I expected, which is unfortunate. Even Men Behind the Sun (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14226.msg868625#msg868625) has insight and raises questions within the frame of a shocking movie. This opens with Ilsa crying after sex, followed by her cruelly castrating her lover. The psychology of why she cries is worth exploring and a better film would go further down that path. This isnít interested in such matters, just endless scenes of torture and sadism. I would love to see a documentary on Naziploitation and the culture that led to 3 more Ilsa films. Just donít ask me to watch the films themselves.


Deadly Strangers (1976)
* *
The story is rather dull with two people meeting and making their way across Britain, one of whom has escaped from an asylum, but which one? However, there are a number of unusual touches, like the garish lighting, the sleazy sexualization of former Disney child superstar Hayley Mills, and Sterling Hayden sporting a tremendous beard (http://www.thebetamaxrundown.com/images/deadlystrangers_frame01.jpg) and acting way too happy to be a part of this film. Not enough to make it worth watching, but enough to keep it from being a waste of time.


Encounters of the Spooky Kind (1980)
aka. Close Encounters of the Spooky Kind
aka. Spooky Encounters
* Ĺ
I just canít get into the Chinese horror comedies, even though the tone isnít too far off from Ghostbusters and the later films of Stephen Chow. I like Sammo Hung, but the humor is so broad and childish. Even the clever ideas come across as sketch comedy, and not SNL sketch, but MadTV.


House of the Long Shadows (1983)
* Ĺ
Itís crushing that this isnít a good film. Starring Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing AND John Carradine in an old fashioned gothic, Dark House mystery. I hope this killed the directorís career. Poorly paced, poorly filmed, just a general waste of everyoneís efforts. The final minutes delivers some of good moments by the horror demi-Gods, but getting there proves a great cast canít save a lousy film. Based on a play by George M. Cohan, which is about the last thing I expected to discover.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 09, 2017, 09:25:31 AM
With this batch, I am caught up to where I left off when I went back to fold in the new titles.

(http://imgur.com/19oKMiL.jpg)

Slaughter High (1986)
aka. April Foolís Day
aka. Jolly Killer
Ĺ
Of all the new inclusions on They Shoot Zombies list, this is the most inexplicable, a slasher film whose twist is that everyone is completely terrible, including the final girl. The typical nerd who will become our killer is pranked multiple times in the opening with not only sexual embarrassment typical of the genre, but electrocution and acid. Budget is low, direction is poor, ending is weird and illogical but the best part of the film. Even the review on They Shoot Zombies recommends it only to genre fans and suggests a few beers.


The Untold Story (1993)
aka. The Eight Immortals Restaurant
aka. Human Meat Pork Bun
* *
Butcher turned serial killer, from the director of Ebola Syndrome working once again with Anthony Wong, whose acting ability Iíve severely under-appreciated. The other film prepared me for the extreme violence and this one certainly doesn't hold back. However, the climax involves the torture and murder of children, done in a irresponsible grindhouse manner. Iím downgrading this to a disappointment because the film crosses a line it didnít need to.


Giorgino (1994)
* * Ĺ
Art house horror along the lines of Nuri Bilge Ceylan. Nearly three-hour story about a doctor looking for a group of children vanished from a small village. There is talk of wolves and suggestion of supernatural forces at play. Story is a little too foggy and low-key for my tastes, but I made it through okay. Female lead is a famous French singer named MylŤne Farmer. Sheís not a strong actress but has a ghostly presence with her pale skin and striking red hair.


Embalming (1999)
* *
The distinct amber tint clued me in that this was from the director of Eureka (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8177.msg487305#msg487305), much discussed around here years ago. What starts as a serial killer thriller with heaps of autopsy body horror goes on to beÖ I donít really know. I couldnít tell what the director was trying to get at, but it wasnít the mystery or the horror, which are both casually laid in and just as casually discarded. Itís hard not to equate the film to the headless corpse at the center of the mystery.


The Nameless (1999)
aka. Los Sin Nombre
* * Ĺ
Iím a fan of director Jaume Balaguerů ([REC], Sleep Tight) and this has an intriguing cop thriller premise. When he focuses on the mother whose murdered daughter may not be dead but still held captive over five years, itís an effective psychological drama. However, thereís a thread about growing and harvesting evil from people that becomes increasingly preposterous as it becomes more important to the film. Well made, but loses its way.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: pixote on June 09, 2017, 02:12:13 PM
The Witchís Mirror (1962)
* * * - Okay
More Mexican horror, but this one didnít leave out the crazy. Witchcraft, ghosts, grave robbing, a gothic setting and killer hands all crammed into 75 minutes, which leaves little time for character and story development.

The Curse of the Crying Woman (1963)
* * * Ė Okay
Mexican Horror is proving to be the untapped vein of good movies. This oneís got a bit of the gothic atmosphere and a fair amount of nutty ideas, mostly in the makeup and effects that look cheap, but actually make the film better. The flying corpse is one of the scariest moments of this Marathon because the timing of the camera move and the edit are perfect.

For anyone interested, these two were part of our 1960s World Cinema marathon, so you can find more thoughts and a ton of screenshots in this thread (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5124.0) (though there be spoilers there).

pixote
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 09, 2017, 02:50:03 PM
Wow! Here I am thinking I'm out on a limb (until Junior does his Mexican Horror Marathon) and you show me a treasure of conversation.

This is most worth discussing.

Quote from: pixote
It's not quite Ed Wood territory, but there's a good deal of C-grade filmmaking on display here (for some reason

I thought it was mostly effective (the only two things that really bothered me were the shock zooms or whatever and those scene with the dogs... cuz they felt like they were shot different than the rest of the stuff).

Quote from: pixote
the collapse of the house probably couldn't have looked any more fake ó and added together they really make the film feel amateurish.

I was more amused by the fakeness than annoyed. Make of that what you will.

Like with the dogs, I accepted the fake moments and I was amused by the unpolished quality to some of the scenes. They didn't take away from the film for me, but rather gave them a feel of the filmmaker's personal touch.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on June 09, 2017, 04:50:39 PM
For this Shocktober, I'd love to watch a bunch of decent horror from different lands.  It seems that most of my favorite horror has the additional layer of cultural uniqueness to it.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 09, 2017, 10:35:04 PM
Yeah, there's an extra kick to something like Viy that's Spiritual Supernatural Horror but also uniquely Russian.

Remind me to recommend The 4th Man. Dutch film by Paul Verhoeven full of symbolism. Though it also twists religious iconography (particularly Christian) in ways that can be taken as blasphemous.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 11, 2017, 01:20:25 AM
(http://imgur.com/VkkcoBM.jpg)

Ring 0: Birthday (2000)
* *  Ĺ
Iíve now seen 5 Ring/Ringu films and aside from the original and remake this is perhaps the best. A prequel explaining the supernatural is normally the wrong way to go, but this is a series that could use some logic. (Well, Ring 2 also tried to explain, but did such a poor job it still ended up making no sense.) Ring 0 also maintains some mystery, but it goes wrong by making Sadako a victim who never makes any decisions regarding what she is being turned into. Itís not interesting when the central figure watches helplessly while those around her make the decisions and/or die.


The Isle (2000)
* * * - Good
Kim Ki-duk drama with disturbing content and very little dialogue. Itís an interesting balance between beauty and brutality, once that Kim handles better than Lars von Trier. The filmmakers share a misanthropic view of people, with characters here who act on the most basic desires of sex, violence and food. The bodily functions I found tolerable, the animal cruelty (fish, frogs and birds) make me hesitant to recommend the film as do the moments of sexual violence, and there is some violence involving fish hooks that really made me squirm. Yet it all comes together under a singular vision to stand both apart and above most movies.


Another Heaven (2000)
* * Ĺ
Serial Killer hunt with a supernatural element. Think of it as Se7en meets Venomís symbiote, where the parasite is fighting its own mortality. Thatís unique but the rest of the film is a bunch of stuff Iíve seen before with frenetic camerawork and a director who takes over two-hours to tell a rather simple story.


Wendigo (2001)
* * Ĺ
The opening confrontation between a family from the city (Patricia Clarkson, Jake Weber and Erik Per Sullivan from Malcolm in the Middle) and wilderness hunters gave me Eden Lake chills. The rest of the film couldíve been a solid paranoia thriller over whether the feud has died down. There are some good ideas and interesting ways of tying the psychological to the supernatural. Despite the super low budget, filmmaker Larry Fessenden shows a distinct vision. However, the promise is never fulfilled and the Wendigo ends up being the wrong thing to focus on.


The Hole (2001)
* *
Bad stuff happens to four teenagers trapped in an underground lair. The filmís cleverness and revelations that characters are even more despicable than they first appear reeks of early Danny Boyle. So much so that it never stands on its own because the twists arenít cool or surprising, theyíre just fulfilling genre expectations. Good performances by a cast, which includes Keira Knightley and Thora Birch.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on June 11, 2017, 10:50:47 AM
Yeah, there's an extra kick to something like Viy that's Spiritual Supernatural Horror but also uniquely Russian.

Remind me to recommend The 4th Man. Dutch film by Paul Verhoeven full of symbolism. Though it also twists religious iconography (particularly Christian) in ways that can be taken as blasphemous.

I'm making my list here (https://letterboxd.com/oldkid/list/horror-films-non-english-speaking/).
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 11, 2017, 09:26:44 PM
That list... hugs me.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on June 14, 2017, 10:59:11 AM
I like the idea of an internationally flavored Shocktober. Might be on board for that.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 14, 2017, 12:42:39 PM
Junior, you do what you do but I think you'd be happy with a month in Mexico.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 16, 2017, 11:25:50 PM
(http://imgur.com/Qex1zqA.jpg)

Visible Secret (2001)
* *
Hong Kong film combining ghosts, possession, romantic drama and the longing emptiness of the New Wave. In other words it is All Over The Place, which is interesting but not nearly as much as it is tiring. I want to recommend it more for being such an original take, but while watching I was checking the running time a lot. Stars Shu Qi, which is never a bad thing.


Bangkok Haunted (2001)
aka. Bangkok Paranormal
aka. Bangkok Kill City
* *
A trio of ghost stories that present Thailand as a country with a steep learning curve before they might produce some outstanding genre work. Each story has a simple core Ė haunted instrument, love potion made from the dead, hanging that was not a suicide Ė but manages to be confusing anyway. Had things not felt so familiar, the narrative and tone jumps in each story mightíve been bewildering.


Rose Red (2002)
aka. Stephen Kingís Rose Red
* * Ĺ
One of the longest titles on They Shoot Zombies Ė 4+ hours Ė is this miniseries written by Stephen King. Haunted House story has Kingís strength of being so steeped in the genre it manages to cram in pretty much every good thing thatís ever been in any haunted house story ever, including what makes those moments good in the first place. Thereís also Kingís weakness with each character getting only one note to play over the 4 hours. Some of the CGI begs you to go easy on it, while the overall Art Direction, Lighting and Makeup are quite good. Mostly works as dumb fun, but also a lot of moments where I cringed and groaned.


Dracula: Pages From a Virginís Diary (2002)
* * * - Good
Those unfamiliar with Guy Maddin will find this to be one of the strangest films theyíve ever seen. I found it less alien than typical Maddin because he was working off a well-known story instead of his own surreal ideas. Maddin takes a couple of key threads from Bram Stokerís Dracula and mixes in modern dance and silent cinema, filmed using 21st Century techniques. The results are occasionally stunning and the different elements work surprisingly well together, though I quickly go so used to the style, I became a little bored by the overly-familiar subject matter.


Alive (2002)
* * * - Okay
Not really horror, but thatís okay because itís from Ryuhei Kitamura whom Iím quite fond of. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9985.msg588853#msg588853) Twilight Zone type story of a murderer saved from execution so he can have a fate worse than death. Minimal sets, lots of style (perhaps too much) and a twist every 10 minutes. Too many twists, though it keeps things interesting.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 17, 2017, 07:48:06 AM
Yea, Maddin's take on Dracula is one of the better ones in cinema.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 17, 2017, 07:42:15 PM
It's very original, but I don't know if I'd recommend it to someone looking for a good Dracula adaptation because it's so Maddin-esque. For that I'd first recommend Coppola's 1992 adaptation.


I've been working in Baton Rouge and during the downtime I started building a ranked list of recommendations from the entire Marathon. It doesn't feel complete by itself, so I'm planning to fold in titles from all past Shocktobers for an Uber-list of Buried Treasures that I have posted reviews for. I'm also separating the * * 1/2 titles I think are risks worth taking (The Sorcerers, Night Tide) from more bland, mixed fare like Another Heaven and Dr. Terror's House of Horrors.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 17, 2017, 09:17:50 PM
Oh sure, as a straight adaptation, but I meant more as an interesting take on the story because a lot of Dracula movies are rather pedantic.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 19, 2017, 07:22:12 AM
(http://imgur.com/DANSxAy.jpg)

London After Midnight (2002)
* * Ĺ
TCM attempted to recreate a lost horror film from 1927 directed by Tod Browning and starring Lon Chaney using the script and as many production stills as they could dig up. The 47-minute result is little more than a valiant effort since there are only so many ways you can reframe and pan across the same photographs and Chaneyís elaborate makeup doesnít look realistic enough caught in the still cameraís flashbulb.


Malťfique (2002)
* * Ĺ
Never heard of the film or French filmmaker Eric Valette. Donít know what to make of this, which reminded me of Le Trou with poorly conceived characters like the crazy idiot that eats anything and the transsexual bully. They find a magic book that may help them escape orÖ you knowÖ damn them for all eternity. Couldíve been better paced, but reasonably well made and quite visual considering 90% takes place in one prison cell. Climax is a bit heady and it doesnít leave me caring to think much about it.


Shark Attack 3: Megalodon (2002)
*
I was all ready for a so-bad-itís-good time, remembering a youtube clip of highlights years ago from Junior (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4403.msg152173#msg152173). Unfortunately, thatís pretty much all there is. The shark grunts a lot and thereís an amazing line of dialogue (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1XOfHax6Q8#noembed) Ė apparently improvised by John Barrowman Ė but the bulk of the film is just a Jaws rehash on a tiny budget.


Darkness Falls (2003)
* Ĺ
Iíve now seen 4 of director Jonathan Liebesmanís 6 features and if I watch any more I can only blame myself. Like Teenage Mutant, Ninja Turtles, Battle: LA and Wrath of the Titans, he doesnít know how to use the art to craft a good scare or thrill. Instead, he cranks up the volume and doubles the edits until the hyperactive emptiness numbs me. Story is also stupidly assembled from clichť bits of other horror films.


Wishing Stairs (2003)
aka. Whispering Corridors 3
* * Ĺ
This is my 2nd WC film, which are teen angst soap opera with supernatural elements. I wish I liked them more because theyíre a different type of horror film in terms of tone. Even though thereís murder, ghosts and blood, the focus is on the petty conflict between the girls, which I find shallow and simplistic compared to the complications of these situations in real life. Mean Girls and Vengeful Spirits should mix, but they work against each other. Feel like I'd be the minority opinion on this.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 22, 2017, 12:14:23 AM
(http://imgur.com/OGYFkJ5.jpg)

Acacia (2003)
* *
Why are Evil Trees a more popular idea than you would expect? Poltergeist, Evil Dead, The Guardian, Sleepy Hollow, Charisma, Treevenge and of course, Trees 2: The Root of All Evil. This is one of those, involving an adopted boy who may be the treeís human offspring. Sedate Korean film succumbs quickly to the silliness of the premise without ever being enjoyably silly.


Dead & Breakfast (2004)
* Ĺ
Much like Very Bad Things, I wanted to punch this annoyingly unfunny gore comedy in the face. Many familiar faces who should be ashamed, so Iím going to take the rest of my time listing their names. Jeremy Sisto, Erik Palladino, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Portia de Rossi, Ever Carradine, David Carradine, Deidrich Bader, Bianca Lawson and Oz Perkins.


Marebito (2004)
aka. The Stranger From Afar
* * * - Okay
Made in 8 days by Takeshi Shimizu (The Grudge filmsÖ all of them) this is a rambling mixture of elements held together by a strong sense of mood. On the surface thereís a hidden underground city, a woman in chains, voyeurism, supernatural fear hiding in plain sight, serial murder and vampirism. Beneath that there are themes of changing gender dynamics in Japanese society, the way some people treat pets like humans, using a camera to distance yourself from the horror of the real world. In other words itís all over the place but holds interest with its interesting ideas. The filmmaking is creepy and haunting, mostly shot in low def. It only hurts the film in that mysterious city, which looks like an old computer game.


Dumplings (2004)
* * Ĺ
I had already seen the shorter version of this as part of ThreeÖ Extremes, where the base uncomfortable components Ė cannibalism and abortion Ė work better. Double the length, the mood and Christopher Doyleís cinematography remain strong, but the simplicity of the story left me hungry for more content.


Spider Forest (2004)
* * Ĺ
I was hoping for more symbolic spiders than literal ones, with those creatures being my horror weakness. Theyíre actually both, which means they donít show up much, but when they do theyíre very creepy crawly. I noticed an early shot that reminded me of Lynch but took it as a one-off. As the murder investigation unraveled on a non-linear timeline the comparison became more obvious. Itís not bad, though I think the narrative confusion detracts more than it adds.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on June 22, 2017, 11:19:38 AM
Putting Marebito on my list.

I hate spider movies.  Gives me jump scares without deserving real emotion. 
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 22, 2017, 11:19:38 PM
Putting Marebito on my list.
Nice. I was going to suggest a list of titles, but now that I've seen so many it's probably best that I stand back and let you decide what interests you. I will suggest taking a look at the site for They Shoot Zombies where you can order the full list by Country (http://theyshootzombies.com/ghf1000/full-list/).


I hate spider movies.  Gives me jump scares without deserving real emotion.
Yeah. I've recommended Kingdom of the Spiders, where they're all tarantula-sized and plentiful, but the spiders in Spider Forest were really small, to where the camera would have to shift focus from an actors face to the spider on a thread. That focus shift would work like a jump scare and leave me unprepared for a couple of moments where a larger spider appeared, like one that shows up on the back of a guy's neck. [Spoiler Tagged for creepiness.]
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on June 23, 2017, 02:04:18 AM
What I would be most interested in is perhaps ten films that you would want to put on my list that I haven't.  I can't promise to include them, but I promise to check them out (or tell you that I've seen it and why it's not on my list).
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 25, 2017, 12:50:17 AM
(http://imgur.com/9McNvqe.jpg)

Feng Shui (2004)
* * Ĺ
Oddly plotted with a first half thatís more about a cheating husband with random ghost people peppered in so you remember itís a horror film. Back half is more assured, playing with deaths related to the Chinese Zodiac. The ghosts have more purpose and their appearances are scarier. Kind of mad that the solution comes from a phone call by a stranger. Dumb way to get your character out of their problem.


Seed of Chucky (2004)
* *
Bride of Chucky was a real surprise when I saw it back in 1998, a reinvention of the franchise with a great balance of horror and laughs from writer Don Mancini. In 2013, Mancini did it again with the underseen good time Curse of Chucky (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13051.msg785046#msg785046), which he also directed. In between Mancini made his directing debut with Seed, and it has two major problems. Mancini isnít a strong director his first time out, nothing like the style he brings to Curse and lacking any scares, surprise or tension needed for a horror film. The script here is his most comedic, too much so, with way too many meta jokes, most of which donít land. In other words, I was right to go from Bride to Curse and I recommend you do the same.


The Dark Hours (2005)
aka. Head Games
* * Ĺ
One of those shots in the dark added by me because I heard it might be a discovery. Falls short, but Iíd like to see director Paul Fox, writer Wil Zmack and star Kate Greenhouse get another chance because thereís definite talent in this tight, little cabin in the woods, home invasion thriller. Steps to the side of torture porn by focusing on psychological terror, but ends up a little obscure about what it wants to do and say.


Voice (2005)
aka. Whispering Corridors 4
* * * - Okay
Another WC movie and my favorite so far because thereís an interesting whodunit around the student whoís murdered and haunts the school as a ghost trying to find her killer with the help of her best friend who learns how to talk with her. I initially bristled when the middle went into soap opera, but I learned to accept thatís what these films are, and itís not as soapy as Wishing Stairs. I would love to watch the series with Sandy. They seem suited to her, unless she has one of those shocking un-positive reactions.


The Skeleton Key (2005)
* *
The story beats unfold similar to Get Out, so the contrast shows whatís wrong here. Get Outís suspense is the result of pointed and uneasy racial satire. Skeleton Key is built on a touristís idea of Voodoo in New Orleans. Director Ian Softley scoops in bayou mysticism for atmosphere, but itís as phony as his portrayal of cyberculture in Hackers. Peter Sarsgaard is a good actor but he doesnít know how to approach a character who is meant to initially appear helpful. He just waits for the script to tell us what heís been letting slip the whole time. Despite all that, I really liked the way the ending plays out.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 25, 2017, 01:14:24 AM
What I would be most interested in is perhaps ten films that you would want to put on my list that I haven't.  I can't promise to include them, but I promise to check them out (or tell you that I've seen it and why it's not on my list).

Most of what I would suggest is on your list or I know you've already seen it (like Sleep Tight, which I will always recommend.) If I come up with more, I'll let you know.


Australia: Long Weekend is a good example of Ozploitation and I was a fan of The Plumber, but you said you were interested in the "additional layer of cultural uniqueness," and Wake in Fright is exactly that.

Czech Republic: Little Otik (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9616.msg758043#msg758043)

France: Lots of good choices here, but one with a brief and now extinguishing reputation is Brotherhood of the Wolf (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=7319.msg419732#msg419732), which is a bold and epic, period horror film with liberal amounts of sex and violence and martial arts.

Germany: Wondering if you've seen any German Expressionism classics, such as The Golem or The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.

Spain: I successfully recommended Witching & Bitching by Ńlex de la Iglesia to Junior, but for you I would suggest getting your feet wet with his wild "end of the world" horror comedy The Day of the Beast.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on June 25, 2017, 02:18:56 AM
I hesitate on the Australia front, because the title of my list is "non-English speaking", mostly because I hate the American-centric word "foreign", unless it's clearly a national context.

I read your review of Little Otik before and I'm interested: it's on.

Brotherhood of the Wolf sounds pretty crazy.  It's on.

I've already seen the two German Expressionistic films you mentioned. I've also seen Nosferatu and Faust.  I liked Golem.  Do you think Golem: How He Came Into the World is worth watching?

The Day of the Beast sounds cool.  I might throw Witching and Bitching on there as well, but "gore-fest" was mentioned. not sure about that.



Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 25, 2017, 08:23:47 AM
I hesitate on the Australia front, because the title of my list is "non-English speaking", mostly because I hate the American-centric word "foreign", unless it's clearly a national context.
I included Australia when I saw The Tenant on your list, which I remember being English. IMDB lists it as English and French. Turns out there are 3 different versions.

Quote
The film was shot part in English, part in French, going by whatever the actors present felt more comfortable with. Afterwards, different language versions were produced in post-production, with part of the cast dubbing themselves in both the fully English and the fully French version, while the rest of the French characters were notably dubbed by actors with audibly US American accents.


I've already seen the two German Expressionistic films you mentioned. I've also seen Nosferatu and Faust.  I liked Golem.  Do you think Golem: How He Came Into the World is worth watching?
I didn't realize Paul Wegener made a Golem trilogy. The 1915 version of The Golem is considered lost, so I guess the film we saw was 1920's Golem: How He Came Into the World. (In between he made The Golem and the Dancing Girl, which is also a lost film.)


The Day of the Beast sounds cool.  I might throw Witching and Bitching on there as well, but "gore-fest" was mentioned. not sure about that.
I couldn't find where I connected de la Iglesia to gore-fest. He's violent, but is a high-energy showman, not a grimy blood peddler. Nowhere near as gruesome as Inside or Martyrs.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on June 25, 2017, 11:38:31 AM
You never mentioned "gore-fest".  I read that on IMDB.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 25, 2017, 09:48:49 PM
This is coming up. The film doesn't look promising, but that's one of my favorite alternate titles so far in this marathon.


Quote from: 1SO
Santaís Slay (2005)
aka. Very Bad Santa
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on June 30, 2017, 09:47:33 AM
(http://imgur.com/db0oIeo.jpg)

Noroi: The Curse (2005)
* * * - Good
Not so much ďfound footageĒ as a pseudo-documentary, this Japanese horror burns slow, but like early M. Night Shyamalan or the first Paranormal Activity, the pace creates tension because you know the film ultimately wants to give you the creepsÖ and it does. One of the most effective horror films of the marathon with some really strong images and moments. My biggest problem is using a mentally challenged character as a genre device, which I always have to forgive when the film is working. (Like Ouija boards, itís the worst thing you can pit into a film aiming for ultimate realism.) Itís not too distracting here, but I can understand him bothering some people.


Isolation (2005)
* *  Ĺ
Irish horror, dismissed as an Alien rip-off, but itís remarkable how much the film looks like something a young Ridley Scott might have crafted. Writer/Director Billy OíBrien makes some rookie mistakes, like too much fetishizing the gore of (fake) dead animals. The sheer volume of uncomfortable and icky medical procedures takes away from the atmosphere. (This would be a terrible film to try and eat to.) The final creature design and movement couldíve benefitted from some more money, but if they ever get Alien away from Sir Ridley, OíBrien is someone who deserves serious consideration. Cast includes Sean Harris (Prometheus), Essie Davis (The Babadook) and Ruth Negga (Loving).


Santaís Slay (2005)
aka. Very Bad Santa
*
ĒWhoís your Daddy? Father Christmas.Ē
How Did This Get Made? A broad and childish comedy about a kill-crazy Santa (wrestler Bill Goldberg). The only film by David Steiman, who worked as a Set P.A. and then personal assistant to Brett Ratner, which might explain the people who appear in this film. The opening scene has James Caan, Fran Drescher, Chris Kattan and Rebecca Gayheart. After that thereís Emilie de Ravin, Robert Culp, Dave Thomas, Saul Rubinek and ĎTinyí Lister. I seriously have a lot of questions about this filmís existence.


Reincarnation (2005)
* * Ĺ
I like filmmaker Takashi Shimizu (The Grudge, Marebito) but the scares and creeps in this ghost story are lacking punch. I like the way the film changes its look between the past and the present and there are still some good moments that remind me why I like Shimizu, but the story and style are too simplified so it never rises above people in ghost makeup.


Luncay (2005)
* *
The style here is more like something from the late 60s, with thick blankets of symbolism and heavy ideas that are either bluntly obvious or nonsense. I guess itís horror because there are a number of images involving organs moving around on their own and the theme of madness, but this kind of surrealism isnít what Iím looking for and this one in particular was a slog to get through.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 04, 2017, 12:06:54 AM
(http://imgur.com/VX7Xb5g.jpg)

Cigarette Burns (2005)
aka. Masters of Horror: John Carpenterís Cigarette Burns
* * * - Good
Considered the best episode of Masters of Horror, built around a solid Ringu premise of a lost film screened only once because the crowd went into homicidal rage. Search for the film allows Carpenter to get meta more successfully than usual. First half is talky, and while thereís no way the payoff can match the expectations of the build-up, what we get is pretty satisfying. Music by Cody Carpenter sounds like Papa John, which is great.


Sheitan (2006)
aka. Satan
* Ĺ
The bulk of the film centers on a bunch of young adults, obsessed with sex beyond even what you might expect from young adults. The script has more crass sexual talk than Deadpool, and this is a drama, so it wears really thin when the horror takes over an hour before it unleashes hell. Thatís the best way to describe it. The final third isnít supernatural and thereís no torture, but the attacks from Vincent Cassell as a whacked out shepherd have the same relentlessness as Leatherface with his chainsaw. Problem is, it isnít entertaining to watch, not in a scary way and not in a fun way.


Final Destination 3 (2006)
* * Ĺ
I stopped watching this series with #2 when the formula became too obvious. The spectacular openings are the highlight (and if you havenít watched 2s log truck, do yourself a favor. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZvvVMeSWcI#noembed) While a roller coaster sounds like a great setting for mayhem, filming such a sequence requires clear images when high speeds make it difficult and too many effects diluting the stuntwork. (This entry makes up for it by having two such sequences.) A nice surprise was discovering the lead is played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead, whose recent work has made me a fan.


Fido (2006)
* * Ĺ
Very fresh and clever take on the zombie film, with an alt-1950s where the undead are sold as pets and servants. Clever doesnít equal funny here and the results left me empty. Like The Love Witch, this is all dressed up in beautiful details, but doesnít go far in terms of story. Lots to admire, but barely a smile.


The Last Winter (2006)
* * Ĺ
When I saw Wendigo a month ago (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg872179#msg872179) it left me interested to see more by filmmaker Larry Fessenden. Little did I know this was also on They Shoot Zombies list. Another creature ghost story tied closely to the mysticism of the land (in this case an artic setting similar to The Thing). Again the vision is distinct, the ideas are muddy but occasionally effective. I see why Fessenden has a following and I also see why that following is so small. Cast this time includes Ron Pearlman, James Le Gros, Connie Britton and Kevin Corrigan.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 08, 2017, 12:47:07 AM
(http://imgur.com/7b2GnFi.jpg)

The Living and the Dead (2006)
* * Ĺ
In an English manor house, a young adult son suffering from schizophrenia is determined to prove he can take care of his invalid mother better than an outsider nurse. This one is going to be a matter of taste. Performances pull no punches and the frenetic camerawork and disconnected soundscape certainly ring cinematically true, but thereís also a strong whiff of exploitation to the direction which places it firmly in horror. Lodge Kerriganís dramas about schizophrenia, Clean Shaven and Keane used a similar technique to better effect. This got me thinking about Angst (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12403.0), which goes down the dark path with its mentally disturbed lead but avoids exploitation with simple, bold directing decisions instead of flashy style and sentiment.


13 Beloved (2006)
aka. 13: Game of Death
* *
There have been a number of these Fear Factor horror films lately, the best one being The Game. The best of the recent batch is Cheap Thrills and Nerve is one I still debate watching. This one from Thailand has some big problems. The main character gets paid after completing each task, but heís told up front if he doesnít complete all 13 he loses all the money. So, why pay small dividends if itís an all or nothing deal? The tone is terribly off, with much of the events played for laughs, which doesnít work when your film has dead pets and parental abuse. What ultimately sinks it is a muddled finale that tries to make the games part of a personal story that doesnít work, like a bad Hollywood rewrite. In brief, 13 Beloved < 13 Tzameti.


The Hamiltons (2006)
* * Ĺ
Debut from a pair of filmmakers who call themselves The Butcher Brothers is about a suburban family with some deeply dark secrets. Having recently lost their parents the remaining siblings quickly unshackle all sense of morality, including but not limiting themselves to having kidnapped women in their basement. I had a lot of trouble getting onto the wavelength of the filmmakers. Donít know if itís the inexperience or sloppy storytelling, but the first half is a few interesting ideas slowly searching for a purpose. I wouldnít be surprised if the Brothers have a better film in their careers, maybe even one that gets me to like this film more.


Poultrygeist: Night of the Chicken Dead (2006)
*
There was a time when I could enjoy Troma, but that doesnít seem like a remote possibility now. Considered by many to be their best film because itís directed by the companyís chief, Lloyd Kaufman, (who acts in the film and does a good job of it), and it incorporates many genres including musical numbers. I thought it was painful, mainly because the visual humor is so gross itís deadening. Compare this to Cannibal: The Musical by Trey Parker, distributed by Troma but made independent of them. Parker knows how to blend horror, rude humor and songs. Poultrygeist is what you get when all of that goes horribly wrong.


Black Water (2007)
* * * - Okay
Killer croc in Australian swamp told in a minimalist style. (Not as minimal as Open Water but more than The Shallows.) This means few characters with few plans, mostly hoping to wait out the danger, which can be trying for some, but thereís still enough tension and suspense to make this a decent film for patient viewers. Later the same year, there was an Australian killer croc swamp film with a much larger budget. Looking forward to comparing the two because that one (called Rogue) is up next.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 11, 2017, 01:56:18 AM
(http://imgur.com/S8G2bCF.jpg)

Rogue (2007)
* *
We begin with 2007ís other Australian killer croc movie, this time with money for a larger cast, including a few stars, and digital effects. The director is Greg McLean, who made Wolf Creek, a film I found tedious until it become irredeemably despicable. So maybe Iím biased, still bearing the sour aftertaste of his direction with WC, but a good killer croc movie needs suspense and thereís none here. Plenty of surprise, and itís to the filmís credit that billing and star power - Sam Worthington, Radha Mitchell, Mia Wasikowska and Michael Vartan - do not boost chances of survival. Digital effects are pretty good, but it only adds to the empty flash compared to Black Water.


I Can See You (2008)
* Ĺ
Coming from 366 Weird Movies, this trip into the woods has a small cult of people who respond to the off-kilter tone and David Lynch style surrealism in the last 20 minutes. There are scenes I can definitely point to as interesting, small moments where I sort of understand what the filmmaker is attempting. Largely, Iím bewildered trying to figure out what itís trying to say. What is this film actually about?


The Cottage (2008)
* Ĺ
Crime comedy misfire that twists into a slasher misfire. The dialogue is staged in a stiff, theatrical manner that makes the actors look like theyíre Ďactingí or doing an old comic routine. Because the director shows no flair for comedy when the film becomes Horror it loses its tone because the violence lacks that necessary splatstick element Sam Raimi and Peter Jackson used to deliver.


The Ruins (2008)
* *
The filmís most original element is the backbone of its marketing campaign. Had I watched without that knowledge, the twist mightíve had an impact and raised my interest in everything that happens after the evil is finally revealed. The cast isnít as annoying as usual for this type of Ďvacation in hellí film, which is strange because their actions are often annoying.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 11, 2017, 01:56:32 AM
(http://imgur.com/lJOQM4X.jpg)
Home Movie (2008)
"Let's have a staring contest. I dare you to stare until our movie's done.
I bet you you can't."


Camcorder Horror, and this commits one of the more frustrating sins of the sub-genre, too many moments when anyone else would put the camera down or turn it off. In my post-viewing I found a number of complaints I can't argue with. The parents make some daft decisions in the face of the terrible things that happen early on. Some people also complain about the performances, which I think is typical of cam horror, where actors either show off (Adrian Pasdar as Dad) or are "natural" to the point of seeming amateur (the rest of the cast). Also typical of this type, the film takes a while establishing suburban normalcy, raising the heat ever so slowly. My biggest problem is a number of shocking moments involve (faked?) dead animals. Home Movie currently has a 5.7 on IMDB, even though there are a number of good reviews, including mine.

I realized it as the film was heading towards its finale. Twenty minutes to go and I wasn't sure what the filmmakers were going to spring for a climax, and it made me nervous. The moments leading to this point were okay, but they accumulated an uneasy feeling that was ready to payoff. I didn't know how dark things might get, or how gruesome, or perhaps it would be another disappointment. While the final seconds leave me hanging a little, the rest of the finale marks this as one of the scariest films of this Marathon, and it's not just a couple of scenes, but a rather lengthy section of sustained terror. Maybe, I'll downgrade it upon further reflection (like I did to poor Robin Redbreast), but right now this is more than Okay.
Rating: * * * - Good
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 16, 2017, 01:13:46 AM
(http://imgur.com/srtkj9e.jpg)

Tokyo Gore Police (2008)
Ĺ
The filmís whole purpose is to be as gory as possible as often as possible, while retaining a comic sensibility that keeps it from becoming sickening. It aims for Robocopís mix of ultra violence and black comedy Ė there are even strange ads between scenes Ė but the pursuit of severed body parts, fountains of blood and extreme body horror is at the expense of everything else. A horror version of a one-joke idea repeated for 100 minutes. It took me four days to get through this.


Mum & Dad (2008)
aka. House Massacre
* *
Kidnapped young woman is Ďadoptedí against her will into a family with no morals. Thereís a good idea to this. I remember a photo on the internet of a mother with her two sons, the sons have their hands on the moms breasts. Itís an image that could inspire a fascinating horror film about how far the darkest corners of humanity have slipped. The suburban exaggerations work against the film, which end up closer to torture porn. Performances are excellent, making the film better than it should be.


Deadgirl (2008)
aka. Dead Girl
aka. Female Animated Corpse
* Ĺ
Like Mum & Dad this premise is likely to offend, but thereís potential if handled right. A female zombie becomes a sex slave, setting this up as a fable about young male lust. Removing a womanís right to say Ďnoí by removing her ability to speak and basic life, but not making it about a sex doll or necrophilia, gives this some original ground, but you have to tread very carefully. These filmmakers are not up to the task, with performances that needed to be stronger and a tone that needed to be less sensationalistic. In fact, this is one zombie film that shouldíve been taken further away from horror and played more for emotional drama.


The Burrowers (2008)
aka. Demons Underground
* Ĺ
My two favorite genres are Horror and Western so any film that mixes the two is a natural draw. Too bad this film Ė a mix of The Searchers and The Descent Ė has no sense of tone. No atmosphere in the lighting, editing or production design. Bland writing and direction too. Just nothing to give it some excitement or interest.


Cold Prey II (2008)
* *
Hereís a film directed with style by someone who knows at least the basics about what a thriller should look like in terms of shots and the editing of those shots. Too bad the script for this slasher has no modern perspective. Itís like they found an unproduced script from the 1980s and just filmed it like weíve never seen this type of slasher film before. Even more specifically, the story credited to five people, is practically a remake of Halloween 2.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: pixote on July 17, 2017, 12:13:45 AM
I applaud the honest and thorough consideration you give to these bottom-of-the-barrel films. I would guess that, in most cases, your reactions are more interesting than the films themselves. Bravo!

pixote
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 17, 2017, 12:43:51 AM
Titles like Deadgirl and Nekromantic I would probably never select to watch on my own, but they have a reputation for some reason and I like finding positive reviews after I watch the movie so that my write-up considers those who found it worth watching.

Tokyo Gore Police is something I might have enjoyed back in the 90s when I discovered Evil Dead II and Peter Jackson's splatstick horror, but I'm just about at the age where I have little patience for a film that just wants to show off gore effects.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: pixote on July 17, 2017, 01:13:11 AM
So you're not excited for Kuso?

pixote
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 17, 2017, 08:33:45 AM
definitely not
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 21, 2017, 12:14:44 AM
(http://imgur.com/QEI1c3v.jpg)

Quarantine (2008)
* *
Reamke of the awesome [REC] (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=7319.msg419212#msg419212) is as pointless as I had heard. It doesnít copy the original 100%, but itís close enough to never stand as its own thing. The good news is some of the best scares from the original retain their fun shock, but itís a shame for anyone whoís seen this instead of the original.


Dance of the Dead (2008)
* Ĺ
American Pie with zombies. Some might find the comedy amusing which would make the characters more tolerable to hang with. I found them to be too broadly drawn, without being outright stereotypes to deconstruct, like The Breakfast Club. One of the most forgettable films of the Marathon.


Dead Set (2008)
* * Ĺ
Producer and Writer Charlie Brooker (Black Mirror) gave me a twinge of expectations for the first time in a long time for this marathon. As I hoped, Booker hits upon a great idea for blending genre and satire, a zombie apocalypse as seen by the cast and crew of Big Brother. What keeps this from being a Discovery is every time thereís zombie action, the camera shakes like itís being held by a paint mixer.


The Children (2008)
* * * - Very Good
Read Review (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14226.msg873867#msg873867)


My Bloody Valentine (2009)
* * Ĺ
Didnít take long for the film to remind me it was made with 3D in mind. Looks like it wouldíve been a benefit and excuses the overall video game look. I thought the 1981 original was a disappointing slasher (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10545.msg637119#msg637119), and this hits many of the same beats, though the remake has better acting, some more money to polish the production and it doesnít take itself so seriously. Itís one of the better mysteries for a slasher, but still no more than an excuse for lots of violent death.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on July 26, 2017, 03:58:17 PM
This is a sub-genre where the most transgressive moment in The Good Son was hearing pre-teen Macaulay Culkin drop an 'F' bomb.

Man, good reference. :)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 26, 2017, 11:56:23 PM
(http://imgur.com/dTlWcLn.jpg)

The Uninvited (2009)
* *
One of the more disheartening Horror trends was around this time when American films were made as if by a Horror version of store bought cookie dough. All the scares and twists would arrive on cue, sapping the genre of surprise or a memorable gut punch. This is one of those milk and cookies films, and it took me until a very particular scare to realize this was a remake of  Kim Jee-Woonís A Tale of Two Sisters. That had mystery, intrigue and suspense right up to the shocking finale. This you can see all mapped out inside of 10 minutes. The only mystery here is who are The Guard Brothers and how did they get the job directing this film?


Friday the 13th (2009)
* Ĺ
This series has always set a very low bar, one this remake is unable to clear. Thereís no spin, no modern update, no fresh angle. Just a shiny new coat of paint Ė though the film is annoyingly under-lit at times Ė and a series of killings that have so little shock or imagination Jason mightíve just as well used a staple gun instead of his machete. He's never seemed so bored to be killing teens.


The Last House on the Left (2009)
* * * - Good
Read Review (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14226.msg874004#msg874004)


Doghouse (2009)
* *
Itís rare for me to get an alien feeling from British cinema culture, but Iím not steeped enough in Danny Dyer (frequent Kermode target), Noel Clarke or Stephen Graham to know if the misogyny is meant to be satirical or if this is what audiences expect from these actors, much like American man-children. I kept admiring the irony of the women all being given exactly one personality trait, which is still better than the men, who all share the same outlook on everything.


The Collector (2009)
* *
Burglar breaks into a house that is wired with a series of elaborate traps. I didnít know going in this was torture porn, which is too bad because I was liking the initial idea and the lead (Josh Stewart) is an appealing desperate criminal. (One thing this film has over the similar Donít Breathe.) It isnít long before the plot becomes a flimsy excuse for a sharp objects to rip through flesh.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 27, 2017, 02:23:26 AM
Friday the 13th (2009)
* Ĺ
He's never seemed so bored to be killing teens.

Great line.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 30, 2017, 12:29:54 AM
(http://imgur.com/UqhZpiY.jpg)

Dread (2009)
When I was in Film School, my final project was an adaptation of this Clive Barker short story. This was watching the remake of a film I wrote and directed. I liked some of the way the information was structured here, and an added subplot about a young woman with a large visible birthmark to intensify her body issues. My version was too literal, and of course has the production value of a college studentís wallet. (Though this doesnít look like it cost much more.) I have an affection for the more natural performances of my film versus the theatrical style and look to the cast here. A strange experience for sure, and certainly not something I can put a rating to


Grace (2009)
* *
Pregnant woman loses her child in a car crash, but by sheer maternal force wills it back to undead life. Great idea for dramatic, thematic horror but the filmmakers donít quite have the skill to make it work and unlike the similar-toned Contracted (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13496.msg817942#msg817942), there isnít a great lead performance here to elevate the under-developed material.


The Horde (2009)
* Ĺ
Iím growing tired of plots that contain the surprise, ďÖand then the zombie apocalypse breaks out.Ē There are good version of this, like Shaun of the Dead, or extending the idea to vampires (From Dusk Till Dawn) or monsters (Attack the Block). The characters here arenít developed enough to make the transition interesting. It was a tedious revenge film before the zombies and a tedious zombie film afterwards.


Carriers (2009)
* * Ĺ
Iíd love to get another pair of eyes on this because it has a lot going for it, but thereís nothing pulling it all together. Excellent cast includes Chris Pine, Emily VanCamp and Piper Perabo. Thereís a lot of good acting elevating this pandemic film above the genre. Characters make some unsympathetic decisions, but it fits the dire situation created by the world. Despite all that positive, the story seems to drift along, never cranking the tension beyond a scattered handful of moments.


Pandorum (2009)
* Ĺ
Interesting premise Ė people wake to learn a savage alien race has taken over their spaceship - deserves another chance, Crashingly loud, over-edited blend of The Descent, Fury Road, Resident Evil and Event Horizon. Annoying style is compounded by characters suffering from psychological trauma that causes hallucinations, so any or all of what youíre watching might be total B.S. anyways.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 30, 2017, 12:40:11 AM
I've decided to move my non-ICM picks into my Shocktober Watchlist, getting me closer to completing this Marathon.

Here are the remaining 25 Titles:
Black Death
Byzantium
Cockneys vs. Zombies
The Dead
Detention
Evolution
Final Destination 5
Grave Encounters
The Greasy Strangler
Gyo: Tokyo Fish Attack
The Human Centipede 2 & 3
I Spit on Your Grave (2010)
Juan of the Dead
Julia's Eyes
Kidnapped
The Last Exorcism
The Lords of Salem
Lovely Molly
The Lure
MegaPiranha
Mother's Day
The Pact
The Taking of Deborah Logan
The Tunnel


Titles no longer a part of this project include...
A Cure For Wellness
The Autopsy of Jane Doe
The Blackcoat's Daughter
Buried
Exorcist III: Director's Cut
Lights Out
Maggie
Never Sleep Again: The Elm Street Legacy
Nina Forever
Prevenge
Raw
Sadako vs. Kayako
The Wicker Tree
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 30, 2017, 01:53:28 AM
So why have you dropped those films?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on July 30, 2017, 03:56:06 AM
The remaining films are the 19 titles I have left on They Shoot Zombies, plus 6 I don't have much personal interest in that are on an Official list at I Check Movies. The dropped titles are ones I want to see anyway, and at this point it makes more sense to save them for Shocktober.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 03, 2017, 01:42:54 AM
Entering this Decade with the first batch of the last 25 titles.


(http://imgur.com/EBdQfBF.jpg)

Mega Piranha (2010)
Ĺ
One of those stupid modern creature features, but this one doesnít even understand how silly it all is, with an insanely complex plot, constantly introducing characters in the first 15 minutes, even though most of them have little to do with the story. Takes itself way too seriously to the point where the highlights seem like accidental idiocy. Whereís the fun in that?


Black Death (2010)
* *
With a cast that includes Eddie Redmayne, Sean Bean and Carice van Houten, and Dark Ages period detail, this aims higher than typical genre fare. You might not categorize it as Horror until the pagans start graphically torturing the Christians. Itís like a grimy Game of Thrones knock-off, even though it pre-dates the series by a year. The coda reframes the film as a very particular origin story, raising my opinion a lot, but getting there isnít terribly interesting.


I Spit on Your Grave (2010)
0 Stars
After 15 minutes of cute/clumsy antics by the lead while the camera leers at her up and down, this uncalled for remake of one of the most well-known terrible films (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12547.msg841294#msg841294) had the bare minimum of my attention. This premise will always fail because as long as itís written and directed by men, it will never earn the feminist shield it hides behind, and if it were ever made by a woman, an honest depiction of the horror would be more than any viewer could bear to sit through. This is better-acted than the original, but it also claims a moral superiority that it never earns.


Kidnapped (2010)
aka. Secuestrados
* * * - Okay
Home invasion thriller with heavy Gaspar Noe influences. Filmed as a series of long takes, events keep turning for the worst until I became torn between the intense realism of sloppy plans gone awry and the feeling that the film was moving closer towards nihilism. Manages to be as slick as other home invasion movies from this time, while also being more believable. Problem is, that level of believability is more punishing than exciting.


The Last Exorcism (2010)
* * * - Good
One of the best ways to tell the quality of a Horror film is the amount of dread I feel towards the end when the lead decides to go back and face the evil. If I know weíre at the climax, then the filmmakers are preparing to empty their bag of tricks and the situation could be worse than anything imaginable. This has one of those moments and while the ending doesnít match the build-up, itís still a very effective build-up. Ashley Bell is great as the possessed girl, frail and menacing at the same time, but the film belongs to Patrick Fabian as a jaded minister who sees faith as a magic show. It was a smart decision to build the routine exorcism plot around such an interesting character.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 03, 2017, 08:31:01 AM
The Last Exorcism is quite good. I'd avoid the sequel, which kisses all of the interesting stuff for a more standard possession thing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 09, 2017, 10:30:45 PM
(http://imgur.com/8yNqfLm.jpg)

The Dead (2010)
* * Ĺ
Full Review (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14226.msg874816#msg874816)


Motherís Day (2010)
* *
Home invasion thriller Ė yep, another one. I had no idea there were so many recently Ė directed by Darren Lynn Bousman (Saw sequels and Repo!) The twist this time is an unusual performance by Rebecca De Mornay as the overly-maternal head of the invading clan. Itís interesting, but like Serial Mom, rings false, which blunts the tension and turns the film more into a piece of theater. Well shot and edited, demonstrating Bousman may be maturing as a director, though thereís also a fair amount of torture porn and attempts to inject dark comedy fall flat.


Juliaís Eyes (2010)
* * Ĺ
Spanish horror produced by Guillermo del Toro about a woman losing her sight while investigating the death of her sister. There are some fun scenes of cat and mouse involving blindness, darkness and flashing lights, but the overall story is often overblown, teetering on silly.


Detention (2011)
* * Ĺ
High School comedy from the director of Torque and some of Britney Spears and Taylor Swiftís more famous videos. The story and style, thick with modern and 90s pop culture references, are a headache, but Iíll admit Iím too old for this, which is aimed at short attention spans. If I had to describe it, it would be a mix of Easy A and Ready Player One as directed by Edgar Wright, which can be understandably appealing. Oh, calling it ĎHorrorí is like calling Worldís End ĎHorrorí. Itís certainly there, but thereís also Sci-fi, fantasy and action.
Here is the NSFW opening scene. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLVUlb7fpF8#noembed) If you love it then this film is for you because itís exactly 90 minutes of this.


The Tunnel (2011)
* * Ĺ
Found footage horror closely follows the Blair Witch template, but the believable performances get the tension up there when itís time to go exploring. Nothing I havenít seen before and the climax delivers near incomprehensible visuals instead of shocking payoffs and jolts.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 12, 2017, 10:20:51 PM
(http://imgur.com/CMOQA9O.jpg)

Final Destination 5 (2011)
* * Ĺ
The FD series is officially formula with all the emphasis on the kills and no attention paid to character. Luckily, the kill sequences are pretty well orchestrated. The effects are from a period where the CG isnít completely terrible, but itís easy to spot, giving the highlights a cartoony look. Best thing about the film is the coda, which is brilliant.


Grave Encounters (2011)
* * * - Okay
More formula found footage/webcam horror. Itís interesting to make the people a bunch of jerks who deserve to get whatís coming to them, but that also works against the film because I didnít care if any of them made it to the end. What makes the film worth recommending is the very high scare factor. What starts as quiet-BANG cinema goes into high terror thanks to excellent and startling effects and creature design that takes ghastly zombies and incorporates the hightened facial features that make clowns so scary.


The Human Centipede 2: Full Sequence (2011)
Ĺ
I have a friend who likes the first two HC films. Iíve listened to him defend the movies on artistic grounds, and I see where heís coming from, but it doesnít explain the button-pushing, race-baiting in the dialogue and other non-centipede details. The perverse fascination of someone making a film with a 12-person centipede as the centerpiece, the feeling that itís carnival entertainment and manages to never sink below that, is all that keeps this from being 0 Stars. Plus it gives me some comparison room for Human Centipede 3, which even my friend despises.


Juan of the Dead (2012)
* *
The tipping point where Iím saying there are too many zombie movies. Uninspired zom-com has a plot as thin as a youtube video, as well as the cinematic qualities and effects budget. Certainly well-meaning, but setting it in Havana adds nothing.


Gyo: Tokyo Fish Attack (2012)
* *
I did not expect the title to be so literal. Anime about marine life suddenly moving on legs and emitting a noxious gas. Expected Japanese weirdness (and sexism) doesnít play much different from a silly Sci-fi channel creature feature until it starts explaining the sudden evolution with some really bizarre revelations that invite any sound logic to abandon ship.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 12, 2017, 11:06:23 PM
Yeah, Grave Encounters is pretty scary. Give the sequel a miss, though, cuz those characters are somehow even worse.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 13, 2017, 12:17:51 AM
I enjoyed Juan of the Dead as a silly zombie flick, but I admit that I don't remember much and there are other low-level zombie flicks I enjoyed more, like Warm Bodies.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 17, 2017, 01:59:34 AM
(http://imgur.com/jhEAPzx.jpg)

Lovely Molly (2012)
* *
Itís tricky portraying mental illness through the horror lens without being offensive. Some films make it look effortless Ė Black Swan, Angst Ė while others, like this one, canít marry the style to the substance. Also, director Eduardo Sanchez (Blair Witch Project) uses the found footage technique until it doesnít suit him, making the film even more uneven. Still, there are some effective moments, including the nicely subtle climax, which is has the same quiet power as the ending of The Witch.


The Pact (2012)
* *
I donít think this story makes sense, with the paranormal bits not fitting in with the serial killer bits. Itís like two scripts mashed together, or more like two short films that still required a lot of silent contemplation to pad out the running time. (I wonder if the genre switch works better in the original short form.) Caity Lotz is a new face to me, but she comes ready to make her mark.


Cockneys vs. Zombies (2012)
* *
Third recent zombie comedy in this marathon. Iíd put this slightly above Doghouse and Juan of the Dead, but all three are aiming for the broadside of the barn and only hit occasionally. Makes me appreciate Shaun of the Dead even more. That was a film with fully-dimensional characters and smart ideas, two things that donít come within miles of these films.


Byzantium (2012)
* *
I knew thereíd be worse films in this Marathon, but there were few I was a disinterested in as Byzantium because Neil Jordan is rarely a good filmmaker. He has style, and a sense of color, but his films often get lost in an artsy-fartsy fog and you canít expect him to provide an ending that makes the journey worthwhile. Thatís what happens here despite a strong performance by Gemma Arterton and Saoirse Ronan, an actress I have yet to see make a bad choice, in the lead.


Itís an important distinction that I have seen a couple of films from Jordan, while I have yet to see one by Rob Zombie that even rises to mediocre. However, Zombie is always someone Iím willing to indulge because I believe his heart is in the right place. He just isnít as skilled as he needs to be. Jordan is frustrating, sometimes laughable, and his few successes seem either accidental or the result of a studio keeping him on a tight leash.


The Lords of Salem (2012)
* Ĺ 
3 by Rob Zombie. I regret watching more than one. I just think he's terrible... but I'll probably get bored one day and watch Lords of Salem.
I knew what I was getting into. I saw the trailer before the Evil Dead reboot earlier this year and I looked over to my friend and said, "No way will I see that." But when plans go wrong and you find yourself with some free time there's no telling what will happen. Rob Zombie hasn't made a movie I've liked yet, and this is sure to be the worst of the year for me.

This comes off as Rob Zombieís most personal film. Gone is the colorful comic book aesthetic and blatant aping of better filmmakers, while still having a particular look and feel that shows no concern for commercial success. (I canít tell if the low budget is by choice or a necessity from Zombieís lack of financial success.) There are plenty of pieces and if someone was inclined they could put them together to form of defense of Zombieís artistic vision, but this isnít an art house enigma. Itís a nearly incomprehensible, formless brain dump.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 20, 2017, 02:41:40 PM
My final count by the end of this Marathon is 399 titles. I'm slightly OCD tempted to make it an even 400, but I'm actually fine with 399.

Two titles left to watch. I can feel the train pulling into the station.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on August 20, 2017, 04:49:13 PM
399 films is a helluva a lot of content. Countless scenes, countless monsters, countless ghosts, countless approaches to the genre itself... it must be dizzying. Here at the end of it all though, has it begun to crystallize at all? Any maxims you can share with us? :)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 20, 2017, 10:44:26 PM
This project began on August 1st. I had no idea this had been going on for over a year. There are 399 reviews posted or linked here, but I actually don't have an exact number because I forgot that last Shocktober I started watching titles from the most recent backwards, mixed in with other Shocktober selections.

I didn't do this to be the Horror guy around here or one of "those horror freaks". I was perfectly happy being the Pixar/Disney guy. Horror creates a certain portrait of the person, because who can watch this many of that type of film. Of course, now that I've watched so many horror films it's a part of my intellect, as if I took a course on the subject. I hope I'm not too obnoxious or snooty when it comes to comments and recommendations for the genre. Also, I like the contrast of being well-versed in both Disney and horror.

I'm still not a big fan of horror from the 30s and 40s, but the great period of discovery is the late 50s and 60s when horror was more confident, but there were still restrictions on blood, sex and sadism. The largest section of discovery comes from here.

I always knew Asian horror was nutty, but I've learned Mexican horror is equally bonkers, though in a completely different way.

I still don't like Italian horror, where Dario Argento is the master by default. They care about story as much as they care about recording the sound. Can't recommend a single film by Mario Bava. Lucio Fulci made a couple that were better and a few that were far worse.

Hammer Horror isn't for everyone, but it strikes a wonderful balance of sleaze and class. Plus, Peter Cushing is simply an incredible actor, perhaps the greatest artist in front of or behind the lens to work steadily in the genre.

There are some great TV Movies - Ghostwatch, Dying Room Only, Someone's Watching Me (directed by John Carpenter) - but none of them escape the restrictions of TV to pass off as cinema, much like how the best college baseball team would likely get destroyed by a below-average major league club.

It's amazing how often I would watch two films that were thematically similar (like mental illness horror or the two about killer crocs in Australia). For example I just watched Evolution and The Lure, which both involved sexual awakenings, ancient mythologies involving beasts and lots of watery dream imagery.

I had no idea how much camcorder horror came out after Blair Witch. It seemed like every batch of five had at least one of these. I prefer it to torture porn and some of my favorite modern horror from this marathon do this, but I'm more appreciative now of a film that doesn't take this approach.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 20, 2017, 11:41:56 PM
(http://imgur.com/zV2Txhv.jpg)

The Taking of Deborah Logan (2014)
* * * - Okay
My last batch started with a debate over portraying mental illness as horror and this one falls on the positive side of that line. That could be because Alzheimers is soon revealed to be something more paranormal and demonic. Thereís a lot to like here, with a complex plot, solid performances and a feel of true terror as the horror ramps up. I realize my favorite scare in camcorder horror is walking up to somebody with their back to the lens. The turnaround gets me every time. That said, I started regretting this wasnít shot in a more classical style because the climax is some of the worst shaky-cam in the sub-genre and I would like to see director Adam Robitelís ability to generate scares in a regular style.


The Human Centipede 3: Final Sequence (2015)
* *
The first film was surprisingly mild and the sequelís stripped down, minimalist approach was the dark sewer of the trilogy. This is the one that nails the tone, a carnival freakshow with garish colors, exaggerated sounds, unapologetic obsession with gross details and performances that ruin the curve of ďover the topĒ for every other film. Lead Dieter Laser (who played the mad scientist in the first film) is in ďGarbage DayĒ mode all the time, while his assistant Laurence Harvey (the lead of HC2) gives a surprisingly good performance. An excellent meta-decision to have director Tom Six play himself, the front of this centipede is Tiny Lister and Eric Roberts also shows up. For all its weaknesses, this one is the purest in vision in what you would expect from a film centered around a human centipede.


Evolution (2015)
* *
So quiet and open to interpretation, Iím only partially intrigued and far more annoyed. Iím not even sure itís good as an allegorical movie, the male companion piece to Innocence. I can appreciate its beauty and much of the visual poetry, but itís too subdued for me, even with the understanding that itís aiming to be subtle.


The Lure (2015)
* * Ĺ
Killer mermaid sisters in a plot that could easily be about vampires, as they struggle to fit in among the humans. I loved the 80s glitz-pop lighting and the mermaid effects have a smooth naturalism. This is also a full blown musical, with not just musical numbers on a stage but woven into the girlsí lives. The songs convey emotional states, but donít advance the plot, which creates a major setback because what little plot is left seems lifted from The Little Mermaid (the original graphic story, not the Disney film) and there's not nearly enough of it. It ends up too simple and some of the big scenes are silly, like a fight between the sisters that plays like theyíre two cats hissing and circling each other.


The Greasy Strangler (2016)
zero stars
I've been wrestling with Human Centipede 3 since I watched it because there's a purity to its overall vision I admire. I won't argue against the negative reviews, but it's honest about its intentions, building off the first two films like they were the set-up and HC3 is the payoff, everything swirling around one of the most absolutely insane over-the-top lead performances. After watching this film, which is rapidly earning a cult following, I'm confused as to why this gets praised and HC3 is shunned. I won't argue for HC3 but I will debate anyone who believes this pile of garbage is a better movie. Greasy Strangler aims for laughs through body function humor, graphic sexuality, and a Napoleon Dynamite deadpan style. It enjoys repeating the same scenes and dialogue endlessly and still manages to run out of story before the ending, filling in the time with surrealism and leaving any rational explanation open-ended. I'm more confident about what little I did like in Human Centipede III now. It's more sure of itself and certainly more fun.
Title: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 21, 2017, 03:28:31 PM
Here is the Ranked List (https://letterboxd.com/1so/list/hidden-horror/) on Letterboxd.

156 films, 105 from this Marathon plus 51 from past Shocktobers, which means all of them have a review in the Forum.

The top 111 I can recommend. The rest I'm mixed on but they're interesting and unique enough for a look if you're into Horror.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 21, 2017, 04:56:57 PM
Sounds about right for Deborah Logan. And I never understood people who recommended The Greasy Strangler either ironically or enthusiastically. Seems like a total waste of time, but I'm glad you confirmed it for us.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 21, 2017, 07:03:04 PM
Greasy Strangler was added to the list after listening to Filmspotting SVU #132 where they both recommended it. I listened to that episode again and Matt calls out Human Centipede as being shock for shock's sake in contrast to Strangler which has a deadpan comedic reason for the graphic humor. I might not disagree as strongly had I not seen HC3, where the centipede and the care and feeding of it - along with other disgusting moments - takes a backseat to the lead performance.

I will say that the humor of Greasy reminded me of Napoleon Dynamite and I HATED Napoleon Dynamite. So if you thought that film was hilarious, you will probably enjoy greasy more than I did.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Corndog on August 22, 2017, 07:52:18 AM
Awesome accomplishment 1SO! To have that sort of depth of knowledge in a genre is very impressive.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 22, 2017, 08:10:19 AM
Not sure if I should congratulate you or send the men with the straightjacket. In either case, I'm impressed.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 22, 2017, 10:48:40 AM
This has been a great accomplishment and a great resource.  I've already used it and I expect to use it again.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 22, 2017, 03:49:25 PM
Indeed a great accomplishment, and it has been very enjoyable reading along.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on August 22, 2017, 08:01:41 PM
Seeing all of this horror (much of it rather poor), are you tempted at all to take a crack at writing a horror film?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 22, 2017, 08:13:46 PM
I used to work for Clive Barker and Sean S. Cunningham. (Not at the same time.) I've written horror scripts for both of them. The Barker one (Age of Desire) was optioned and made it as far as Variety's list of films in Preparation. Link to still-existing press release (http://www.clivebarker.info/pressmidnight.html). I've also developed a few horror ideas to pitch. The marathon didn't give me new horror ideas or inspire me to write any of my pitches.
Title: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on May 07, 2018, 01:21:10 PM
The definitive list of 1000 Horror films (They Shoot Zombies Don't They) just posted their update for 2018.

192 new titles. 86 that I haven't seen.

This isn't something I'm interested in taking on right now, but it gives me something to look forward to for Shocktober.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: philip918 on May 07, 2018, 05:59:50 PM
I Spit on Your Grave (2010)
0 Stars
After 15 minutes of cute/clumsy antics by the lead while the camera leers at her up and down, this uncalled for remake of one of the most well-known terrible films (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12547.msg841294#msg841294) had the bare minimum of my attention. This premise will always fail because as long as itís written and directed by men, it will never earn the feminist shield it hides behind, and if it were ever made by a woman, an honest depiction of the horror would be more than any viewer could bear to sit through. This is better-acted than the original, but it also claims a moral superiority that it never earns.

Revenge is coming out in iTunes tomorrow and looks to potentially handle this ugly trope the right way:

https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/revenge_2018
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on May 07, 2018, 11:36:10 PM
I saw about the movie and heard the buzz, but I also feel like, "ugh, I'm probably going to end up watching this." Meaning if it's not as good as I'm hearing then I'm sitting through this all over again.
Title: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 04, 2018, 10:42:47 PM
When They Shoot Zombies posted an update, it left me with 86 new films to watch for 100% completion.

Here is the ranked list (https://letterboxd.com/1so/list/horror-watchlist/). Everything after 86 is for Shocktober.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: philip918 on August 06, 2018, 01:24:08 PM
Oooh, you haven't seen Martyrs. I've thought about that film a lot even years after seeing it.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 06, 2018, 01:54:02 PM
I saw Martyrs 10 years ago and itís stayed with me. I recently listened to The Canon ep about it where the guest knew he was fighting an uphill battle. It made me want to revisit the film to see how I felt about it 10 years later. Shocktober seemed like a good time to watch it again.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 06, 2018, 06:04:25 PM
Martyrs is amazing.  I saw it because of The Canon recently.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 07, 2018, 12:59:14 AM
(https://imgur.com/27BFiRa.jpg)

The Monster (1925)
★ ★ ★ Ė Okay
I wasnít into this one at first, with an amateur detective trying to solve a disappearance. The tone is more comedy than horror and itís all played pretty broadly. However, after about 20 minutes the amateur is literally dropped into an underground haunted house, along with the girl heís sweet on and a rival. What follows still is more comic than scary, but itís a fast-paced run through the usual haunted house tricks of secret doors, shadows, surprises, a lightning storm outside and a mad doctor (Lon Chaney) pulling the strings.


West of Zanzibar (1928)
★ ★
I still have a good memory of Kongo (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg845594#msg845594) from 2 years ago, so I immediately recognized the story. That remake is better because the story works better as a Sound film and good as Lon Chaney may be, heís not in the same league as Walter Huston.


La Llorona (1933)
aka. The Crying Woman
★ ★
Early Mexican horror is culturally important and based on a famous folktale. It looks like even with optimal picture and sound the quality would still be low and the story isnít well-told anyways. The presentation is static, thereís no atmosphere and the dialogue is pedestrian. By that, I donít mean that I speak the original Spanish, but that much of the dialogue are small, simple phrases repeated, like calling out names or asking ďWhere is ___?Ē


Murders in the Zoo (1933)
★ ★ Ĺ
Creepy Lionel Atwill (Moriarty in Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon) is very effective as a cold-blooded zoologist. The opening and closing scenes are shockingly sadistic for the time. Randolph Scott is a decent but bland lead. However, the comic relief of Charles Ruggles is embarrassing, which is especially surprising considering Iíve recently watched him in two comedies where he was a highlight.


The Vampire Bat (1933)
★ ★
This is a mess. Lionel Atwill is on hand again, aided by Melvyn Douglas and Fay Wray, but the scriptÖ well now it all makes sense. I was looking up the writers name only to discover there is no credited screenplay. Thatís why everyone is looking for a vampire, or a killer bat, or a madman, but really just an evil scientist. The film looks like it was shot in less than a week, with all the logic of the dumbest Summer studio blockbuster.
Title: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 09, 2018, 10:09:53 PM
(https://imgur.com/mot5ej8.jpg)

These new entries are getting me to question the calculations in creating the TSZDT list, especially with many new titles appearing so high on the list. (Invisible Ray is #298, Mummy's Hand is #445 and Human Monster is #555.) Iíll give you there may not be 1000 good Horror movies in existence. Iíve only seen 1200 myself, but I can report that at least 500 of those are better and more interesting than this recent batch.
 

The Invisible Ray (1936)
★ ★
A special meteor lands in Africa and I immediately think ďWakanda!Ē Boris Karloff leads an expedition to study the radiation, which has magical healing powers but curses the doctor with glowing skin and a touch that kills instantly. He looks for help from scientist Bela Lugosi, who sees the radiation is also poisioning Karloffís mind. There are some nice glowing effects and the destruction of a cliffside that disintegrates with a liquid center, but itís all painfully average. Karloff and Lugosi are subdued and even together they seem disinterested.


The Man Who Changed His Mind (1936)
aka. The Man Who Lived Again
aka. Doctor Maniac Who Lived Again
★ ★ Ĺ
Body swap horror with Karloff again. The early stage of this Marathon is starting to feel like a Netflix binge, with one-hour tales about mad scientists meddling in Godís domain amongst sparking lab equipment. The only thing to note here is director Robert Stevenson would go on to helm Mary Poppins.


The Human Monster (1939)
aka. The Dark Eyes of London
aka. Dead Eyes of London
★ Ĺ
Bela Lugosi stars Ė and by now I know I am definitely more of a Karloff fan Ė as an insurance agent running a very obvious scheme involving murdered clients and a large disfigured, blind man who might be insulting if he were the least bit realistic. I appreciate the brief running time of these films, though with a few more minutes they might make more sense. This revised list has put too much importance into these cheap B-movies, and I have many more to watch.


Before I Hang (1940)
★ ★ Ĺ
Back to Karloff, who makes this film as good as it is. Stupid (and oft used) plot about a good person injected with the blood of a killer that turns him into a killer too. Karloffís explanations about scienceís ability to stop aging would just be weird and campy coming from Lugosi, but Karloff has Vincent Priceís ability to sell anything. Itís a fairly layered performance, having to swing between various degrees of sweet and homicidal. Better than the dumb story deserves.


The Mummyís Hand (1940)
★ ★
My favorite Mummy movie is the 1999 Stephen Sommers film. (Well, what would you choose?) This has the exact same prologue and is also more Action/Adventure than Horror. It has George Zucco, who played the first Moriority against Rathbone in The Adv. Of Sherlock Holmes and Wallace Ford is a familiar face, though I donít recall him ever trying so hard to be funny. That is all I might remember a month from now because thereís so little effort put into making these classic monster movies distinct from one another.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 10, 2018, 08:28:02 PM
Iíll give you there may not be 1000 good Horror movies in existence. Iíve only seen 1200 myself, but I can report that at least 500 of those are better and more interesting than this recent batch.

I've got a new itch.
Since posting this, I've looked at my Letterboxd and IMDB Ratings, my ICM checks, Essentials and an outdated personal list I have on my computer. It seems there are at least 600, possibly even 800 Horror movies I could put into a master list. I'm curious to see that list realized, but am already having difficulty splitting hairs with a ranking of so many titles.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: philip918 on August 11, 2018, 01:00:20 AM
Iíll give you there may not be 1000 good Horror movies in existence. Iíve only seen 1200 myself, but I can report that at least 500 of those are better and more interesting than this recent batch.

I've got a new itch.
Since posting this, I've looked at my Letterboxd and IMDB Ratings, my ICM checks, Essentials and an outdated personal list I have on my computer. It seems there are at least 600, possibly even 800 Horror movies I could put into a master list. I'm curious to see that list realized, but am already having difficulty splitting hairs with a ranking of so many titles.

Excited to see the final list. The splitting hairs does start to feel arbitrary a few films in.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 11, 2018, 12:21:42 PM
There's also the issue of films that are debatably Horror. According to Letterboxd, Manhunter is Horror but The Silence of the Lambs is not. I disagree. I'm saying 'no' to They Live and The Seventh Victim, but 'yes' to Duel, The Devil's Advocate and Arsenic and Old Lace.

It's difficult to leave out The Nightmare Before Christmas, which is full of Horror imagery, but it's a movie about Halloween (and Christmas), not a Horror movie.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 11, 2018, 02:07:06 PM
I just want to say "yes" to all of them, because for me horror includes that which is frightening, as well as that which may not be frightening at all but is centered around classic horror imagery.

And I wouldn't try to rank all of them, but put them in categories.  600 is just too hard.  Have a top 100 ranked and the rest in groupings.  You really need a bottom 10 as well.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 11, 2018, 08:47:52 PM
And I wouldn't try to rank all of them, but put them in categories.  600 is just too hard.  Have a top 100 ranked and the rest in groupings.
I have a solid Top 47 from my Essentials. I started back at the dawn of cinema because I'm not a fan of early Horror. I'm building alongside my current Marathon list, where I'm up to 1944 and I have a total of 32 films.


You really need a bottom 10 as well.
How about a Bottom 17. I ruled out some of the more forgettable garbage and titles that were trying to be Best Worst Movie (like Birdemic). These films still make me mad when I think about them.


17. The Human Centipede 2: Full Sequence (2011)
The perverse fascination of someone making a film with a 12-person centipede as the centerpiece, the feeling that itís carnival entertainment and manages to never sink below that, is all that keeps this from being 0 Stars

16. Dreamcatcher (2003)
S**t weasels, Mr. Gay. Morgan Freeman has never been bad in a movie. This one performance balances the scales.
(https://imgur.com/f6rF1ke.jpg)

15. Tusk (2014)
Kevin Smith's directing has become worse over time and now he's just as bad a writer.

14. Driller Killer (1979)
Iíd rather watch the b-roll footage as a documentary than Abel Ferrara casting himself as a pretentious jerk artist. The kind of trash where someone would turn to a horror junkie like me and say, ďyou actually like this crap?Ē NoÖ I donít.

13. Blood Freak (1972)
A guy does too much drugs and turns into a giant turkey monster. According to Letterboxd, there are 30 worse films in this Marathon, but that would surprise me. It surpasses Terror in the Midnight Sun, though still slightly better than Night of the Lepus, also released in 1972. This barely qualifies as a film with occasional cutaways to a guy sitting at a desk to fill in story gaps. Big laugh for the sound of a turkey gobble to attempt suspense.

12. Street Trash (1987)
This is like some cinematic Fear Factor, disgusting imagery, with little surrounding it. Bad actors fake their way through terrible scenes with no story to connect them besides the toxic drink, so all you have to look forward to are gross out moments of bodies melting.

11. Snuff (1976)
A terrible exploitation film thatís sometimes hilariously bad. (Among the dubbed cast is a young girl clearly voiced by a male doing a high, squeaky voice.) Then at the end comes the filmís reason for being, an alleged actual murder of one of the cast. Iím thankful for the incompetence of the filmmakers, but it only points up the cheap gimmick and the cynical approach towards achieving cinema immortality.

10. Lady in a Cage (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12452.msg751722#msg751722) (1964)

9. Tales From the Quadead Zone (1987)
Some people praise the filmmakers passion over the lack of a sound mix, Casio keyboard score and other horrible qualities. I came up in this era and itís not sour grapes to say there are better examples of Trash Cinema out there.

8. The Guardian (1990)
William Friedkin's killer tree movie. The worst edited film in history with montages of unrelated imagery.

7. Beloved (1998)
Thinks it can get away with sickening imagery by wrapping itself in importance. The noisy crickets during the dialogue scenes are more interesting.

6. Night of the Lepus (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12547.msg825336#msg825336) (1972)

5. I Spit on Your Grave (2010)
After 15 minutes of cute/clumsy antics by the lead while the camera leers at her up and down, this uncalled for remake of one of the most well-known terrible films had the bare minimum of my attention. This premise will always fail because as long as itís written and directed by men, it will never earn the feminist shield it hides behind, and if it were ever made by a woman, an honest depiction of the horror would be more than any viewer could bear to sit through. This is better-acted than the original, but it also claims a moral superiority that it never earns.

4. The Woman (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=11565.msg700283#msg700283) (2011)
Nobody who releases a film this awful deserves the chance to make another one. Tommy Wiseau is a more capable filmmaker than Lucky McKee.

3. House at the Edge of the Park (1980)
I heard about this one years ago and debated even including it because it's crude exploitation built off the success of Last House on the Left, from the director of Cannibal Holocaust. I see the class warfare angle that somebody might have put in at one point, but this is just a lot of indefensible rape and cruelty from a director whose angry, neanderthal view of humanity didn't need to be shared with the world.

2. I Spit on Your Grave (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12547.msg841294#msg841294) (1978)

1. Demons (DŤmoni) (1985)
Demons is slightly less off-putting to watch than 2 Girls, 1 Cup. And it's about as professional in the technical qualities. Screenplay would be a tie.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on August 11, 2018, 09:17:33 PM
16. Dreamcatcher (2003)
S**t weasels, Mr. Gay. Morgan Freeman has never been bad in a movie. This one performance balances the scales.
(https://imgur.com/f6rF1ke.jpg)

Dumb as it is I've seen it twice through to the end. There is a wtf entertainment value there. It never comes together, the tone is a mess, the dialogue is often stupid... and yet I can sit through it. If that count's for anything it surpasses half of the movies I put on these days.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 11, 2018, 10:30:39 PM
Beloved is a really interesting entry on this list. I've only read the book so far, but that was really excellent. I know things can easily get lost in translation, so I'm eager to see the movie and find out if you're right on this one.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 12, 2018, 01:45:03 AM
That is a truly marvelous bottom 17.  The fact that I Spit On Your Grave gets on the list twice is remarkable.

The comments by you and smirnoff makes me want to see Dreamcatcher, just to see Morgan Freeman in such a car wreck.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 12, 2018, 11:45:19 AM
My former boss touted Dreamcatcher as this thoughtful, interesting horror film and made us feature it in one of our horror film festivals. I think everyone else involved was left scratching their heads as he tried to justify its brilliance to us. Such a terrible movie.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 12, 2018, 08:19:17 PM
(https://imgur.com/oy5VQxM.jpg)


King of the Zombies (1941)
★ ★
Perhaps cinemaís first zombie comedy, mostly due to the antics of a reviled black character actor names Mantan Moreland. This isnít my first time watching Morelandís jittery, bug-eyed routine (though this is by far the biggest part Iíve seen him play). He seems like a nice enough person, but most of his material has dated uncomfortably. There is one great moment when heís tricked into thinking heís become a zombie. He walks up to a couple of actual zombies and says, Ēmove over boys, Iím one of the gang now.Ē Nominated for Best Score, this remains the only Oscar nominated zombie film.


Night Monster (1942)
aka. House of Mystery
★ ★ Ĺ
Old Dark House gothic occult murder mystery is so over-stuffed, the only role for Bela Lugosi is butler. This one kind of works in small moments, including a great shot where the killerís shadow on the wall grows until it consumes all light in the room. The script cannot answer basic logic questions that pile up along the way. The final explanation is so unsatisfactory it makes all the plot holes even bigger.


The Return of the Vampire (1943)
aka. Vampires of London
★ ★ Ĺ
Unofficial Dracula sequel, not made by Universal, has Lugosi playing the Count with a different name. The fun twist is his servant Renfield is a Wolf Man, transforming under Lugosiís spell rather than a full moon. Lugosi goes through the motions, but Matt Willis as the morally conflicted Wolf Man makes this one of the better classic monster films of this period.


The Mummyís Ghost (1944)
aka. The Mummyís Return
★ ★
For as famous as the Universal monster movies are, itís amazing how little care went into them. Just borrow a plot from one of the other films Ė this one is Bride of Frankenstein Ė throw in the usual suspects (Lon Chaney Jr., John Carradine, George Zucco) and keep it around an hour. Carradine is always fun and Warner Brosí Barton MacLane is here, doing his usual tough cop act.


Voodoo Man (1944)
aka. The Tiger Man
★ ★ Ĺ
We must be getting into Lugosiís later work because this film has no money. It looks cheap and thereís very little plot as scenes stretch to get the film to 60 minutes. David Carradine is fun as Lugosiís crazed, love starved assistant, and with the smallest amount of care this might've been an actual good movie.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 14, 2018, 09:17:29 AM
And I wouldn't try to rank all of them, but put them in categories.  600 is just too hard.  Have a top 100 ranked and the rest in groupings.
I have a solid Top 47 from my Essentials. I started back at the dawn of cinema because I'm not a fan of early Horror. I'm building alongside my current Marathon list, where I'm up to 1944 and I have a total of 32 films.
I'm now up thru 1957 and my list is only 47 titles, not counting those Essentials. It looks like the really good Horror for me starts in the 1960s.

Because there are so few titles so far I've been ranking them while I come up with a better idea. Plan A is to post the list in a chronological order, so that there's a Best Horror Film for each year. Since I most enjoy going through the genre chronologically, anyone who wants to experience something similar can follow in my footsteps watching the best representation of the genre as it evolves. I could also post my Top Pick among other picks. For example...
1959
Me: The Tingler
TSZDT: House on Haunted Hill
IMDB: The Hound of the Baskervilles
Letterboxd: The Ghost of Yotsuya


Plan B is a more simple Alphabetical list within each Rating category. It offers a little separation based on my star ratings with no need to further organize.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 14, 2018, 10:35:06 AM
That sounds so awesome.

But hard.  As the years go on, you have to make hard choices between good movies.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 15, 2018, 07:05:27 PM
(https://imgur.com/HsTMXRF.jpg)


House of Horrors (1946)
aka. Murder Mansion
aka. The Sinister Shadow
aka. Joan Medford is Missing
★ ★
ďMeet the CreeperĒ, a cult killer made famous by Rob Zombie. The hulking murderer is actually spun off from Sherlock Holmes and the Pearl of Death (1944) Here he helps an artist by murdering critics. Itís even more simplistic than it sounds, without a single intense scene, much like most horror films of the period.


Strangler of the Swamp (1946)
★ ★ Ĺ
English-language remake of a German horror film thatís been on my Watchlist for years. (1936ís Fšhrmann Maria is difficult to find.) After the parade of half-baked Hollywood films itís refreshing to see one that has a thought-out idea, with a beginning, middle and almost an end. (Those credits come up quick.) The final product still comes off as not all the way done, but thatís probably more the blame of the American Producers out to make a cheap buck than the director who also helmed the original film.


Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956)
aka. Invasion of the Flying Saucers
★ ★
This filmís claim to immortality are the special effects by Ray Harryhausen, in particular the climax where a bunch of saucers crash into all the famous Washington D.C. landmarks. (The thought of this plays a lot less distressing today.) The rest of the film is too simple to be interesting. They come after us, we shoot back at them and finally everything explodes.


The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1956)
★ ★
Seemed like an odd inclusion since the story only contains elements of Horror, but I thought maybe they threw in more pulp like Hammerís 1959 version of Hound of the Baskervilles. There is more talk of witchcraft and a scene of torture, but two other versions of this story are also on the list. So I guess enough people think of this as a Horror film. Gina Lollobrigida is pretty great as gypsy temptress Esmeralda, but Anthony Quinnís mumbly, method take on Quasimodo is less articulate than Joaquin Phoenix and never connected with me.


The Werewolf (1956)
★ ★ Ĺ
I liked the filmmakersí attempt to reinvent werewolf mythology with a focus on humanity instead of gothic atmosphere. The transformation is fine, and the cast of unknown actors are doing their best, but the film wouldíve benefitted from a little cinematic dazzle. Itís not as bad as some of the super cheap Lugosi films Iíve watched recently, but those films didnít have a script that cared which makes it more of a letdown here. Still recommended if youíre looking for a different kind of werewolf film. FYI, director Fred F. Sears also made Earth v. Saucers and The Giant Claw, the most laughably bad film in this Marathon. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg846724#msg846724)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 15, 2018, 07:48:14 PM
What do you anticipate being your first 3 star movie of this new batch? Anything look promising?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 15, 2018, 08:02:10 PM
Not to get my hopes up, but The Diabolical Dr. Z (1966) is 6.8 on IMDB and 3.48 on Letterboxd, so maybe in 20 films. My next 5 includes one by William Castle and I usually enjoy his work.
It looks like the best stuff is being saved for Shocktober.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 15, 2018, 10:41:02 PM
What do you anticipate being your first 3 star movie of this new batch? Anything look promising?
I guess I should mention I gave 3-stars to the first film I watched from this batch. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg891857#msg891857)

And the next film on my list will get the same rating.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 15, 2018, 10:53:04 PM
I knew I was gonna miss one. Still, I admire your dedication to the cause. And I'm glad you found another one!
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 16, 2018, 06:33:55 AM
Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956)
aka. Invasion of the Flying Saucers
★ ★
This filmís claim to immortality are the special effects by Ray Harryhausen, in particular the climax where a bunch of saucers crash into all the famous Washington D.C. landmarks. (The thought of this plays a lot less distressing today.) The rest of the film is too simple to be interesting. They come after us, we shoot back at them and finally everything explodes.

This film has always been a favourite of mine. The films budget was so low they did not have money for high speed cameras, so Ray Harryhausen had to stop motion the building explosions, something he vowed never to do again. Just checked up and yes my memory was correct, he did stop motion the explosions of the Washington DC buildings at the end of the film. I also read (in Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life) "I have to say that I am not enamoured with Earth Vs the Flying Saucers, it remains for me the least favourite of all our pictures".

Forbidden Planet came out the same year and had a big budget (over $1M), however EvtFS made $1,250,000 while FP made $1,600,000. So EvtFS made a sizeable profit, while FP made little or none.

P.S. It is lovely when my past habit of buying books comes in handy.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 16, 2018, 09:38:09 AM
I like learning the trivia with these movies, which sometimes explains their appearing on the updated list. I agree there's better Ray Harryhausen work from this era. The stories in The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms and It Came from Beneath the Sea are just as bad but the effects imagery is more memorable.

Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 16, 2018, 12:57:41 PM
I knew I was gonna miss one. Still, I admire your dedication to the cause. And I'm glad you found another one!
A peek behind the curtain...

My usual lifestyle of breakfast movie, lunch movie, nighttime movie has been disrupted by some pretty exciting job opportunities ($) that include a lot of traveling. (I'm writing this at an airport terminal headed to Louisiana.) Most of my down time is in flight or at the end of the day, where I'm usually pretty wiped and wouldn't be able to engross myself in something complex. My other Marathon stopped at …ric Rohmer and it would be unfair to try and fit in his films under these conditions. A perfect opportunity for 60-75 minute genre pulp. So, I don't see it as dedication to the cause - though there's a benefit to being so thoroughly knowledgeable about a specific genre - so much as doing my version of watching a TV Series.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 16, 2018, 11:13:31 PM
(https://imgur.com/bVLa6bw.jpg)


X: The Unknown (1956)
★ ★ ★ Ė Okay 
Early Hammer Horror very much in the mold of their intelligent and unpredictable Quatermass films. (This was set up to be a Quatermass, but the creator of the character wouldnít approve a script he didnít work on, so they renamed the character.) The film opens with the first creepy, tense scene of this new batch and I like how events unfold like a mystery, but the plot definitely loses its way as it nears the finish. The creature is an origin story of a much more famous 1958 monster, The Blob, though thereís nothing connecting the two films.


I Was a Teenage Frankenstein (1957)

ĒSpeak. I know you have a civil tongue in your head because I sewed it back myself.Ē
I descendent of THE Dr. Frankenstein tells his friend out of the clear blue that he wants to build a person out of dead parts. At that precise moment, thereís a horrific car crash outside his house where a boy is thrown far enough from the wreckage that Dr. F and his friend are able to cart the teen undetected back into the house. This constant stupidity is more amusing than any serious points the film wishes to make.


It! The Terror from Beyond Space (1958)
aka. It! The Vampire from Beyond Space
★ ★
Rip-off of The Thing from Another World with a co-ed space crew heading home menaced by a stowaway creature from Mars. Thereís also plenty of evidence that Alien was influenced by this, which shows what a difference Ridley Scottís class and atmosphere brings to such a B-movie premise. This crew could not be less interesting, and the hulking rubber creature is just as bland as it snarls around the ship.


Macabre (1958)
★ ★ Ĺ
Directed by William Castle, who is so much better than his legacy of gimmicks led me to believe. A great high concept plot with a small townís despised doctor learning that someone his kidnapped his daughter and buried her alive. The clock ticks and everyone is an obvious suspect. This couldíve been one of Castleís best, but the pacing is interrupted by a couple of lengthy flashbacks, one of the lead performances is really weak and the ending doesnít make much sense. Thatís balanced by a couple of scary moments more intense than you expect to find pre-Psycho. Looking forward to showing this to Mrs. 1SO for Shocktober


The Return of Dracula (1958)
aka. Curse of Dracula
aka. The Fantastic Disappearing Man
★ ★ ★ Ė Okay 
Another film that rethinks mythology by moving it to a modern setting, and the most successful example yet. This time it's Dracula fleeing his homeland and winding up in small town America. Similar to Shadow of a Doubt, with curly-haired Francis Lederer looking nothing like one's idea of a vampire. The real discovery is Norma Eberhardt as kind-hearted Rachel, who falls under the vampire's spell. Without ever hitting the nail on the head, she plays the relationship as a sexual awakening and a loss of innocence. Perhaps too character focused for Horror fans - the low IMDB rating is inexplicable, especially when most of the reviews are full of praise - there's still a brutality bubbling just below Dracula's seductive surface.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on August 20, 2018, 11:21:28 PM
(https://imgur.com/kshzgdK.jpg)


Gorgo (1961)
★ Ĺ
Kaiju from Ireland? Actually London gets the worst of it and there are brief good moments when Gorgo destroys Tower Bridge and the Clock Tower. There are no interesting human characters, except for maybe the annoying tyke that reminds me of Gamera. Thereís way too much stock footage for this to be a good bad movie, and I would love to know the thought process that led to giving the rubber suit some realism by having the ears move.


The Mask (1961)
aka. Face of Fire
aka. Eyes of Hell
aka. The Spooky Movie Show
★ ★
A mask is unearthed that causes the wearer to have highly-addictive nightmares. The highlight is the wild imagery Ė originally shot in 3D Ė every time the mask is put on. What I donít get is why someone would be drawn like an addict to repeat the experience, but I guess idyllic images wouldnít sell tickets. Everything surrounding the mask sequences is relentlessly uninteresting.


Brainiac (1962)
aka. Baron of Terror

Simply terrible revenge flick involving a comet that turns into a reincarnated warlock baron who can transform into a brain-sucking rubber-masked creature with an absurdly long tongue. The baron can also hypnotize people by staring blankly at them. Sometimes the victim bugs their eyes out, but sometimes they just scream in terror. None of this makes any sense, including the police who show up just in time with flamethrowers strapped on.


The Phantom of the Opera (1962)
★ ★ Ĺ
I loved seeing Hammerís attention to sets and costumes applied to this story and Michael Gough is a terrific slimeball, but this version of Phantom completely blows the big moment by avoiding it in the obvious scene. Instead, later on the Phantom removes the mask himself, which is missing the point. There also isnít good reason for it to be done at that moment, and making thigs worse, the makeup is horrible. The ending is also rushed Ė typical of Hammer Ė with a lot of climax crammed into the last two minutes. This was close to being my 2nd favorite Phantom (after Paradise), but that final stretch undoes a lot of goodness.


Diary of a Madman (1963)
aka. The Horla
★ ★
You gotta love Vincent Price and he really is the whole show here, but with the script giving him too little to do he's simply going through the motions. Supernatural tale of possession and revenge has one really good shock - caught me off guard because there's no logic to what happens - but most of the horror moments are more effects than chills, like the green light across a person's face when under the control of the ghost demon.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on August 21, 2018, 01:34:26 AM
When it's all said and done I'd love to hear your favourite poster. I always love looking at them.
Title: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 21, 2018, 10:47:28 PM
Before I post my favorites...

You already commented (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg854568#msg854568) on my least favorite, the cheap-looking House That Dripped Blood (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg854337#msg854337). The recent one for Brainiac (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg892250#msg892250) would be my 2nd least favorite because who thought that long snake tongue was a good idea, let alone something to advertise. There's a film coming up called Island of Death whose poster is equally off-putting (https://letterboxd.com/film/island-of-death/). I'm already not looking forward to that one.

The poster for The Return of Dracula (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg892150#msg892150) is interesting because Norma Eberhardt's character is all about purity and innocence. The camera only focuses on her beautiful face, so it's startling to see a cheesecake pose on the poster.


My favorite posters from TSZDT 1000:
I'm going to overlook the classics because their images are so iconic. A true Top 10 posters would include Alien, The Shining, Jaws, The Thing, Rosemary's Baby, Dawn of the Dead and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. My favorite of this batch would be the pumpkin becoming the slasher for Halloween.
(https://imgur.com/cooaNSI.jpg)

I've seen a number of posters for Suspiria that focus on the bold colors. I think this minimalist approach is one of the best. I'm also including a similar idea to the poster for Inside
(https://imgur.com/dNHwgK6.jpg) (https://imgur.com/ABqssMo.jpg)

Another good minimalist poster.
(https://imgur.com/0tSSLbo.jpg)

Many posters feature evil people looking sinister.
(https://imgur.com/Fzp0Z4N.jpg) (https://imgur.com/9FJRc3w.jpg)

I think this one is creepier because it's clear nerdy scientist doesn't have good social skills. He's either going to kill her in the name of science or he's going to accidentally kill her because he's lived a solitary existence.
(https://imgur.com/2t5AytR.jpg)

I wish this film actually had a fraction of the terror on the woman's face.
(https://imgur.com/NPjDpnv.jpg)

This poster set me up for Giant mummies that had a particular reaction to light. Too bad the actual film isn't as creative.
(https://imgur.com/BWJw5dW.jpg)

This one, on the other hand, captures the tone of the film quite well.
(https://imgur.com/x6ByJuD.jpg)

I love everything about this poster: the font, the expressions, the glossy look. Nothing like the movie at all.
(https://imgur.com/jmD6qex.jpg)

The missing eyes and purple skin makes for a colorfully disturbing poster.
(https://imgur.com/vPmOavk.jpg)
The use of color also enhances this NSFW poster for Amer (https://letterboxd.com/film/amer/)

I like the waves of fire look to the font for this one.
(https://imgur.com/ad3Bhk4.jpg)

Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on August 21, 2018, 11:49:21 PM
Nice selections! Scanning through the thread, yeah, the minimalist ones kind of stand out don't they... especially during that era when the trend seemed to be the exact opposite (fill every square inch!).


I would go with these for my own top 5 :))
(https://i.imgur.com/ZzCYTQA.jpg)(https://i.imgur.com/aT1xyom.jpg)(https://i.imgur.com/SF8a8og.jpg)(https://i.imgur.com/458teJX.jpg)(https://i.imgur.com/jfwre81.jpg)

One thing I'm not a fan of, and Blood and Roses is a good example, is the how the tagline shrinks as you read it. Is this a horror movie poster or an undercover eyesight test?



Going back through the thread I see you watched Pandorum, but you didn't enjoy it quiet as much as I did. I kind of forgot about the hallucination parts. :))
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 25, 2018, 10:44:05 PM
Hello everyone.

My exciting new life opportunities have put everything else on hold for the time being. I haven't had time to watch movies and for once I'm not twitchy about it... yet.

What I have been able to do in my spare time is work on a definitive Horror Watchlist. Without going too much into it, this came from complications I was having trying to come up with the right format. A ranked list was working fine until I got to the 1960s when the amount of horror films got too overwhelming. So, I created a format I think works best. Most of the work was done before I got super busy.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 26, 2018, 01:46:42 AM
I have seen 62 percent of this list.  I'm surprised at how many of the films I hearted, as horror wasn't my most favorite of genres, but I am certainly growing to love it under many supervised Shocktobers.

The first two I haven't seen are The Descent and Diabolique.  I have seen 45 of the initial 50 essentials.

I have seen 14 of your 30 essentials.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sandy on August 26, 2018, 03:46:41 AM
Alien and An American Werewolf in London.

I have my work cut out for me! :D Those movies and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari would make a good starter list for me for Shocktober, unless you'd like to recommend something(s) instead! (We talked about The Collector, but it's not at my library.)

Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on August 26, 2018, 06:47:51 AM
The first two I haven't seen are The Bride of Frankenstein and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. I've seen 60% of it.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 26, 2018, 05:01:47 PM
The first two I haven't seen are The Descent and Diabolique.  I have seen 45 of the initial 50 essentials.
Those two films I think of as being two very different types of Horror films, yet I can see you enjoying both a lot.


Alien and An American Werewolf in London.
I tried to get Mrs. 1SO to watch Alien, but she heard it was very gooey and that turned her off more than being scary. I want to show her James Gunn's Slither this year, but I think that one's more gooey so I'll probably just watch it alone.

Those two films are why I decided to include TSZDT Top 50. Alien I love, one of the Top 10 Horror films ever made. American Werewolf I like parts of, but there's a lot that doesn't work for me. However, if someone wanted to do a Corndog like marathon of the genre, Werewolf has to be included.


I have my work cut out for me! :D Those movies and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari would make a good starter list for me for Shocktober, unless you'd like to recommend something(s) instead! (We talked about The Collector, but it's not at my library.)
Dr. Caligari is a great starter because the Horror is in the atmosphere. It sets the table for the month really well.



The first two I haven't seen are The Bride of Frankenstein and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. I've seen 60% of it.
Would you say this is because you're still educating yourself on the Classics, or is early Horror not as interesting to you as more recent films?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 27, 2018, 10:47:34 PM
Taking the list Private while I build it up for Shocktober.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sandy on August 28, 2018, 12:38:24 AM
I tried to get Mrs. 1SO to watch Alien, but she heard it was very gooey and that turned her off more than being scary. I want to show her James Gunn's Slither this year, but I think that one's more gooey so I'll probably just watch it alone.

gooey :)

I don't mind gooey as much as demons and stuff, but it's not something I would intentionally go to a movie for! 

Quote
Those two films are why I decided to include TSZDT Top 50. Alien I love, one of the Top 10 Horror films ever made. American Werewolf I like parts of, but there's a lot that doesn't work for me. However, if someone wanted to do a Corndog like marathon of the genre, Werewolf has to be included.

Later in September, I might ask if you'd like to help me with a small Schocktober list. :)

Quote
Dr. Caligari is a great starter because the Horror is in the atmosphere. It sets the table for the month really well.

I will for sure put this on the list then!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on August 31, 2018, 10:13:57 PM
Of course I will still be hosting Shocktober this year and I'm looking forward to it, but at my current rate I won't be watching nearly as many films. I originally hoped to complete the 53 remaining titles from this Marathon by Oct. 1. That now seems impossible and I have wonderful reasons to not make that deadline.

I also hoped to release my definitive Horror Watchlist, and that may still happen sometime before Halloween.

For October, I will focus on my meal times with Mrs. 1SO and her list of not-so-scary titles. (Of the 48 films in her Watchlist, only 16 are officially classified as Horror.) I also may get to some of the re-watches I've been excited to return to, like Martyrs, Slither and Carnival of Souls.

I look forward to all of your participation.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on August 31, 2018, 11:11:02 PM
I forget what it's called but there's a new podcast starting that's going through the Jason movies (similar to the James Bonding podcast). It's hosted by Matt Gourley and Paul Rust. Come October I might try following along.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on August 31, 2018, 11:19:22 PM
I have not seen a single one of the Jason movies.  I wonder if it's time for me to watch one.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: philip918 on September 01, 2018, 02:49:34 PM
I also may get to some of the re-watches I've been excited to return to, like Martyrs, Slither and Carnival of Souls.

Three of my favorites! Excited for your thoughts when you revisit.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 01, 2018, 08:20:45 PM
I have not seen a single one of the Jason movies.  I wonder if it's time for me to watch one.
I enjoy the first four a lot, six is my favorite, the rest are mostly shades of bad, eight being the notable bad in that's so bad it's good.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2018, 08:29:40 PM
Despite my personal connection to some of the very nice people who worked on the series and my own participation on Jason X, I don't think I have anything good to say about the entire franchise.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on September 02, 2018, 11:34:13 PM
I have not seen a single one of the Jason movies.  I wonder if it's time for me to watch one.
I enjoy the first four a lot, six is my favorite, the rest are mostly shades of bad, eight being the notable bad in that's so bad it's good.

Can I skip around?  Watch, say, 1, 2 and 6?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 03, 2018, 09:27:23 AM
Yea, the lore is not strong. You really only need to have seen the first one to understand the basis of the series.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 05, 2018, 03:10:03 PM
I've had some time to work on that Horror Watchlist. Discovering that the 80s was a really poor time for Horror. At first I thought it was because that's when my watching went into overdrive, but the number of good Horror films is very low. Of course, there are exceptions but I'm getting a big picture look of how little respect there was for the genre during that decade. It's not just the market being flooded with slashers. Plenty of thoughtless films from all the sub-genres.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 15, 2018, 02:07:47 PM
I'm in the final 10 years of the Watchlist. Meanwhile, I wanted to repost this obscure recommendation that's going onto the list.

Lake Mungo (2008)
* * * - Good
One of those Horror titles with a fair amount of good buzz. I have to limit what I say because how much you know going in can easily alter what you get out of it. The film is a supernatural documentary (not found footage) about a family dealing with the death of their drowned teenage girl. There's a strong subtext of a family dealing with grief that I can't help feel is exploitative when it's sharing screen time with a ghost story. Ultimately, the filmmakers decide to indulge the paranormal side, and I recommend it to horror fans because the film is really creepy with some moments of truly effective terror. Worth remembering for a Shocktober selection that's under 90 minutes.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on September 15, 2018, 10:24:44 PM
I keep meaning to watch that one. Perhaps this Shocktober!
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on September 16, 2018, 10:14:29 PM
The List is ready to be shared. 423 titles. I'll post it when I open the Shocktober thread.
Title: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on September 19, 2018, 12:04:46 AM
(https://imgur.com/XxOr539.jpg)

Horror Castle (1963)
aka. Terror Castle
aka. Back to the Killer
aka. The Virgin of Nuremberg
★ ★ Ĺ
The genre is growing up fast with this Italian film challenging the acceptable amount of gruesome imagery. Hammerís atmosphere of colorful class is dragged through smoke and sleaze. The story is fairly standard early torture porn, aside from a connection to post-Nazi Germany that manages to not come off as bad taste.


The Curse of the Mummyís Tomb (1964)
★ ★
Iím coming to the conclusion that of all the classic monsters, The Mummy is the most limited. Thereís the defiled tomb, the ancient curse and learning it was all done for love. This one has a small wrinkle involving the monsterís offspring, but itís the same slow-moving revenge. The sets and props look too clean and the bandaged creature has all the personality of a killer refrigerator.


Devil Doll (1964)
★ ★ Ĺ
When a film appears on MST3K, it creates an automatic lowering of expectations, as if any film from that show should never be allowed on a list of the Best anything. This isnít a good film, but it has a couple of novel twists for the ventriloquist dummy sub-genre and the actor playing the entertainer is pretty good, creating some genuine unease with his wooden partner.


The Evil of Frankenstein (1964)
★ ★ Ĺ
ĒHe has a good brain and excellent eyes. I cannot tell you where I got them, but I assure you theyíre perfect.Ē
I wonder if thereís any continuity to the story of these Hammer Frankenstein films or if itís just the next adventure (excuse) for Peter Cushing to be excellent. (Among all actors who have played the role, Cushing gives Dr. F the best balance of intelligence and madness.) Iíve referred to Hammer as comfort Horror and this is perhaps the most comfy. A couple of small new wrinkles to the otherwise standard formula. Nothing exceptional.


Bloody Pit of Horror (1965)
aka. The Scarlet Hangman

Torture Porn done in the style of the old Batman TV Series, and I don't think that's a deliberate choice.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Junior on September 19, 2018, 09:40:00 AM
I'm trying to imagine 60s Batman torture porn and I just can't. Where do people come up with this shit?
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on September 19, 2018, 11:33:14 AM
I thought I'd have more to say, but that description summed it up perfect. Perhaps a few screenshots.

(https://imgur.com/7bgcMfS.jpg)

(https://imgur.com/qFzOUTS.jpg)

(https://imgur.com/mAhpnJZ.jpg)

(https://imgur.com/IJtHBlS.jpg)


I get that some people like their horror with a high amount of camp and that's why the film is on They Shoot Zombies, but even as part of a Halloween film fest with friends and drinks, there are better options out there. Here's what the site says.

Quote
ďBy having a smooth pace, the right amount of action and cheese, and a good dolloping of the old fashioned castle dungeon ambiance, there definitely ends up being very little to not like about Massimo Pupilloís turn from the black and white Terror-Creatures from the Grave to this colored and near comic-like take on de Sadean torture. The sheer zaniness of it all makes the overly elaborate death devices and unlikely situations perfectly acceptable. Itís just that type of movie."
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on September 21, 2018, 10:57:14 PM
Wow.  Just wow.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2018, 01:03:39 AM
(https://imgur.com/M6oDMax.jpg)

Color Me Blood Red (1965)
aka. Model Massacre
★ Ĺ
Godfather of Gore Herschell Gordon Lewis is despised among critics because the heavy amounts of blood are further cheapened by wooden acting, stilted dialogue and poor lighting. I think they give the films their own style and usually Lewis has an original idea to work with. Here, heís (unofficially) remaking A Bucket of Blood, which is just lazy. The one thing I used to like about HGL is absent, inspiration.


Die, Monster, Die! (1965)
aka. Monster of Terror
aka. Colour Out of Space
aka. The House at the End of the World
★ ★ Ĺ
Spooky mansion mystery from a story by H.P. Lovecraft with Boris Karloff oddly seeming out of place, too classy for such a loopy film. Thereís a lot of aimless wandering, but the last 20 minutes throws in some wild turns, as if they werenít sure of what they were building to, so they throw in a handful of ideas all at once. Messy, but quite entertaining at the end.


(https://imgur.com/ToD0L0w.jpg)
Billy the Kid vs. Dracula (1966)
★ Ĺ
You look at that title and think this might be good for some unintentional laughs, but itís not even that entertaining. The highlight is the red filter they throw in front of Dracula (John Carradine) whenever heís supposed to be seducing someone with his hypnotic charms. This effect also highlights the contradiction of a 60-year-old immortal Dracula. Cast and sets are minimal and everything is filmed in daylight, including the night scenes. If there were any hints the filmmakers cared or understood the spirit of what they were selling, I might have more affection for it. This is just a bad film with a novel label.


Incubus (1966)
★ ★
Folk horror, similar to The Wicker Man or The Witch. (The goat here could be related to Black Phillip.) Full of atmosphere, thanks to legendary cinematographer Conrad Hall and the film being the only one filmed in Esperanto, a language foreign to everybody. All these dislocation tricks do the heavy lifting for too simple a story of demons corrupting pure souls. Casting William Shatner as the most innocent person in the village just brings another layer of strangeness. He does get a typical Shatner moment, however. Following a solar eclipse he tells a woman they just spent the night together.


The Diabolical Dr. Z (1966)
aka. Miss Death
aka. Miss Death and Dr. Z in the Grip of the Maniac
★ ★ Ĺ
This is actually the third film in the 7-film Orloff series that starts with The Awful Dr. Orlof (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg847589#msg847589), and my 2nd film from notorious exploitation filmmaker Jesķs Franco. This early work is more polished that I would've expected. Coming out before Franco could go wild with on-screen nudity, I actually admire the heavy suggestion of sexuality here with careful wardrobe choices and clever camera placement. The thriller plot is also better than most giallo, which still isn't very good but at least I didn't want to slam my head into the table watching stylish sensationalism steamroll over any substance.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on September 28, 2018, 10:27:30 AM
(https://imgur.com/9V1OYVf.jpg)

Torture Garden (1967)
★ ★ Ĺ
Five tales of terror with a framing story by a very hammy Burgess Meredith. More serious than typical of this type, but the wraparound and the stories themselves are paced longer than necessary. Best segment features Jack Palance and Peter Cushing as Edgar Allen Poe fanatics.


Rape of the Vampire (1968)
aka. Queen of the Vampires
★ ★
Feature debut by Jean Rollin, whose name has come up a few times in this thread. Iím glad I didnít start here because this is more scattershot and incoherent than his typical erotic horror. With a solid foundation under me, I recognize Rollinís usual touches, and I like the story of four sisters driven to believe they are vampires and hunted as such until a real female vampire arrives to help them turn on their attackers. Thereís just too much art school pretentiousness in this early work.


Oblong Box (1969)
aka. Dance, Mephisto
★ ★ Ĺ
With the generous participation of Vincent Price and Christopher Lee, this film packs in voodoo, grave robbing, revenge, an old dark house and facial disfigurement. Thatís way more story than Iím used to in Horror and it doesnít cohere into a single vision but grabs at whateverís handy. Thereís a lot here to like, but despite all the pulp juice itís a really dry experience.


Cry of the Banshee (1970)
★ ★
Vincent Price hunts witches, abusing his power by taking liberties with the accused young women. Thereís a good (and very modern) idea here when he ends up angering a real witch and her coven who sets out to destroy Price and his family. What muddles everything is the film itself takes more pleasure in abusing and displaying the young women then in the scenes of revenge that could have given true nightmares to all men.


The Dunwich Horror (1970)
★ ★
The creature on the poster is imposing and looks impressive in the film too. However, it only appears in a couple of shots at the end. The rest of the film has it killing POV style using a psychedelic image filter, which generates no thrills. The story building up to the creature is a number of familiar elements that all seem a bit tired this time.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on October 01, 2018, 10:00:38 AM
(https://imgur.com/qfjY9ed.jpg)

Count Dracula (1970)
aka. The Nights of Dracula
★ ★ Ĺ
Excited to watch the latest adventure of Christopher Leeís Dracula, but this is an adaptation of the source material. Itís the same as Coppolaís Dracula but without all those delicious bells and whistles. Klaus Kinski is perfectly cast as Renfield, but itís too nothing a part.


Blood from the Mummyís Tomb (1971)
★ ★
Back to Mummys and another plot Iíve seen once or twice before. (Evil female mummy reincarnated as or possessing a modern woman.) Two thoughts I keep having with these mummy films. 1) Is it possible that the Brendan Fraser action/adventure is the best AND one of the most faithful versions of this story? 2) Limited to exotic Egyptian imagery, is it even possible to put a good scare into one of these films?


The Brotherhood of Satan (1971)
aka. Come in Children
★ ★ ★ - Okay 
Read Full Review (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14872.msg893728#msg893728)


Hands of the Ripper (1971)
★ ★ Ĺ
Jack the Ripper had a daughter who learned about her father and is now psychologically scarred. This Hammer horror has a solid cast and the classy period detail to make it reasonably entertaining, but it seems to struggle with horror evolving into a bloodier genre, with shots of the bloody aftermath while the camera looks away during what should be suspenseful murders. (Iíd rather have the tension than the gore.) Once again, the ending is abrupt.


Lust for a Vampire (1971)
★ ★ Ĺ
Hammer again, getting further from the classic monsters and closer to the lunacy of Vampire Circus with less old men who speak in theatrical tones and a lot more nudity. Delivers on its title with a young man who successfully seduces a beautiful female vampire. Against all odds, film manages to stay classy despite the pornographic plot with a lot of suggestion, stunning beauty and the required amount of vampire activity.
Title: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on October 03, 2018, 11:57:53 PM
(https://imgur.com/hP20IQX.jpg)

Season of the Witch (1972)
aka. Hungry Wives
aka. Jackís Wife
★ ★ Ĺ
George Romeroís least well-known horror film, probably because its 70s no-budget look is visually unappealing. It lacks focus for sure, with some sloppy editing and a couple of really long dialogue scenes. (The film exists in 3 versions: the 89min Season of the Witch, the 130min Hungry Wives and the 104min Jackís Wife, which I saw.) Once again, Romero shows a mastery for using Horror as Satire, showing how a housewifeís boredom would lead her to witchcraft, which liberates her from domestic life. That aspect of the film, and how it all plays out is smartly-handled. 


Return of the Blind Dead (1973)
aka. The Return of the Evil Dead
aka. Mark of the Devil 5
★ Ĺ
Sequel to the film that inspired this Marathon. It was while watching Tombs of the Blind Dead that I realized much as I had interest in the films on They Shoot Zombiesí list, the only way I would complete it is as a batch where I could quickly move away from such uninspired choices. This film is better I think, but thatís the 200 films between lowering my expectations.


The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973)
aka. Dracula is Alive and Well and Living in London
aka. Dracula is DeadÖ and Well and Living in London
aka. Count Dracula and His Vampire Bride
★ ★ Ĺ
Having played Dracula 10 times, this is the last time Christopher Lee is up against Peter Cushingís Van Helsing. (Appearing in over 30 films together, they would co-star one last time after this in House of the Long Shadows.) Lee always has great presence, but Cushing is the superior actor and this lesser Hammer Horror comes alive every time heís on screen. Stakes couldnít be higher with an older Count bored with this world using Satanists and the plague to bring about Armageddon. Fittingly, this is one Hammer film that doesnít rush the ending.


House of Whipcord (1974)
aka. The Photographerís Models
aka. Stag Model Slaughter
★ ★
In the final twenty minutes I started to see the satirical angle to this British women in prison film. There's something definitely going on in the subtext about the systematic suppression of females done by other women who hide behind men to carry out their own revenge against pretty ladies having a good time. It took me so long because the film's surface is a pandering fetish picture. Not too violent and not at all scary, I can understand the film finding a cult of fans but I won't be joining in.


The Devilís Rain (1975)
★ ★
ĒAbsolutely the most incredible ending of any motion picture.Ē is a bold claim by the marketing department. While not remotely true, the ending is the best part of this film and the final twist is even better than that. Getting there, however, is no fun at all. Thereís no cohesion to the scenes, a disaster of editing, with too much of whatís left performed without dialogue so that itís boring too. The inexplicable star power includes Tom Skerritt, Ernest Borgnine, William Shatner, Eddie Albert, Ida Lupino and John Travolta.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 04, 2018, 09:34:11 PM
The next 5 are very discouraging. Think Iím going to switch over to a proper Shocktober, with titles Iím more excited to watch.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: philip918 on October 05, 2018, 12:20:52 PM
Thank god. Stop doing this to yourself. This thread has become torture porn.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 05, 2018, 02:56:22 PM
I don't mind it so much during the off-season, but this month I'm feeling like I'm stuck doing homework while all my other friends are playing.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on October 05, 2018, 04:02:35 PM
The Devilís Rain (1975)

 The inexplicable star power includes Tom Skerritt, Ernest Borgnine, William Shatner, Eddie Albert, Ida Lupino and John Travolta.

Wow, has any other film come close to that density of big names?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 05, 2018, 09:27:04 PM
In this Marathon, probably not, though if Universal's Dark Universe were to continue their Avengers film would certainly top it. Usually these films just get one or two over the hill names to slum it.

I remember the opening scene in Santa's Slay (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg872870#msg872870) has James Caan, Fran Drescher, Chris Kattan and Rebecca Gayheart. After that thereís Emilie de Ravin, Robert Culp, Dave Thomas, Saul Rubinek and ĎTinyí Lister.


Also, mother! has a pretty amazing group
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on October 05, 2018, 10:01:17 PM
I remember the opening scene in Santa's Slay (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg872870#msg872870) has James Caan, Fran Drescher, Chris Kattan and Rebecca Gayheart. After that thereís Emilie de Ravin, Robert Culp, Dave Thomas, Saul Rubinek and ĎTinyí Lister.

My god. Just watching the trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45wLLhUaMgA#no) for that was soul sucking.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 05, 2018, 10:12:56 PM
The film screams out to be an episode of How Did This Get Made?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on October 06, 2018, 12:17:41 AM
I remember the opening scene in Santa's Slay (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg872870#msg872870) has James Caan, Fran Drescher, Chris Kattan and Rebecca Gayheart. After that thereís Emilie de Ravin, Robert Culp, Dave Thomas, Saul Rubinek and ĎTinyí Lister.

My god. Just watching the trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45wLLhUaMgA#no) for that was soul sucking.

Watching the trailer just made me want to watch it.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on October 06, 2018, 01:22:14 AM
Drink everytime someone makes a Christmas pun.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on October 06, 2018, 06:35:41 AM
I have I feeling I may pass out before the end of the movie.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 14, 2018, 10:23:49 PM
The Devilís Rain (1975)

 The inexplicable star power includes Tom Skerritt, Ernest Borgnine, William Shatner, Eddie Albert, Ida Lupino and John Travolta.

Wow, has any other film come close to that density of big names?

I just watched Eyes of Laura Mars (1978), and the cast includes...
Faye Dunaway
Tommy Lee Jones
Brad Dourif
Raul Julia
Rene Auberjonois
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 14, 2018, 11:45:08 PM
Had to share this. Very funny.

WARNING: The creature designer sculpted the dogs for The Thing and this looks similar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8WlqFdlo6g
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on October 15, 2018, 12:10:18 AM
(https://imgur.com/P48hVUf.jpg)

Grizzly (1976)
aka. Claws
★ ★
It's so Jaws that I could never let the film stand on its own merits. Moving the story to the woods and First Blood's color palette of green and brown, there isn't a single good shot involving the damn bear, which is described as being twice as big and strong as any bear in existence, but when you see it, it's just bear-sized. Christopher George does a good William Holden.


Island of Death (1976)
aka. Killing Daylight
aka. Cruel Destination
★ Ĺ
A couple on vacation in Greece. The film reveals that the two are actually serial killers with no moral boundaries. This hits you fairly early in a simulated scene between the man and a goat. Itís one of those button-pushing films, and sometimes I could see an attempt to be BuŮuel and Pasolini by way of Gaspar Noe. Itís not complete garbage, though the filmmaking only occasionally rises to the occasion and seems to run out of ideas by the end so that the couple and everyone they meet are only interested in non-consensual sex.


The Haunting of Julia (1977)
aka. Full Circle
★ ★
The intense opening where a couple loses a child reminded me of Donít Look Now and The Changling. What follows however is less about horror and more about being overwhelmed by grief. Mia Farrow gives a strong performance, but the director is more interested in watching her being sad then handling the supernatural moments, which pop in like an unwanted intrusion even though thatís the only time the film comes to life.


Eyes of Laura Mars (1978)
★ Ĺ
Faye Dunaway plays an edgy fashion photographer who inexplicably has visions from the point-of-view of a serial killer. John Carpenter wrote the heavily altered script Ė 5 other writers credited on IMDB Ė but was busy making Halloween. (Ha!) Iíd be interested in a remake of his original draft because the photography angle is interesting. The cop thriller with a number of suspects (and Dunaway falling in love with Tommy Lee Jones while everyone around her dies) is a barely coherent mess.


Prophecy (1979)
★ ★
Environmental pollution creates a mutated grizzly bear. Film wastes 75-minutes on one-dimensional character building, with only a couple of brief attack scenes. However, the final half-hour is Insane!!! The creature is far more extreme than the films ĎPGí rating would suggest, and director John Frankenheimer flexes his muscle with tension and a couple of the biggest scares Iíve had all month. The film is also unintentionally hilarious (see above clip), and itís impressive that the movie is able to thrill and chill amid such bad moments and stupid character decisions.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on October 17, 2018, 10:32:55 PM
The Devilís Rain (1975)

 The inexplicable star power includes Tom Skerritt, Ernest Borgnine, William Shatner, Eddie Albert, Ida Lupino and John Travolta.

Wow, has any other film come close to that density of big names?

I just watched Eyes of Laura Mars (1978), and the cast includes...
Faye Dunaway
Tommy Lee Jones
Brad Dourif
Raul Julia
Rene Auberjonois

Powerful names. Too bad it was only good for 2 stars. :(



Quality sleeping bag death. Very satisfying poof.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on October 23, 2018, 12:04:57 AM
(https://imgur.com/aDVWHGy.jpg)

The Boogey Man (1980)
Ĺ
Man this is bad. A girl sees her brother commit murder through a mirror. Years later, the woman finds the mirror and shatters it, only to have the pieces commit inexplicable evil deeds as they are scattered around. (Kind of like Oculus but terrible.) Poorly filmed with little money and a bad script, itís the kind of film whose inclusion in They Shoot Zombies makes me question the entire list.


Zombie Holocaust (1980)
aka. Doctor Butcher M.D.
★ Ĺ
Iíve seen a few (too many) of this type of Italian Horror, but this one throws everything into the stew. An organ thief at a hospital leads to an expedition into the jungle where cannibals live in fear of a mad doctor and his zombie army. The gore effects are really well done, and the movie moves quickly through all the sub-genres, but this is still only for people into this type of extreme film. Frequently mentioned on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast.


Bloody Moon (1981)
aka. The Saw of Death
★ Ĺ
Iím not instantly against sleazy filmmaker JesŻs Franco. I was a fan of Paul Verhoeven once. There are a couple of memorable violent kills in this slasher, but most of it captures the inane plotting and stupid characters thatís bad about the sub-genre. Itís Giallo without the flash.


Amityville II: The Possession (1982)
★ Ĺ
Most of the movie is very grim, with an abusive father and the demon possessing the son lusting after his sister. The haunted house scares are standard fare. (Doesnít helped that I just watched Netfilxís Haunting of Hill House.) The final third is a pretty good Exorcist knock-off with good special effects supporting the battle between Priest and Demon.


976-EVIL (1988)
aka. Dial the Devil
aka. Horrorscope
Ĺ
Hard to believe this was directed by an actor. While Robert Englund will never be nominated for an Academy Award, heís one of the best within the Horror genre. The Ďactingí here (by some pros as well as amateurs) is across the board terrible, as if they were trying to invent a new type of performance art. Iím talking Gigli bad, less believable than those scenes of Nicholas Cage in The Wicker Man, except here itís all the time (and not even a fraction of it is entertaining.) The cheap production and nonsensical story might have bothered me more, if I couldíve gotten past the people.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on October 23, 2018, 05:10:34 AM
The Boogey Man (1980)
Ĺ
Man this is bad. A girl sees her brother commit murder through a mirror. Years later, the woman finds the mirror and shatters it, only to have the pieces commit inexplicable evil deeds as they are scattered around. (Kind of like Oculus but terrible.) Poorly filmed with little money and a bad script, itís the kind of film whose inclusion in They Shoot Zombies makes me question the entire list.
In Decemer 1980 there was a debate on Swedish television on the influence of violent movies availible on VHS at that time and the destructive effect they had on young people. I remember that The Boogeyman was one of the titles that were singled out on this program. Other movies that were mentioned in this context were The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, The Driller Killer, Tourist Trap and a few others. Btw, The Boogeyman has the scene with the girl and the pair of scissors in front of the mirror, right?
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 23, 2018, 09:52:36 AM
It does. Before stabbing herself with the scissors she slices her top open because this is a terrible film.

Some of you may be wondering what I'm still doing over here. Truth is, while I have a list of Horror titles not on the They Shoot Zombies list, most of them are similar recommendations from other lists and reviews. The titles I most wanted to see for Shocktober, I already have. I'm 19 films away from 100% completion, including a few titles I want to see - such as A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010), Black Christmas (2006) - and one my wife has nostalgia for, Elvira: Mistress of the Dark (1988).

Much as I respect They Shoot Zombies, you can see by my reviews this year's update has weakened the list quite a bit. It's a sentiment I see echoed on the ICM Forum by others who aim to complete. There are already ideas in place for how the list is compiled that will hopefully weed these lesser horror films back out.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on October 23, 2018, 04:16:05 PM
Horror is not my go-to genre, but I for one still very much appreciate your capsules from the bottom of the barrel. :)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: oldkid on October 23, 2018, 06:15:07 PM
I saw the first half hour of Nightmare on Elm Street (2010) by accident.  That first half hour made a worse mistake than the whole of the original Nightmare-- it was dull.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 23, 2018, 08:00:16 PM
Horror is not my go-to genre, but I for one still very much appreciate your capsules from the bottom of the barrel. :)
Thank you. Part of my fun with this Marathon is expressing my reaction in as few sentences as possible.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Jeff Schroeck on October 24, 2018, 03:19:23 PM
Horror is not my go-to genre, but I for one still very much appreciate your capsules from the bottom of the barrel. :)
Thank you. Part of my fun with this Marathon is expressing my reaction in as few sentences as possible.

It's kind of like the grim bastard cousin of Roujin's "70s US" marathon.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on October 25, 2018, 11:33:35 PM
(https://imgur.com/4OW5V3i.jpg)

Elvira, Mistress of the Dark (1988)
★ ★ Ĺ
Read Full Review (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14872.msg894712#msg894712)


Brain Dead (1990)
aka. Paranoia
★ Ĺ
A brain specialist (Bill Pullman) is hit by a car and starts having hallucinations. He might be suffering from intense paranoia or he might be a victim of his own experimental surgery. The script takes great pleasure confusing fact with fantasy but has no interest in finding a conclusion to all the weirdness or giving the characters any layers or thematic resonance. Just weird for the sake of being weird.


Childís Play 3 (1991)
★ ★
You can note the filmmakers who get the joke of the killer doll versus a film like this where director Jack Bender just ignores what makes Chucky absurdly unique and goes through standard slasher icon motions. It makes for a pretty boring film, a haunted house where the creators are doing it for paychecks and not for love.


Subspecies (1991)
aka. In the Twilight
aka. The Night Has Fangs
★ Ĺ
It's hard for me to like the films of producer Charles Band. He's a cheap motel promoting quality. What's wrong with producing more modest scripts or wear your cut corners on a more charming sleeve. He's the DC Universe of Indie Horror, eyes always on the product and never on the art.


The Pit and the Pendulum (1991)
aka. The Inquisitor
★ ★
Charles Band again, only this time Stuart Gordon directs. Thatís not a mark of quality, but experience puts it a step up from the last film, which is good because the script here is even worse. Like something Uwe Boll would be a part of. Itís all over the place in terms of story and tone. The horror is mostly torture porn, but some individual scenes are interestingly played and most of the cast knows to treat it tongue in cheek.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on October 26, 2018, 01:10:07 AM
The Pit and the Pendulum (1991)
aka. The Inquisitor
★ ★
Charles Band again, only this time Stuart Gordon directs. Thatís not a mark of quality, but experience puts it a step up from the last film, which is good because the script here is even worse. Like something Uwe Boll would be a part of. Itís all over the place in terms of story and tone. The horror is mostly torture porn, but some individual scenes are interestingly played and most of the cast knows to treat it tongue in cheek.

How great was that haircut on Henriksen though? :)
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on October 26, 2018, 01:45:42 PM
It's that distracting tuft in the center of his forehead I want to know the backstory on. The only thing more distracting was the occasional dip into modern slang.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on October 26, 2018, 11:50:35 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/rC90R2w.jpg)

The baby version.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on October 27, 2018, 06:06:34 AM
Brain Dead (1990)
aka. Paranoia
★ Ĺ
A brain specialist (Bill Pullman) is hit by a car and starts having hallucinations. He might be suffering from intense paranoia or he might be a victim of his own experimental surgery. The script takes great pleasure confusing fact with fantasy but has no interest in finding a conclusion to all the weirdness or giving the characters any layers or thematic resonance. Just weird for the sake of being weird.

So this is the film that caused Braindead to be called Dead Alive in the USA.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on October 28, 2018, 11:42:33 PM
(https://imgur.com/mOvahP6.jpg)

Leprechaun (1993)
★ Ĺ
Iíve dodged this bullet for a long time. On the slasher scale, Leprechauns surpass Chucky dolls at looking more silly than scary. That means you have to be really smart to write an effective film where your unstoppable menace is a Leprechaun. The script does a pretty good job laying down the rules Ė which I understand are quickly discarded in the sequels Ė but there isnít one single laugh or one threatening scene to be found. Watching a young Jennifer Aniston run around in this nonsense was more entertaining than I expected.


Necronomicon (1993)
★ ★
Adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft stories with a meta-framing story. Starts very disappointing with a poorly-done, confusing sea creature story from Christophe Gans (Brotherhood of the Wolf, Silent Hill). The 2nd tale is like a boring episode of Tales From the Crypt, but the finale is directed by Brian Yunza (Bride of Re-Animator), whose team of creative make-up artists push it to the limits. The audacious visual splatter of the last twenty minutes makes art out of gore, and its relentlessness is pretty entertaining.


Dark Waters (1993)
aka. Dead Waters
★ ★ ★ - Okay
Hereís where They Shoot Zombies serves its purpose. I donít know anybody involved, in front of or behind the camera. Itís a UK/Russian production shot in English, though thereís very little dialogue. Itís a Folk Horror mystery with symbolic use of fire and water, witchcraft and strange nuns. For a long time, it didnít make much sense, but there is a strong sense of vision that transcendeds plot confusion and a really low budget. It comes together in the end, and the horror imagery along the way held my interest.


Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995)
★ ★
The first half is so laugh-free and desperate that itís kind of sad. Iím trying to figure out why the film gets better, including a staking scene (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fFnJNC0K0w#noembed) I thought was consistently amusing. My theory is that I was determined not to quit so I started looking for any near laughs, and I did find them. Not a lot, but more than I expected.


The Mangler (1995)
★ Ĺ
A sentient laundry-folding machine is a pretty thin premise Ė and I already wrote about the killer elevator (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg866686#post_elevator) Ė so the script puts in so many subplots and distractions that the movie runs 106 minutes. Director Tobe Hooper justifies this by letting the actors run wild, a technique common with his less successful work. So when the massive machine gets up and chases after people by the end, it doesnít seem that unusual.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on October 29, 2018, 05:59:30 AM
Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995)
★ ★
The first half is so laugh-free and desperate that itís kind of sad. Iím trying to figure out why the film gets better, including a staking scene (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fFnJNC0K0w#noembed) I thought was consistently amusing. My theory is that I was determined not to quit so I started looking for any near laughs, and I did find them. Not a lot, but more than I expected.
Vampire movies are my favorites in the horror genre. This is a stupid one, alright, but i think it is commendable how close it follows the original story.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on November 01, 2018, 12:22:09 AM
(https://imgur.com/Af4MKuc.jpg)

Bad Moon (1996)
★ ★ Ĺ
I have trouble watching animals in peril because an actor will know they are giving a performance while a dog has to be trained to behave in ways they may not understand. This is a werewolf story told from the point-of-view of a family dog who discovers, confronts and fights off the monster. It speaks well of the filmmakers that I had a difficult time with some scenes, because they didnít look fake and the dog gets severely beaten. Itís a decent, little story but perhaps one thatís better to read than to watch.


Black Christmas (2006)
Ĺ
From the writer/director of that really good remake of Willard, this is one of the worst films in the wake of Scream. The Christmas period detail is decent (though not as good as Krampus), but the characters are hateful, the story is routine and the editing is choppy. Nobody seems to understand how bodies work, with people being busted up like theyíre made out of pumpkin.


Hellís Ground (2007)
★ ★
Pakistani horror film aims at a lot of targets: zombies, backwoods folk, social commentary. Itís all quite crazy and alien, while at the same time being wholly derivative.


Left Bank (2008)
★ ★ Ĺ
Slow burn, urban version of The Wicker Man and once I knew where it was going the story became sadly predictable. Has enough new wrinkles, including some really strong body horror and a well-acted relationship drama, but without the wholly original folk weirdness itís just a pale imitation.


Vinyan (2008)
★ ★
Many reviews use the phrase Donít Look (Apocalypse) Now, which is all too fitting a label. A couple travel to Burma, on the slim chance their deceased son was actually kidnapped. Along the journey, they slowly go insane while the strangeness of the jungle consumes them. The sound mix interestingly puts the atmosphere noise in the foreground and the dialogue behind it, adding to the dislocation, but I was never hooked by the journey. I have a feeling goodguy may love this.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: smirnoff on November 01, 2018, 12:36:01 AM
Vinyan (2008)
★ ★
Many reviews use the phrase Donít Look (Apocalypse) Now, which is all too fitting a label. A couple travel to Burma, on the slim chance their deceased son was actually kidnapped. Along the journey, they slowly go insane while the strangeness of the jungle consumes them. The sound mix interestingly puts the atmosphere noise in the foreground and the dialogue behind it, adding to the dislocation, but I was never hooked by the journey. I have a feeling goodguy may love this.

Your description piqued my interest. The trailer took it away.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: 1SO on November 01, 2018, 09:16:52 AM
I watched it. Itís pretty accurate and very Spoilery.
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on November 03, 2018, 11:31:54 PM
A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010)
★ Ĺ
One of the biggest problems with the original film is they didnít have the budget to match the ambition. You can often see the strings on the nightmare visuals, but the film is made with passion. This is the opposite. Plenty of money for production values and a talented cast, but thereís no care, so the characters behave like pawns in a film and not real teenagers. Jackie Earle Haley is a better actor than Robert Englund, but the limp script gives him nothing to sink his talent into.


Wake Wood (2010)
★ ★ Ĺ
Irish Horror starring Aidan Gillen and Timothy Spall left me deeply confused about what the filmmakers were going for. Domestic drama about a couple who lose a child and use folk witchcraft to bring her back has its emotions beaten and bloodied by numerous scenes of body horror and injured animals. Later on, the throw in some brutal murders Ė usually with the child involved Ė that would make Jason Voorhees queasy. Thereís a definite tone here, which is why I can some people enjoying its originality.


This completes the latest round of updates to They Shoot Zombies, Don't They.
Title: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: 1SO on November 03, 2018, 11:45:46 PM
Some Stats:
I wish I had done this with the last batch so I could compare. With 82 new reviews, here's how the 1000 films break down.

5 Stars: 7
4 Stars: 11
3.5 Stars: 40
3 - Very Good: 58
3 - Good: 108
3 - Okay: 123
2.5 Stars: 173
2 Stars: 248
1.5 Stars: 167
1 Star: 39
.5 Star: 22
0 Stars: 4

Average Rating: 2.299

5 Stars [Interesting that most of these can only debatably be classified as Horror.]
Alien
Aliens
A Clockwork Orange
Dawn of the Dead (1978)
Se7en
Silence of the Lambs
The Terminator

0 Stars:
Night of the Lepus
I Spit on Your Grave (1978)
Demons (1985)
The Woman (2011)
Title: Re: Horror: A New Beginning
Post by: Beavermoose on November 04, 2018, 04:21:25 AM
A Nightmare on Elm Street  :o(1996):o
★ Ĺ

Was wondering if there was an unknown mid 90s remake until I read Jackie Earl Haley.
Title: Horror Never Dies
Post by: 1SO on May 12, 2019, 12:17:12 PM
An update just came out for They Shoot Zombies... (http://theyshootzombies.com) 35 new entries including the most recent releases Hereditary and A Quiet Place.

There are nine new titles for me, which I am filing into my Horror Watchlist for a future date.
Title: Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on May 12, 2019, 06:24:57 PM
October can't get here soon enough.
Title: Horror Never Dies
Post by: 1SO on July 26, 2019, 01:04:10 AM
There are nine new titles for me, which I am filing into my Horror Watchlist for a future date.

I'm using my work break to watch the 9 titles so that I don't have them waiting for me like homework when Shocktober comes around.
Man Made Monster (1941)
The Mummyís Tomb (1942)
Weird Woman (1944)
The Maze (1953)
The Creature Walks Among Us (1956)
The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (1966)
The Return of Count Yorga (1971)
Haunted (1995)
Tales from the Hood (1995)
Title: Re: Horror Never Dies
Post by: 1SO on July 31, 2019, 09:07:16 AM
(https://imgur.com/l6NFXxd.jpg)

Man Made Monster (1941)
aka. The Electric Man
aka. The Atomic Monster
★ ★
Promising start with stars Lon Chaney Jr., Lionel Atwill and Samuel S. Hinds. Plot involving Chaney given an overdose of electrical energy is well beneath their abilities, hardly any thought put into it. The effect of glowing, electrified Chaney quickly goes from cool to silly. Much better is the makeup showing the effects of the electrical overdose on his face.


The Mummyís Tomb (1942)
★ ★
Universal had some classic monster movies, but most of the collection from this era use their icons to kill time and recycle plots. This runs one-hour and starts with a 10-minute recap of the last film, before presenting the most routine scenes of The Mummy lurking around at night, scaring people with his shadow.


Weird Woman (1944)
★ ★ Ĺ
This oneís different. Voodoo and superstition are at play, and if they couldíve afforded to up the atmosphere it mightíve helped me get past the slapped together storytelling.


The Maze (1953)
★ ★ Ĺ
Engaged woman is mysteriously dumped and she forces her way to the manís estate to find out why. From there itís some pretty good mystery and atmosphere leading toÖ Iíll just say the guy is under a curse, but not something simple like a Wolfman. The conditions of his curse are more imaginative, more extreme and hard to not laugh at when revealed. Possibly worth finding on YouTube to see what Iím talking about.


The Creature Walks Among Us (1956)
★ ★
Starts as a retread of Black Lagoon then presents an interesting idea about doctors operating on The Creature so that his lungs breathe air instead of water. That turns out to only be an excuse to reveal a much cheaper-looking suit and turn this into a reheated Frankenstein story.
Title: Re: Horror Never Dies
Post by: 1SO on August 04, 2019, 12:45:03 AM
(https://imgur.com/fZf9tqR.jpg)

The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (1966)
aka. The Blood Demon
aka. Blood of the Virgins
aka. The Snake Pit and the Pendulum
★ ★
Christopher Lee brings a lot of charisma to the beginning and end of the film, but this loose adaptation of the Poe story looks cheap and rushed. Nothing seems particularly clever or thought out, including the potentially horrific opening where Lee is quartered by horses Ė the limbs detach like theyíre Velcro Ė and the supposedly elaborate torture chamber, with traps hidden in secret passages.


The Return of Count Yorga (1971)
aka. Curse of Count Yorga
★ ★
The suburban vampire is back. Despite a poster selling Christopher Lee, Yorga is actually played by someone better resembling Ray Liotta. Thereís a sense they were going more for fun this time, but thereís little sense of Yorga getting closer or further away from his master plan. One of the earliest horror films to pump up the sound mix and score, including a cheap jump scare. Also one of those annoying films where someone suggests itís the work of a vampire and everyone laughs at them until itís too late.


Haunted (1995)
★ ★
Based on a 1988 novel by James Herbert, though you mightíve guessed the material was a century older by how familiar it feels. As creaky as the doors in this over-lit gothic mansion. Extremely light on scary moments or violence, but gets the R Rating because of a high amount of nudity.


Tales from the Hood (1995)
★ ★ ★ - Okay
Cheesy but effective because the five stories have strong roots in real black problems. Gang violence, police brutality, racism and domestic abuse manage some social points as well as comic book style horror that reminds me of Creepshow. First episode is perhaps best, with some great blending of fantasy and graffiti, while the last suffers from jamming the black-on-black violent message down our throats with actual and staged news clips and photos.