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Filmspotting Message Boards => Marathons => Topic started by: 1SO on August 29, 2017, 11:16:41 PM

Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on August 29, 2017, 11:16:41 PM
You know that sub-board we have for all the Directors (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?board=27.0) where I'm a moderator? That's my next Marathon.

Each of the 778 Directors will be taken on a case-by-case basis, as many films as I care to handle, including possible re-watches. Some directors will take some time while some I can't find a reason to watch any. This is why I'm having trouble finding a standard form to match the content, the kind of question smirnoff might come up with about what I learned from the experience.

The list is in order of each Director's topic number, so the earlier the thread was created, the sooner I will get to that thread. I figure this will group the directors somewhat according to the tastes of those who started the threads.

First up was Alfred Hitchcock, which didn't go well (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14481.msg875723#msg875723).

Woody Allen was next but I've already seen 32 (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3329.msg713932#msg713932) and couldn't think of a good reason to watch another. (Whatever Works?)

I am currently watching two by Frederico Fellini, The White Sheik (recommended to me) and Il Bidone (want to see for Broderick Crawford). After him is Steven Spielberg, but again 30 films seems very complete (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3341.msg823223#msg823223).

Along the way I plan to do my duty and make sure the threads are up to date.

I welcome any suggestions about how I can turn this project into a more rewarding activity worth having its own Marathon thread.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on August 30, 2017, 04:27:07 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/vuaVcHT.gif)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Corndog on August 30, 2017, 07:19:20 AM
Kind of like this, but a deeper dive (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9451.0). Btw, I like Whatever Works.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on August 30, 2017, 07:28:53 AM
One key difference is I don't want to impose a set number. Some of these directors I've wanted to do a thorough Marathon, and this is my chance. For some, one will hold me over for a while.

Unlike the last big Marathon, I'm not so much looking for any possibly good films, but any films that will make me sufficiently knowledgeable about each director.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on August 30, 2017, 08:57:51 AM
I like Whatever Works too. Had a ball at the cinema, couldn't stop laughing.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on August 30, 2017, 10:00:16 AM
Unlike the last big Marathon, I'm not so much looking for any possibly good films, but any films that will make me sufficiently knowledgeable about each director.

Sufficient for what?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on August 30, 2017, 10:21:56 AM
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire: Movie Edition
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on August 30, 2017, 12:41:58 PM
I want to learn. I want to know why these directors were selected for threads. In some cases I want to take a new shot at unlocking some greatness that has eluded me. (Il Bidone did that for me with Fellini.) Some of them, I had to select "haven't seen any" and I would like to correct that. Others I want to see what they're like when you look past their best work.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Junior on August 30, 2017, 01:48:12 PM
This is fun and crazy in a very 1SO way. I'll be paying attention.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on August 30, 2017, 03:24:05 PM
It wouldn't be the Filmspotting Forum without 1SO diving into a marathon that have the rest of us shivering in fear.  Nice.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on August 30, 2017, 10:46:03 PM
With such a vast number of films I would be tempted to employ a strict 5 minute cut off. If it sucks or is only average after 5 minutes move on. Every time you sit down to watch something expect it to take 5 or 6 movies before landing on something that you want to continue. Just go on a ruthless run and gun tear through these filmographies.

You won't be able to claim you've "seen" everything in the ICheckMovies sense of the word, but you'll keep your tempo up, and you'll get a taste of a lot of things in a little time (which is it's own kind of knowledge). And the things you do see in their entirety, you'll be seeing because you're enjoying them.

Imagine for instance a director whose work you haven't seen at all and they have like 15 films. Traditionally one would select a couple films to watch, hope they they are representative, and then see them through to completion. It may be that you don't end up enjoying either film and you're interest in delving further into the director's filmography is low, and so you move on to someone else (hoping, but also always wondering, if what you did see was characteristic of that director's style, and that you haven't missed something you may have loved).

OR you could watch 5 minutes of all 15 films and get some quick answers. Treat it like a wine tasting. Generally a quick sip is enough to know whether you should buy the bottle. You're looking for films that immediately fire you up. You may blow by one or two that may have developed later on, but in that way you're no worse off than the other approach which leaves some movies unwatched altogether.

I dunno, maybe it feels a little disrespectful or unfair to see 2 minutes of a Frank Capra movie and be like "f this" but whatever.  If he's never made a movie you've liked yet, and you're already scraping the bottom of his barrel, do you need more than 2 minutes?

Generally speaking, good movies don't start by being bad movies, so you can't go too wrong imo. :)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on August 30, 2017, 11:43:55 PM
I've always been an advocate of finishing what I start because I've seen a number of terrible movies with a great scene in the middle or even at the very end. I guess I've always watched cinema Chapter-by-Chapter and it all melts together into one gooey ball of camera technique and sound. It can't be compared to a wine tasting because the flavor keeps changing.

My recent Horror Marathon gave me the confidence in my endurance to tackle this massive list. I wish there was a way to put all directors on an equal playing field, but there are obviously ones I'm more interested in and ones I'm already looking to do the bare minimum. And if you think by that I mean threads started by goodguy and roujin, those are some of the blindspots I'm most curious to get to. (You can thank my viewings of The Wait (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14226.msg863499#msg863499), Cosmos and Kosmos for that.) The directors I'm barely interested in were started by people who are no longer here to discuss their decision to start the thread. It's building a room with no light and no windows hoping someone will come visit and then abandoning the premises.

The parts for me about this Marathon that I'm uncomfortable with is that reviews will be posted on the Director threads, so without a Marathon reason to post here this thread will likely sink down in the next few weeks, and I'm working without a playlist I can stand back and look at, with titles to look forward to and a general overall number of films. I tried a couple of times and it's futile to try and decide which films and how many for a director I won't get to for weeks/months. I am building a Letterboxd list of titles watched as I go, but that's in Private right now.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: chardy999 on August 31, 2017, 12:35:54 AM
I agree with oldkid, this is scary.

I used to be a completist but then I asked myself "if I didn't pay for this drink/meal/etc. would I keep drinking/eating it?" It's always no. So I stop. Maybe once I've eaten almost EVERYTHING like 1SO that could change.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: jdc on August 31, 2017, 01:20:45 AM
"if I didn't pay for this drink/meal/etc. would I keep drinking/eating it?"

Will you torture yourself with something horrible just because you paid for it?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 01:35:38 PM
By my current count, there are 778 director threads to work through. I won't be doing a separate look at 1980s Woody Allen or Herzog documentaries. I've already done 6.
Hitchcock, Alfred
Allen, Woody
Fellini, Federico
Spielberg, Steven
Lee, Ang
Coppola, Francis Ford

Up Next are...
Wilder, Billy - I have Kiss me Stupid and Fedora
Bluth, Don - I can't believe he was created so early
Scorsese, Martin
Malick, Terrence
Soderbergh, Steven
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on September 01, 2017, 01:52:14 PM
Wilder, Billy - I have Kiss me Stupid and Fedora
Bluth, Don - I can't believe he was created so early
Scorsese, Martin
Malick, Terrence
Soderbergh, Steven

As you announce upcoming directors, I'd be curious to see a list of your unseen films, perhaps with any reason you've avoided them until now. Or maybe just, like, a one-line summary of your current relationship with that director, expectations, etc.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 02:33:04 PM
That's a fine idea. Perhaps a post for each director here before (and maybe after) I dive into their thread.

I'll work on refining the format as I go.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 01, 2017, 04:49:24 PM
Following along
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: don s. on September 01, 2017, 05:58:52 PM
Me, too.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 09:26:21 PM
Alfred Hitchcock Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3313.msg722803#msg722803)

Certainly a master and the perfect counter to Stanley Kubrick, a filmmaker who only made few films, worked in different genres and most of his output is considered classic. Hitch made dozens of pictures, mostly thrillers and his greatness is diluted outside of a core group of masterpieces. Everyone who loves Hitch, loves to sift through for the hidden gem, which is where I find recommendations that lead me to Topaz, Under Capricorn and Family Plot.

Except for The Lodger, 39 Steps and The Man Who Knew Too Much, I have not seen his films from before 1935. After that there's Jamaica Inn, which I suppose would be next, though it's at the bottom of my priorities, and I'm more interested in Charles Laughton and Maureen O'Hara than the direction. I'd be more interested in watching episodes of television he directed.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Woody Allen
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 09:39:39 PM
Woody Allen Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3329.msg713932#msg713932)

Glancing through the threads I notice MartinTeller and Timbzy have seen more. I like Allen when he's on, but his need to put out a movie a year leaves me with no urge to complete this filmography. My unseen films are...
Anything Else
Cafe Society
Celebrity
Irrational Man
Magic in the Moonlight
A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
Scoop
To Rome With Love
You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Federico Fellini
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 09:44:33 PM
Federico Fellini Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3336.msg531906#msg531906)

I've been gnawing away at Fellini in the hope that one day I will adore Cabiria, La Dolce Vita and 8 1/2 as much as everyone else. As for unseen titles, I still have a few choice selections including:
And the Ship Sails On
Casanova
City of Women
Ginger and Fred - this will probably be the next one
The Clowns
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Steven Spielberg
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 09:59:20 PM
Steven Spielberg Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3341.msg823223#msg823223)

I grew up a Spielberg kid, one of a few names where I will watch regardless of what I thought of the last few films. I've seen all his features and his episodes of Amazing Stories. I'll watch Ready Player One and if there's an Indiana Jones 5, I'll be there no matter who stars or even if George Lucas produces and/or writes it.

I might watch Something Evil - his horror TV-Movie - this Shocktober, and I've never seen his short Amblin'. Just not interested.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ang Lee
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 10:14:19 PM
Ang Lee Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3351.msg713934#msg713934)

Ang Lee is very good at what he does. I know that because his style of character-driven storytelling isn't what I like, but I like most of his films. He takes his time and lets the people guide the story, and I can't often fault how effective his results are.

I seen everything except Taking Woodstock and Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk. For this marathon, I watched his first film Pushing Hands, but didn't write about it. Again, it's not a movie I would choose to watch, but I also can't find fault with it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Francis Ford Coppola
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 10:23:00 PM
Francis Ford Coppola Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3353.msg753509#msg753509)

His greatest films are THE greatest films and the rest are about as bad (or only as good) as their reputation. I have not seen Jack or Tetro. I couldn't guess which would be worse, having seen a few scenes from Jack and knowing Tetro comes from the same period that produced Youth Without Youth and Twixt.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Billy Wilder
Post by: 1SO on September 01, 2017, 10:33:03 PM
Billy Wilder Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3356.msg516187#msg516187)

Planning to watch Fedora and Kiss Me Stupid to complete Billy Wilder's Hollywood filmography. (Maybe someday I'll even check out Mauvaise graine for 100%.) Don't see a reason not to. With 5 Essentials, he's one of the top filmmakers and I've already seen the titles considered his worst. Only Avanti! was painfully bad.



Thank you for my indulgence. This catches me up.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on September 01, 2017, 10:37:24 PM
I would love for someone else to agree with me that Easy Virtue (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017843/reference) is very good, but I think the deck is stacked against your being that person, lol.

Then again, it's a better option for you than Coppola's Jack, if it comes to that.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Woody Allen
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on September 02, 2017, 05:44:22 AM
Woody Allen Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3329.msg713932#msg713932)

Glancing through the threads I notice MartinTeller and Timbzy have seen more. I like Allen when he's on, but his need to put out a movie a year leaves me with no urge to complete this filmography. My unseen films are...
Anything Else
Cafe Society
Celebrity
Irrational Man
Magic in the Moonlight
A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
Scoop
To Rome With Love
You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger
I tried to go complete on Woody's filmography 10-15 years ago. Today it would be a though task to rank them all and I would have most of them at around body temperature levels (30-40°). One title that stood out a little back then was Celebrity. I had a little thing against Leonardo DiCaprio until I saw that one.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Federico Fellini
Post by: Jeff Schroeck on September 02, 2017, 07:43:11 AM
Federico Fellini Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3336.msg531906#msg531906)

I've been gnawing away at Fellini in the hope that one day I will adore Cabiria, La Dolce Vita and 8 1/2 as much as everyone else. As for unseen titles, I still have a few choice selections including:
And the Ship Sails On
Casanova
City of Women
Ginger and Fred - this will probably be the next one
The Clowns

The Clowns is really good if you're into silly mockumentaries like the Rutles movie.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Federico Fellini
Post by: 1SO on September 02, 2017, 02:24:26 PM
I tried to go complete on Woody's filmography 10-15 years ago. Today it would be a though task to rank them all and I would have most of them at around body temperature levels (30-40°). One title that stood out a little back then was Celebrity. I had a little thing against Leonardo DiCaprio until I saw that one.
I've always been a fan of Leo, but I was interested in the film to see how Kenneth Branagh fares as a Woody surrogate. There should be a ranked list of people in Woody Allen movies who are clearly playing the part a younger Allen would've played himself.


The Clowns is really good if you're into silly mockumentaries like the Rutles movie.
I didn't know it was a mockumentary. I just figured Fellini plus clowns equals some kind of uber-clown posse, like a Wes Anderson movie about a family of architects and painters.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Don Bluth
Post by: 1SO on September 02, 2017, 02:33:53 PM
Don Bluth Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3357.msg876119#msg876119)

When Bluth first made his mark, his fluid ink style was a relief from Disney's dark period. However, with The Little Mermaid Disney took the crown back and Bluth was left behind as his stories became increasingly insipid. Anastasia was a last ditch effort to make a film in the Disney mode, but the songs were forgettable and the story problematic.

I have not seen...
An American Tail
Bartok the Magnificent
The Pebble and the Penguin
A Troll in Central Park

An American Tail - I hate the song, and I hate the screechy film version of it even more - but this seems like the time to check out the popular film. I considered re-watching The Secret of NIMH, but I think my good memory of it is being heavily supported by nostalgia and I don't want to see that crumble.

Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on September 02, 2017, 11:27:15 PM
You liked Dragon's Lair that much?  It looked like a cash-grab in association with a really expensive video game, so I avoided it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 02, 2017, 11:56:01 PM
You can watch it for free on youtube so how much cash can they grab?

(I'm actually not sure if you think I'm referring to the announced movie adaptation of the game or if you're even aware that Bluth is working on a feature length Dragon's Lair movie.)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Junior on September 02, 2017, 11:56:09 PM
I have way too much invested in memories of Rock-a-doodle from a childhood of fear. That shit will mess you up.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 03, 2017, 12:17:32 AM
I've only seen the movie once, but "Tyin' Your Shoes" is stuck in my head as deep as "It's a Small World".
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Martin Scorsese
Post by: 1SO on September 03, 2017, 12:24:45 AM
Martin Scorsese Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3361.msg642660#msg642660)

Scorsese is one of those directors I didn't like initially. It was Goodfellas that broke through and he's been one of my favorites ever since. Not a big fan of his documentaries, unless the subject is him talking about movies. That is why I haven't seen...
Shine a Light
No Direction Home
George Harrison: Living in the Material World
A Letter to Elia

I have Shine a Light on tap. Also Italianamerican and something called The Audition, which I think is an extended advertisement for something, much like The Key to Reserva, but it stars Robert De Niro, Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt and Scorsese. Seems worth watching.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Martin Scorsese
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on September 03, 2017, 03:46:27 AM
Martin Scorsese Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3361.msg642660#msg642660)

Scorsese is one of those directors I didn't like initially. It was Goodfellas that broke through and he's been one of my favorites ever since. Not a big fan of his documentaries, unless the subject is him talking about movies. That is why I haven't seen...
Shine a Light
No Direction Home
George Harrison: Living in the Material World
A Letter to Elia

I have Shine a Light on tap. Also Italianamerican and something called The Audition, which I think is an extended advertisement for something, much like The Key to Reserva, but it stars Robert De Niro, Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt and Scorsese. Seems worth watching.
Shine A Light comes across much like an ordinary concert movie, but it captures the energy of The Stones in a great way.

No Direction Home was released when I was in my most severe Dylan addiction period and the movie was greeted somewhat like a miracle among us Dylanites back then. Scoresese was accessed material via Dylan's office that up to then never had been shown publicly. The movie was made for the American Masters series (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/bob-dylan-about-the-film/574/) that runs on PBS.

The George Harrison movie isn't as prolific which fits the way George lived. He was a beautiful person.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 05, 2017, 05:02:56 AM
When you say initially, do you mean when he came into the scene or when you started watching his movies, in whatever order? Looking at your list I would guess the latter?

(Can I sign you on for my anti-Silence club I am starting?)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: jdc on September 05, 2017, 10:05:55 AM
(Can I sign you on for my anti-Silence club I am starting?)

I'd sign up
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 06, 2017, 05:23:39 AM
I have way too much invested in memories of Rock-a-doodle from a childhood of fear. That shit will mess you up.

Yeah, how dare they do that to the nice owl!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 06, 2017, 05:24:48 AM
(Can I sign you on for my anti-Silence club I am starting?)

I'd sign up


Cool, so it's you, me and the /Filmcast against Junior/olkid. I'll get the pitchforks (or whatever it is they use in Japan).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 06, 2017, 07:30:13 AM
Pretty sure I liked Silence more than oldkid. Just sayin'.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 06, 2017, 09:31:20 AM
Don't worry, there is enough fire and brimstone for everyone.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on September 06, 2017, 01:03:46 PM
Better be careful.  Sam, Junior and I have ninja skills.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 07, 2017, 06:39:18 AM
Naruto ninjas or TMNT ninjas?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on September 09, 2017, 02:19:41 PM
If I told you I'd have to kill you.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 09, 2017, 04:04:52 PM
You cannot, I have been trained in the tradition of the samurai.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on September 10, 2017, 01:33:14 AM
You only win if you also have Tom Cruise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9jAwRBXPQA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9jAwRBXPQA)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Terrence Malick
Post by: 1SO on September 13, 2017, 07:15:44 PM
Terrence Malick Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3374.msg704990#msg704990)

I've lived my life listening to and reading others go on and on about Malick's poetic genius. It's why I've seen seven of his features, and the fact that my favorite is Knight of Cups shows that I don't understand him at all. While liking Knight means I will probably like Song to Song, I really have no reason to watch or even re-watch any of his work as a Marathon chore. If I'm ever in the mood for a Malick, I'll act on that impulse, but I'm moving onto the next director.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on September 13, 2017, 07:23:05 PM
(Did you skip the original (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=882.0) director's thread, by the way?)

Post-vacation bump.

(Or is it that you've already seen his complete filmography?)

pixote
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Steven Soderbergh
Post by: 1SO on September 13, 2017, 07:31:01 PM
Steven Soderbergh Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3378.msg757355#msg757355)

At the start of the last decade he was a director to not miss.
At the end, he became one to avoid.  The Good German really tipped my opinion to the other side, and his approach to Che sealed it.

Major titles I haven't seen include two Spalding Gray documentaries:
Gray's Anatomy
And Everything is Going Fine
also Logan Lucky
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 13, 2017, 07:40:04 PM
Word buried Stillman (882) between 8629 and 8959. He's Director #102

Cool that you did the work to correctly note that Anthony Asquith is #198
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 14, 2017, 06:42:47 AM
Terrence Malick Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3374.msg704990#msg704990)

I've lived my life listening to and reading others go on and on about Malick's poetic genius. It's why I've seen seven of his features, and the fact that my favorite is Knight of Cups shows that I don't understand him at all. While liking Knight means I will probably like Song to Song, I really have no reason to watch or even re-watch any of his work as a Marathon chore. If I'm ever in the mood for a Malick, I'll act on that impulse, but I'm moving onto the next director.

I didn't get to seven but I have Malick fatigue too. Haven't watched his three or four latest movies.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kevin Smith
Post by: 1SO on September 16, 2017, 11:59:30 PM
Kevin Smith Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3380.msg634493#msg634493)

I should have gotten off this train back when Smith announced his retirement. The fact that he's never developed any skill as a director beyond learning how an edit works could be forgiven by great writing, but what was once his strength now only shines when he's speaking in public. My #1 still stands. I'll happily watch when it's him in front of a microphone, but after Tusk, if it's something printed from his computer I have no interest. None. I'd rather fill in the gaps of M. Night Shyamalan.

I haven't seen Cop Out or Yoga Hosers. I have no interest in Hit Somebody, Moose Jaws, Helena Handbag or even Jay and Silent Bob Get a Reboot.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Orson Welles
Post by: 1SO on September 17, 2017, 12:20:38 AM
Orson Welles Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3389.msg753670#msg753670)

Feels like Francis Ford Coppola all over again. One inarguable classic, some flawed genius and a lot of studio interference. ICheckMovies has given me a number of suggestions from the list of what I haven't seen.
Othello appears to be the Must Watch
The Immortal Story could be interesting and is under an hour.
Too Much Johnson was before(?) Citizen Kane. Interesting.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Paul Verhoeven
Post by: 1SO on September 17, 2017, 11:40:58 PM
Paul Verhoeven Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3411.msg756137#msg756137).

Before Showgirls, he was one of my favorite directors. I even like Hollow Man and Flesh + Blood is a bonkers, lusty adventure just waiting to be discovered. There isn't a lot I haven't seen, but I always meant to catch Katie Tippel back in the day. Don't really care now. I also haven't seen Tricked. Going to think about how much I want to watch something by Verhoeven considering I already feel like an authority.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 18, 2017, 04:02:26 AM
Did I ever read your Elle review? I don't remember ever seeing it.

I am now more incited to watch Total Recall.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 19, 2017, 04:17:19 PM
Did I ever read your Elle review? I don't remember ever seeing it.
I thought I wrote one, but I can't find it.

I've also decided not to watch Katie Tippel. With genre films, it's pretty easy for me to watch something with little to no prep, however dramas I need to be more in the mood for. So while I've always meant to catch up with this hole in my Verhoeven filmography, I have no enthusiasm to do it right now and would rather move on to the next director.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Christopher Guest
Post by: 1SO on September 19, 2017, 04:56:43 PM
#15 Christopher Guest Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3424.msg876852#msg876852)

Guest seemed like a clever person with one style of filmmaking that allowed his cast to play. The Big Picture is a more conventional narrative, but the jokes are mild and mixed and play like a stand-up routine turned into a scene.


Almost Heroes!

I haven't seen his two least popular projects, Mascots and Almost Heroes. I could be easily tempted by an enthusiastic review of either (or his 8 episode series "Family Tree"), and I would love to read karlwinslow's defense, which I would more likely to believe is cheeky trolling. It doesn't seem like I'm missing anything by moving onto the next director.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Mel Gibson
Post by: 1SO on September 19, 2017, 05:05:36 PM
#16 Mel Gibson Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3446.msg861908#msg861908)

I've seen his 5 features, and choose not to go down the rabbit hole of his personality, but simply comment on the work. (Believe me, if you're going to do that you best stopping watching movies and television now, as well as give up on reading many authors.)

IMDB says he made a documentary called "Mel Gibson Goes Back to School" where he teaches Hamlet to a group of high school drama students. Sounds interesting. I may look for it, which would also give a breather for anyone who wants to post a comment here.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Christopher Guest
Post by: Jeff Schroeck on September 19, 2017, 05:15:55 PM
I haven't seen his two least popular projects, Mascots and Almost Heroes. I could be easily tempted by an enthusiastic review of either (or his 8 episode series "Family Tree"), and I would love to read karlwinslow's defense, which I would more likely to believe is cheeky trolling. It doesn't seem like I'm missing anything by moving onto the next director.

Mascots has one compelling story line and the mascot performance pieces are fun, but the rest seems like he wasn't trying very hard.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on September 19, 2017, 05:24:45 PM
How long since you've seen Braveheart?

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 19, 2017, 08:29:33 PM
Probably when I was reviewing the 90s, so about 15 years. I've seen it 3 times. Starts a little slow, but once the revenge plot kicks in it gets a lot better. Didn't care for the ending which went on way too long, though after a couple more films I saw that it's just what Gibson likes to dwell on.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on September 19, 2017, 09:34:22 PM
I do like that that epilogue though. :)

Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 20, 2017, 04:39:28 AM
I didn't know Gibson had directed Braveheart. I also didn't know there Man Without even existed.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - David Lynch
Post by: 1SO on September 21, 2017, 10:54:38 PM
#17. David Lynch Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3452.msg791078#msg791078)

I can understand those that are reluctant to watch Lynch, say he's not for them or flat out hate his work. He's more of a modern artist who happens to also make movies, which are often just as surreal as his art installations. I was around in 1999 when people who knew Lynch's style were uneasy by how normal The Straight Story is, yet I find plenty of Lynch in that film too.

I've seen all of Lynch's features and all of Twin Peaks including The Return (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=11485.msg876734#msg876734). I haven't seen The Missing Pieces, but I don't know what I'd get out of a collection of odds and ends. I've also seen many of Lynch's short films but not all of them and MartinTeller has a ranked list (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3452.msg515358#msg515358) which includes some of those shorts along with reviews from Dynamic:01 : The Best of DavidLynch.com (https://martinteller.wordpress.com/2013/06/08/dynamic01-the-best-of-davidlynch-com/). I don't know how easy these will be to find, but I'm going to look for them.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - David Lynch
Post by: MartinTeller on September 22, 2017, 08:56:38 AM
#17. David Lynch Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3452.msg791078#msg791078)

I can understand those that are reluctant to watch Lynch, say he's not for them or flat out hate his work. He's more of a modern artist who happens to also make movies, which are often just as surreal as his art installations. I was around in 1999 when people who knew Lynch's style were uneasy by how normal The Straight Story is, yet I find plenty of Lynch in that film too.

I've seen all of Lynch's features and all of Twin Peaks including The Return (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=11485.msg876734#msg876734). I haven't seen The Missing Pieces, but I don't know what I'd get out of a collection of odds and ends.

This is what I had to say about it:

Quote
The new Blu-Ray edition includes the long-awaited deleted and extended scenes, an hour and a half of them.  While there’s some interesting material here, most of it is the stuff that separates the movie from the TV show.  There are a number of throwaway bits involving secondary characters, including almost every season 1 cast member (with the notable exceptions of Catherine Martell and the Hornes).  If you imagine Fire Walk With Me as a 4-episode “prequel” run of the show, these scenes are the things you’d be mildly interested in or amused by while waiting for the good bits.  Does anyone really need to see Pete and Josie bicker with the bank manager about a piece of lumber?  I think not.

Other scenes are not especially missed in the context of the movie but are still a good watch, like Isaak’s final confrontation with the sheriff.  Most valuable are the last few deleted scenes, which provide some tantalizing bits of epilogue for the “Twin Peaks” universe, including more of the beloved Agent Cooper.  These would have been out of place after the film’s climax, but serve as excellent supplementary material.  What the deleted scenes don’t do is shed much light on the mysteries of the film.  A few tidbits are explained a little more, but mostly the film retains its wonderful inscrutability.


I've also seen many of Lynch's short films but not all of them and MartinTeller has a ranked list (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3452.msg515358#msg515358) which includes some of those shorts along with reviews from Dynamic:01 : The Best of DavidLynch.com (https://martinteller.wordpress.com/2013/06/08/dynamic01-the-best-of-davidlynch-com/). I don't know how easy these will be to find, but I'm going to look for them.

Ah, I see I was missing some shorts and odd bits in my rankings. I also decided to split out the features from the rest... something I don't think I've done for any other director, but it feels appropriate in this case for some reason.

Still quite a few shorts I haven't seen, not to mention his Duran Duran concert film (I dunno, I like DD but this seems like inessential viewing) and his early attempts at TV. I should track some of that stuff down.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - David Lynch
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2017, 09:08:09 AM
Ah, I see I was missing some shorts and odd bits in my rankings. I also decided to split out the features from the rest... something I don't think I've done for any other director, but it feels appropriate in this case for some reason.
It does. I watched some shorts last night and mixing them in with the features makes it difficult because I retain more of a memory of the features while the short films, like Boat, just pass by my brain for a few moments.


What is Eraserhead Stories? Is that on the DVD?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - David Lynch
Post by: MartinTeller on September 22, 2017, 09:10:31 AM
What is Eraserhead Stories? Is that on the DVD?

Yeah, it's Lynch just talking about the movie for 85 minutes. It's probably my favorite DVD extra.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2017, 09:18:16 AM
Also, now that I've separated the rankings I see that I'm not a fan of his shorts, which are more undeveloped mood moments wrapped in Lynch's style. (45 minutes of Rabbits with only about 4 or 5 interesting things that happen beyond the initial look of the frame.)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ridley Scott
Post by: 1SO on September 22, 2017, 09:26:37 AM
#18. Ridley Scott Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3459.msg681493#msg681493)

I like Ridley Scott and scoff at those who say he's past his prime. He often fails to spot narrative flaws, but he's always been that way. His films are only as good as their scripts because the filmmaking is often close to flawless. (Robin Hood stands out as having a number of bad directing choices. Someone to Watch Over Me is an under-appreciated gem.) Because of that, I will watch anything directed by Sir Ridley. There are 4 features I haven't seen and I'm game for all of them:

A Good Year
Body of Lies
The Counsellor
Exodus: Gods and Kings

I might also re-watch Someone to Watch Over Me.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 22, 2017, 09:45:20 AM
I liked A Good Year when I was a kid. Exodus is a mess with interesting ideas in it. More so than 10 Commandments I would say.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Tim Burton
Post by: 1SO on September 25, 2017, 11:53:54 PM
#19. Tim Burton Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3491.msg677408#msg677408)

There are no absolutes in film opinions, but looking at the poll for Tim Burton it seems most agree his recent output isn't as good as his early work. I thought he was bulletproof until Mars Attacks!, one of the most depressing nights at the cinema I've ever had. There would be worse to come, like Alice in Wonderland, another of my most depressing cinema experiences.

Some believe Burton made a comeback with Big Fish. I thought it was a load of crap - in the case of a scene involving an elephant, literally - but I do think the old Burton resurfaced in Sweeney Todd.

As for what to watch, I haven't seen Big Eyes or Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children and I've been interested in both. I also learned Burton directed Hansel and Gretel (1983) as a Halloween short for the Disney Channel, and there's a 1986 episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents called "The Jar" that sounds interesting.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on September 26, 2017, 01:41:57 AM
Big Eyes is probably the least "Tim Burton" film of his I've seen.  Miss P is his attempt to do Harry Potter with some high highs and some low lows.  Neither are his worst or his best, but I think you'd find them worth your time.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 26, 2017, 03:29:12 AM
I watched Big Eyes at the cinema and forgot most about it almost immediately. It's an average biopic that is barely Burtonian.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - James Cameron
Post by: 1SO on September 26, 2017, 11:54:59 PM
#20. James Cameron Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3530.msg609073#msg609073)

My favorite director working today. Like many, I wish he wasn't so deep in the Avatar business, but I'll be there opening weekend all the same. (This also means I'm set up for a major fall.)

I haven't seen Cameron's documentaries, but I have as much interest in them as a documentary by Hitchcock or Leone. It's not where their greatness is on display. So Ghosts of the Abyss and Aliens of the Deep will remain unwatched, and I can't find a reason to revisit his features, all of which I've seen several times over the years.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Uwe Boll
Post by: 1SO on September 27, 2017, 12:15:50 AM
21. Uwe Boll

Part of me would love to watch his entire body of work just to say I did it.  If only there was a reward or a special merit badge at the end...

A joke poll, so do I take it seriously? I've seen part of House of the Dead, Alone in the Dark and BloodRayne, but not enough to count them as watched. IMDB has Rampage rated highest (6.3, one of only four film rated above 5.0). A third of the Filmspotters who voted in the poll selected Postal. I'll watch almost anything, but I'm having trouble with the fact that Boll himself never took what he did seriously, I don't see the value in watching just one of his films and I don't really want to commit to a set of titles.

Maybe there's a documentary of his work on YouTube.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - James Cameron
Post by: oldkid on September 27, 2017, 03:05:43 AM
#20. James Cameron Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3530.msg609073#msg609073)

My favorite director working today. Like many, I wish he wasn't so deep in the Avatar business, but I'll be there opening weekend all the same. (This also means I'm set up for a major fall.)

I haven't seen Cameron's documentaries, but I have as much interest in them as a documentary by Hitchcock or Leone. It's not where their greatness is on display. So Ghosts of the Abyss and Aliens of the Deep will remain unwatched, and I can't find a reason to revisit his features, all of which I've seen several times over the years.

I kinda liked Aliens of the Deep, if only for the cinematography.  Such a crisp presentation of a new world.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 27, 2017, 03:44:20 AM
What order are you doing these in? I cannot figure out how Boll gets to be #21.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 27, 2017, 05:24:48 AM
The order is decided by when the poll was first created. The first ever Director thread on the boards was Alfred Hitchcock and Uwe Boll was poll #21.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 27, 2017, 06:02:38 AM
Why did you choose that order?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 27, 2017, 08:09:20 AM
I've done similar marathons a couple of times before and went alphabetically. I was looking for a new approach and I like the unpredictability of not knowing what's ahead and the grouping of directors by the person who posted individual threads.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 27, 2017, 09:07:25 AM
Why not go by Director's Project rating?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 27, 2017, 09:22:33 AM
I considered that, however...

Whether I go by final group ratings or Personal ratings, I'm either starting or ending with a whole lot of bad directors. Plus, I end up doing a side Marathon of obscure directors, which wouldn't be well served taken all at once. Seemed like a recipe for me not completing this project.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 27, 2017, 09:38:46 AM
Point taken.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on September 27, 2017, 02:14:51 PM
I've done similar marathons a couple of times before and went alphabetically. I was looking for a new approach and I like the unpredictability of not knowing what's ahead and the grouping of directors by the person who posted individual threads.

Before seeing this conversation, I was beginning to wonder whether maybe the current order wasn't ideal for you. If this marathon is really going to last multiple years, I wonder if you'd get more out of revisiting films by Spielberg, Hitchcock, etc. at the end of that time (after exploring a ton of other new cinema) rather than scraping the bottom of their unseen filmography at this point in time. I guess it depends what your goals are, though.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on September 27, 2017, 02:28:31 PM
This is an educational Marathon and I'm looking to fill in gaps. Ultimately, I'm becoming less interested in new watches when I already have a mighty group of films I enjoy and would rather rewatch than gamble on a lesser-known title. This gives me good reason to watch films I've been putting off.

I posted in Uwe Boll's thread but this overview (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5SYQ2Xmx-Lg#noembed) has convinced me I don't want to waste my time. Because of a change to my workload next month, I'm going to switch my focus to Shocktober.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Fred Zinnemann
Post by: 1SO on November 02, 2017, 01:00:45 AM
#22. Fred Zinnemann Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3546.msg620232#msg620232)

In that post I wrote, "Don't be fooled by the colors. Except for Jackal, which is my #20 film of All Time, I'm not a fan of his directing." His style is difficult to peg. He seems very detail oriented, but in films that require emotions more than details his approach leaves me parched.

I've been wanting to get back to this project and he has a Noir, so you can count on me watching Kid Glove Killer (1). I've had The Search (2) high on my Watchlist for years and The Sundowners (3) in my unwatched DVD pile. iCM says I should look at Julia (4) and perhaps The Men (5) and/or A Hatful of Rain (6). My love of Anthony Quinn puts Behold a Pale Horse (7) on my radar and if all that isn't enough, I'm considering giving another chance to A Man For All Seasons (8 ).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 02, 2017, 04:37:50 AM
I like High Noon. You put it quite low.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on November 02, 2017, 03:48:21 PM
The Men is well worth your time. Zinnemann is a great director of actors.

He seems very detail oriented ...

Yeah, the word I always associate with him is precision. He's a craftsman director, similar perhaps to someone like Lumet. He lets the story determine the style rather than imposing style on the story, often building the film around the performances. I'll probably sneak Julia into my Year-by-Year marathon next week.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on November 02, 2017, 04:47:08 PM
I've been wanting to get back to this project and he has a Noir, so you can count on me watching Kid Glove Killer (1).

I went and looked up the etymology of kid gloves. It's kid as in young goat. Gloves made from young goats. Before now any time I heard that phrase I always imagined some mythical glove that someone handled kids with at some point. I hope I wasn't the only one.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 02, 2017, 04:51:34 PM
I imagined something different. Gloves made out of kids' skin. Not kid goats. Kid kids.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Jeff Schroeck on November 02, 2017, 06:21:49 PM
I've been wanting to get back to this project and he has a Noir, so you can count on me watching Kid Glove Killer (1).

I went and looked up the etymology of kid gloves. It's kid as in young goat. Gloves made from young goats. Before now any time I heard that phrase I always imagined some mythical glove that someone handled kids with at some point. I hope I wasn't the only one.

I also assumed it was a metaphorical item of clothing for handling a situation, like "big boy pants".
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Sergio Leone
Post by: 1SO on November 12, 2017, 09:10:48 PM
#23. Sergio Leone Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3548.msg515685#msg515685)

My pick for the Greatest Director who ever lived. Working against that claim is his paltry filmography of only 7 features starting with The Colossus of Rhodes, the only film of his I've never seen and still am not sure I want to. Even Kubrick has left us with more to savor.

I'd be more interested in watching any commercials he may have directed or a collection of his odds and ends, such as the opening scene of A Genius, Two Friends, and an Idiot, which I have seen. (It's a moment drawn-out and capped with a deadpan joke. Very him.)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Spike Lee
Post by: 1SO on November 12, 2017, 09:41:12 PM
#24. Spike Lee Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3564.msg879656#msg879656)

The current poll has only 13 votes spread across 4 options, while the Poll that was closed 2 years ago (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3564.msg808402#msg808402) had 66 votes across 11 options. Maybe this speaks of how far outside the cultural conversation Spike Lee has fallen. There was a time when every Spike Lee film would cause a discussion.

I thought I had seen 4 Little Girls, but maybe not. It certainly stands out as the Spike Lee film I should catch up with. I also haven't seen Miracle at St. Anna, whose failure seems to be where Lee fell out with audiences, She Hate Me, which sounds terrible and Red Hook Summer, which after Crooklyn I have no interest in. As a horror junkie, I should be interested in Da Sweet Blood of Jesus, but I really don't get the film it was based on and I read this was a disaster on every level. I might look for Passing Strange, which Roger Ebert was incredibly enthusiastic about. Plus the combination of theater and music intrigues me.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Christopher Nolan
Post by: 1SO on November 16, 2017, 10:42:39 PM
#25. Christopher Nolan Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3603.msg716031#msg716031)

This seems largely unnecessary, especially after my Dark Knight Marathon (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14218.0). Part of my reason for doing this is to correct and clean up Director threads and I was surprised to discover Dunkirk wasn't added... and nobody was asking for it either.

That's the big one I haven't seen, but it'll have to wait for the DVD next month. I was not going to the theater for a Nolan film after Interstellar, though Dunkirk's brief running time is a step in the right direction. I looked for Nolan's other two short films, Larceny and Tarantella, but they don't seem to be available to the public.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Cronenberg, David
Post by: 1SO on November 16, 2017, 11:05:36 PM
#26. David Cronenberg Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3636.msg776505#msg776505)

One of those directors I wouldn't call a personal favorite, but I constantly admire his distinct and unique vision. Often looked at as a Horror director, his take on body horror is closer to the surrealism of David Lynch, although a lot more clinical and in his later years, more cerebral.

I've never seen A Dangerous Method, which aside from the cast never interested me, but I'm willing to give it a look. He made an auto racing film in 1979 called Fast Company which I am definitely giving a pass. I am going to look for a 1970 film called Crimes of the Future, which reads like his entire career in one go.

Quote
"A sometime director of a dermatological clinic called the House of Skin is searching for his mentor, the mad dermatologist Antoine Rouge. Rouge has disappeared following a catastrophic plague resulting from cosmetic products, which has killed the entire population of sexually mature women."


I may also seek out his short films The Nest, Camera and From the Drain
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 17, 2017, 04:18:09 AM
Two hours is considered a brief running time now?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Teproc on November 17, 2017, 04:22:30 AM
Two hours is considered a brief running time now?

Dunkirk is 106 minutes long, which I guess is more "average" than brief overall, but for Nolan it's definitely on the short side. Probably his shortest, right ?

*Quick cut to IMdB*

Yeah, it's his shortest film since Following.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 17, 2017, 05:30:12 AM
Google had it at two hours.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 17, 2017, 07:11:16 AM
Google lies sometimes.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 17, 2017, 08:35:46 AM
Forsooth.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ashby, Hal
Post by: 1SO on November 19, 2017, 08:47:48 AM
#27. Hal Ashby Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3665.msg705573#msg705573)

I like Ashby and if you haven't seen any of his work it's worth committing to Marathon his 7 films from the 70s. After that, it's a pretty steep drop in quality. I've seen all his features except Second-Hand Hearts and Lookin' to Get Out (rated 4.9 and 5.1 on IMDB). Maybe it's the month, but I'm interested in re-watching his final feature, 8 Million Ways to Die (a more respectable 5.7), which I saw on HBO 30 years ago.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Powell and Pressburger
Post by: 1SO on November 20, 2017, 12:20:22 AM
#28. Powell & Pressburger Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3693.msg609197#msg609197)

There seems to be some disagreement as to which films should be in this thread, with some posts including Powell's solo directing credits and The Thief of Bagdad (1940) where Powell is one of 6 credited directors. It doesn't help that the poll itself is organized in no particular order, but I would rather leave it alone than rebuild it with a chronological poll so I simply added the option of 'other'. I also included alternate titles since 7 of the 15 films they made together are known equally by two different titles.

For this Marathon, I am looking strictly at films directed by both of them. (Perhaps it is worth creating a separate thread for Michael Powell's solo projects.) Looking at that list I plan to watch The Small Back Room (aka. Hour of Glory) and Gone to Earth.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Powell and Pressburger
Post by: pixote on November 20, 2017, 12:30:42 AM
...The Thief of Bagdad (1940) where Powell is one of 6 credited directors...

'credited' in the IMDb sense, perhaps, but only Berger, Powell, and Whelan are actually credited by the film itself.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 20, 2017, 05:45:19 AM
That is by far one of the rankings I am going to be most interested in as far as this project goes. Mankiewicz would rank at the top too.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on November 20, 2017, 11:30:42 PM
...The Thief of Bagdad (1940) where Powell is one of 6 credited directors...

'credited' in the IMDb sense, perhaps, but only Berger, Powell, and Whelan are actually credited by the film itself.

pixote
So if I create a thread for just Powell, should Thief of Bagdad go in? Is it worth the poll when we know Peeping Tom is going to run away with it?


That is by far one of the rankings I am going to be most interested in as far as this project goes. Mankiewicz would rank at the top too.
Mankiewicz is #64 and I am a fan.

I forgot to mention my overall thoughts on Powell & Pressburger, which is that like most I think they're superb and there's usually a feeling of cinematic invention to their work, either with the visual direction or story structure. What holds me back is I often take half the running time getting into one of their films beyond admiration from a distance - A Matter of Life and Death being the exception - and I'm often exhausted by the end.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 21, 2017, 04:43:53 AM
Nonsense. Lermontov is in the very first scenes of The Red Shoes. He's your way in.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on November 21, 2017, 05:19:44 AM
So if I create a thread for just Powell, should Thief of Bagdad go in? Is it worth the poll when we know Peeping Tom is going to run away with it?

I'd vote for Bagdad for Tom (pending rewatches of both), but I don't know whether the former really belongs in a Powell poll (even though it's easy to imagine that he's responsible for so much of what's great about the film).

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on November 21, 2017, 09:46:25 AM
Nonsense. Lermontov is in the very first scenes of The Red Shoes. He's your way in.

He's not my way into Victoria and her hopes and dreams, which is the core of the movie. I takes half the film to get into Julian Craster, who pulls Victoria in a direction away from Lermontov.

The Archers can have great openings, but they don't pull me in like A Matter of Life and Death, which is about our main relationship. Red Shoes starts with the students in the balcony. That pulls us into Lermontov, but not yet into the film. This is like how there's the great opening sequence to Colonel Blimp - "The war starts at midnight." - but it takes Clive Candy's deepening friendship with the German officer for the film itself to start taking on a lasting impact.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 21, 2017, 09:52:38 AM
I think you misunderstand who the Red Shoes is really about.  ;)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Junior on November 21, 2017, 10:06:58 AM
I actually really like that about the Archers' movies. They grow on you. By the end I'm so wrapped up in it that I don't even remember how I got there. This goes back to whether you want a movie to start with a bang or end with one. Obviously the best would be bangs all the way through, but I lean toward the ending if I have to choose.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on November 21, 2017, 03:40:44 PM
The way they do it is best for re-watches.  We then know where it's going to end up, and we can add all the details to the overall direction.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Brian De Palma
Post by: 1SO on November 24, 2017, 12:42:18 AM
#29. Brian De Palma Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3705.msg515504#msg515504)

With 6 titles in my Essentials, Brian De Palma used to be my favorite director working. You'll notice I've even seen many of De Palma's early films and his unpopular comedies.

Like a relationship we broke up during an advance screening of Snake Eyes (with the original ending). For the opening dazzle I was in love and as the film went on, the flaws became harder to ignore and by the end I was dazed and depressed. I didn't want to believe it and looked for the good in Mission to Mars and thought Femme Fatale might be De Palma getting back on his feet, but The Black Dahlia was terrible and Redacted was Casualties of War remade on nothing but bad choices.

Because of that, I haven't seen Passion, but I'm ready to do it. I'd also like to see Murder à la Mod, though I don't know if I'm going to be able to find it. Most excitedly, I'm going to re-watch Raising Cain, which of the ones I really enjoy is the one I remember the least.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on November 24, 2017, 12:44:47 AM
I hope your review of Raising Cain gives it the smirnoff treatment it so richly deserves.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 24, 2017, 03:40:55 AM
I've watched four DePalma's and they're okay at best. I've never been much curious to watch more of them.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on November 25, 2017, 01:31:48 AM
I've watched four DePalma's and they're okay at best. I've never been much curious to watch more of them.

I love this because no matter how many you've seen, if you say you haven't seen 1 or 10 or whatever, someone will come along and say you haven't seen the good ones. :)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on November 25, 2017, 01:34:55 PM
I've watched four DePalma's and they're okay at best. I've never been much curious to watch more of them.

I love this because no matter how many you've seen, if you say you haven't seen 1 or 10 or whatever, someone will come along and say you haven't seen the good ones. :)
I'm not sure that applies to De Palma. You're either into his style or you're not. If you are than you can appreciate the bad ones for their stylistic touches. If you're not that even the best ones will annoy you. The Untouchables is perhaps the best balance of De Palma restrained with many moments that are distinctly his, but it carries all his flaws as well if you know what to be looking for. DH's top 2 De Palma are Carrie and Scarface and I can't recommend a title that will make him glad he watched another. That said, I think of DH forced himself to watch more he would find that 2-4 of them are okay.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 26, 2017, 07:54:19 AM
Yea, he's deals in this kind of artsy shlock that I think he is for a certain type of film fan. When he clicks with you, the result is masterful and there's not quite much out there like it. But if he doesn't, you'll probably be super off-put.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 27, 2017, 09:50:19 AM
I enjoyed some of the touches in Carrie. Scarface might warrant a rewatch but Untouchables basically bored 16 year old me.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 27, 2017, 11:12:40 AM
I love to recommend Blow Out to people just because I feel like it's the synthesis of De Palma's style. I would probably still recommend that to you, DH. I prefer Phantom of the Paradise, but that one is a bit out there and leans heavy into De Palma's campy tendencies.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on November 27, 2017, 04:07:45 PM
The problem with Blow Out is Nancy Allen's decision about her voice. It punches a black hole in her performance that sucks in the entire film.


My rewatch of Raising Cain did not go as joyfully as planned. It's a laughable piece of rubbish.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on November 27, 2017, 04:11:07 PM
My rewatch of Raising Cain did not go as joyfully as planned. It's a laughable piece of rubbish.

Indeed. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14547.msg880259#msg880259)

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: roujin on November 27, 2017, 06:05:25 PM
Can't wait.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on November 27, 2017, 06:12:10 PM
DH, I think you'd like The Untouchables a second time.  So much to see that a 16 year old might easily miss.

I think Blow Out is a fun ride.  Although I might not have seen it since I was 16.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on November 28, 2017, 12:31:01 AM
My rewatch of Raising Cain did not go as joyfully as planned. It's a laughable piece of rubbish.

Indeed. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14547.msg880259#msg880259)

pixote

(https://i.imgur.com/rTdGJd8.gif)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Carpenter
Post by: 1SO on November 28, 2017, 01:16:44 AM
#30. John Carpenter Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3764.msg715140#msg715140)

3 Essentials, including Halloween, a masterpiece of horror direction. I've been a fan through good times and bad, which is why I didn't quit watching his films until Ghosts of Mars. (Everything from 1984's Starman to 1996's Escape From L.A. I watched in the movie theater.) It's why I keep re-watching The Thing even though I'm in the unpopular opinion that it's a not good movie with a few unforgettable scenes.

Pickings are slim here, and I'm still not watching Ghosts of Mars. I also have no interest in his acclaimed Elvis movie. Instead, I'm going to watch his last feature, 2010's The Ward. I'm also going to re-watch In the Mouth of Madness, because it has a fair share of friends who like it, but this is one where if the experience is matching my initial reaction I will abandon the viewing.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on November 28, 2017, 01:52:09 AM
I have seen zero of these.
I am still at zero. They Live is highest on my watchlist because of this John Ashbery poem (http://the-purest-of-treats.blogspot.se/2011/03/john-ashbery-they-knew-what-they-wanted.html).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 28, 2017, 05:20:00 AM
Why do you hate Prince of Darkness?

If Big Trouble is anything like Escape from NY I have no interest. They Live could be tempting though.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on November 28, 2017, 09:02:44 AM
I love how the opening credits for Prince of Darkness last for the entire exposition, running about 10 minutes. Beyond that it's an increasingly nonsensical film that - now that I think about it - reminds me of Mouth of Madness. I wasn't going to watch Prince again because I've already seen it twice, but the two films might be good to compare with each other.

Big Trouble in Little China is little like Escape From NY. Escape was an action movie with a limited budget so there is little action and the film coasts on atmosphere and weird characters. Big Trouble is post-Raiders of the Lost Ark, so there's a heap more action and comedy and the 80s aesthetic melds with Chinese culture in a very fun way. Plus, Kurt Russell is one of the great ineffective action heroes, believing he's John Wayne when in fact he's completely in over his head against the women, martial artists and gunplay going on around him.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Carpenter
Post by: 1SO on November 29, 2017, 11:48:10 PM
#31. Jim Jarmusch Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3839.msg743924#msg743924)

I initially liked Jarmusch's deadpan style, but I always expected it would evolve more towards humor, becoming an American Roy Andersson. The breaking point for me was Ghost Dog, which did not need to be as long as it was. Discovering Takeshi Kitano around that time showed where Jarmusch had it all wrong. Edited down, Ghost Dog could've been a Kitano mix of violence, philosophy, gangsters and deadpan.

After that, I only watched Jarmusch films reluctantly. (I'd love to hear what the current generation thinks of JJ, if they think of him at all.) Broken Flowers almost brought me back to him, but my disdain for Only Lovers Left Alive is so out of step with everyone else whose seen it that I ignored all the praise for Paterson, the only non-documentary I haven't seen. So, reluctantly, I will now be watching Paterson.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on November 30, 2017, 05:58:46 AM
Except for Lovers, JJ is an enigma to me. At best his other movies were tedious.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Todd Field
Post by: 1SO on December 01, 2017, 12:24:43 AM
#32. Todd Field Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3846.msg755457#msg755457)

I threw this poll up too soon. It's actually from a project I did when I first joined the forum which I modified and re-polled for the current board.

After In The Bedroom and Little Children, he’s close... real close.  But right now I think Field is still a well of untapped potential.  I like the way he handles actors, but I’m more enamored with the writing skills he brings to difficult projects.  He likes to break the rules, and somehow is able to get away with it.  His direction is visually very fluid and a masterpiece is in his future, but I think he’s still a couple of films away.

I could go picking through some short films or TV work, but it's probably best to move on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Cassavetes
Post by: 1SO on December 01, 2017, 12:41:59 AM
#33. John Cassavetes Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3875.msg604906#msg604906)

A pioneer, but not a favorite. I like the rawness of most of the acting, but I often feel trapped inside his world and am never anxious to return to it. A Woman Under the Influence is one of the best movies I don't care if I ever watch again. Nothing to do with the content being off-putting, it's just so draining. This is why I have no interest in seeing the other cut of The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. Once was enough (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg604909#msg604909).

What I haven't seen are Cassavetes' two studio films. ICM has Too Late Blues on two lists, but I'm more interested in A Child Is Waiting because it stars Burt Lancaster and Judy Garland. Maybe I'll watch both.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Tery Gilliam
Post by: 1SO on December 02, 2017, 12:13:56 AM
#34. Terry Gilliam Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3878.msg718815#msg718815)

Like Tim Burton, Gilliam was a favorite of mine in the 90s and it's sad to see how far he's fallen. Still, I'm always interested in a new Gilliam film, which is why I've seen all his features, many of them multiple times which is why I don't have anything to re-watch either. This includes The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, which I've seen 3 times even though it's only Okay.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jonathan Glazer
Post by: 1SO on December 02, 2017, 12:23:16 AM
#35. Jonathan Glazer Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3891.msg880725#msg880725)

Like Todd Field, you could argue that I started this thread too soon, but his three features constitute a unique start matched only by Pete Docter. When you add in his music videos, he's easily one of the most interesting, visionary directors working today.

Nothing here for me to take a look at.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Cameron Crowe
Post by: 1SO on December 02, 2017, 12:35:18 AM
#36. Cameron Crowe Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3913.msg776506#msg776506)

After the stumble of Vanilla Sky, Cameron Crowe stepped off a cliff with Elizabethtown. That disaster not only broke me, the films that followed indicate that he's never recovered.

I haven't seen Pearl Jam Twenty, which is great timing being DOCember, and I have to admit I'm interested in We Bought a Zoo - is it actually better than it sounds? - and curious about Aloha - is it actually a bigger disaster than Elizabethtown?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 02, 2017, 05:05:38 AM
I would so love to watch a new Cameron Crowe movie and like it. I daren't though.

When you add in his music videos, he's easily one of the most interesting, visionary directors working today.

Working...has he done anything since Under the Skin?

Do you count Docter's three shorts as his débuts?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 02, 2017, 02:04:10 PM
When you add in his music videos, he's easily one of the most interesting, visionary directors working today.

Working...has he done anything since Under the Skin?

Do you count Docter's three shorts as his débuts?
He's in prep on a new film now.

Docter: Monsters Inc., Up, Inside Out
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on December 02, 2017, 06:52:45 PM
Stumble of Vanilla Sky? Stumbled onto greatness!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 03, 2017, 06:30:30 AM
(Saw this after the poll.)

But you don't like Inside Out...
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 03, 2017, 07:13:11 AM
(Saw this after the poll.)

But you don't like Inside Out...
I put Inside Out and Under the Skin at the same 2.5 star level.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 03, 2017, 08:51:12 AM
I was referring to when you said Pete Docter had a great début three movies streak. IO is the third of those, right?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 03, 2017, 09:16:25 AM
I was referring to the overall level of praise for those three films, which I find equal to Glazer.

My personal opinion of each trio also matches up. But if you take my opinion of one set they won’t match the general consensus of the other.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Baz Luhrmann
Post by: 1SO on December 05, 2017, 06:03:06 AM
#37. Baz Luhrmann Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3930.msg807650#msg807650)

I like Baz, while agreeing on his faults. I wish he made more features, it seems most of his recent work is elaborate commercials.

I'm tempted to watch the Pilot for The Get Down, but that's the only episode he directed and I'd rather catch up with that apart from being part of Luhrmann's career.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - François Truffaut
Post by: 1SO on December 05, 2017, 06:17:09 AM
#38. François Truffaut Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3942.msg687139#msg687139)

My love for Truffaut rivals his love for cinema. I always see him as separate from the French New Wave, above it. My extensive Marathon (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=11026.0) of his films - along with Akira Kurosawa and Satyajit Ray - is one of my favorite times at the movies. Still there are some gaps to fill and I have down to look at:
The Soft Skin (1964)
The Woman Next Door (1981)
Confidentially Yours (1983)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 05, 2017, 08:49:01 AM
Isn't Vivement Dimanche one of the most famous Truffauts? It was the first I ever watched and the one I have liked best so far. Or at all even.

How do you rank Truffaut among directors?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on December 05, 2017, 09:37:04 AM
Isn't Vivement Dimanche one of the most famous Truffauts?

Not here it isn't, not by a longshot. Truffaut is far from a household name here, so if anyone knows him it's usually for his most canonical work, The 400 Blows (or as "that French dude from Close Encounters of the Third Kind").

Truffaut features by number of votes on IMDb:

The 400 Blows (79,502)
Fahrenheit 451 (35,523)
Jules et Jim (30,342)
Day for Night (16,065)
Shoot the Piano Player (14,132)
The Last Metro (10,061)
Stolen Kisses (9,391)
The Bride Wore Black (7,146)
The Wild Child (6,369)
Bed & Board (6,296)
The Story of Adele H. (6,118)
The Woman Next Door (5,696)
The Soft Skin (5,367)
The Man Who Loved Women (5,161)
Mississippi Mermaid (4,787)
Love on the Run (4,741)
Confidentially Yours (4,559)
Small Change (4,473)
Two English Girls (3,847)
The Green Room (2,153)
A Gorgeous Kid Like Me (1,686)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Teproc on December 05, 2017, 09:46:36 AM
I wouldn't say it's among his better known films here either. Definitely no in the top 5. Les 400 coups and Jules et Jim are definitely way above everything else, and then it's La nuit américaine/Day for Night, Le dernier métro and Tirez sur le pianiste probably... and then the other Doinel films collectively.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Cameron Crowe
Post by: roujin on December 05, 2017, 10:57:49 AM
I haven't seen Pearl Jam Twenty, which is great timing being DOCember, and I have to admit I'm interested in We Bought a Zoo - is it actually better than it sounds? - and curious about Aloha - is it actually a bigger disaster than Elizabethtown?

Aloha is very good. I also like We Bought a Zoo. Both much better than Elizabethtown which, while not a disaster, is probably his weakest movie.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 07, 2017, 03:01:05 PM
How do you rank Truffaut among directors?
My favorite French director by a wide margin. (I went through IMDB and couldn't come up with a 2nd favorite.) I found my last ranked list of directors and Truffaut was #11, just above Don Siegel and below Hayao Miyazaki.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Junior on December 07, 2017, 05:09:01 PM
I've enjoyed the Resnais movies I've seen so far the best of that era and country. Still exploring, tho!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 07, 2017, 05:10:10 PM
How do you rank Truffaut among directors?
My favorite French director by a wide margin. (I went through IMDB and couldn't come up with a 2nd favorite.) I found my last ranked list of directors and Truffaut was #11, just above Don Siegel and below Hayao Miyazaki.

Renoir?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on December 07, 2017, 05:11:53 PM
1. Napoleon
2. La Roue
3. J'Accuse
(1919)

Not a bad start.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on December 07, 2017, 05:12:34 PM
Resnais is up there. Bresson is my favorite. Of course, I don't expect you to like Godard, but he's probably in my top 3.

As for contemporaries, Assayas is pretty fantastic.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 07, 2017, 06:42:44 PM
I’ve gotten more out of a Luc Besson film. Enjoyed myself more too. But he just can’t be my #2. I’m sure I just need to watch more Agnes Varda, because I love her personality and approach.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 07, 2017, 06:47:51 PM
How do you rank Truffaut among directors?
My favorite French director by a wide margin. (I went through IMDB and couldn't come up with a 2nd favorite.) I found my last ranked list of directors and Truffaut was #11, just above Don Siegel and below Hayao Miyazaki.

Renoir?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 08, 2017, 07:05:48 AM
I'd probably put Renoir slightly below René Clair. Rules of the Game is one of those films I continually revisit, hoping I'll better understand the acclaim. None of the 15 features I've seen are Great.

My favorite run of French films besides Truffaut are the early musicals of Maurice Chevalier and German Ernst Lubitsch is mostly responsible for those.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jean-Luc Godard
Post by: 1SO on December 12, 2017, 11:00:10 PM
I'm not going to post reviews from Truffaut. Two of my three selections I had a very difficult time getting into and staying with. Took me a long time to finish them. Here are my Updated Rankings (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3942.msg687139#msg687139)

If only I knew who was next.


#39. Jean-Luc Godard Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3949.msg724008#msg724008)

It's pretty well known around here that I'm not a fan, but I keep trying because...
A) There are still a number of praised works
B) Pierrot le fou gave me a special pleasure, and I'm hoping to find another like it
C) I'm me


Unwatched titles give me a lot to choose from. ICM suggests...
Une Femme Mariée
Nouvelle vague
Every Man for Himself
All's Well

IMDB would want me to consider...
Le Petit Soldat
La chinoise
Made in U.S.A


I dunno. Going to move onto my other projects while I'm waiting for inspiration to strike.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 13, 2017, 02:54:52 AM
Run. Away.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Teproc on December 13, 2017, 04:12:22 AM
You could pair La chinoise with the recent biopic (Le Redoutable) whenever you get access to it. It's surprisingly good ! The biopic I mean, I doubt La chinoise is, but Le Redoutable is based on Anne Wisniewski's memoirs, so it gets featured a bit.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on December 13, 2017, 06:30:10 AM
How do you rank Truffaut among directors?
My favorite French director by a wide margin. (I went through IMDB and couldn't come up with a 2nd favorite.) I found my last ranked list of directors and Truffaut was #11, just above Don Siegel and below Hayao Miyazaki.
In 2015's Director Ratings Project I ended up with five French directors in my Top 10:
I can see how some of these suit you less than good but I would imagine a guy like Henri-Georges Clouzot would be a good fit for you, for example.

As for Godard goes I have One Plus One in my Top 100 and it is a funny mix of documentary and associative cinema so in a way it is a good watch for the December marathon.

https://youtu.be/1zkfL-rgom0
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on December 13, 2017, 08:01:49 AM
I don't think you'd like Made in U.S.A based on your rankings. Godard is not for everyone and I don't begrudge anyone who doesn't care for his films.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 13, 2017, 09:06:43 AM
I'd never even heard of Grandrieux before. Maybe I should watch more Clouzot.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on December 13, 2017, 10:46:25 AM
I don't think you'd like Made in U.S.A based on your rankings

yes, this

Godard is not for everyone

and this

Run. Away.

and especially this. Just don't do it. This path leads only to regret.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: roujin on December 13, 2017, 10:56:02 AM
Godard's A Married Woman is incredible, very overlooked from his 60's period.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jean-Luc Godard
Post by: 1SO on December 13, 2017, 09:25:16 PM
This is entirely the wrong way to approach Godard. I'll admit, there's something unique to his deconstruction, and I'm willing at some point to wipe the slate clean and start fresh down the road. I see him as the director's equivalent of Andy Kaufman where the contempt for the fan is part of the point. I'd just rather enjoy a director than watch them poke me with a stick.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jee-woon Kim
Post by: 1SO on December 13, 2017, 09:41:23 PM
#40. Jee-woon Kim Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3985.msg718679#msg718679)

My personal champion from South Korea. There are only 12 posts in this thread and 4 of them are from me. It's not that he's obscure. Most have at least heard of A Bittersweet Life, Tale of Two Sisters, I Saw the Devil and/or The Good The Bad The Weird. His strong sense of style seems to be turning people off while those films repeatedly hit my sweet spots. I thought I was going to be re-watching something here, but I still have a couple of gaps to fill, his sports comedy The Foul King (2000) and his most recent, The Age of Shadows (2016), which was selected over The Handmaiden as South Korea's entry for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar. Also, it's neo-Noir.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 14, 2017, 04:42:27 AM
The Age of Shadows better be the bee's tits then, because The Handmaiden is tops.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jee-woon Kim
Post by: MartinTeller on December 14, 2017, 08:50:06 AM
#40. Jee-woon Kim Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3985.msg718679#msg718679)

My personal champion from South Korea.

From this statement, I expected to see more than one in the dark green. Your rankings for Bong Joon-ho and Park Chan-wook are better... what makes Kim your "champion"?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 14, 2017, 09:35:17 AM
It’s the cool factor. His films are the coolest. They often fall short because of stylistic excess or questionable decisions, but his great moments are many and they’re better shot, edited and sound designed than any of his contemporaries. His genres so far have been Horror, Western and Crime Thriller, all favorites of mine. Like Takeshi Kitano, his direction often rises well above the overall films.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 14, 2017, 12:00:50 PM
Been thinking about this at work. As much as I have a lot of Directors to go, I’m seriously considering taking the holidays to watch Kim’s filmography chronologically. (I’ll skip The Last Stand, which wasn’t bad but very inpersonal.) it sets the two new ones at the front and back and will certainly be fun for me.

Who knows, maybe I can even convince others to try one.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 14, 2017, 12:05:54 PM
Not me I think, sorry.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 14, 2017, 12:09:42 PM
DH, for you I would suggest watching the trailers for Good Bad Weird and A Bittersweet Life. Gives you the cool flavor with none of the commitment issues.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 14, 2017, 01:36:09 PM
I watched the GBW trailer. Part of me thinks I'd like it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on December 14, 2017, 02:58:14 PM
I stopped about a third of the way through, but you might like it, DH.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 14, 2017, 03:02:25 PM
GOOD: It’s Sergio Leone at double speed...

BAD: ...for 140 minutes...

UGLY/WEIRD: ...and that’s it. Characters and story never develops. They just keep finding new ways to crash into each other.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Teproc on December 14, 2017, 03:05:45 PM
GOOD: It’s Sergio Leone at double speed...

Is that really good ? Isn't the delibate pacing what's great about Leone ?

I am nonetheless intrigued.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 14, 2017, 04:20:17 PM
It’s taking Leone style and levels of coolness and reworking them as a modern adrenaline rush rather than just cloning Leone. Something new built on something classic that succeeds at being its own thing.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on December 14, 2017, 05:01:50 PM
It is certainly it's own thing, a rush, as compared to Leone's slow build, while still clearly influenced by Leone.  But it felt to me to be a hodgepodge of scenes thrown together, but I didn't finish it, either.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 14, 2017, 06:57:59 PM
You saw enough. It’s basically 3 sequences - train, tenement village, horses and motorcycles across the desert - and each is filled with stylish excitement, similar to Fury Road, but each sequence is executed the same way and the novelty wears off faster than it should.

You can tell I’m torn because a great director should sculpt individual moments to create an A-Z experience. However, most directors can’t even pull off moments like this in the first place.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 15, 2017, 03:46:29 AM
Now I am much less intrigued about it.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Akira Kurosawa
Post by: 1SO on December 25, 2017, 01:13:05 AM
#41. Akira Kurosawa Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3999.msg686057#msg686057)

My Kurosawa Marathon (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=11026.0) from 5 years ago covered this ground thoroughly. No argument from me about him being one of the Top Directors of All Time. At the time, I was unable to find The Quiet Duel (1949), so I'll look for that again.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on December 25, 2017, 05:53:57 AM
Huh, you've got Yojimbo ranked lower than Sanjuro?
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Robert Zemeckis
Post by: 1SO on December 27, 2017, 01:30:27 AM
#42. Robert Zemeckis Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4017.msg881981#msg881981)

When I was first getting into film, Zemeckis was one of my favorite directors. Romancing the Stone was my first favorite movie of all time, beaten the next year when I first watched Back to the Future. Roger Rabbit 3 years later proved he was better than Spielberg to me. There were hiccups after that, but it was abandoning live action for performance capture animation that turned me. (Those dead eyes.)

Looking over what I haven't seen reveals some interesting options. I've already decided to bit the bullet and watch his version of A Christmas Carol. I've seen a little of I Wanna Hold Your Hand and I'm not going to be watching it in full. There's an episode of Tales From the Crypt called "You, Murderer" which says it stars archive footage of Humphrey Bogart. I imagine this is similar to JFK being in Forrest Gump. I'm hoping to find it if only to spot the Bogart movies they take from to splice this performance together.

While I'm interested in something called Robert Zemeckis on Smoking, Drinking and Drugging in the 20th Century: In Pursuit of Happiness, I'm not going to work too hard to find it. I will however be watching a short film Zemeckis made for the BTTF trilogy on Blu-Ray called Doc Brown Saves the World. I haven't seen his two most recent films, The Walk and Allied, and I'm honestly not all that interested in either of them.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Robert Zemeckis
Post by: MartinTeller on December 27, 2017, 08:23:34 AM
I've seen a little of I Wanna Hold Your Hand and I'm not going to be watching it in full.

Why not (and why isn't it in the poll)? It's not bad. Eddie Deezen! Wendy Jo Sperber!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 27, 2017, 09:37:58 AM
In the poll I replaced it with 'other' because I like to have that option, especially since Zemeckis has directed a lot of non-features, and in both polls Hand never received a single vote.

I find the career of Eddie Deezen fascinating (the pre-Gilbert Gottfried), but what I had watched of the movie was annoying and too broad to want to watch the rest. (Similar to a reaction some screwball comedies give you.)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Michelangelo Antonioni
Post by: 1SO on December 27, 2017, 11:52:05 PM
#43. Michelangelo Antonioni Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4055.msg714065#msg714065)

I had been warned off of Antonioni because his pacing and emphasis on emotions over story seemed like a bad fit. This was confirmed by the doomed viewing of Blow-Up in college when I was more interested in the mystery than the photographer. 6 years ago, I watched L'Avventura and have been a fan of Antonioni since.

That said, I have a number of films to select from. Il Grido is definitely going to happen. I will also look into Le amiche, Story of a Love Affair, The Lady Without Camelias and Identification of a Woman, but if I feel myself burning out on his style I'll move on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Albert Brooks
Post by: 1SO on December 28, 2017, 11:52:27 PM
#44. Albert Brooks Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4112.msg714428#msg714428)

Brooks' output is a little sad. From 1979 - 1991 he made two uneven comedies with many moments of greatness followed by two great comedies with small moments of unevenness. Then, it's like he just fell apart. The three features that follow all start strong and end very weak. I like Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World enough, but he's cheating by digging up old comedy routines. After that, he abandoned writing and directing completely and is now known best for playing Marlin in Finding Nemo/Finding Dory and a solid dramatic supporting turn in Drive.

I've seen all his features and will be posting a review for Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World before moving on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - David Gordon Green
Post by: 1SO on December 29, 2017, 12:09:30 AM
#45. David Gordon Green Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4122.msg882078#msg882078)

Unlike most, I wasn't a fan of Green's Malick-esque debut, but the relationship drama at the heart of All the Real Girls got me on board. I haven't seen Your Highness or The Sitter and I won't be watching them now, but I do have a number of interesting options. I'm going to look for Joe because I'd like to see Nicholas Cage be good again and I may seek out Stronger because it's from this year.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: philip918 on December 31, 2017, 02:53:31 PM
Re: Zemeckis

Allied is supposed to be good. I've been meaning to check it out. It's on Hulu. I've also heard The Walk was a great theatrical experience. Not sure it would hold up in the living room.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Junior on December 31, 2017, 03:14:34 PM
Allied is solid stuff. It is "the kind of movie that doesn't get made anymore".
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 31, 2017, 05:11:07 PM
Most directors change as they get older. The Spielberg who made The Post isn't the same one who made Schindler's List. With Zemeckis, there's pre-Animation and post-Animation and his run of films in the 80s and 90s is one of the best filmographies ever. There is perhaps a direct line from Cast Away to Flight, but it goes through the animated features and he seemed to return to live-action with less assured instincts.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Landis
Post by: 1SO on January 01, 2018, 01:25:54 AM
#46. John Landis Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4145.msg882198#msg882198)

Amazing to see the thread for John Landis is so short. There was a brief period (1978 - 1983) where he was the comedy king, and now he's one of the great cinema storytellers, a great guest for any podcast. Of the titles I haven't seen...

Schlock: His film debut, which he talks about a lot on podcasts. Might be hard to find and probably terrible, but I'll look for it.
Innocent Blood: The one I will definitely watch, especially with it being re-appraised among the horror community as a hidden gem.
Susan's Plan: Kind of curious how this film happened. Easily the most obscure film in Landis' catalogue and with an IMDB rating of 5.3 I won't be checking it out.
Blues Brothers 2000: As a fan of the original, I'm kind of curious to see what that film looks like if everything goes wrong, but I'm not that curious.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 01, 2018, 08:12:35 AM
I've yet to like a Landis film (see Blues Brothers, Three Amigos, America Werewolf in London). I legitimately do not understand what people think is great about Blues Brothers.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 02, 2018, 12:40:46 AM
I legitimately do not understand what people think is great about Blues Brothers.
Great music, wonderful cameos, epic car chase slapstick and deadpan comedy reactions to all the insanity. It's very similar to The General in terms of scale, humor and the reaction of the lead(s), but the music is something that put Blues Brothers way above.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Arthur Penn
Post by: 1SO on January 02, 2018, 01:10:30 AM
#47. Arthur Penn Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4176.msg796323#msg796323).

Penn has made a Masterpiece, a Messterpiece, a piece of crap and plenty in between. He has titles I've been curious about forever, but never sat down to watch. A perfect candidate for this Marathon. I will try to get to...
The Left Handed Gun
The Chase
Alice's Restaurant



That leaves Four Friends, but I'd rather re-watch Dead of Winter, which I saw 30 years ago.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Richard Donner
Post by: 1SO on January 06, 2018, 12:50:05 AM
#48. Richard Donner Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4213.msg755435#msg755435).

This time it's personal. While I never thought of Donner as one of the Greats - a distinct lack of style and a sense of humor that's only slightly better than Brian DePalma - he could put together a great story at times. He gave the world Superman and Superman II. His filmography has so much variety, with action, horror, fantasy and a western. But I said it was personal.

In 1989 he directed one of the great half-hours of television, an episode of Tales from the Crypt called "Dig That Cat... He's Real Gone", starring Joe Pantoliano and Robert Wuhl. It's shot and edited in a frenetic, almost experimental state. A really good story told with an aggressive style not associated with Donner. He filmed it in between Lethal Weapon and Lethal Weapon 2, which cut together to form a nearly 4-hour Godfather of the action genre.

Also between the two LWs he made Scrooged. Scrooged and The Goonies (1985) are two comedies with a strong cult following and I despise them both. Scrooged is way over-produced and seriously unfunny, while Goonies is kiddie trash.

The other personal film for me is 1992's Radio Flyer, one of the best, most difficult films ever made about child abuse. Donner made some big, risky decisions, giving the drama a heavy dose of fantasy that some thought undercut the abuse, but I thought it enhanced it while also making it easier to sit through. The way the film ends is one of the most clever bits of direction I've come across, but the film was a major flop and afterwards Donner stopped trying. His output after Radio Flyer is indifferent at best.

I haven't seen his three features before The Omen, but I love the concept of a buddy action comedy called Salt and Pepper.

Quote
After discovering the body of a murdered female agent in their trendy Soho, London nightclub, groovy owners Charles Salt (Sammy Davis Jr.) and Christopher Pepper (Peter Lawford) partake in a fumbling investigation and uncover an evil plot to overthrow the government.

I haven't seen Timeline. I have no reason to see Timeline. I won't see Timeline.

That leaves Inside Moves (1980), which looks interesting enough. I'll be watching that.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Preston Sturges
Post by: 1SO on January 06, 2018, 11:14:27 PM
#49. Preston Sturges Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4221.msg731129#msg731129)

I like him as a writer even more than I like him as a director, where his best quality is knowing best how to direct one of his scripts. I also like his ensemble of regulars, especially the great William Demarest, who appeared in 8 of Sturges' films and two additional scripts by Sturges. Where I'm out of step with popular opinion is I think The Palm Beach Story is very overrated and Sullivan's Travels slightly overrated, while there isn't enough love for Hail the Conquering Hero.


I haven't seen The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend, which comes up a lot as a recommendation even though it's not supposed to be a good movie. That's on youtube, so I'll be watching it. There's also The Great Moment, which has been completely under my radar until now even though it stars Joel McCrea, Betty Field, Harry Carey and William Demarest. That just leaves The French, They Are a Funny Race, which I have no interest in at this time.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Frankenheimer
Post by: 1SO on January 07, 2018, 11:09:05 PM
#50. John Frankenheimer Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4233.msg705124#msg705124)

I like his good stuff and really don't like the rest. There isn't any in between. What I don't understand is how his good films - pulpy as they often are - appear to come from a place of intelligence, but the bad ones range from numb to braindead. 


With 30 feature films and a half-dozen more acclaimed TV Movies, I have a lot to choose from. Black Sunday and Grand Prix have been deep on my Watchlist forever and I've been interested in The Iceman Cometh, avoiding it because it's almost 4 hours long. So, I'll plan to make time for that. There's also a Playhouse 90 on Criterion called The Comedian starring Mickey Rooney, Kim Hunter and Edmond O'Brien and written by Rod Serling. Seems like something that might appeal to me.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Takashi Miike
Post by: 1SO on January 15, 2018, 01:01:10 AM
I'm 50 Directors down. 79 films (https://letterboxd.com/1so/list/all-the-directors/by/your-rating/). Seems too early for any overall analysis.


#51. Takashi Miike Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4251.msg745248#msg745248)

23 films, which only scratches the surface. I give a pretty detailed opinion of Miike at the start of the thread (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4251.msg141538#msg141538). What most people don't get is that Miike's filmography has a lot of variety. The boundary/button-pushing fare tends to grab the attention, but he's made family films and restrained art pieces as well.

Figuring out what to watch is as steady as playing hopscotch during an earthquake. There are a lot of options and it's going to depend on what I'm in the mood for. Availability is going to be a factor too. Looking at my blind spots, I'm most interested in...
Agitator (2001)
Negotiator (2003)
Crows Zero (2007)
Ace Attorney (2012)

and possibly
Dead or Alive 2: Birds (2000)
Zebraman (2004)
Hara-kiri: Death of a Samurai (2011)
Blade of the Immortal (2017)


I streamlined the poll, removing some of the more obscure options that have yet to receive a single vote.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Frankenheimer
Post by: pixote on January 18, 2018, 02:00:07 PM
#50. John Frankenheimer Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4233.msg705124#msg705124)

We should both revisit The Train to see if I've been overrating it or you've been underrating it.

pixote
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Stanley Donen
Post by: 1SO on January 19, 2018, 12:52:15 PM
#52. Stanley Donen Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4282.msg597434#msg597434)

I'm a huge fan and would call him one of the most under-appreciated entertainers of cinema. Even if you take away the films he co-directed with Gene Kelly, many of his solo efforts are the best kind of crowd pleasing star vehicles. (Something you can't say of Mr. Kelly's solo work.) I noticed I tend to rate his films slightly higher than their IMDB ratng (extremely rare) and I've mostly watched his highest rated work, so perhaps I've been lucky.

I will definitely be re-watching Two For the Road, the one exception. (I like it. It's fine.) As for new stuff, I have a lot to choose from. While they're not highly rated, my raised opinion of Donen will probably hold up. Here's what I haven't seen, ranked by the chance that I will seek it out.

1. Give a Girl a Break
2. Kiss Them For Me
3. Movie Movie
4. Deep in my Heart
5. Once More, with Feeling!

Surprise Package
Fearless Fagan
Love is Better Than Ever
The Little Prince
Lucky Lady
Saturn 3
Staircase


I'll probably also rewatch The Grass is Greener because I own it and I like it a lot.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sandy on January 19, 2018, 04:55:38 PM
I haven't seen any of these, except for a little bit of The Grass is Greener. I own Two for the Road, so that will probably be my next Donen film to watch. I'm glad to see Arabesque not get a green color on your linked list. I can't stand that movie!

Looking forward to hearing how these watchlist films fare with you.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kazan, Elia
Post by: 1SO on January 21, 2018, 12:41:12 AM
#53. Elia Kazan Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4301.msg743091#msg743091)

Though he doesn't make the kind of films I'm drawn to, he's such a good director that I usually end up surprised by how much I like his work. (I think of him as Sam Mendes if Mendes was American Beauty good all the time.) Among the ones I've seen, Gentleman's Agreement stands out as an early example of the Academy rewarding a film and filmmaker for one of their worst, and America America is such a personal project and so far outside his usual I wish I was more of a supporter.

There are 5 titles I haven't seen and while my current impulse is to watch them all, I should probably choose wisely and move on. I'm open to recommendations for...

Pinky (1949): racial dramas from this long ago tend to be a live wire
Man on a Tightrope (1953): highest-rated among those I haven't seen, but this is the most likely for me because of Gloria Grahame
The Arrangement (1969): Kirk Douglas, Faye Dunaway, Deborah Kerr and Richard Boone. But this one makes me the most nervous.
The Visitors (1972): looks intense, plus it's based on the same incident that inspired Casulties of War
The Last Tycoon (1976): I hear nothing but bad, but the cast in incredible, it's Kazan's final film and the amount of negative word about makes me even more curious
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Otto Preminger
Post by: 1SO on January 21, 2018, 11:27:15 PM
#54. Otto Preminger Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4313.msg796111#msg796111)

I don't have much of an opinion of Preminger, whose films tend to fall somewhat short of expectations. I've seen 15 of his movies, all in the last 8 years, and while I liked almost half of them, they've all left me unsatisfied in part or whole. That means there is a lot I haven't seen, but nothing stands out as one I've been meaning to get to.

ICM and IMDB suggest...
Bonjour tristesse
The Moon is Blue
The 13th Letter
The Cardinal
Exodus

The 13th Letter is also recommended by MartinTeller, so I'll certainly watch that and probably move on.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on January 22, 2018, 08:26:22 AM
I recall the "M*A*S*H" episode where everyone is all excited to see The Moon is Blue because they think it's a dirty movie and they have to sneak around to see it and it turns out to be really tame.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 22, 2018, 09:40:28 AM
That’s stuck with me all these years. The big reason why I don’t want to see that film.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kazan, Elia
Post by: roujin on January 22, 2018, 11:01:32 AM
#53. Elia Kazan
The Visitors (1972): looks intense, plus it's based on the same incident that inspired Casulties of War
The Last Tycoon (1976): I hear nothing but bad, but the cast in incredible, it's Kazan's final film and the amount of negative word about makes me even more curious

The Visitors is very good.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 22, 2018, 12:16:51 PM
I read your review and I was hoping to agree with it. It didn’t work for me as a portrait of America and the strange embrace you mention along with most of the grandfather’s actions I could not believe. Disapproving of the son-in-law he sees as a coward I get, but taking it to embracing the creepy strangers left me confused.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jean-Pierre Melville
Post by: 1SO on January 22, 2018, 11:23:59 PM
I'm dragging my feet deciding if I want to watch my Preminger tonight.


#55. Jean-Pierre Melville. I don't have a ranked list because he's not a director who's bowled me over, even though I can see the talent and skill in his style and he makes the kind of movies I would expect to love. I started with Le Samouraï and have watched 6 others, trying to find that one that I connect with. I prefer Jacques Becker if only for Le Trou, but in a Deathmatch I'd probably vote for Melville because his style is so distinct.

What I might do is a Marathon where I watch no more than one Melville a day. New films and rewatches. Chronological so I can watch his style develop. I'll skip Le Silence de la Mer because it's the one I remember best. So the list will be...
Les Enfants Terribles - NEW
Bob le Flambeur - REWATCH
Léon Morin, Priest - NEW
Le Doulos - REWATCH
Le Deuxieme Souffle - REWATCH
Le Samouraï - REWATCH
Army of Shadows - REWATCH and the one I'm least interested to see again, so I may skip this one.
Le Cercle Rouge - REWATCH
Un Flic - NEW and I haven't decided yet if I'm actually going to include it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on January 23, 2018, 08:28:20 AM
This director doesn't bowl me over, so I'm only going to spend 14 to 18 hours watching and rewatching his movies.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 23, 2018, 08:54:46 AM
If I took that attitude I would’ve never watched all the great Bergman.

A director I love is comfort food. With Melville, I want to give him a fair chance or discover Why he doesn’t excite me like you think he would.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on January 23, 2018, 11:38:07 AM
I will be interested in your reviews of the movies I watched for my marathon.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 24, 2018, 02:07:43 AM
I recall the "M*A*S*H" episode where everyone is all excited to see The Moon is Blue because they think it's a dirty movie and they have to sneak around to see it and it turns out to be really tame.

My memory of the episode is that they do not get to see the film, because to get to see the film Klinger (I think) swaps the labels with another film and then some general pulls rank and gets them the film. So they end up with another film.

Dirty, in 1953, for this film was related to it pushing the Hays Code boundaries, so very tame by today's standards. I vaguely remember that The Moon is Blue being a key film in the death of the Hays Code, but I would need to check that, because I also vaguely remember trying to confirm and it not being the case.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on January 24, 2018, 08:17:26 AM
I recall the "M*A*S*H" episode where everyone is all excited to see The Moon is Blue because they think it's a dirty movie and they have to sneak around to see it and it turns out to be really tame.

My memory of the episode is that they do not get to see the film, because to get to see the film Klinger (I think) swaps the labels with another film and then some general pulls rank and gets them the film. So they end up with another film.

I think you're right, but I also recall a coda where they do finally watch TMiB and they're all bored silly.

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Moon_Is_Not_Blue) backs me up
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 24, 2018, 02:00:55 PM
Research trumps ageing memory  ;D
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on January 24, 2018, 06:49:45 PM
research
trump
aging
memory

To the politics thread!

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Antares on January 24, 2018, 08:46:04 PM
I recall the "M*A*S*H" episode where everyone is all excited to see The Moon is Blue because they think it's a dirty movie and they have to sneak around to see it and it turns out to be really tame.

My memory of the episode is that they do not get to see the film, because to get to see the film Klinger (I think) swaps the labels with another film and then some general pulls rank and gets them the film. So they end up with another film.

I think you're right, but I also recall a coda where they do finally watch TMiB and they're all bored silly.

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Moon_Is_Not_Blue) backs me up

It was scandalous because the main female character, refers to herself as a virgin, when conversing with William Holden's character. That was taboo back then.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on January 24, 2018, 10:04:08 PM
research
trump
aging
memory

To the politics thread!

pixote

[round of applause] ;D
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Stanley Kubrick
Post by: 1SO on January 25, 2018, 12:39:13 AM
While I continue with Jean-Pierre Melville...

#56. Stanley Kubrick Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4349.msg704969#msg704969)

Can't believe it took this long to start a Kubrick thread. Arguably on every movie website where directors are discussed the #1 slot is either Hitchcock or Kubrick. This is usually where I say something about a great director being overrated, but Kubrick is in my Top 5 (with Hitchcock, Leone, Kurosawa and Billy Wilder). It's just Dr. Strangelove and The Shining I don't like as much as most, and my problem is with the screenplays, not the direction.

I haven't seen Fear and Desire, and even with a proper DVD release I still don't want to. Instead, I'm going to use this opportunity to rewatch Eyes Wide Shut, something I've been wanting to do, been talking about doing for 18 years.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on January 25, 2018, 08:42:37 AM
Top 5 with only 3 teals and a bunch of lime greens?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on January 25, 2018, 09:33:23 AM
Top 5 with only 3 teals and a bunch of lime greens?

I find this curious too. Also that none of your "top 5" directors appear in your top 25 movies. Do you judge directors on criteria besides their output?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on January 25, 2018, 09:39:04 AM
Maybe their beards?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 25, 2018, 10:50:54 AM
Also that none of your "top 5" directors appear in your top 25 movies. Do you judge directors on criteria besides their output?
Yes. I hate the belief that the best movie is the best directed movie, as if the two are one and the same. I’ve seen plenty of great directors who filmed bad scripts or great actors and crew working for a bad director. You can argue that the poorly structured Full Metal Jacket with the aimless middle is Kubrick’s fault, but the direction of the individual scenes and sequences is consistently captivating.

Takeshi Kitano’s films up through Zatoichi are some of my favorites in terms of direction, but the overall films vary wildly in quality.

Casablanca is Michael Curtiz’s best film, but Captain Blood and The Adv. of Robin Hood are better directed.

James Cameron is my favorite director working today. While his scripts have grown increasingly problematic, and he does bear some responsibility for that, but the way he chooses to film those scripts are jaw dropping.


And 3 Teal puts him in a very small group. I don’t have the stats but I think Wilder, Kubrick and maybe Spielberg have the most number of Essentials.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on January 25, 2018, 12:13:06 PM
Casablanca is Michael Curtiz’s best film, but Captain Blood and The Adv. of Robin Hood are better directed.

Nope. Nah hah. No way.

Is teal **** and above?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 25, 2018, 12:22:33 PM
I stopped trying to be precise but Teal are most of my Essentials which includes 3.5 stars. The 3 teal Kubrick are...
26. A Clockwork Orange
98. The Killing
130. Paths of Glory
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Atom Egoyan
Post by: 1SO on January 28, 2018, 08:49:52 AM
My Jean-Pierre Melville retrospective is up to Le Deuxieme Souffle.


#57. Atom Egoyan Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4364.msg796331#msg796331)

Interesting to see Egoyan again. In the 90s, he was ready to become a major name in filmmaking with The Adjuster, Exotica and The Sweet Hereafter. Then he steadily dropped off into obscurity. I wasn't even sure he was still making movies until I updated the poll, which is a mess. (Please, let's never start with a director's most recent film and then build backwards.)

I haven't seen an Egoyan film since Felicia's Journey (1999), and I'm not that interested either. So, I'll probably look at something from early in his career, Family Viewing and/or Next of Kin.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Oliver Stone
Post by: 1SO on January 29, 2018, 12:12:36 AM
Jean-Pierre Melville retrospective:
I started Le Deuxieme Souffle only to quickly realize I had just watched it. (Last November according to ICM.) So, I'm going to watch Le Samouraï before bed.


#58. Oliver Stone Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4368.msg839797#msg839797)

Incredible to believe Stone was once a favorite of mine. I got on board with Salvador and Platoon in 1986 and the last of his films I watched in the theater was Any Given Sunday in 1999. (Everything in between I saw on the big screen.) I don't know if Alexander broke him, though that seemed like a disaster from its inception, but World Trade Center was bland filmmaking from someone who was experimental and daring up to then. I may be mixed on the content and presentation of Natural Born Killers, but it's one of the best shot and edited films ever made. That's what I miss most from Stone, his aggressive editing.


I want to see one of the later films, and I posted a question (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9540.msg883827#msg883827) between Savages and W. (I have little interest in Money Never Sleeps or Snowden.) I also want to see The Hand (1981). I'm expecting nothing, but it's a Horror film and it stars Michael Caine.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on January 29, 2018, 09:47:26 AM
There was a brief time in my college years when Talk Radio was one of my FAVORITE movies. For the life of me I don't know why. Maybe I just liked Bogosian's verbal rhythms.

It was around the same time I was a big fan of The Dark Backward. Ugh.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 29, 2018, 11:22:55 AM
Me too. When it sticks to the stage play it's a perfect concert of Bogosian's word and performance with Stone's stylized visuals. When rebuilding my Top 100 in 2010 I watched it again (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8652.msg532753#msg532753) and the shortcomings were too big to ignore. However, I still see the glass as more full than empty.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Guy Ritchie
Post by: 1SO on January 29, 2018, 11:28:30 PM
The Jean-Pierre Melville retrospective is nearly complete. I'm going to watch Le Cercle Rouge and post.


#59. Guy Ritchie Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4380.msg836214#msg836214)

This is one of the funniest threads I've skimmed through. 20 posts that will make you think he's one of the least worthy directors in the sub-board followed by brief opinions on Snatch, which may be referring to the movie. Hard to tell. Like those who like him, I think he came out strong and has been wobbly ever since Madonna ruined his career, but the potential is still there.

I haven't seen Swept Away and I'm not going to. I also haven't seen King Arthur, nor do I see a reason to. I know I'll be watching his live-action remake of Aladdin next year - I just learned he directed it - so I'm fine with moving forward.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Stephen Chow
Post by: 1SO on January 29, 2018, 11:40:43 PM
#60. Stephen Chow Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4422.msg775289#msg775289)

I have been missing Stephen Chow and his brand of live-action cartoon insanity. Like most people, I discovered him with Shaolin Soccer and he built on that with Kung Fu Hustle, which contains the most inventive use of digital effects since The Matrix. I enjoyed them so much, I even sat through CJ7, which was as bad as it looked.


I'm looking forward to seeing what I can find from Chow. I've wanted to see The God of Cookery ever since I heard it existed, but availability has always been an issue, though I haven't looked in years. If not, I'll also look for Forbidden City Cop. I'm definitely going to take this opportunity to watch The Mermaid.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: tinyholidays on January 30, 2018, 12:20:55 AM
Oh no. God of Cookery was on Netflix last year. D: Maybe it'll be back!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on January 30, 2018, 12:24:07 AM
Fight Back to School was the most enjoyable Chow film I watched as part of the 1990s Far East Bracket. It looks to be available on YouTube with much better image quality than what I watched back then (but not in Cantonese, that I can find).

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 01, 2018, 09:20:12 PM
Stephen Chow only stars in Fight Back to School. It was directed by Gordon Chan.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - David Lean
Post by: 1SO on February 01, 2018, 09:36:07 PM
#61 David Lean Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4427.msg726461#msg726461)

David Lean had an amazing track record, proven by the many lists in his thread, but the very words 'Directed by David Lean' instantly make me think, "It's gonna be a bit long then, isn't it?" He only made 6 films over 2 hours, but 3 of them are his most popular work. He's like Andrei Tarkovsky in that regard. (A worthy adversary for a Deathmatch.)

There are 5 titles I haven't seen:
Major Barbara (1941)
This Happy Breed (1944)
The Passionate Friends (1949)
Madeline (1950)
Ryan's Daughter (1970)

(https://imgur.com/SZAD0HZ.jpg)

Ryan's Daughter is the only one I've heard of, and it stars Robert Mitchum, but it's also the longest. So despite being on 2 ICM lists, it's the least likely.
This Happy Breed is from Criterion, but The Passionate Friends has Claude Rains in it. ...and it's only 95 minutes.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: PeacefulAnarchy on February 01, 2018, 09:40:30 PM
Ryan's Daughter is not very good. The other four are the four I haven't seen so I can't help you, but I would chose Major Barbara for Wendy Hiller.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on February 01, 2018, 10:53:55 PM
This Happy Breed is better, but Passionate Friends ain't bad.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Darren Aronofsky
Post by: 1SO on February 02, 2018, 01:20:10 AM
#62 Darren Aronofsky Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4436.msg714073#msg714073)

For someone so new, with only 7 features, Aronofsky has one of the longest director threads, and reading the comments, he comes off as one of the most divisive filmmakers. Checking with the Director Ratings Project, it seems while nearly everyone have a film rated Green or better along with a Red title - MartinTeller has a perfect rainbow (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4436.msg515104#msg515104) - we tend to be favorable in our overall opinion of his talent. (Of course, this was before mother!)

I think he's one of the best filmmakers working today and admire the way he swings for the fences every time out. I can't see him working on a franchise, but he doesn't dwell deep in the arthouse either, with mid-budget projects starring big names in films he seems to have a personal stake in.

I've seen all of his features, but none of the short films that came before Pi, mainly because I really don't like Pi. (I tried a 2nd time, and found myself liking it even less.) I'll look for those short films, especially hoping to find Protozoa.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on February 02, 2018, 05:49:08 AM
Never realised River Kwai was by Lean.

I don't hate any Aronofsky movie, so no red there, although I probably would detest The Wrestler if I saw it.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jean Renoir
Post by: 1SO on February 02, 2018, 11:34:23 AM
#63 Jean Renoir Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4464.msg863695#msg863695)

Here's a director who doesn't bowl me over, to borrow Martin's words, and unlike Melville, I don't see reason to do a deep exploration to find out why. I'm out of sync with a number of classics, but I can understand the love for 8½ or Dr. Strangelove. There's a definite vision pushing cinema to new places. I don't see that with Renoir, in particular with The Rules of the Game, which is a perfectly agreeable piece of dry white toast.

I've seen 16 films by Renoir, most without connecting that they're tied to the same filmmaker. (I tend to blur Renoir with René Clair, and when I pulled up this thread I expected to find And Then There Were None.) My favorite is The Grand Illusion, until the final 20 minutes. The two I'm most likely to recommend are Swamp Water, which I think only Martin has seen even though it stars Walter Brennan, Walter Huston, Anne Baxter and Dana Andrews. and This Land is Mine, which I don't think anyone here has seen, even though it stars Charles Laughton, Maureen O'Hara and George Sanders.

As for what to watch, there are a number of possibilities, none of which stand out as something that might change my opinion of Renoir. One of my side lists I'm working on is anything that appears on at least 5 ICM lists and that means Toni (1935) and The Golden Coach (1952). I might also watch Elena and Her Men (1956) because it stars Ingrid Bergman and/or The Diary of a Chambermaid (1946) because it stars Paulette Goddard.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: PeacefulAnarchy on February 02, 2018, 05:32:41 PM
I've seen This Land is Mine, it's quite good though far from my favourite of his.
Toni is good but it's a bit heavy handed. I did not like The Golden Coach because I hated Magnani's character, I can't fairly judge the film as a whole because the character dominates it so much. I enjoyed Elena and Her Men for Bergman and the comedy.

I'm not really sure what you mean by "definite vision pushing cinema to new places."  Because I don't know how you can watch that much Renoir and not see the class and gender issues that repeatedly dominate his work, and, especially at the time the films were made, they were clearly pushing boundaries of what stories could be told with cinema. Renoir's strengths maybe don't stand out as distinctively as Kubrick's meticulousness or Fellini's self absorbed grandiosity but they don't seem particularly hidden.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 02, 2018, 07:42:05 PM
I'm not really sure what you mean by "definite vision pushing cinema to new places."  Because I don't know how you can watch that much Renoir and not see the class and gender issues that repeatedly dominate his work, and, especially at the time the films were made, they were clearly pushing boundaries of what stories could be told with cinema. Renoir's strengths maybe don't stand out as distinctively as Kubrick's meticulousness or Fellini's self absorbed grandiosity but they don't seem particularly hidden.

I don't notice Renoir doing anything new, exciting or unique with the medium of film. I say this having read an entire article years ago about the complex long takes in Rules of the Game, and you can praise the film for my NOT noticing these shots while I was watching the film, but I prefer a less invisible style. Stories of class and gender issues is something you can find in a series of books, I'm talking about the way you can watch 5 seconds of a film and know immediately it's Wes Anderson or Spike Lee, and you don't need to know about the time these films were made in.

I'm not saying it's not there because I've read a lot about Renoir, but then I watch the films and I don't see or hear it. Even the effusive "Lubitsch touch" is easier for me to spot than Renoir's particular genius.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Post by: 1SO on February 03, 2018, 03:08:08 PM
#64 Joseph L. Mankiewicz Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4490.msg728558#msg728558)

Sometimes a director has one definitive Masterwork, but you can put All About Eve aside and still find plenty of greatness. I think of Mankiewicz as a favorite even though I've already dug into his catalogue seep enough to find some unimpressive titles and one outright bomb, though that's Cleopatra (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4490.msg799937#msg799937), so it came as no surprise.

Which means, while I've seen more than half of Mankiewicz's films, it's easy to find some interesting new titles to watch.

No one here has seen 5 Fingers ?
Seems like the place to start. I'll also look for The Honey Pot
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on February 03, 2018, 06:20:07 PM
Your Mankiewicz link goes to your Renoir list. 5 Fingers is a decent film. I had meant to watch his King film in DOCember, before things went sideways.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 03, 2018, 06:37:12 PM
Fixed. I think half the time I post a new Director, the Subject still lists the prior one.

At least Cleopatra went to the right spot.


I'm not going to post reviews for the Renoir I watched. They're fine, I'm just not into finding something to say about them.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ed Zwick
Post by: 1SO on February 05, 2018, 12:50:11 AM
#65 Edward Zwick Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4499.msg756147#msg756147)

I know Legends of the Fall is soap-opera-ish, western melodrama, but it still gets me at a gut level.  Glory is his best film, but I have a soft spot for Legends.  The rest are pretty middling.
Couldn't have said it better, and gong through the thread there's a repeated feeling that it's difficult to believe such a mediocre filmmaker is responsible for Glory.

I've watched more Zwick than I should because he works with great actors. I was done after The Seige, but then Tom Cruise did a samurai film (that turned out to be Japanese Dances With Wolves) and Leonardo DiCaprio signed onto Blood Diamond.

I haven't seen Defiance, Love & Other Drugs or Pawn Sacrifice, and I'd be interested in all of them if they were directed by someone else. I'm actually going to try and go early and watch his 1983 TV Movie, Special Bulletin, which won 4 Emmy Awards and is on YouTube.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Robert Bresson
Post by: 1SO on February 06, 2018, 10:35:42 AM
#66 Robert Bresson Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4529.msg762299#msg762299)

Starting with Au hasard Balthazar and A Man Escaped, I thought Bresson was going to be one of my favorite directors, but the deeper I dug into his brief filmography, the more hit-and-miss he became. This may be because his stripped down style doesn't mesh with my supersonic viewing habit, and I will probably revisit Diary of a Country Priest one day.

According to IMDB and ICM, I've seen the 9 most popular titles, and I could easily watch the next three on both lists:
The Devil, Probably (1977)
A Gentle Woman (1969)
Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)

MartinTeller's review of Une femme douce (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4529.msg767267#msg767267) has made that a definite selection, and I'll see if I'm still in the mood from there.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on February 06, 2018, 10:47:24 AM
Les anges du peche might appeal to you as well. I recall it as a more conventional film, and a pretty solid one.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 06, 2018, 01:30:55 PM
I imagine I'll watch all of them eventually, but I'm not going to push myself just for the sake of being a completionist.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Carl Theodor Dreyer
Post by: 1SO on February 07, 2018, 02:47:05 AM
#67 Carl Theodor Dreyer Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4529.msg762299#msg762299)

While I love Passion of Joan of Arc, what I love about it doesn't extend to his other films, making for a rather mixed bag of experiences.

This is another case where I've already seen all the popular titles. Reading the thread and looking at IMDB and ICM, the two most likely titles to watch are The President and Leaves From Satan's Book. One is more than half the length of the other, which could be the deciding factor.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - F.W. Murnau
Post by: 1SO on February 08, 2018, 12:06:17 AM
#68 F.W. Murnau Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4553.msg755546#msg755546)

In a Deathmatch I would easily pick Murnau over Dreyer, over most silent film directors in fact, if only because Murnau showed me that the silent movie camera could be alive to rise and fall and float around the space. It wasn't about compositions and edits and two-dimensional space. Murnau was perhaps the most visually creative filmmaker until Orson Welles made Citizen Kane. You can change a cynic's mind about silent films in four easy steps: Nosferatu, Last Laugh, Faust and Sunrise.

After that, Murnau's filmography becomes much less familiar. I watched The Haunted Castle to begin my Horror Marathon, one of 11 films he made from 1920 to 1922. As for the rest, I'm just reading about them for the first time, and I have no idea about availability. I'm considering...
Tartuffe (1925)
Phantom (1922)
Burning Soil (1922)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Brett Ratner
Post by: 1SO on February 08, 2018, 02:43:05 PM
#69 Brett Ratner Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4563.msg755553#msg755553)

Some of the quality swings in this Marathon...

In the commentary for Rush Hour, Ratner gives the secret to his success as hire great people, let them do what they do and then take all the credit for the film. If you look at his career, he's worked with a number of great Cinematographers and Editors, but the results show what happens when there's nobody in charge. I own Rush Hour 2 because it's the rare Hollywood movie where Jackie Chan got to direct the action with his stunt team, and I never disliked X-Men: The Last Stand, though there's plenty to dislike in it (mostly Juggernaut.)

I could easily let this one go and move ahead except I've always been curious about Tower Heist and Hercules stars Dwayne Johnson. Plus, after all that silent movie watching, I'm looking for something mindless and loud.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Noah Baumbach
Post by: 1SO on February 10, 2018, 03:14:31 PM
#70 Noah Baumbach Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4580.msg714417#msg714417)

I love The Squid and the Whale, and everything after has been some amount of disappointment. I don't know why there's so much difference to me, but the script for Squid has me jealous. It's a beautiful combination of smart, clever and heartbreaking, and every script by Baumbach since has been slapdash by comparison.

I'm not interested in catching up with the earlier films Highball and Mr. Jealousy, but I have some level of interest in the later films I haven't watched.
While We're Young (2014)
Mistress America (2015)
The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) (2017)

All 3 I planned to catch up with eventually, always putting it off. Looks like that time is now.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Junior on February 10, 2018, 03:33:10 PM
Mistress America and Meyerowitz Stories are both pretty great. Have fun!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Jeff Schroeck on February 10, 2018, 03:58:27 PM
I just watched Meyerowitz last night and I thought it was great! It has a few good visual gags and Sandler is especially good. The only issues I had with it are an editing trick that overstays its welcome and a few exchanges where the characters are explaining the subtext to each other.

I think I've avoided Mistress America mostly because of how much I dislike the "self taught" joke they kept playing on the podcast.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Noah Baumbach
Post by: jdc on February 10, 2018, 06:30:16 PM
#70 Noah Baumbach Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4580.msg714417#msg714417)

I love The Squid and the Whale, and everything after has been some amount of disappointment.

I feel that same way, not that there isn't good stuff in what follows but nothing has come close to The Squid and the Whale making them somewhat disappointing. But most are still worth watching, just not Top 100 material for me
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on February 12, 2018, 12:44:20 AM
#69 Brett Ratner Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4563.msg755553#msg755553)

Some of the quality swings in this Marathon...

In the commentary for Rush Hour, Ratner gives the secret to his success as hire great people, let them do what they do and then take all the credit for the film.

Do you think he started to believe his own story as time went on, and forgot the things he did that originally made him successful (i.e. seeking out the best people to work with)?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 12, 2018, 01:21:28 AM
No, and having just watched two of his more recent films it still holds true that he's an empty chair surrounded by people looking for direction. Hercules and Tower Heist and slick looking and well cast and neither has a single shot or moment that stands out as an artistic decision.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jean-Pierre Jeunet
Post by: 1SO on February 12, 2018, 09:00:57 AM
#71 Jean-Pierre Jeunet  Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4592.msg884493#msg884493)

Where did Jeunet go? Seeing his name again sent me to Wikipedia to find out if he retired. I never heard of 2013's The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet - was it released in the U.S.? - So I thought his last film was Micmacs in 2009.

He has a visual imagination like no other, but it's such a dominant trait that some of his films only have the Art Direction going for it. (If you think Wes Anderson is overly-indulgent, Jeunet's frequent absence of human emotions make Wes all warm and fuzzy by comparison.)

I haven't seen the early short films, that T.S. Spivet feature or the 55-minute TV Pilot Casanova, and I'm fine with that.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Alain Resnais
Post by: 1SO on February 12, 2018, 09:28:47 AM
#72 Alain Resnais Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4602.msg884495#msg884495)

It was September 2010 when I went from having watched zero Resnais to watching Night and Fog, Hiroshima Mon Amour (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8652.msg501999#msg501999) and Last Year at Marienbad (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8652.msg511110#msg511110), the 3 titles that dominate Resnais' poll. This brief early supernova period appears to kick off what turned into an unremarkable career, or maybe that's just by comparison.

Appearing on 6 ICM lists, Providence (1977) is the one I need to watch. None of the others are jumping out at me, but I'd be happy to read some opinions.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Teproc on February 12, 2018, 10:05:36 AM
For Resnais, On connaît la chanson/Same Old Song is quite good, it's a lip-sync musical written by Jean-Pierre Bacri and Agnès Jaoui, which sounds weirder than it is but still, quite good. I don't know how familiar you are with Bacri/Jaoui, they're writers and actors with a pretty specific sensibility for French dramedies, the most famous one from them would probably be Le goût des autres/The Taste of Others.

Edit: Oh, and Spivet is decent, but judging by your overall opinion of Jeunet you wouldn't like it much. It's lesser than Micmacs. While the Wes Anderson comparison is very much on-point for Jeunet, I wouldn't accuse him of lacking emotion, ever. Cutesy and annoying I can see, but his films are always heartfelt post-Caro (Amélie and on).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on February 12, 2018, 10:23:15 AM
I remember seeing the trailer for Spivet and in the first few seconds thinking "that's gotta be Jeunet".
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Geroge A. Romero
Post by: 1SO on February 13, 2018, 09:26:32 AM
#73 George A. Romero Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4609.msg818626#msg818626)

A true master of horror, though I wonder how many find the crude production values off-putting. Romero is such a legend, you don't think of him as an independent filmmaker, but his films don't look polished until the 80s. Commenting on Romero is like commenting on Citizen Kane. What is there to say at this point? He single-handedy defined zombies, and boldly made social commentary films disguised as horror.

I noticed this begins a streak of Horror Directors (proto-Shocktober), and because of my Marathon last year I might not have something to watch, or I will have to take a really deep dive. This is the case with Romero with two obscure titles I've been curious about: Two Evil Eyes (1990), which Romero directs half and Dario Argent directs the other half, and Bruiser (2000). There is also Season of the Witch (1972), but despite the title, it's listed as a drama and not horror. (The original title was Hungry Wives and it might've been changed to draw in Romero fans.)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Wes Craven
Post by: 1SO on February 14, 2018, 02:59:30 PM
#74 Wes Craven Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4616.msg753209#msg753209)

Though he made some of the most notorious horror movies, among Horror directors I always think of Wes Craven as one of the most likable. This probably explains why I've watched so many of his films, even though the bad ones are downright inept. For example, right after Nightmare on Elm Street he made The Hills Have Eyes Part II where you can see some stunt crew clearly standing next to a guy who falls by himself, and his next film (Deadly Friend) has the laughable Death by Basketball (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSW2pPlZF-M#noembed). (NSFW)

When Craven passed away recently I caught up with Deadly Blessing. There are some TV Movies, but nothing I'm interested in seeing.


His poll is incomplete, missing Cursed and My Soul to Take, but adding two titles not likely to be voted on would make it even more of a mess.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Dario Argento
Post by: 1SO on February 14, 2018, 03:07:55 PM
#75 Dario Argento Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4645.msg714069#msg714069)

There are things about Argento I like and he's one of the best Giallo directors, but I hate the way that sub-genre throws all logic out the window for sensation and the small amounts of style don't make up for it.

I'll watch something here, besides his half of Two Evil Eyes. Argento is always something I peck at occasionally. However, I want to go back through my reviews and look over my options. I'm more likely to rewatch something I saw long ago, like Deep Red, Tenebre or Phenomena.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Junior on February 14, 2018, 03:08:56 PM
The restored Blu of Suspiria is coming out soon, maybe give a look to that?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Dario Argento
Post by: MartinTeller on February 14, 2018, 04:19:56 PM
#75 Dario Argento Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4645.msg714069#msg714069)

broken link

pix edit: fixed
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 14, 2018, 07:36:47 PM
The restored Blu of Suspiria is coming out soon, maybe give a look to that?
This is the one I've seen recently (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4645.msg843929#msg843929) and remember best, (and I wear I watched it in HD, which the screenshots in my review seem to support.)

Veehd has the Restored Cut of Profondo Rosso (aka Deep Red) in Widescreen HD. I'm sure when I watched this it was the shorter cut on VHS, so I will watch this better quality version.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Mario Bava
Post by: 1SO on February 15, 2018, 01:27:40 AM
#76 Mario Bava Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4650.msg753390#msg753390) where I go 0 for 15

My recent Horror Marathon gave me 8 films by Mario Bava to watch, and if you followed along with that you know why I won't be watching or re-watching anything now.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Don Coscarelli
Post by: 1SO on February 15, 2018, 09:12:24 AM
#77 Don Coscarelli Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4658.msg753510#msg753510)

scraping the bottom of the barrel are we?
I hope not.  Still a long way to go until Halloween.

pixote

I would love to know why this poll exists. Even among Horror directors, Coscarelli's name is way down on the list, though John Dies at the End (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12452.msg750738#msg750738) was a big step above the Phantasm films. I've only seen two of those, but I'd rather watch the Chucky films of Don Mancini (http://www.imdb.com/filmosearch?explore=title_type&role=nm0238841&ref_=filmo_ref_job_typ&sort=year,desc&mode=detail&page=1&job_type=director).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Robert Wise
Post by: 1SO on February 15, 2018, 09:33:41 AM
#78 Robert Wise Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4659.msg728462#msg728462)

Because of the tedium of his films that aren't great, I think of Robert Wise as overrated, though not as much as MartinTeller (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4659.msg516190#msg516190). Funny enough, it's Martin I have to thank for introducing me to two of my favorite Noirs, The Set-Up and Odds Against Tomorrow, both by Wise.

I often confuse Robert Wise for Nicholas Ray, and may say something similar when I get to his thread.

As for something to watch, Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) and I Want to Live! (1958) have been on my Watchlist forever, which is what this Marathon is made for. Because of certain stars or genre, I may also get to...
This Could Be the Night (1957) - Jean Simmons
Two for the Seesaw (1962) - Robert Mitchum
Star! (1968) - Julie Andrews musical
Audrey Rose (1977) - Horror
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on February 15, 2018, 01:17:13 PM
Not to jinx things, but Somebody Up There Likes Me seem can't-miss.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 15, 2018, 11:29:11 PM
I didn't realize it was a boxing movie. The Paul Newman movie that's on my Watchlist is about lumberjacks and co-stars Henry Fonda. I looked it up, and the one I was thinking of is Sometimes A Great Notion, which Newman directed.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - James Whale
Post by: 1SO on February 17, 2018, 12:09:46 PM
#79 James Whale Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4665.msg818188#msg818188)

I don't like early 30s horror films all that much. I have more of an opinion of James Whale from Ian McKellen's portrayal in Gods and Monsters than from the films themselves. I decided to repost my favorite Whale film because it's such a buried treasure. As for something new, I'm interested in The Kiss Before the Mirror (1933).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on February 17, 2018, 02:15:43 PM
I'd like to watch Waterloo Bridge myself.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - James Whale
Post by: 1SO on February 17, 2018, 11:54:08 PM
I just learned that Whale remade Kiss Before the Mirror in 1938 as Wives Under Suspicion. It stars Warren William, so I'm going to watch that with Mrs. 1SO after this weekend.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Tobe Hooper
Post by: 1SO on February 18, 2018, 12:02:41 AM
#80 Tobe Hooper Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4671.msg787902#msg787902)

Tobe Hooper is known for making a lot of terrible films. He's made his mark on cinema with Texas Chainsaw, Poltergeist and having Mathilda May play a completely nude vampire in Lifeforce. I've already delved deep into his filmography and have found moments of charm in Eaten Alive and Texas Chainsaw 2. I'm sure I haven't seen my last Tobe Hooper film, but I'm not interested in watching anything new from him for this Marathon.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Eli Roth
Post by: 1SO on February 18, 2018, 12:12:10 AM
#81 Eli Roth Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4695.msg804482#msg804482)


I really like where Roth is coming from and as long as he understands his limitations as a storyteller and doesn't let ego extinguish the giggling kid inside, he's capable of some fun things.  If he starts to believe the hype fanboys throw at him, he will become the Brett Ratner of the Horror Genre.
After watching Knock Knock I believe this has come to pass. I still have to see Green Inferno, but Knock Knock was so bad I'm kind of mad at Eli and don't want to give him my time.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Sam Raimi
Post by: 1SO on February 18, 2018, 12:27:30 AM
#82 Sam Raimi Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4715.msg755551#msg755551)

Throughout the 80s and 90s, I never missed a Sam Raimi film. While i never made a great one, his style just put a big smile on my face. In my memory, I watched Evil Dead II almost every day. It seems like everything imploded when he aimed for artistic credibility in the late 90s and then blockbuster success with his Spider-Man Trilogy. Drag Me to Hell was a nice return to his roots, but the bloat of Oz the Great and Powerful seemed to have stripped his soul. Still, I'm surprised it's taken him so long to make another feature.

Another Director where I have nothing to watch and can't find a reason to re-watch anything.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Richard Linklater
Post by: 1SO on February 18, 2018, 12:46:33 AM
Finally, a director I can spend some time with.

#83 Richard Linklater Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4735.msg738050#msg738050)

Like many (but certainly not all) I think Linklater is one of the best directors working today. He doesn't make the kind of films I rush out to the theater for, but I usually finish with some level of satisfaction and a few are really great, even if nothing has landed on my Essentials.

This is a great opportunity to watch his newest film, Last Flag Flying (2017). I'm also going to catch up with Me and Orson Welles (2008) and re-watch Tape (2001), which I've only seen once but remember liking a lot. That leaves the only popular Linklater film I haven't seen as Bad News Bears, and I'm good with that.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Sam Mendes
Post by: 1SO on February 20, 2018, 09:02:36 AM
#84 Sam Mendes Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4737.msg723224#msg723224)

I've seen all 7 of Mendes features even though I only like 4 of them. That's partly because he started with American Beauty which contains one of my favorite scenes of all time (http://1strongopinion.blogspot.com/2006/07/why-we-love-cinema-american-beauty.html). Mendes technical craft produces more emotional ice than Christopher Nolan and the more his films want you to care about the characters from an un-ironic distance the more I want to punch them in the face. (For those who don't know, that phrase originated from Matty Ballgame's review of Away We Go.)

There is some of Mendes stage work that was filmed for broadcast and might be available on the internet, but I'm not interested in seeing Cabaret, Company or King Lear as staged by Mendes so I'm moving on.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Rob Zombie
Post by: 1SO on February 20, 2018, 09:14:43 AM
#85 Rob Zombie Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4759.msg756146#msg756146)

For the record, I love the music of Rob Zombie. I purchased many of them on cassette or CD and saw him in concert where he put on a heck of a show. I even got to meet him, shake his hand and all that. Maybe that's why I keep watching these terrible movies, hoping that his grindhouse music will translate one day to movie form. In this poll, I voted "don't like any" and I'm doubting that I ever will.

When I saw Rob Zombie's name, I thought I'd be moving onto the next director. Then I noticed 31, his sadistic clown movie which I know I'll probably watch one day. Then I remembered my watch of The Lords of Salem (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.msg875211#msg875211) was just last August and I came to my senses.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Post by: 1SO on February 20, 2018, 09:39:21 AM
#86 Rainer Werner Fassbinder Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5159.msg842209#msg842209)

I thought I've been slowly picking away at Fassbinder's prolific output, but I've actually seen very little. I don't have a strong opinion on him, more intrigued than anything, and I feel with so many projects there's bound to be a combination of style and script that's just right for me. (All of his theatrical features on IMDB are rated above 6.5)

I don't know how many titles I'll get to, and I'm also looking at goodguy's list (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5159.msg728612#msg728612) for recommendations. So I'll definitely be aiming for...
Katzelmacher
Händler der vier Jahreszeiten (The Merchant of Four Seasons)
Effi Briest

ICM has me down for...
Veronika Voss
Fox and His Friends
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Hayao Miyazaki
Post by: 1SO on February 21, 2018, 08:19:02 PM
Getting on a plane tomorrow for work, so I'm going to post a couple of these in advance.


#87 Hayao Miyazaki Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5302.msg707973#msg707973)

Filmspotting 2015 Top Rated Director of All Time (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13595.0), and I don't have a problem with that. I've seen all his features and if Boro the Caterpillar is ever finished I will watch that too. Miyazaki's work extends far beyond features, though many of his short films are difficult to track down. I have watched and written about Sherlock Hound (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=11485.msg781392#msg781392).

As for what I haven't seen, IMDB lists a 49-minute feature called Conan the Future Boy: The Big Giant Robot's Resurrection. I'm assuming this comes from Future Boy Conan, which Miyazaki worked on (along with Isao Takahata.) I don't know how easy it will be to find this title, especially when episodes of the series make it confusing, but I will look for it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Danny Boyle
Post by: 1SO on February 21, 2018, 09:05:02 PM
#88 Danny Boyle Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5305.msg714425#msg714425)

Two interesting notes about this thread:
1. The poll contains no options for Haven't Seen, Don't Like or Other and so far nobody has complained about that, which would speak very highly of Boyle's abilities.
2. My own ranked list has been inexplicably missing 28 Days Later... even though it's my 2nd favorite Boyle film.

So, yeah, I like Danny Boyle a lot, though I used to like him a lot more. (I owned the DVD for The Beach and Vacuuming Completely Nude in Paradise.) The editing in his films is typically masterful and there's no shortage of creativity, though his approach has gone more commercial over time. (Not the material, but his way of presenting it.)

I keep putting off T2 Trainspotting for no good reason and now I have no excuse. I also want to re-watch Slumdog Millionaire, which I liked far less than I expected to.


Also, there's a rumor right now that he might direct the next James Bond film. That would be awesome.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Corndog on February 21, 2018, 09:12:46 PM
I believe T2 would be worth your time.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: jdc on February 22, 2018, 01:46:21 AM
I believe T2 would be worth your time.

Much better use of time then rewatching  Slumdog Millionaire (not that it is a bad movie)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Dario Argento
Post by: chardy999 on February 22, 2018, 05:39:51 AM
#75 Dario Argento Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4645.msg714069#msg714069)
I'm more likely to rewatch something I saw long ago, like Deep Red, Tenebre or Phenomena.

Tenebre and Phenomena are worth it, especially Phenomena which has the freshness of Suspiria.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 22, 2018, 06:57:11 AM
I added both to my Shocktober Watchlist.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: philip918 on February 22, 2018, 04:12:14 PM
I thought Phenomena was pretty dumb and boring, but still entirely worth it for the completely bonkers ending.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John McTiernan
Post by: 1SO on February 23, 2018, 09:48:37 PM
#89 John McTiernan Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5371.msg718814#msg718814)

The rise of John McTiernan was one of the great Double (Triple) Grand Slams of my lifetime. Going from Predator to Die Hard to Red October, McTiernan appeared to be a director with indisputably great instincts, and I would like to imagine a parallel universe where the streak continued. Instead he made Medicine Man, a film as tone deaf as McT's previous work was pitch perfect. It's been a rocky ride from there with everyone choosing a different title to declare Underrated. (For me it's Thomas Crown Affair.)

I've read the Wikipedia coverage of McTiernan's criminal problems multiple times, unsure if that's what killed his career or if it was the double shot of Rollerball and Basic. (A pair which seems to be anti-matter opposite of Die Hard and Red October.) They remain the only 2 McTiernan films I've never seen - I used to own Nomads on VHS. I'm still working in Syracuse, so I have a couple of days (and some Danny Boyle films) to decide if either of them are worth watching.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on February 24, 2018, 02:26:10 AM
What does glowing teal mean in your colour scale?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 24, 2018, 07:31:07 AM
Nothing. I just love that movie more than a reasonable amount. I’ve probably watched it more than any other film.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Pedro Almodóvar
Post by: 1SO on February 24, 2018, 06:50:10 PM
#90 Pedro Almodóvar Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5534.msg714059#msg714059)

I got into Almodóvar with Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, which was followed by disappointments until I gave up in frustration. While I liked the under-appreciated Live Flesh, it was my dislike of All About My Mother that made me think the director is simply not for me (since everyone else loved that movie.) The Skin I live in and Volver have re-ignited my optimism to where I'm ready to give Almodóvar a fresh appraisal.

ICM suggests I look at his early works What Have I Done to Deserve This? and Law of Desire, but I'm more interested in his newer films, particularly The Flower of My Secret and Julieta. I would like to rewatch Live Flesh to see if it still holds for me and if I'm in the mood, I'd like to take a 2nd look at All About My Mother.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Pedro Almodóvar
Post by: chardy999 on February 25, 2018, 02:55:08 AM
#90 Pedro Almodóvar Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5534.msg714059#msg714059)

I got into Almodóvar with Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, which was followed by disappointments until I gave up in frustration. While I liked the under-appreciated Live Flesh, it was my dislike of All About My Mother that made me think the director is simply not for me (since everyone else loved that movie.) The Skin I live in and Volver have re-ignited my optimism to where I'm ready to give Almodóvar a fresh appraisal.

ICM suggests I look at his early works What Have I Done to Deserve This? and Law of Desire, but I'm more interested in his newer films, particularly The Flower of My Secret and Julieta. I would like to rewatch Live Flesh to see if it still holds for me and if I'm in the mood, I'd like to take a 2nd look at All About My Mother.

I'm a big fan of Almodóvar but I'd suggest skipping What Have I Done to Deserve This?. A second watch of All About My Mother propelled it into my Top 100 so I'd definitely recommend a rewatch. Julieta is pretty good, but I'd prioritise Broken Embraces from the newer stuff which I don't see in your list.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 25, 2018, 06:27:52 PM
I don't want to watch so much Almodóvar and I've been trying to pick one of the early films. Law of Desire will do fine. I'm also not that committed on Flower of My Secret so it's probably best to skip that unless I get a whim.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: roujin on February 26, 2018, 08:53:36 AM
I don't want to watch so much Almodóvar and I've been trying to pick one of the early films. Law of Desire will do fine. I'm also not that committed on Flower of My Secret so it's probably best to skip that unless I get a whim.

Law of Desire is one of my favorites, and maybe the 2nd best film he did in the 80's (Women on the Verge being first).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on February 26, 2018, 10:30:07 AM
Awesome. That’s next up for me to watch when I get back home.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Wong Kar-Wai
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2018, 10:00:43 PM
Still watching Almodóvar, but looking ahead.


#91 Wong Kar-Wai Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5543.msg756145#msg756145)

Was really hot on him for a brief period, cooled off a bit now.
With only one underwhelming feature in the past ten years, WKW has dropped from being a Miyazaki level darling to needing to prove himself again. (Much like my favorite director, James Cameron.) I've seen all his features - most of which I own on DVD - and some of his short work, but the fire has gone out, his greatness now only a memory. I need something to reignite that.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Paul Thomas Anderson
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2018, 10:35:54 PM
#92. PTA Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5551.msg716813#msg716813)

Phantom Thread was something of a comeback for me, one of the few who did not like The Master. (It seems like an obvious candidate for a re-watch, but I've already seen it twice and I'm not yet ready for a 3rd attempt.) I added a separate list for PTA's short films and music videos that I've seen. The only feature I haven't seen is the 54-minute documentary Junun, and I don't know if anyone here has seen that one. Don't see why I need to be the first.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Michael Mann
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2018, 10:51:22 PM
#93 Michael Mann Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5566.msg592314#msg592314)

I had actually forgotten about The Cabal. Read Mann's thread and it's Republicans and Democrats as people take sides on the Miami Vice Cabal (which has expanded to all of Mann's digital work.) Up to 1999, Mann was one of my favorite directors, a detail-oriented technician with strong story skills coated in Michael Bay levels of machismo. His recent works have been varying degrees of stupid and all could benefit from severe re-editing. (Ali's focus on the life between the highlights demonstrated why downtime makes for terrible drama.)

Two titles jump out for me to watch:
L.A. Takedown (1989) - Mann's first run at Heat
Blackhat (2015) - the only theatrical feature I haven't seen

I'm probably also going to throw a re-watch of The Keep (1983) in there because it's Horror and I remember it being really good for about an hour.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Pedro Almodóvar
Post by: 1SO on February 28, 2018, 09:16:12 AM
ICM suggests I look at his early works What Have I Done to Deserve This? and Law of Desire, but I'm more interested in his newer films, particularly The Flower of My Secret and Julieta. I would like to rewatch Live Flesh to see if it still holds for me and if I'm in the mood, I'd like to take a 2nd look at All About My Mother.

I'm a big fan of Almodóvar but I'd suggest skipping What Have I Done to Deserve This?. A second watch of All About My Mother propelled it into my Top 100 so I'd definitely recommend a rewatch. Julieta is pretty good, but I'd prioritise Broken Embraces from the newer stuff which I don't see in your list.
I knew I didn't want to watch that much Almodóvar, and after watching Law of Desire and Live Flesh yesterday I've come to the conclusion that Almodóvar films need to be spaced out. I'm not looking to power through too much more and a re-watch of All About My Mother wouldn't be wise. I have Julieta, which I will save for tonight, probably after something by Michael Mann.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Michael Mann
Post by: philip918 on February 28, 2018, 04:29:55 PM
I'm probably also going to throw a re-watch of The Keep (1983) in there because it's Horror and I remember it being really good for about an hour.

The Keep is good for about an hour. It's a film that I wouldn't mind seeing remade. There's tons of potential in the story and setting.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Lars Von Trier
Post by: 1SO on March 01, 2018, 05:13:40 PM
#94 Lars Von Trier Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5845.msg766976#msg766976)

While he was never a favorite director, there was a time when I would watch anything he made because after watching dozens of regular films, it's good to find someone who can still provoke me. Breaking the Waves is one of my top Mess-terpieces, a film I saw in the theater and bought the day it was released on home video. One of the most emotional experiences I've had with a film.

I've seen most Von Trier, and I like to recommend The Boss of it All because it's not like any of his other films. It's actually... enjoyable. The big omission for me is that after watching Nymphomaniac: Vol. 1, I chose to pass on Vol. 2, and I'm not changing my stance now. I'm keeping my eye on The House That Jack Built, a horror/thriller set to be released this year.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - The Coen Brothers
Post by: 1SO on March 01, 2018, 05:28:12 PM
#95 Joel and Ethan Coen Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=6908.msg612781#msg612781)

Another poll without options for Haven't Seen/Don't Like, which is fitting because if that's where your vote would go you're probably on the wrong forum. Definitely among the best, even if I've low-ranked some of their titles. Some films - A Serious Man - took a re-watch for me to like it, which is why I'm planning to re-watch Miller's Crossing (for the 3rd time) for this project.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Lars Von Trier
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on March 02, 2018, 04:39:54 AM
#94 Lars Von Trier Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5845.msg766976#msg766976)

While he was never a favorite director, there was a time when I would watch anything he made because after watching dozens of regular films, it's good to find someone who can still provoke me. Breaking the Waves is one of my top Mess-terpieces, a film I saw in the theater and bought the day it was released on home video. One of the most emotional experiences I've had with a film.

I've seen most Von Trier, and I like to recommend The Boss of it All because it's not like any of his other films. It's actually... enjoyable. The big omission for me is that after watching Nymphomaniac: Vol. 1, I chose to pass on Vol. 2, and I'm not changing my stance now. I'm keeping my eye on The House That Jack Built, a horror/thriller set to be released this year.

The Boss of it All is fun. It is so light it is almost not a Von Trier film.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Quentin Tarantino
Post by: 1SO on March 02, 2018, 11:40:55 AM
#96 Quentin Tarantino Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=7197.msg715156#msg715156)

Often right alongside James Cameron as my favorite director working today, but I fear his time is fading fast. (The grindhouse approach to violence in Hateful Eight was all wrong for that story, and the film in general shows he no longer has the ability to edit out any of his precious moments.) I'll still see the next one in theaters and I dare him to make a film under 100 minutes. (His cut of Death Proof is 113m.)

I haven't seen My Best Friend's Birthday, but I've never heard or read a thing that makes me believe there would be some value to that. His features I've watched multiple times, except for Hateful 8. I'm good with moving on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ron Howard
Post by: 1SO on March 02, 2018, 11:53:07 AM
#97 Ron Howard Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=7429.msg414616#msg414616)

The first director poll that I started.

I like Ron Howard and didn't believe people who called him a hack because he made a number of un-hacky directing choices. He was a crowd pleaser, like Rob Reiner, and that wasn't a bad thing. Lately his films have been less pleasing. Rush, Cinderella Man and Beautiful Man are the only ones from this decade I like, and The Grinch is one of the worst films ever made. Don't ask Ron Howard to be Tim Burton.

I could be cute and put the Marathon on hold until Solo comes out. I have to get to work, but I'll pull up something interesting.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on March 02, 2018, 06:26:30 PM
#97 Ron Howard Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=7429.msg414616#msg414616)

The first director poll that I started.

I like Ron Howard and didn't believe people who called him a hack because he made a number of un-hacky directing choices. He was a crowd pleaser, like Rob Reiner, and that wasn't a bad thing. Lately his films have been less pleasing. Rush, Cinderella Man and Beautiful Man are the only ones from this decade I like, and The Grinch is one of the worst films ever made. Don't ask Ron Howard to be Tim Burton.

I could be cute and put the Marathon on hold until Solo comes out. I have to get to work, but I'll pull up something interesting.

I think of him as the non-visionary sort of director whose films really live or die on the quality of the story/script being strong. If it's a good story he won't screw it up, if it's kind of a nothing special story he won't do anything that somehow makes it a good film to watch anyway. I think of Clint Eastwood, Curtis Hanson and Peter Weir in the same way. Do you agree with that assessment?

I don't mean anything negative in the "non-visionary" lable... films are ruined by a director's baggage as often as they're improved. Your comments about The Hateful Eight being a good example.



Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on March 03, 2018, 02:29:17 PM
Two films I think about most when assessing Ron Howard being non-visionary.

A Beautiful Mind: If you haven't seen it, the first half requires very special handling. It's essentially a magic trick, and you can't fumble it or the entire project is a failure. Eventually the film becomes very standard biopic fare, but the way Howard crafts that opening shows he has more than a workmanlike ability.

EdTV: I watched this on DVD and it contained a lot of deleted scenes that hinted at a very different movie. It left me with a new insight about Howard because he could have included all of the other material, none of which were wisely cut but which point to a much different film. The script was more of a drama and the emotional scenes gave it a balance of laughter and heart that might've put it closer to Parenthood. (A great scene I still remember is Ed's father passes away and the family asks Ed to stay away at the funeral because they don't want all the cameras around. We watch Ed trapped by his own celebrity, shut out by his relatives, and it's heartfelt without being the least bit mawkish.) I don't know if it was wise to cut it all out, but it shows that he's not a filmmaker tied too closely to what is on the page.

I think Howard brings the style he feels the story needs. So while Ransom doesn't cover any new ground it shows Howard understands more than just comedy.


I haven't looked at my options for Howard yet, but I'm considering a deeper dive, including his debut Grand Theft Auto and perhaps re-watches of Ransom and The Paper. I might even watch Inferno after all.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on March 04, 2018, 03:47:28 AM
At this point I don't remember A Beautiful Mind, but I have seen it. EdTV would be a first time for me, but something about it always failed to grab me. Maybe it was the likeness to the Truman Show, or just that the whole premise has been kind of caught up with reality and it's annoying. :-\
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Leos Carax
Post by: 1SO on March 05, 2018, 09:14:08 AM
#98 Leos Carax Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=7672.msg714979#msg714979)

The last paragraph of my Mauvais sang review says it best.
This is the type of film that can be very appealing to a large cinematic group that I am not one of. There's a quote I love by Otie Wheeler on Letterboxd that goes "The kind of movie that, even on a third viewing, makes you ashamed of the last 100 movies you watched, the last 100 days you lived or rather didn't, your humdrum existence a pathetic placeholder for what should be called living." I'm more of a grindhouse guy, but I at least appreciated Carax's talent.

Selecting a film here is easy, since I haven't seen Boy Meets Girl. I would also rewatch Holy Motors, but we're getting close to the end of the decade and that's already high on my list for a 2nd look when I get to my Best of the Decade marathons.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Fernando Arrabal
Post by: 1SO on March 05, 2018, 09:59:29 PM
#99 Fernando Arrabal

This presents an interesting case. This thread was created by FarfetchFilm in April, 2010, who then disappeared in April, 2011. The thread contains 6 posts, 3 saying they've never heard of the director and 3 by FfF who "thought this guy was famous." When I did the Director Ratings Project, Arrabel was the only person to receive Zero votes. In 2014, I posted...
I can't even find one of his films, except on Fandor, which seems to have his entire output.
I will have to see if this has changed. Meanwhile, Arrabel's output remains small. He has 6 director credits, his last one being a TV Movie in 1993
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on March 09, 2018, 05:51:25 AM
#94 Lars Von Trier Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5845.msg766976#msg766976)

While he was never a favorite director, there was a time when I would watch anything he made because after watching dozens of regular films, it's good to find someone who can still provoke me. Breaking the Waves is one of my top Mess-terpieces, a film I saw in the theater and bought the day it was released on home video. One of the most emotional experiences I've had with a film.

Do you have a complete list of your Messterpieces?

#95 Joel and Ethan Coen Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=6908.msg612781#msg612781)

Another poll without options for Haven't Seen/Don't Like, which is fitting because if that's where your vote would go you're probably on the wrong forum. Definitely among the best, even if I've low-ranked some of their titles. Some films - A Serious Man - took a re-watch for me to like it, which is why I'm planning to re-watch Miller's Crossing (for the 3rd time) for this project.

You should watch it a fourth time...
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on March 09, 2018, 08:29:40 AM
Do you have a complete list of your Messterpieces?
All my charts and lists, this is never something I tracked.


I'm planning to re-watch Miller's Crossing (for the 3rd time) for this project.

You should watch it a fourth time...
I've gotten the same result all 3 times, and most recently I didn't even have a new way to describe my intense, burning indifference. I'll be surprised if I return again to this film in my lifetime.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Douglas Sirk
Post by: 1SO on March 09, 2018, 08:44:17 AM
#100 Douglas Sirk Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8580.msg695225#msg695225)

Like most, my appreciation for Sirk starts with his genre-defining melodramas of the 1950s, but he has a more varied filmography, from his 5 Film-Noirs to his multiple films featuring George Sanders. I'm also curious why Sirk's famous melodramas don't extend to his two films starring Barbara Stanwyck, There's Always Tomorrow and All I Desire, while The Tarnished Angels is often listed as Sirk's surprise for those who wish to seek it out.

Magnificent Obsession has been on my Watchlist for years, with availability always a problem. I'm also planning to watch A Time to Love and a Time to Die, another 2nd tier Sirk that comes up a lot. Had this been Noirvember I would probably watch Thunder on the Hill, but since we're doing Westerns this month, I'm including Take Me to Town, starring Ann Sheridan.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on March 09, 2018, 09:07:57 AM
You had me at George Sanders.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: jdc on March 09, 2018, 06:08:22 PM



I'm planning to re-watch Miller's Crossing (for the 3rd time) for this project.

You should watch it a fourth time...
I've gotten the same result all 3 times, and most recently I didn't even have a new way to describe my intense, burning indifference. I'll be surprised if I return again to this film in my lifetime.

As much as I think you are wrong, I can't help love the description of "intense, burning indifference." I am going to borrow that from you sometime over this weekend
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on March 10, 2018, 05:20:24 AM
Sounds like something I would say about a Ken Loach movie.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Progress Report
Post by: 1SO on March 11, 2018, 12:20:36 AM
100 Directors Down seems like a Milestone, but I'm not sure how to mark it since there isn't a set approach to all Directors.

165 Titles (https://letterboxd.com/1so/list/all-the-directors/). 143 First time viewings.

690 Directors to go, which at this pace has me completing the Marathon around September 2021.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Edgar Wright
Post by: 1SO on March 11, 2018, 03:03:42 PM
#101 Edgar Wright Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8629.msg745176#msg745176)

One of the Best Directors Working Today, so I'm in line with most.

But maybe I'm not.

Hot Fuzz is masterful and I tend to catch something new every time I watch it. I'm also a big fan of Scott Pilgrim, which I've seen it 4 times front to back plus I've rewatched individual scenes many times. The World's End... starts great, but it reaches a point where I stop liking it and then I like it less as it goes on. Same with Baby Driver, except I reach that point fairly early. I was also underwhelmed by Spaced, which makes me hesitant to see anything else by Wright from this early, but that's all I have to work with.

I'll be looking for A Fistful of Fingers, but also a 48 minute story that I think expanded into Hot Fuzz called Dead Right. I hope these aren't too difficult to find.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Corndog on March 11, 2018, 03:25:06 PM
Dead Right is not good, and Wright has admitted to as much.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on March 11, 2018, 03:36:02 PM
He should be ashamed not to have named it Dead Wright.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Whit Stillman
Post by: 1SO on March 12, 2018, 10:58:27 AM
#102 Whit Stillman Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=882.msg861146#msg861146)

I think of Stillman as one of those directors who popped up occasionally on the Indie scene in the 90s, forgetting he made a brief return with two films this decade. While I love good writing, his writing is so over-baked it only delights me occasionally.

I've seen his entire brief filmography, so moving on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Satyajit Ray
Post by: 1SO on March 12, 2018, 11:06:55 AM
#103 Satyajit Ray Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8959.msg685618#msg685618)

Introduced to me through one of my favorite Marathons (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=11026.0), you can chart my journey from hesitancy to confident belief in his greatness.

One day I will re-watch the Apu Trilogy, but I've been wanting to get to this to see what blind spots I can fill in. I'll definitely be watching Days and Nights in the Forest (1970) and The Home and the World (1984), but I have more to consider when I have more time to look.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on March 12, 2018, 11:31:10 AM
Obviously, you can look at my rankings to see what I would recommend. I've got Criterion's new release of The Hero sitting at home, but haven't had time to get to it yet.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on March 12, 2018, 11:56:58 AM
I was reading your megathread and may possibly add...
The Expedition (1962)
Company Limited (1971)
An Enemy of the People (1989)

I love the plot of Enemy, but your description sounds disappointing. I'm keeping it in my back pocket in case I can't find the other titles.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ingmar Bergman
Post by: 1SO on March 16, 2018, 10:07:23 AM
#104 Ingmar Bergman Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8960.msg735940#msg735940)

I came at Bergman the wrong way because of film school, where I was shown Persona and The Seventh Seal and was left intimidated. It's taken me a long time to get over that one-word description, and I still don't see myself binging on his films for days on end. However, I wonder if now that I've seen his major achievements what's left can be called less of a challenge and easier to simply enjoy, like the last of his films I watched, Summer With Monika.

I'm not going to spend this time catching up with Martin on the dozens of titles I still have to watch, the 14 that appear in ICM Lists, or the 13 that rate higher than 7.0 on IMDB. I have selected 3 films to watch because I want to see them.
Summer Interlude (1951)
The Magician (1958)
Face to Face (1976)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Luis Buñuel
Post by: 1SO on March 19, 2018, 12:45:00 AM
#105 Luis Buñuel Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8961.msg714891#msg714891)

While MartinTeller perhaps did the most to bulk up the Director Threads, these last three names come from his heart. That's a good reason for me to leave Buñuel alone, because unlike Ray and Bergman, I don't get this filmmaker. In this thread is a post (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8961.msg763082#msg763082) I made when I'd only seen 13 of his films, and 4 years later, this opinion still holds.

Quote
They don't leave me wanting to get into a conversation. I don't have the passion to take a stance against Bunuel's large fan base, like I do with Goddard and I wouldn't say I get the acclaim either. His body of work is the opposite of compulsively watchable.

Rather than announce a punishing Marathon, I quietly watched Nazarín because it appears on 6 ICM Lists. No need to post a review. No desire to. I'm happy to move on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Hal Hartley
Post by: 1SO on March 19, 2018, 01:20:40 AM
#106 Hal Hartley Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8969.msg886777#msg886777)

I was going to talk about how, like Whit Stillman, a thread for Hartley seems like a relic from two decades ago. (Everything I've seen from him came out between 1989 and 1998.) Then I read the thread, full of mentions of Godard, which is obvious to me now. (I always fixated on the deliberately wooden dialogue and delivery.) Except for Amateur, I always liked Hartley's moments where he breaks the rules.

[Here I stopped to watch the dance scene from Simple Men (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vgb8CyrgppI#noembed), which is perfectly imperfect and single-handedly reminds me why I want to make movies.]

Even though I liked Henry Fool, I'm reluctant to watch Fay Grim, though I would like to watch the final film in the trilogy Ned Rifle (2014). I'm also curious about Surviving Desire (1992).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Hal Hartley
Post by: oldkid on March 20, 2018, 01:43:58 AM
[Here I stopped to watch the dance scene from Simple Men (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vgb8CyrgppI#noembed), which is perfectly imperfect and single-handedly reminds me why I want to make movies.]

This kinda blew me away.  I need to see some of these films.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jean Vigo
Post by: 1SO on March 20, 2018, 09:54:03 PM
#107 Jean Vigo Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8990.msg886875#msg886875)

I remember the point where I went from having never heard of Jean Vigo to being obsessed with finding his work. Roger Ebert's review of L'Atalante (https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-latalante-1934) describes Francois Truffaut's obsession with Vigo. (I love the detail of how the sum total of Vigo's work takes 200 minutes.) Unfortunately, I didn't have a similar experience. Even though I spaced my viewings out over a long period and I even tried re-watching L'Atalante, I simply cannot see what the fuss is about.

I have a day of work to think about if I want to try re-watching something else - probably Zero for Conduct - or moving on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Robert Aldrich
Post by: 1SO on March 21, 2018, 11:51:26 PM
#108 Robert Aldrich Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8996.msg713931#msg713931)

I've got a huge list of directors who don't have a poll like this, so hopefully no one objects to a flood of new threads.
I've been enjoying this random ordering based on when the Director's Thread was created, so there's a little disappointment that this starts a lengthy run of Alphabetical Directors. Still, it's only 56 names which is a fraction of the overall list, so it maintains some randomness.

When I like Aldrich, he's my version of one of those uber-macho filmmakers like Sam Fuller or John Milius. He makes movies for guys who like movies, but he does care about women being half his potential audience, something you're not likely to say about Sam Peckinpah.

I've already done a pretty deep dive into Aldrich - probably why  I have so many titles that aren't a shade of Green - but there are still a number I'm interested in. I already have Twilight's Last Gleaming (1977) so that's definite. ICM suggests Hustle (1975), which isn't highly rated on IMDB, but has a lot of interesting elements. The Grissom Gang (1971) looks nuts, and stars the unusual Kim Darby. The Angry Hills (1959) is also a possibility because of Robert Mitchum.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Robert Altman
Post by: 1SO on March 25, 2018, 08:49:44 AM
#109 Robert Altman Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8997.msg714060#msg714060)

A legend, though not without his frustrations. I've never been fond of the overlapping dialogue, though it works sometimes, and when he's off his bad films tend to be painful to sit through.

I've already done a pretty extensive look at Altman, though he's so prolific I will probably never run out of something to watch. I have to consider Tanner '88, which I've always been interested in. I thought it was much longer than 6 hours. Thieves Like Us (1974) and Countdown (1967) are on my Watchlist, so I should finally get to those.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Lindsay Anderson
Post by: 1SO on March 30, 2018, 04:04:50 PM
#110 Lindsay Anderson Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8998.msg714062#msg714062)


I remember Anderson best as the first Director in my initial Directors of Shame Marathon (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.0). The first film O Lucky Man! (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg596871#msg596871) convinced me this was a great idea because I would never have watched this 3-hour Mess-terpiece otherwise and it's stuck with me all these years.

His brief filmography has one title I'm very much interested in seeing, The Whales of August.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Roy Andersson
Post by: 1SO on April 01, 2018, 12:14:19 AM
#111  Roy Andersson Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8999.msg757468#msg757468)

Having only seen two films and a short, I can say that Andersson has a definite particular style, but maybe that deadpan only tells part of the story. I'm unable to track down A Swedish Love Story, but I can get A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence, which I believe is more of the same.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 01, 2018, 02:01:39 PM
I prefer to post these during the day rather than the dead of night and I expect I'll have time for both the Andersson and this film tonight.

#112  Theodoros Angelopoulos Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9000.msg757544#msg757544)

If not for the Directors Sub-Board I doubt I would've ever attempted a film by Angelopoulos. I'm certainly not going to marathon his work. Not my style, though I certainly don't dislike him. A type of cinema I only care to experience every few years, which means I can pick what I want over what ICM or IMDB recommends, though my pick Eternity and a Day ranks highly with both.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Roy Andersson
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on April 01, 2018, 04:41:02 PM
#111  Roy Andersson Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8999.msg757468#msg757468)

Having only seen two films and a short, I can say that Andersson has a definite particular style, but maybe that deadpan only tells part of the story. I'm unable to track down A Swedish Love Story, but I can get A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence, which I believe is more of the same.
Andersson's first two full length movies are more conventional than the tableau style that characterizes his more recent ones (Songs, You The Living and - as you suggest - Pigeon).

A Swedish Love Story (1970) got much appraise when it was released but then the follow-up Giliap (1975) flopped and Roy Andersson was doomed to walk in the desert for many years. He took on advertising and developed the deadpan style that he has excelled in in his later movies. Personally, I think that their very parts often outmatch the movies themselves. Many of the commercials he has produced can be seen on YouTube but I guess that some of the ingenuity gets lost in the translation. World Of Glory (1992) is the first part of a project that was initiated by the Gothenburg Film Festival to capture the zeitgeist of the 90s. Also worth mentioning is Something Has Happened (1993) which was commissioned by the NHS to increase HIV awareness but they abstained from showing the finished product as it was thought to be too controversial.

Roy's birthday was March 31. His full name btw is Roy Arne Lennart Andersson, mine is Karl Arne Lennart Andersson. I'm totally positive that mom and dad never knew about him. ;D
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 01, 2018, 09:01:54 PM
I've been debating Something Has Happened because I know MartinTeller likes it a lot.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kenneth Anger
Post by: 1SO on April 01, 2018, 11:41:17 PM
#113  Kenneth Anger Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9001.msg714064#msg714064)

I see a clear direct line from Anger's short films to the buff 80s and 90s action films like Top Gun and The Rock. Scorpio Rising has to be my favorite piece of experimental cinema, blending pop songs and homoerotic biker gang imagery. That one 30-minute work of cinema makes him a King (on the throne next to Maya Deren for Meshes of the Afternoon.) His short films don't always work for me, but I usually find them interesting in some way. I wish Anger had made a feature.

While I haven't seen everything, I'm more than satisfied by what I have managed to watch. The rest is not as recommended and harder to find. I'm good with moving on.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Bernardo Bertolucci
Post by: 1SO on April 01, 2018, 11:56:56 PM
#114 Bernardo Bertolucci Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9002.msg755373#msg755373)

I see so much greatness in Bertolucci's work, but that one Great Bertolucci film has always eluded me. His films are always an uneven mixture to where the scenes that fall short bring the overall impact down. I've even rewatched The Conformist and 1900, thinking this time it's all gonna click, and those are the two films I know I will rewatch again, (but not now.) There's also too much sexual interest in his films, where they go beyond being an important part of the story into more of a personal intrusion.

Appearing on 6 ICM lists, I obviously need to watch Before the Revolution, though I know nothing about it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on April 02, 2018, 10:50:47 AM
There is no such thing as too much sexual interest.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Mel Brooks
Post by: 1SO on April 03, 2018, 09:27:23 AM
#115 Mel Brooks Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9003.msg714432#msg714432)

I like reading the thread for Brooks because it covers my own personal divisive relationship with him. Brooks manages to be both side-splittingly hilarious and deeply lame, inspired but obvious. I was around in the wake of Blazing Saddles followed by Young Frankenstein, easily his two best though not without their own large doses of jokes that simply don't work.

First of all, you fans of Robin Hood: Men in Tights are as wrong as fans of Miami Vice. It's the film that turned me off of Mel Brooks films for good. So I haven't seen Life Stinks or Dracula: Dead and Loving It, and I considered watching them because these aren't difficult films to sit through, but actually I'm good with moving on.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Corndog on April 03, 2018, 09:33:14 AM
Have you seen the Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee episode where Jerry spends the evening with Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks watching Jeopardy and movies "where they have to secure the perimeter"? (Not that it's directed by Brooks)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Frank Capra
Post by: 1SO on April 03, 2018, 09:51:01 AM
#116 Frank Capra Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9005.msg714928#msg714928)

One of my favorite directors, as proven by the many reviews I've already posted in his thread. There's also the one deeply unpopular opinion of my not liking It's a Wonderful Life. (Not hating, just not liking.) In exchange, I have two obscure Capra title among my Essentials - Ladies of Leisure and American Madness - which brings Capra's total Essentials up to 7.

So, I'm good with watching more Capra, except most of what I have is from his really early days, titles like Long Pants (1927), The Matinee Idol (1928) and The Power of the Press (1928). There is also Broadway Bill (1934), which Capra later remade as Riding High. It stars Myrna Loy, so I'll definitely take a look at that one.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 03, 2018, 09:56:08 AM
Have you seen the Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee episode where Jerry spends the evening with Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks watching Jeopardy and movies "where they have to secure the perimeter"? (Not that it's directed by Brooks)
I listened to Reiner and Brooks on separate episodes of Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast, where each accuses the other of constantly falling asleep while they watch movies together.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Spike Jonze
Post by: 1SO on April 04, 2018, 09:27:08 PM
#117 Spike Jonze Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9006.msg516955#msg516955)

My relationship with Jonze's work is a bit frustrating. He's immensely talented and probably the greatest director of Music Videos there will ever be. The talent carries over into his features, but they've never quite connected with me like they have with others. My seemingly lifelong stance as the minority opinion on Being John Malkovich (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9006.msg792242#msg792242) followed by my belief that the joke of the ending to Adaptation shoots everything I like about the film up to that point right in the head. Where the Wild Things Are is one of the saddest kids films I've ever seen and I get that's the point, but it's also why I don't ever want to return to that place. That makes Her his best film by default, and even that doesn't come close to his best work.

My list includes all the videos I remember. I used to own the DVD of Spike Jonze videos. There's nothing here for me to catch up with or revisit.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Charlie Chaplin
Post by: 1SO on April 04, 2018, 09:44:58 PM
#118 Charlie Chaplin Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9008.msg773123#msg773123)

Brilliant comedic timing, but the more I watch the more it all blends into the same type of film with various high levels of sentiment. There are classic moments, but that's what I remember from his films, individual moments rather than the entire film. That's why (for example) Modern Times is low for me, a classic start leading into a more typical relationship story. It gets even worse when trying to remember the difference between short films.

There is one feature I haven't seen, A Countess From Hong Kong. It's not highly regarded and I don't look to Marlon Brando for laughs. So, I'll be moving on
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jean Cocteau
Post by: 1SO on April 04, 2018, 09:57:17 PM
#119 Jean Cocteau Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9009.msg667391#msg667391)

Martin said it:
I feel like he takes himself a little too seriously and thinks far too highly of himself.
But I liked Orpheus and I wish I hadn't waited so long to watch Testament of Orpheus, which I assume is a sequel of some kind. I'm also curious to know what 8 X 8: A Chess Sonata in 8 Movements is, though I may not be curious enough to actually watch or finish it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Charlie Chaplin
Post by: roujin on April 05, 2018, 08:37:08 AM
There is one feature I haven't seen, A Countess From Hong Kong. It's not highly regarded and I don't look to Marlon Brando for laughs. So, I'll be moving on

I know a couple of weirdos who consider this one of the best films of all time!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on April 05, 2018, 10:45:34 AM
#119 Jean Cocteau Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9009.msg667391#msg667391)

Martin said it:
I feel like he takes himself a little too seriously and thinks far too highly of himself.
But I liked Orpheus and I wish I hadn't waited so long to watch Testament of Orpheus, which I assume is a sequel of some kind. I'm also curious to know what 8 X 8: A Chess Sonata in 8 Movements is, though I may not be curious enough to actually watch or finish it.

If his movies are anything like his books, he definitely takes himself seriously.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Charlie Chaplin
Post by: 1SO on April 05, 2018, 04:52:06 PM
There is one feature I haven't seen, A Countess From Hong Kong. It's not highly regarded and I don't look to Marlon Brando for laughs. So, I'll be moving on

I know a couple of weirdos who consider this one of the best films of all time!
I don't want to take the bait on this or do anything that may lead to me watching A Countess From Hong Kong, but I'd certainly like to read a positive opinion.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - George Cukor
Post by: 1SO on April 05, 2018, 11:07:34 PM
#120 George Cukor Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9010.msg730954#msg730954)

One of those names where he worked a little here and there on other people's films so you have to keep straight which titles belong completely to him. Clearly a favorite of some big name actresses, he works with the people I love but the acting far surpasses the material, and many times not even that. There are some Winners, but I don't go into a Cuckor film expecting a winner.

Cukor made a lot of films that fall right into my comfort zone, which means I'm ready to watch many titles. Possibilities...
Girls About Town (1931): Kay Francis, Joel McCrea and Eugene Pallette
Two-Faced Woman (1941)
The Marrying Kind (1952)
The Actress (1953): Spencer Tracy, and Jean Simmons
Wild Is the Wind (1957): Anthony Quinn
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 05, 2018, 11:26:08 PM
I feel like he takes himself a little too seriously and thinks far too highly of himself.

If his movies are anything like his books, he definitely takes himself seriously.

8 X 8: A Chess Sonata in 8 Movements opens with a scroll as long as Alone in the Dark. It ends with, "This film has been produced by artists. We have made use of the traditional freedom of the artist to follow our inspiration."


At the start of Le Testament d'Orphee, the narrator says, "My film is nothing other than a striptease act, gradually peeling away my body to reveal my naked soul."
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on April 06, 2018, 03:55:57 AM
I feel like he takes himself a little too seriously and thinks far too highly of himself.

If his movies are anything like his books, he definitely takes himself seriously.

8 X 8: A Chess Sonata in 8 Movements opens with a scroll as long as Alone in the Dark. It ends with, "This film has been produced by artists. We have made use of the traditional freedom of the artist to follow our inspiration."


At the start of Le Testament d'Orphee, the narrator says, "My film is nothing other than a striptease act, gradually peeling away my body to reveal my naked soul."
Cocteau is super pretentious in the best possible way. His confidence in fine art is both amazing and endearing. The world  needs people like him, but only one at a time, please.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: DarkeningHumour on April 06, 2018, 05:41:24 AM
I have now been shaking my head for 20 minutes.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Michael Curtiz
Post by: 1SO on April 06, 2018, 07:51:16 PM
#121 Michael Curtiz Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9011.msg776820#msg776820)

173 features on IMDB he Directed or co-Directed, many with Warner Bros, where he worked on over 50 films during the 1930s. That's why I've probably seen so many. With such a large number, it's little surprise that I like 20 of them, even if that's less than half of what I've seen.

I'm not going to do a list with Michael Curtiz. I'm going to start in 1930 and look at each film's plot and cast to decide if I'm interested. I'm also planning to rewatch some films, in particular Mildred Pierce and The Breaking Point.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 06, 2018, 11:39:31 PM
So, I lied. Here is my tentative list for Michael Curtiz.

The Cabin in the Cotton (1932)
Female (1933)
Little Big Shot (1935)
Stolen Holiday (1937)
Daughters Courageous (1939)
Four Wives (1939)
This is the Army (1943)
Mildred Pierce (1945)
The Lady Takes a Sailor (1949)
The Breaking Point (1950)
I’ll See You in My Dreams (1951)
The Story of Will Rogers (1952)
The Hangman (1959)
The Man in the Net (1959)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 09, 2018, 01:19:46 PM
I like stopping this madness for a longer look at a single Director, and so far Curtiz is looking even better to me. Aside from the two reviews I've posted, I've already seen...
The Cabin in the Cotton (1932)
Female (1933)
Stolen Holiday (1937)
The Lady Takes a Sailor (1949)

And I've decided to add The Egyptian (1954) to my list.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 17, 2018, 10:48:11 PM
I've been busy with work, but I've also been loving this deep dive into Michael Curtiz. 12 of my last 13 films have been by Curtiz and I'm finding his take on Noir especially interesting, which is why I've added The Scarlet Hour (1956) to my list.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Vittorio De Sica
Post by: 1SO on April 22, 2018, 10:43:32 PM
#122 Vittorio De Sica Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9012.msg777241#msg777241)

I will probably never crack the reasoning for my indifference towards Italian neorealism. I thought Bicycle Thieves was okay when I watched it in film school, but it was Umberto D. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8652.msg497636#msg497636) that first made me realize this isn't a reason why I love movies. Little surprise that my favorite De Sica is Miracle in Milan which is so fanciful and magical in tone it could be seen as Fantasy.

I already quietly watched Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow and don't care to write about it. Such is my indifference. There are other noteworthy title I haven't seen, like Marriage Italian Style and The Children Are Watching Us, but I'd rather move on than plug up these blindspots.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Sergei Eisenstein
Post by: 1SO on April 22, 2018, 11:04:57 PM
#123 Sergei Eisenstein Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9013.msg888088#msg888088)

Talk about a director with a reputation to live up to. In terms of classic cinema, the Odessa steps sequence in Battleship Potemkin is right up there with the shower scene in Psycho and may be the earliest instance of a scene eclipsing the film it appears in. Of course a director that talented has more to offer, though Eisenstein's output seems a lot smaller than his ICM or IMDB page would suggest, with a number of titles that seems spun off from or variations on ¡Que viva Mexico!

I'm still in the afterglow of my two week deep exploration of Michael Curtiz, so I'm going to keep this simple. Old and New (1929) appears on 4 ICM lists and is the only film with over 100 votes on IMDB I haven't seen.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Mios Forman
Post by: 1SO on April 23, 2018, 10:57:12 PM
#124 Milos Forman Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9014.msg796345#msg796345)

 :'(

I didn't notice he was coming up so soon after his passing, but this is great because I can now pay some tribute to a filmmaker who has helmed two of my Essentials including my #3 film of All Time.

While I have gone back and watched two of Forman's Czech films, I still haven't seen Black Peter (1964). I'm on the fence about Taking Off (1971), and would rather take a fresh look at Hair (1979), which was my first Forman film. Plus, it'll make a great opener to this year's Music of May (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9014.msg796345#msg796345).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Samuel Fuller
Post by: 1SO on April 26, 2018, 01:17:02 PM
#125 Samuel Fuller Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9015.msg792442#msg792442)

I don't consider myself a fan of Fuller, though he's made movies I like and some I love. It seems I like the films that are for people who don't like Sam Fuller films, the less overbaked hyperbole and lurid shock the better.

I've never heard of Park Row (1952), probably because of the unknown cast, but it's highly-rated and was the lead up to Pickup on South Street. Always been curious about Fixed Bayonets! (1951)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Peter Greenaway
Post by: 1SO on April 29, 2018, 12:45:07 AM
#126 Peter Greenaway Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9016.msg517345#msg517345)

In college, Peter Greenaway was my snobby artist pick for any deep conversation about cinema art. The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover was my first NC-17 film (and in a movie theater) and The Baby of Macon was my first bootleg. I watched both many times, even though they were difficult films for many reasons. That's what made Drowning By Numbers such a blast. It was both Greenaway's most light-hearted film and a game - For those that don't know, the numbers 1 - 100 appear in order during the course of the film - while retaining his formal style.

I watched and enjoyed others, but The Pillow Book broke the spell and I went from finding Greenaway fascinating to finding him dull. That one film made me lose interest in seeking out other work. It's been at least 10 years since I've watched a Greenaway film. For this project, I'll be seeking out The Falls (1980). I'm also curious about Eisenstein in Guanajuato (2015), since I'd like to see what a modern Greenaway film looks like and I just read up about Eisenstein's Mexican work last week.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - D.W. Griffith
Post by: 1SO on April 29, 2018, 10:39:14 PM
I'm only going to be getting to Eisenstein in Guanajuato. Then it's onto...


#127 D.W. Griffith Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9017.msg721945#msg721945)

I feel my film school totally lied to me, telling me I had to appreciate Griffith when there were directors like F. W. Murnau and Fritz Lang who made more cinematic (and less racist) contributions. I do appreciate being forced to watch Intolerance, but why not Sunrise?

I've seen most of Griffith's major works. He has enough short films to bury me for a month, but I'm really not that interested. I'll look for Hearts of the World (1918) and Isn't Life Wonderful (1924), but I'm not going out of my way to locate them.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Peter Greenaway
Post by: Corndog on April 30, 2018, 08:13:10 AM
I'm also curious about Eisenstein in Guanajuato (2015), since I'd like to see what a modern Greenaway film looks like and I just read up about Eisenstein's Mexican work last week.

It's interesting enough. I thought the editing was the most interesting part.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 30, 2018, 10:09:09 AM
Greenaway has always been a technically superior filmmaker, and there are a number of shots here unlike anything I've seen in a film before. (Most striking to me was the way he plays with color grading in the opening sequence.) I just wish there wasn't so much focus on Eisenstein's supposed sexual awakening.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Howard Hawks
Post by: 1SO on April 30, 2018, 10:51:38 PM
I'm not that far behind, but I happened to peek at who's up next and it got me very excited so I started looking for titles to watch.


#128 Howard Hawks Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9020.msg609544#msg609544)

With 7 titles on my Essentials, Hawks is definitely a favorite and his films are often a joy to watch. I could go the full Curtiz, throw in a bunch of re-watches and make most of a month of this, but I won't have much new to say about His Girl Friday, Ball of Fire and El Dorado. Plus some of these will come up in Corndog's Westerns Marathon. I'm hoping to watch...

Paid to Love (1927): I wanted to see something from early in his career and this has William Powell
A Girl in Every Port (1928): Sounds like typical Hawks, plus Victor McLaglen and ICM recommended
The Dawn Patrol (1930): Familiar with the title, very highly rated on IMDB and a great cast
The Criminal Code (1931): Almost watched this Walter Huston vehicle today
The Crowd Roars (1932): Re-watch of a Cagney I've wanted to revisit. Also with Joan Blondell.
Sergeant York (1941): Only seen it once and liked it a lot.
Land of the Pharaohs (1955): The other ICM pick. Risky, but goes nicely with my last Curtiz being The Egyptian.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Huston
Post by: 1SO on May 04, 2018, 10:12:17 PM
#129 John Huston Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9021.msg721462#msg721462)

The definition of a classic director. Strong in many genres, the scripts he directs or often great and at least very interesting (Beat the Devil). Even The Misfits, which I despise is the kind of hate I can only have for a filmmaker who knows what they're doing.

While I kept myself from going on a full tear of Hawks films, that's even harder to stop with Huston, and some titles are in need of a rewatch. I saw Moby Dick (1956) before I even knew what a director did, and I keep going back and forth on Prizzi's Honor (1985)

As for new watches...
Let There Be Light (1946): One of his most highly acclaimed is a documentary on PTSD
Moulin Rouge (1952): Already on my list this month for Music of May
The Roots of Heaven (1958): African adventure starring Errol Flynn
The Night of the Iguana (1964): On my Watchlist for years
The MacKintosh Man (1973): Same, but with Paul Newman


That's plenty, but I'm also considering We Were Strangers (1949) for John Garfield, The Barbarian and the Geisha (1958) for John Wayne and a re-watch of Victory (1981) because I liked it as a kid.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Alejandro Jodorowsky
Post by: 1SO on May 12, 2018, 03:19:27 PM
#130 Alejandro Jodorowsky Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9022.msg517578#msg517578)

I should do my own list and not just copy Martin. When I was learning about cinema, El Topo had a reputation much like a snuff film, except I hoped one day to see the film. I purchased a bootleg and loved it, while also being frustrated by it. That's Jodorowsky. Love the vision while finding it to be too much to take in a large dose.

I always planned on watching Fando and Lis (1968) next and during that delay he's released  The Dance of Reality (2013), which I'd also like to see. I may also watch The Holy Mountain again just for the visual ingenuity.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on May 12, 2018, 08:56:25 PM
The Dance of Reality is not up to the quality of El Topo or The Holy Mountain, but it has a nice meta aspect, given that Alejandro's son is playing Alejandro's father. It is very much a surreal film, but not entirely.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Krzysztof Kieslowski
Post by: 1SO on May 14, 2018, 10:42:53 PM
I hope the timing of my posts aren't confusing. I often enter the evening with one film left to watch from the previous director, but I hate posting these in the middle of the night where they're less likely to be read.


#131 Krzysztof Kieslowski Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9023.msg724427#msg724427)

My first Kieslowski was Decalogue, which I didn't appreciate because it was after reading a bunch of writing about it being the greatest thing ever and I went in expecting a more direct series about The Ten Commandments in modern life. At the time, the only one I really liked was Thou Shall Not Kill, mostly because of its unique colors. Years later, I liked A Short Film About Killing about the same while I liked A Short Film About Love even more, largely because I had watched Three Colors by then.

Of the Three Colors, I can understand White being seen as the weak entry, but the story's unpredictability and the dynamic of the lead's perception of wife, how that poisons their dynamic and the events that put them on equal footing hit me in a place few films go... my very soul. As a writing exercise, I did an adaptation of the film, making some alterations to fit in my own personal thoughts on such a situation. It's one of my favorite things I ever wrote, though I understand it's the work of an inexperienced screenwriter in his early 20s.

Kieslowski has made such an impact on modern cinema I was surprised to learn he's directed so few features. I wasn't able to find No End, but I can and will watch Blind Chance (1987).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Buster Keaton
Post by: 1SO on May 17, 2018, 09:03:14 PM
#132 Buster Keaton Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9024.msg517580#msg517580)

My first Buster Keaton was the 2nd half of a Double Feature. First was Chaplin's The Gold Rush, which I liked. Then it was The General, which blew me away. I've seen everything Keaton was involved in (except for a few sound pictures) because over one weekend American Movie Classics played it all in a Marathon I recorded on VHS tapes, getting up during the night to change the tapes.

I don't enjoy silent film comedy as much as I used to, so I'd rather move on than revisit something that might not hold up as well as I remember.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jane Campion
Post by: 1SO on May 17, 2018, 09:09:33 PM
#133 Jane Campion Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9025.msg766412#msg766412)

The thread for Jane Campion is unusually long because with OAD as my guide I did a thorough Marathon of her work back in 2014.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Henri-Georges Clouzot
Post by: 1SO on May 17, 2018, 09:16:51 PM
#134 Henri-Georges Clouzot Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9026.msg753507#msg753507)

I've only seen three features? That surprised me, though he doesn't have that many credits for how famous he is. Also, like with Jean-Pierre Melville, I don't like as films as much as it seems like I would.

I've been looking for Quai des Orfèvres (1947) for years, one of my biggest Shames. I will try again. Also, I just love the title The Murderer Lives at Number 21 (1942). I'll look over a few more titles and probably come up with 3-5 to watch.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on May 17, 2018, 09:35:20 PM
A restoration of Quai des Orfèvres is currently making the arthouse rounds. Its two-week run in LA ended earlier this month. Geez, sometimes it’s like you’re not even trying! lol

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on May 25, 2018, 11:02:33 PM
I am cutting my losses and abandoning my exploration of Henri-Georges Clouzot. I watched The Murderer Lives at Number 21 and Quai des Orfèvres, and I just don't like the way Clouzot tries to be sneaky about his genre. Instead of giving effective tension and suspense, Clouzot uses comedy (Number 21), music and character drama (Orfèvres) so that the thriller elements can... surprise us? That seems like a real reductive way to make a thriller, lower our expectations and then give us crumbs. Perhaps Clouzot is too subtle or too sophisticated for my tastes. Either way, I'm moving on. 

Updated Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9026.msg753507#msg753507)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jules Dassin
Post by: 1SO on May 25, 2018, 11:41:30 PM
#135 Jules Dassin Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9027.msg777238#msg777238)

When I saw the name, I was thinking of Dassin as someone who makes Crime and Heist films whose work could be confused with Jean-Pierre Melville. Looking over his movies, I'm very much mistaken. I've collected my reviews over to Dassin's Thread (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9027.msg889109#msg889109) because this is going to mostly be a Marathon of Rewatches.

Brute Force: Watched Dec. 2011. I keep going back and forth if this is properly rated or perhaps it deserves to be on my Essentials.
Thieves' Highway: Watched Nov. 2012. I wasn't such a big Richard Conte fan when I first saw it.
Night and the City: Watched June 2011. My opinion is so far apart from most I knew I'd have to give it another look one day.
Never on Sunday: Something new. Sounds unusual. Highly rated.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on May 26, 2018, 12:27:15 AM
I am cutting my losses and abandoning my exploration of Henri-Georges Clouzot.

So you've finally come out of the Clouzot. It's about time. #brave
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on May 26, 2018, 01:35:44 AM
There should be no doubt now who came up with this thread title (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12357.0).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jonathan Demme
Post by: 1SO on May 26, 2018, 11:52:06 PM
#136 Jonathan Demme Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9028.msg710238#msg710238)

Something Wild may be one of the pivotal films of my lifetime. I saw it on HBO right when I was getting into films, right when I was finding my own style. The beginning has one of the most graphic sex scenes I had seen at the time and from there the film redefined for me what a film could do. It mashes a lot of genres and broke a lot of molds for me. I watched it several times, and not just for the first 30 minutes.

I've written in several places about The Silence of the Lambs, one of my Top 10 films of All Time and the greatest thriller ever made. (Sorry, Hitchcock.) In general I've had mixed success with Demme, which makes sense the more I learn about how he likes to film movies. Some things work and some things don't and some day I may try to find out what led him to cast Mark Wahlberg as Cary Grant in The Truth About Charlie, but I still can't bring myself to do it. What I will do is watch his early breakthrough Citizen's Band (1977) and rewatch Melvin and Howard (1980), which left me cold the first time.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on May 27, 2018, 12:23:32 AM
There should be no doubt now who came up with this thread title (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12357.0).

Fond memories. :)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Ford
Post by: 1SO on May 28, 2018, 10:23:12 AM
#137 John Ford Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9031.msg611359#msg611359)

It was a long time before I learned to love John Ford's filmmaking, which I found square and kind of corny. I know sdedalus had something to do with me seeing the light. I always liked Liberty Valance, though not half as much as I love it now. Young Mr. Lincoln was when I found that the things I used to not like about Ford were what I now loved about him.

I've seen a lot, so this is going to be picking a few I've always been interested in.
Steamboat Round the Bend (1935): I didn't like Judge Priest but I find the celebrity of Will Rogers interesting
The Prisoner of Shark Island (1936)
Mogambo (1953)
Sergeant Rutledge (1960): The one I'm most interested in seeing
7 Women (1966): A rewatch sort of. When I first had the chance to see it I wasn't in the mood and I hardly remember it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on May 28, 2018, 11:48:26 AM
I’ll join you on those first two, I think. They’re coming up soon in my Ford marathon, just after The Whole Town’s Talking.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on May 28, 2018, 10:01:53 PM
I worry about my speed. However...
a) My life is about to get very busy and stay that way through most of June. So that'll slow me down.
b) I can always watch these at your pace and work on the next director in the meantime.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Edward Dmytryk
Post by: 1SO on June 04, 2018, 09:02:03 PM
#138 Edward Dmytryk Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9034.msg742464#msg742464)

Even though he only made 5 Film Noir, I think of Dmytryk as a Noir director because his films favored cutthroat, morally ambiguous characters and plots that are tough as a nut and just as hard to crack. The western Warlock is his masterpiece, with the help of Henry Fonda, Richard Widmark and Anthony Quinn. For that reason alone, I'm ready to do a little digging.

I've seen the popular choices. ICM and IMDB suggest The Young Lions (1958), which has  Montgomery Clift, but I'm not too interested in 167 minutes of Marlon Brando and Dean Martin. So, maybe. More likely and based on availability...
Confessions of Boston Blackie (1941): I like these pre-noir mysteries and Chester Morris is a good lead.
The Falcon Strikes Back (1943): Same and while nobody can replace George Sanders, I like the character
Tender Comrade (1943): Ginger Rogers and Robert Ryan. I hear they have great chemistry.
The Mountain (1956): Spencer Tracy
Where Love Has Gone (1964): Courtroom drama starring Bette Davis and Susan Hayward
Alvarez Kelly (1966): Western starring William Holden and Richard Widmark
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on June 05, 2018, 12:06:13 AM
Hmm, why does my post in that thread say it was last edited by you?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 05, 2018, 12:29:46 AM
Back when roujin and me were given the keys to the directors, I asked you if I could fix posts where the photos were no longer showing. You would start with a photo and then the next post would have your list. You said it was fine, so I started replacing the posts where the photos didn't show with your list (cut/paste) and then deleting the 2nd post so it wasn't a duplicate post. I also changed the thread titles, removing "Director's Best:"
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Bob Fosse
Post by: 1SO on June 12, 2018, 08:38:22 AM
#139 Bob Fosse Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9035.msg827247#msg827247)

There have been a number of great film choreographers (Michel Kidd, Hermes Pan, Jerome Robbins) but Busby Berkeley and Bob Fosse were gods among men. Had to say that even though we're talking about directing here. It's unfortunate that Fosse only made five features, all expertly edited.

Trying to come up with a unifying reason for being mixed on three of them, there's a reluctance to cut out something that may be fine by itself but as a piece of the entire picture really drag down the pacing. The most glaring example is "I'm a Brass Band" in Sweet Charity, a number from the stage that should've been cut for the screen. The one time this indulgence worked was "Take Off with Us" in All That Jazz.

Since there's nothing new to discover, I will move ahead.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Masaki Kobayashi
Post by: 1SO on June 12, 2018, 08:49:22 AM
#140 Masaki Kobayashi Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9036.msg662034#msg662034)

While Martin's poll sticks to the more well-known and available titles from when he made the poll back in 2010, I don't think Kobayashi's other films are likely to surpass these. (Of the 8 listed only 3 have votes, which is also fitting.) It's not that his other films aren't good. It's that his best work is unparalleled.

I've seen 12 of his 22 films. I don't know what I'm going to watch yet, but I don't want to do a comprehensive Marathon. The one I'm most interested in is The Inheritance (1962).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on June 13, 2018, 04:33:16 PM
I might be in for Lang, depending on what you watch. I'm definitely looking for an excuse to watch The Marriage Circle and Broken Lullaby for Lubitsch, among others.

pixote
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Fritz Lang
Post by: 1SO on June 13, 2018, 04:39:51 PM
#141 Fritz Lang Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9038.msg754248#msg754248)

My original aim was to complete this project by the end of the Decade, but once I realized that would be impossible, it became easier to do longer studies of each director if I wanted to. I've already seen 30 of Fritz Lang's 46 features. The reviews are scattered all over this forum. Some I watched for Noir-vember, some were because after finally watching  Metropolis (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9939.msg587905#msg587905) in 2011 I wanted to see more of his silent work.

Because my Lang is so spread out, there are a titles I want to rewatch along with the new discoveries. In particular I want to watch the Dr. Mabuse Trilogy, especially since this includes his final film, which I've never seen.
My list of possibilities:
Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler (1922)
Woman in the Moon (1929) - ICM pick
The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933)
Ministry of Fear (1944) - A rewatch, but I love Ray Milland and can't remember this one
Tiger of Bengal (1959)
The Indian Tomb (1959)
The 1,000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse (1960)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Fritz Lang
Post by: pixote on June 13, 2018, 05:29:47 PM
Woman in the Moon (1929) - ICM pick
The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933)

I'd like to watch your whole list (except for Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler, which was already part of one of my marathons (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13381.msg810110#msg810110)). Kanopy has these two above, though, which makes it more likely I'll get to them — perhaps along with Four around a Woman, which is under an hour.

I'm pretty sure I've seen Ministry of Fear, but I don't remember it either.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 13, 2018, 05:31:07 PM
I'm definitely looking for an excuse to watch The Marriage Circle and Broken Lullaby for Lubitsch, along others.

pixote
Those two are definitely under consideration. Monte Carlo is the one I most want to see.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on June 13, 2018, 05:41:37 PM
Monte Carlo is the one I most want to see.

The writing credits there seem to be the most fascinating aspect:

Ernest Vajda                      ...        (adaptation)
Hans Müller                       ...        (play "The Blue Coast")
Booth Tarkington                  ...        (novel "Monsieur Beaucaire")
Evelyn Greenleaf Sutherland       ...        (play "Monsieur Beaucaire")
Vincent Lawrence                  ...        (additional dialogue by)


I'm wondering if Vajda really incorporated elements from the novel and the two theatrical applications, or if an IMDb user just got overzealous.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Fritz Lang
Post by: 1SO on June 13, 2018, 05:43:05 PM
I'd like to watch your whole list (except for Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler, which was already part of one of my marathons (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13381.msg810110#msg810110)). Kanopy has these two above, though, which makes it more likely I'll get to them — perhaps along with Four around a Woman, which is under an hour.

Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler is 4-hours, which gives you some time. Except my plans to see American Animals today fell thru so I have a hole in my schedule. How long is Kanopy's version of Woman in the Moon? there's a 95, 156, 169 and 200 minute cut. Mine is 169m.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on June 13, 2018, 05:47:38 PM
It lists it at 171 minutes (Kino Lorber).

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 19, 2018, 03:20:36 PM
I said it would be a busy month. I still have Tiger of Bengal, The Indian Tomb and The 1,000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse to watch. Today I'm watching Confirm or Deny (1941), which was started by Lang but Archie Mayo took over after six days of production.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on June 19, 2018, 03:55:12 PM
I'm enjoying this mini-Lang marathon, so I might keep going with it. Very interested to listen to the audio commentary on The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (trying to condition myself to pronounce it similar to medusa instead of, like, MA-boose) later on tonight; after that, not sure if I'll sneak in a Ministry of Fear rewatch or jump straight to The Indian Tomb ... or neither.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ernst Lubitsch
Post by: 1SO on June 20, 2018, 08:22:01 AM
#142 Ernst Lubitsch Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9039.msg645307#msg645307)

Took me years to understand what "The Lubitsch Touch" meant, mostly because I think Trouble in Paradise and To Be or Not to Be are highly overrated. Switch their reputations with Angel and One Hour With You and the world seems right to me. Ninotchka and The Shop Around the Corner stay right where they are, while Design for Living I should probably re-watch even though I already have a large buffet in front of me, mostly from early in his career.
I Don't Want to Be a Man (1918)
Madame DuBarry (1919)
The Marriage Circle (1924)
Lady Windermere's Fan (1925)
Monte Carlo (1930)
Broken Lullaby (1932)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Sidney Lumet
Post by: 1SO on June 24, 2018, 08:41:20 AM
#143 Sidney Lumet Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9040.msg783964#msg783964)

If someone said, "Quick, name 3 Sidney Lumet films." I'd probably respond Serpico, Prince of the City and Dog Day Afternoon. I think of Lumet as the definitive NYC filmmaker, even more than Woody Allen, yet only one of his five films in my Essentials is set on the city streets.

I started watching Lumet when I was probably too young to best appreciate him. Because of that, I'd like to rewatch Serpico (1973), which I last watched in the 80s. I've also had a pair of Sean Connery movies on my Watchlist: The Hill (1965) and The Offence (1973).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on June 24, 2018, 05:47:17 PM
I've always been mildly interested in The Hill, but I'll probably pass on Lumet. Prince of the City is the one I need to see, and Dog Day Afternoon and The Verdict are the two that I need to rewatch.

Actually, someone randomly gave me the Blu-Ray of Deathtrap not too long ago; maybe I'll use this as a nudge to finally watch it.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 24, 2018, 09:25:01 PM
Actually, someone randomly gave me the Blu-Ray of Deathtrap not too long ago; maybe I'll use this as a nudge to finally watch it.

pixote
Deathtrap is one of the biggest disagreements between Junior and me, and we rarely disagree on anything. That alone makes it something to watch. #Team1SO
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on June 24, 2018, 10:13:52 PM
Are you tracking your director ratings as you move through this project? I imagine most of the directors so far have been known quantities, but have any seen significant upticks in your rating of them?

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 24, 2018, 10:57:03 PM
I'm keeping a Letterboxd Diary (https://letterboxd.com/1so/list/all-the-directors/), but since each Director is being handled differently most of these viewings are watching titles outside the canon hoping for Discoveries.

So far I've watched 271 films.
106 features and 1 Short (Scorsese's The Audition) I recommend. 13 of these are Rewatches.
The best Discoveries of this Marathon - in the order that I watched them - are:
The Search (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3546.msg879654#msg879654) (1948, Fred Zinnemann)
Passing Strange (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=3564.msg879840#msg879840) (2009, Spike Lee)
The Chase (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=4176.msg882437#msg882437) (1966, Arthur Penn)
T2:Trainspotting (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=5305.msg885386#msg885386) (2017, Danny Boyle)
Taking Off (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9014.msg888134#msg888134) (1971, Milos Forman)
Park Row (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9015.msg888271#msg888271) (1952, Samuel Fuller)


These are 6 directors I have different levels of admiration, and all of them I look more fondly on because of these films.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Louis Malle
Post by: 1SO on June 27, 2018, 08:25:23 PM
#144 Louis Malle Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9042.msg622205#msg622205)

I never thought of Malle as part of the French New Wave, looking at his films as strong actor showcases and not an excuse to try something new and throw the rules out the window. That's because I first discovered Malle in the 80s, when the wave had crested and settled. He was popular with Siskel and Ebert, but being young I thought of his work as a bit dry. I still don't love Malle, but after Atlantic City I go into his films more hopeful. (My Dinner with Andre almost undid all that goodwill and certainly would have if I wasn't warned about it.)

I don't want to get too extensive with Malle, but The Lovers (1958) is on 6 ICM Lists and I've been interested in Black Moon (1975). I often read of that one being not so good, but it also seems too weird to pass up.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 28, 2018, 07:02:13 AM
Black Moon is very weird, makes House almost normal. Is it good.... tough call, it would need several viewings to determine. It does provide some very odd moments. House is the wrong comparison, Eraserhead would be better, although Black Moon is well lit.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 29, 2018, 12:26:22 AM
Black Moon is very weird, makes House almost normal. Is it good.... tough call, it would need several viewings to determine. It does provide some very odd moments. House is the wrong comparison, Eraserhead would be better, although Black Moon is well lit.
House, Eraserhead, El Topo... these are fun films to try and figure out. They also feature stunning lighting that can support multiple layers of weird and stimulating. Black Moon is shot by Sven Nykvist in a naturalistic style, but not gritty, which fit Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 29, 2018, 07:02:19 AM
Yes the lighting in Black Moon was not a strong feature (although my memory of Eraserhead is lots of night time shots) and it does not add to the weirdness of the film, rather it is banal like it is saying: what we are watching is normal, real even, but that does not fit with what we are watching as it is not normal. There is an overall flatness to the feel of the film. Still it feels like there is more waiting to be discovered, but requiring multiple viewings. The trouble is, the film is not strongly driving you to want to watch it multiple times.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Anthony Mann
Post by: 1SO on June 29, 2018, 09:02:09 AM
#145 Anthony Mann Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9043.msg660566#msg660566)

I didn't know who Anthony Mann was before I joined the forums. MartinTeller got me interested when he said that Mann was terrific at both Westerns and Noir at a time when I was getting deep into both. I agree about the Westerns, but the Noirs often make ridiculous decisions, and I would think there were two different directors if not for how much great Noir gets into Mann's westerns. Mann has a wonderful sense of space for the characters within the frame and in relation to the camera, and to complete his collaborations with John Alton I will be watching The Black Book (aka. Reign of Terror) (1949)

Mann is a director I don't get tired of, so I'm open to watch...
Strangers in the Night (1944)
Strange Impersonation (1946)
The Heroes of Telemark (1965)

However, Mann also has a pair of Epic Historical films for me to see.
El Cid (1961)
The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Vincente Minnelli
Post by: 1SO on July 02, 2018, 10:34:49 AM
#146 Vincente Minnelli Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9047.msg799053#msg799053)

I don't knock Minnelli as much as I used to. That's a combination of noticing what he does very well in terms of the camera and the Art Direction and watching the Essential melodrama Home From the Hill, (not my MOST Buried Treasure, but it's down pretty deep.) My problems with Minnelli can be seen in Meet Me in St. Louis, which I think is a little overrated and The Band Wagon, which I think is poorly directed except for the "Girl Hunt Ballet".

So far, deep dives with Minnelli has led me to more misfires than gems, so I'm sticking to 3 from my Watchlist.
The Cobweb (1955)
Lust for Life (1956)
Tea and Sympathy (1956)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on July 02, 2018, 01:14:04 PM
Hmm. I'm probably even less a fan of Minnelli than you are, so this could be interesting. Tea and Sympathy is my favorite of his and the one I've been meaning to revisit; and Lust for Life is the other one I've most been meaning to see. They're both on Filmstruck, along with The Cobweb, so I guess I'm joining in, at least for two of them. I think I'll let you be the guinea pig on The Cobweb before I decide whether to make time for it.

Really strong piece of writing. Hope I remember to read it again if/when I watch Tea and Sympathy.

It's been seven years, so I thought you might need the above reminder.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 02, 2018, 02:58:21 PM
The thread has a lot of good reading once you've seen the films. sdedalus' post is why it went onto my Watchlist.

Tell me Home From the Hill is at least something you're interested in.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on July 02, 2018, 03:48:13 PM
Tell me Home From the Hill is at least something you're interested in.

Having George Peppard and George Hamilton in the same film seems like it violates some universal maxim, but I'm always interested in a Mitchum film. I picture it, perhaps, as a Minnelli-directed version of Giant, which is kind of a worst-of-both-worlds scenario ... but it sounds like thematically it'll tie together with Tea for Sympathy in worthwhile ways. Decisions, decisions.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on July 03, 2018, 02:59:05 PM
I think I'll let you be the guinea pig on The Cobweb before I decide whether to make time for it.

Your country thanks you for your sacrifice.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 04, 2018, 02:09:28 AM
I think I'll let you be the guinea pig on The Cobweb before I decide whether to make time for it.
Spoiler Alert: I don't recommend you make time for it.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kenji Mizoguchi
Post by: 1SO on July 07, 2018, 08:57:58 AM
#147 Kenji Mizoguchi Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9048.msg723666#msg723666)

I never got into Mizoguchi. I tried back when he was a favorite of Martinteller, and I discovered Sansho the Bailiff, which is in my Essentials. He's a director where what I would read about him would never seep into my viewing experiences. Because of that, I've seen very few of his 94 features. Only a third of these are relatively easy to find, but with Martin cooling on him as well I'm not feeling compelled. ICM recommends 8 titles but I'm just going to watch the one on top, Taira Clan Saga (1955).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on July 07, 2018, 06:06:57 PM
Mizoguchi will be heavily featured in a Japanese film marathon I hope to start next year.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 07, 2018, 11:06:31 PM
I look forward to that. Much as I think I like Japanese movies, it's really just a couple of popular directors and genre stuff. I've spoken out about Ozu many times, Mizoguchi doesn't interest me though I bet if I spread everything out I'd find a couple or a few I really like. I'm even less excited about Mikio Naruse. Naruse is #214 but I see Ozu is up next.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Yasujiro Ozu
Post by: 1SO on July 07, 2018, 11:54:26 PM
#148 Yasujiro Ozu

There is no Ranked List for reasons you can find all over my posts on Ozu (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9049.msg783047#msg783047). I have seen 15 of his films and couldn't tell you one from the other. That sameness combined with his uncinematic formal approach gets under my skin, and I realized I have two options here. I could do like with Jean-Pierre Melville, wipe the slate clean and start from the start. (I've been told repeatedly when you Marathon Ozu the subtle differences from one film to another make each one special.) However, since that's not something I'm interested in doing at this time, I'm going with the other option and moving onto the next director.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Pier Paolo Pasolini
Post by: 1SO on July 08, 2018, 12:07:40 AM
#149 Pier Paolo Pasolini Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9050.msg637810#msg637810)

One of those like Takeshi Kitano whose direction is often more interesting than the films themselves.
The Gospel According to St. Matthew, Salo and Teorema are some of the most unforgettable film experiences of my life, and each one for different reasons. My Marathon with Bondo of Pasolini's Trilogy of Life (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9536.msg664775#msg664775) was one of my favorite partnerships on the Boards.

IMDB and ICM suggest Oedipus Rex (1967) but I'd rather see Pasolini's version of one of my favorite stories, Medea (1969).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Roman Polanski
Post by: 1SO on July 10, 2018, 12:35:34 AM
#150 Roman Polanski Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9051.msg518846#msg518846)

While never a favorite of mine, he has 3 films on my Essentials. I've already been really good at keeping up with Polanski's notable work, including some of his early short films, and my Top 8 I've seen more than once. The biggest omissions are his version of Oliver Twist, which doesn't appeal to me at all and Venus in Fur, which I'm only learning about while updating his thread. I know I haven't written about most of his work, but I don't see a good reason to not movie on.


...okay, looking at who is up next I now have a reason.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Hirokazu Koreeda
Post by: 1SO on July 10, 2018, 12:56:24 AM
#151 Hirokazu Koreeda Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9053.msg868401#msg868401)

I skimmed thru the thread because while my current vote is "don't like any", I've been curious about a couple of Koreeda's films, and with posts like OAD's words on Like Father, Like Son, I want to watch the film just to read that post.

So, I'm going to hit the pause button here and take some time watch films I'm interested in. I may even space them out with the next director(s). I'm most interested in...
Maborosi (1995) - early masterwork with intriguing premise
Air Doll (2009) - Very intriguing premise. Sounds like a Spike Jonze idea.
Like Father, Like Son (2013) - OAD
The Third Murder (2017) - courtroom mystery? Want to see Koreeda's version of that.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Teproc on July 10, 2018, 02:28:16 AM
I would advise against The Third Murder (which is not bad but pretty tedious) and recommend Our Little Sister, although it's a film I'd describe as Ozu-esque, so maybe not for you.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: valmz on July 10, 2018, 03:32:11 AM
Our Little Sister is so, so great. It's like a metaphor for Koreeda's filmmaking: While his cinematic "elders" are wreaking havoc and drama, he decides to focus only on the opportunities to make people's lives better. So much magic in that one.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on July 10, 2018, 08:25:33 AM
Thirding the recommendation for OLS, my favorite. Although I Wish might be more suited to your tastes.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 10, 2018, 09:22:50 AM
Taking it all into consideration because I don't know why I'm not as excited about Koreeda as everyone else. Though I often see him mentioned as a contemporary of Ozu, I think that's about his humanism and not any formal directing choices. In that regard, Koreeda is often compared to Taiwanese directors Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-hsien, who combine to form a supergroup of acclaimed filmmakers I generally avoid.

The Third Murder intrigues me because it appears to be more of a genre piece and may be the Koreeda film for people who don't like Koreeda. I'm not ruling out Our Little Sister, I Wish or a possible rewatch of Nobody Knows. I'm just going to see where this goes and hope for the best.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: valmz on July 10, 2018, 01:22:10 PM
I don't think Koreeda is similar at all to the Taiwanese directors. He doesn't do "slow cinema", really. He's much closer to Rohmer. People talk. A lot.

As for The Third Murder, I have heard that it's the Koreeda film for nobody. Even if it's the Koreeda film for people who don't like Koreeda, it's still probably not a great genre film for people that like genre films. Seems like going to In n Out and only ordering a plate of lettuce, just so that you can say you ate there. But - did you, really? Wouldn't you rather just have a good salad?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Mamet, David
Post by: 1SO on July 10, 2018, 11:00:32 PM
I wanted to space out the Koreeda films more and the next director is a great choice.

#152 David Mamet Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9054.msg718658#msg718658)

Like with Aaron Sorkin, I love that sweet, sweet dialogue. A writers poll would be more fitting, but there was a period where Mamet was developing solid directing skills. Then came State and Main, a major stumble, and he's been shaky for me ever since. I've rewatched his first 5 features numerous times. I don't even like Homicide overall but the first half is some of Mamet's best work.

I've seen all of Mamet's features except for Phil Spector (2013), and while I hear it doesn't work I'm curious to learn why. I also want to take another look at Redbelt (2008), which I found interesting but strangely plotted. I'm probably also going to watch that first half of Homicide again.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - David and Albert Maysles
Post by: 1SO on July 13, 2018, 09:06:11 AM
#153 David and Albert Maysles Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9055.msg890900#msg890900)

I thought the Maysles' were an inseparable team, but it's difficult to create an accurate thread for them because they frequently work apart or with others. The only films that bear both their names and nobody else are The Beales of Grey Gardens (2006) and Showman (1963). I was surprised to learn Grey Gardens is credited to 4 Directors.

The Maysles' is a name I grew up knowing about long before I watched anything. Same with D.A. Pennebaker. Documentaries aren't my thing and I'm not even sure what I want to watch here, but I'm leaning towards a rewatch of Grey Gardens (1975) and the 30 for 30 short Muhammad and Larry (2009)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Leo McCarey
Post by: 1SO on July 14, 2018, 12:57:37 AM
#154 Leo McCarey Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9056.msg890973#msg890973)

I was starting to wonder when this was going to bring me one of my Classic Hollywood directors. While McCarey is not a favorite, he did put two in my Top 200. Unfortunately, he also wasn't very prolific, unless I want to marathon a bunch of Laurel and Hardy shorts. There are no glaring omissions, but I want to recharge my cinema batteries.

The Kid From Spain (1932) - I'd heard Eddie Cantor was a popular leading man but obnoxious by modern standards. (And it was Gilbert Gottfried who said it.) I've been wanting to see for myself, so this works.
Six of a Kind (1934) - Speaking of annoying, this has Gracie Allen AND W.C. Fields. It's only and hour and rated pretty highly.


Not watching unless someone can convince me (and I'd be surprised if anyone's even seen these.)
Belle of the Nineties (1934) - Mae West
My Son John (1952) - a Jonathan Rosenbaum selection that's 5.6 on IMDB
Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys! (1958) - cute premise, but only 6.0 on IMDB and the cast (Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Joan Collins, Jack Carson) isn't enough for me.
Satan Never Sleeps (1962) - I like William Holden, but not enough for a low-rated 2+ hour war drama. Besides, drama isn't McCarey's speciality.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on July 14, 2018, 01:06:40 AM
I'm always have to remind myself how few films McCarey made after 1940.

I had a wonderfully distracting week, which put me behind in my movie watching, but I might try to join you in The Kid from Spain, since it's on Filmstruck.

I'm surprised Indiscreet didn't make the shortlist — though reading up on it, it doesn't sound quite as promising as I thought initially (Gloria Swanson, Barbara Kent, Gregg Toland).

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 14, 2018, 01:15:08 PM
I had a wonderfully distracting week, which put me behind in my movie watching, but I might try to join you in The Kid from Spain, since it's on Filmstruck.

pixote
I don't know if that's enough of a reason, especially when you so many films that are probably better uses of your time. I picked up the two films today and will probably watch both tonight.


Are you tracking your director ratings as you move through this project? I imagine most of the directors so far have been known quantities, but have any seen significant upticks in your rating of them?

pixote
Still trying to come up with something to do here. When I hit #150, I realized it was better to start this sooner rather than later.
150 Directors. For all I have:
1. A thorough, color-coded list
2. A Rating from the Director Ratings project.

The obvious thing would be to re-rate them and rank them accordingly, but how useful is that? I don't even know what I might do with such a list, let alone how others might use it as a reference guide.
Is it better to rate them by the number of successes? Is it fair to average their filmography out when some filmmakers will suffer from that simply because they made so many films?
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ermanno Olmi
Post by: 1SO on July 14, 2018, 01:33:04 PM
#155 Ermanno Olmi Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9057.msg810715#msg810715)

Until someone comes along with a passion for Olmi, he'll always be on the fringe of my Italian cinema education. His career covers a lot more ground than the titles in the poll, but most of them are extremely hard to find. I'm going to keep this simple.  IMDB and ICM say that Time Stood Still (1959) is what I should try next. It also comes with a lengthy review from MartinTeller (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9057.msg800789#msg800789), who gives it a Very Good rating.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Sydney Pollack
Post by: 1SO on July 15, 2018, 10:04:50 AM
#156 Sydney Pollack Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9059.msg707061#msg707061)

I get the impression Pollack was an intelligent guy. He enjoyed popular genre material, but he always approached things in a classy way. Because of that, I've watched more of his films than I realized, and been mixed on many of them. What's a thriller without thrills? That would be a thriller directed by Sydney Pollack.

I'm just now reading about This Property Is Condemned (1966), which seems interesting and a remote possibility.
Castle Keep (1969) is an action comedy starring Burt Lancaster. Sold!
The Yakuza (1974) has been on my Watchlist. Plus, Robert Mitchum.
Stupid as it sounds, I've always been interested in Havana (1990). 
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on July 15, 2018, 10:50:35 AM
I remember The Yakuza’s being worthwhile. Mitchum is really appealing in it, says my vague memory.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Yasujiro Ozu
Post by: roujin on July 17, 2018, 08:48:09 AM
#148 Yasujiro Ozu
his uncinematic formal approach

 :o
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicholas Ray
Post by: 1SO on July 19, 2018, 12:29:35 AM
#157 Nicholas Ray Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9062.msg729435#msg729435)

This is why I can't rank Directors. My Top 5 Nicholas Ray films are really well directed. The direction is a big part of what makes them stand out from similar material. However, overall Ray is not a director I like because his stamp on genre material more often than not produces creaky, dull films. If there are problems with the script, he only magnifies them with his direction.

I have two Nicholas Ray films on my Watchlist...
Born to Be Bad (1950): Not a big fan of Joan Fontaine, but Robert Ryan and Film Noir
The Savage Innocents (1960): Anthony Quinn as an Eskimo. This film (https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fforgottenfilmcast.files.wordpress.com%2F2018%2F01%2Fthe-savage-innocents-1.png%3Fw%3D700&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fforgottenfilmcast.wordpress.com%2F2018%2F01%2F13%2Fthe-savage-innocents%2F&docid=dcWwV6bhnwn9eM&tbnid=-9GCGhtgdKMXCM%3A&vet=10ahUKEwin5N3TtqrcAhXJGTQIHWinBL0QMwhZKBUwFQ..i&w=700&h=285&safe=off&client=safari&bih=716&biw=1036&q=The%20Savage%20Innocents&ved=0ahUKEwin5N3TtqrcAhXJGTQIHWinBL0QMwhZKBUwFQ&iact=mrc&uact=8) just looks (https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Folivefilms.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F05%2Fwsi-imageoptim-web-front-the-savage-innocents.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Folivefilms.com%2Fproduct%2Fthe-savage-innocents%2F&docid=pf1kdCfbqSxOfM&tbnid=ARJ5mS9FN8hhBM%3A&vet=10ahUKEwin5N3TtqrcAhXJGTQIHWinBL0QMwg1KAAwAA..i&w=765&h=1079&safe=off&client=safari&bih=716&biw=1036&q=The%20Savage%20Innocents&ved=0ahUKEwin5N3TtqrcAhXJGTQIHWinBL0QMwg1KAAwAA&iact=mrc&uact=8) completely nuts (https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Frarefilm.net%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F03%2FThe-Savage-Innocents-1960-1.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Frarefilm.net%2Fthe-savage-innocents-1960-nicholas-ray-anthony-quinn-yoko-tani-carlo-giustini-adventure-crime-drama%2F&docid=J3ZvkPc5HvGgLM&tbnid=fmuBCnwXBPaGgM%3A&vet=10ahUKEwin5N3TtqrcAhXJGTQIHWinBL0QMwheKBowGg..i&w=1001&h=436&safe=off&client=safari&bih=716&biw=1036&q=The%20Savage%20Innocents&ved=0ahUKEwin5N3TtqrcAhXJGTQIHWinBL0QMwheKBowGg&iact=mrc&uact=8).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 23, 2018, 12:56:23 AM
I had written a lengthy post about Nicholas Ray in his thread - a paragraph on the two movies and much more on additional reading I did, which better informed my opinion of the director - and it just disappeared. Obviously I pressed the wrong keys, but this is very disappointing.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on July 23, 2018, 08:02:17 PM
I had written a lengthy post about Nicholas Ray in his thread - a paragraph on the two movies and much more on additional reading I did, which better informed my opinion of the director - and it just disappeared. Obviously I pressed the wrong keys, but this is very disappointing.

I'm sorry.  My dog ate it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 23, 2018, 09:48:04 PM
Your dog knows quality.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Carol Reed
Post by: 1SO on July 23, 2018, 10:14:38 PM
#158 Carol Reed Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9065.msg891325#msg891325)

I miss the days when I could not just be out of sync with the majority opinion but give reasonable reason why. I'm very proud of my post on The Third Man, though I don't expect it to persuade anyone. It's been the lynchpin on my opinion of Carol Reed. In his thread is a lot of praise for The Third Man, and the only film watched by nearly half the people posting lists. It's like he's one of those directors who got it perfect once and the rest is disposable.

I think of Carol Reed as a follower of Hitchcock with the British resolve of Anthony Asquith, and I say that knowing it's a short-sighted statement and there are probably better filmmakers to compare Reed to, like Ealing Studios directors. This is why I'm more interested in Reed's film than you might think. My Watchlist contains...
Girl in the News (1940)
The Stars Look Down (1940)
The Way Ahead (1944)
The Man Between (1953)
Trapeze (1956)
Our Man in Havana (1959)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on July 23, 2018, 10:53:27 PM
I had written a lengthy post about Nicholas Ray in his thread - a paragraph on the two movies and much more on additional reading I did, which better informed my opinion of the director - and it just disappeared. Obviously I pressed the wrong keys, but this is very disappointing.

(http://www.reactiongifs.com/r/gtfafm1.gif)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 24, 2018, 12:00:16 AM
Cheered up by one of my favorite gifs of all time.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Éric Rohmer
Post by: 1SO on August 03, 2018, 01:28:46 AM
#159 Éric Rohmer Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9066.msg891747#msg891747)

Quote
I saw a Rohmer film once. It was kind of like watching paint dry.
- Harry Moseby in Night Moves (1975)

I don't feel the same way, but my experiences with Rohmer do seem to be more dependent on my attitude in the moment than most directors. I can pick up a genre film like a Jersey Mikes sandwich, but I have to WANT to see a Rohmer. Problem is, I'm rarely in that mood.

With that in mind, I need to be extremely selective about what I watch here. ICM has 18 films that appear on a list. Chloe in the Afternoon (1972) is on 4 Official Lists, so that seems a wise choice. The thread has a lot of recommendations, and I want to have something else on standby in case I want to watch more. Top picks based on my familiarity with the titles would be...
Pauline at the Beach (1983)
A Tale of Winter (1992)
Autumn Tale (1998)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on August 04, 2018, 10:38:14 PM
Announcing a Hiatus to the Marathon. I have a special work assignment that's going to put my brain to work and during my downtime, I'd rather get back to the 86 new titles I have to watch to complete They Shoot Zombies, Don't They? You can look for me back over on this thread (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13986.0)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: oldkid on August 05, 2018, 02:23:46 PM
I'd rather get back to the 86 new titles I have to watch to complete They Shoot Zombies, Don't They?

Yes.  Of course you would.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 05, 2018, 03:13:04 PM
I support 1SO's desire to watch more bad horror films.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Éric Rohmer
Post by: 1SO on November 18, 2018, 08:46:09 PM
#159 Éric Rohmer Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9066.msg891747#msg891747)

Quote
I saw a Rohmer film once. It was kind of like watching paint dry.
- Harry Moseby in Night Moves (1975)

I don't feel the same way, but my experiences with Rohmer do seem to be more dependent on my attitude in the moment than most directors. I can pick up a genre film like a Jersey Mikes sandwich, but I have to WANT to see a Rohmer. Problem is, I'm rarely in that mood.

With that in mind, I need to be extremely selective about what I watch here. ICM has 18 films that appear on a list. Chloe in the Afternoon (1972) is on 4 Official Lists, so that seems a wise choice. The thread has a lot of recommendations, and I want to have something else on standby in case I want to watch more. Top picks based on my familiarity with the titles would be...
Pauline at the Beach (1983)
A Tale of Winter (1992)
Autumn Tale (1998)

This has been holding me up. I want more of an education on Rohmer, but I really need a strong push to watch these films. (A Filmspotting Marathon would really help.) I made a new Watchlist not looking at the post and also came up with 4 titles. (Only Autumn Tale was different, replaced by The Aviator's Wife.) Still, I was stalling. Chloe in the Afternoon was Okay, but hardly the spark to ignite further exploration of Rohmer.

I'm moving onto [checks list] Roberto Rossellini.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Éric Rohmer
Post by: goodguy on November 18, 2018, 10:17:40 PM
This has been holding me up. I want more of an education on Rohmer, but I really need a strong push to watch these films.
...
Chloe in the Afternoon was Okay, but hardly the spark to ignite further exploration of Rohmer.

I don't want to stop you from moving on, but maybe trying some of Rohmer's less typical films could keep you interested: Perceval (1978) is essentially a medieval musical shot entirely on stage, with a stunningly abstract visual style that takes his cues from illuminated manuscripts of the period (not unlike Secret of Kells, there is even a brief animated sequence). The Lady and the Duke (2001), set during the French Revolution, has Rohmer go digital with bluescreen and digital backdrops inspired by panoramic paintings.

Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on November 19, 2018, 03:11:16 PM
You just cleared something up for me. I've been seeing double, combining Perceval with Bresson's unorthodox Lancelot du Lac. (I bet the two look nothing alike.)

I'm not done with Rohmer, I just don't think a forced Marathon - short or long - is the way to go. I'd like to learn about his Six Moral Tales and how they thematically connect, along with his Four Seasons. I would even say he's a good director, though I'm sure it reads like he's not to my tastes. I'm trying to figure out why I run hot and cold with Rohmer's typical talky sex/relationship films but when Richard Linklater works in the same style I'm immediately drawn in, even if I'm not initially interested in the film itself.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Roberto Rossellini
Post by: 1SO on November 19, 2018, 03:48:46 PM
#160 Roberto Rossellini Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9067.msg763832#msg763832)

I generally don't appreciate Italian neorealism, but I very much appreciate Ingrid Bergman, who worked with Rossellini many times. Pairing Bergman with George Sanders for Journey to Italy was a major disappointment (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12749.msg763836#msg763836), but I'm getting far enough away to where I'm almost ready to give it another chance. Scorsese talks a lot about Rossellini in his documentary My Voyage to Italy (Essential), giving me reason not to give up looking for a gem.

Fear (1954) is a Bergman film I've never seen.

Beyond that I'm sticking close to ICM, with 3 titles that appear on at least 5 Official Lists:
General della Rovere (1959)
India: Matri Bhumi (1959)
The Rise of Louis XIV (1966)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Andrei Tarkovsky
Post by: 1SO on November 22, 2018, 01:02:54 AM
#161 Andrei Tarkovsky Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9068.msg773906#msg773906)

While he's not a director I enjoy, I don't dispute his reputation as a Grand Master. I at least admire his technique and appreciate him more with each passing year. This is why I've seen his seven main features, including 3 or 4 visits to Solaris. He's still a slog for the guy who likes it hard and fast, but there's a level of awe few filmmakers ever achieve.

Debating if I should move on, I've been wanting to watch Stalker again. (Original Review (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=8652.msg503836#msg503836)) I think I'm going to do that.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jacques Tati
Post by: 1SO on November 26, 2018, 09:26:07 AM
#162 Jacques Tati Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9070.msg787751#msg787751)

I appreciate Jacques Tati, but I have a problem with the sameness to his style, with polite misunderstandings a common source of humor in all his work. I often tire of this single strain of humor before just one of his films is complete. His onscreen character of Mr. Hulot is a delightful comedic extension of Chaplin's tramp.

With such a small filmography, it's a choice between Trafic and Parade. I doubt I'll attempt both.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 26, 2018, 10:05:09 AM
Trafic is more in style with the films you've seen with more Mr. Hulot. Parade is basically a vaudeville performance captured on film.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on November 26, 2018, 04:46:23 PM
Trafic is more in style with the films you've seen with more Mr. Hulot. Parade is basically a vaudeville performance captured on film.
That rings true. Forza Bastia is a charming soccer documentary, but I guess you need to be immersed in the heritage of the sport to fully appreciate it.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Wim Wenders
Post by: 1SO on November 28, 2018, 12:58:37 AM
#163 Wim Wenders Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9072.msg519807#msg519807)

Wenders was peaking right as I was getting into cinema. My first of his films was The American Friend, which was unlike anything that was forming my developing tastes at the time. Those tastes were blown apart with my 2nd film, Wings of Desire. I went back to discover Paris, Texas while Wenders went on to stumble through the rest of his career.

At one time I was going to do a chronological Wenders Marathon. This was quickly derailed by Alice in the Cities, after which I had to watch something that wasn't a Wenders film. That was over 5 years ago, and I've still never seen Kings of the Road, which is also on 7 ICM Lists.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - William Wyler
Post by: 1SO on November 29, 2018, 09:04:34 PM
#164 William Wyler Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9073.msg670435#msg670435)

One of the Best. Not just one of my favorites, but a filmmaker so inarguably great I have knee-jerk less respect of the opinion of whoever voted "don't like any'. They're not all Great, but over 25% of what I've seen are, and I've liked two-thirds. In other words, I'm just happy to be here.

Watchlist:
Hell's Heroes (1929)
A House Divided (1931)
These Three (1936)
Carrie (1952)
The Liberation of L.B. Jones (1970)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on November 29, 2018, 10:24:43 PM
The Heiress is a prime candidate for my top 100 if I decide to revamp my list. I really wish someone would release it on Blu-Ray already.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on November 30, 2018, 02:09:29 AM
My unpublished review of These Three encourages you to watch it for this marathon, so good job.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - William Wyler
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on November 30, 2018, 03:33:02 AM
One of the Best. Not just one of my favorites, but a filmmaker so inarguably great I have knee-jerk less respect of the opinion of whoever voted "don't like any'. They're not all Great, but over 25% of what I've seen are, and I've liked two-thirds. In other words, I'm just happy to be here.
I am happy for you too, but I will continue to dislike Ben-Hur which is the only one that I have seen.
:D
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on November 30, 2018, 07:30:15 AM
That makes sense. Even by my list, 'don't like any' is 33% possible if you've only seen one. Like evaluating Spielberg having only seen 1941.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: 1SO on December 09, 2018, 10:45:03 AM
#165 Nicolas Roeg Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9079.msg839448#msg839448)

Difficult to appreciate. I'm not surprised to see his poll heavily favoring three early works made in succession. Venturing outside that is drifting into challenging waters, often with an editing style that would take an audio commentary to understand what he's attempting to do.

If anyone is interested, I would happily team up to watch that trilogy and talk about Roeg's mark on cinema.
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

Meanwhile, I have two films I want to see because of the lead actor.
Eureka (1983) starring Gene Hackman
Track 29 (1988) starring Gary Oldman
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on December 10, 2018, 01:30:22 AM
#164 Nicolas Roeg Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9079.msg839448#msg839448)

Difficult to appreciate. I'm not surprised to see his poll heavily favoring three early works made in succession. Venturing outside that is drifting into challenging waters, often with an editing style that would take an audio commentary to understand what he's attempting to do.

If anyone is interested, I would happily team up to watch that trilogy and talk about Roeg's mark on cinema.
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

Meanwhile, I have two films I want to see because of the lead actor.
Eureka (1983) starring Gene Hackman
Track 29 (1988) starring Gary Oldman

I have seen Walkabout, and the other 2  are a strong interest for me. I will see if I can source the 3 films.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on December 10, 2018, 04:21:30 AM
If anyone is interested, I would happily team up to watch that trilogy and talk about Roeg's mark on cinema.
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)
All three of those could end up on a Top 100 of mine, but I don't know if I have much worthwhile to contribute as they all primarily have been gut level experiences, that may be a bit hard to account for verbally. I and Sandy watched Walkabout earlier this year and I'd like to revisit the other movies as well, time permitting.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 11, 2018, 07:53:26 PM
My schedule is always flexible so I can watch the films within any time frame (after the Holidays, weekly, monthly). I'll keep moving ahead with the larger Marathon, but that doesn't mean I'm no longer interested in revisiting Roeg's trilogy.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Sayles
Post by: 1SO on December 11, 2018, 10:58:43 PM
Whatever Happened To...

#166 John Sayles Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9080.msg715791#msg715791)

When I got into cinema, John Sayles was a name also spoken of with respect. Always on the verge of greatness, held back by his uncommercial choices, he's another filmmaker with a great trilogy of three films made in succession.
Matewan (1987)
Eight Men Out (1988)
City of Hope (1991)

I keep waiting for the day when City of Hope gets discovered for the Great Film that it is, with Sayles writing at its peak, this Robert Altman ensemble piece by way of New Jersey was shot by Robert Richardson and the banquet of words and lighting is rarely this complimentary.

That falling interest in Sayles' talent is a great mystery to me and I want to fill in some of the gaps. I plan to watch...
Lianna (1983) - the only early Sayles I haven't seen
Casa de los Babys (2003)
Amigo (2010)
Go For Sisters (2013)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 18, 2018, 11:27:48 PM
Availability is going to be an issue here, more than usual.


I was only able to get access to Lianna (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9080.msg895866#msg895866), so I'll have to come back to Sayles later.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Paul Schrader
Post by: 1SO on December 18, 2018, 11:40:53 PM
#167 Paul Schrader Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9083.msg895868#msg895868)

Never been a fan. Trying to describe his stamp I come up with his frequent attempts to remake Taxi Driver in a different context. (Hardcore, Light Sleeper and First Reformed are Ozu like in their similarity to Taxi Driver.)

As a horror fan, I have interest in Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist, but I want to see the botched Exorcist sequels in a group. That leaves Schrader's film debut Blue Collar (1978) as the one title I'm curious to see.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on December 19, 2018, 12:02:56 AM
Yea that's a tough list of films to get excited about.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Paul Schrader
Post by: goodguy on December 19, 2018, 07:46:49 AM
#167 Paul Schrader Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9083.msg895868#msg895868)

Never been a fan. Trying to describe his stamp I come up with his frequent attempts to remake Taxi Driver in a different context. (Hardcore, Light Sleeper and First Reformed are Ozu like in their similarity to Taxi Driver.)

As for First Reformed, I remember various critics citing Bresson's Diary of a Country Priest and Bergman's Winter Light as influences, and sure, they are kinda obvious, but it wasn't until a recent rewatch of the Bergman film that I noticed *how* close First Reformed follows it, beyond mere influence, like the Bresson. I don't remember Taxi Driver well enough to draw parallels.

Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 19, 2018, 11:58:07 AM
I noticed the influence of all three, but I was most disappointed when Amanda Seyfried appears as this version's Cybil Shepherd. That's when the beats of Taxi Driver started to stick out within the context of Bresson and Bergman.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Don Siegel
Post by: 1SO on December 19, 2018, 12:03:57 PM
#168 Don Siegel Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9084.msg641885#msg641885)

I say it right at the top of the post. One of the greatest directors ever, with a major rate of success. Or maybe I've just been watching all the right films. I'm going to be filling in gaps on this one, with a number of obscure titles.
Count the Hours (1953)
Crime in the Streets (1956)
Edge of Eternity (1959)
Hell is for Heroes (1962)
Death of a Gunfighter (1969)
The Black WIndmill (1974)
Telefon (1977)

I also want to give Madigan (1968) another shot since it's the one Siegel movie I don't like, and it's generally regarded as a good one.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on December 19, 2018, 12:37:26 PM
Heh, I checked this morning and you only had The Beguiled colored teal.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 19, 2018, 12:41:54 PM
Before I post I recheck the colors and change most Essential titles to Teal. I also correct the heading, removing “Director’s Best”.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Don Siegel
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on December 19, 2018, 02:19:02 PM
#168 Don Siegel Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9084.msg641885#msg641885)

I say it right at the top of the post. One of the greatest directors ever, with a major rate of success. Or maybe I've just been watching all the right films. I'm going to be filling in gaps on this one, with a number of obscure titles.
Telefon (1977)


I remember seeing this years ago and enjoying it. It is very much a Bronson film, but the plot has a bit more complications than your usual Bronson film.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Don Siegel
Post by: pixote on December 22, 2018, 11:09:56 PM
Hell is for Heroes (1962)

This is a rewatch, right? I could have sworn we'd both championed it in the past.

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 22, 2018, 11:25:44 PM
As far as I can tell that was sdedalus. None of my checklist sites indicate that I've watched this and I don't think I've ever championed a Steve McQueen movie.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on December 29, 2018, 12:44:03 AM
Watched Death of a Gunfighter (1969) but I won't include it in my post on Don Siegel. He came in to finish it in 9 days after another director was fired 25 days in. The final product is credited to Alan Smithee.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Sturges
Post by: 1SO on December 31, 2018, 12:17:50 AM
#169 John Sturges Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9088.msg521387#msg521387)

I don't think too much one way or the other of Sturges. His classics - Great Escape, Magnificent Seven - are overrated. I've never sought out a film because he directed it, and I've only seen so many because he works with a lot of my favorite actors and makes a lot of Westerns.

The Hallelujah Trail (1965) - Burt Lancaster and Pamela Tiffin (One Two Three)
Joe Kidd (1972) - I think this is the only Clint Eastwood western I've never seen
The Eagle Has Landed (1976) - genuine interest in this one
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jacques Tourneur
Post by: 1SO on January 02, 2019, 11:48:52 PM
#170 Jacques Tourneur Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9089.msg728460#msg728460)

Pretty solid track record with one Western Masterpiece in Canyon Passage. I wish I had more to discover, but I've been pretty thorough with his filmography already. Experiment Perilous (1944) is the one standout, which I've avoided because most reviews I read are pretty negative. I would like to take a 2nd look at I Walked With a Zombie (1943).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Agnes Varda
Post by: 1SO on January 05, 2019, 12:34:01 AM
#171 Agnes Varda Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9090.msg723850#msg723850)

Time to take a deep breath.

One of the flags I planted with this Marathon was the desire to do a deep and thorough exploration of the works of Agnes Varda. Features, Docs, Shorts. There's a lot I want to see. The only titles I'm comfortable not returning to are The Gleaners & I, The Beaches of Agnes and La Pointe-Courte.

My Wishlist:
1958 Diary of a Pregnant Woman
1962 Cleo from 5 to 7
1965 Le Bonheur
1966 The Creatures
1967 Oncle Yanco
1969 Huey/Black Panthers
1969 Lions Love
1976 Daguerreotypes
1977 One Sings, The Other Doesn’t
1981 Documenteur
1981 Mur Murs
1985 Vagabond
1988 Kung-fu master!
1991 Jacquot de Nantes
2002 The Gleaners and I: Two Years Later
2017 Faces Places
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - King Vidor
Post by: 1SO on January 12, 2019, 12:15:57 AM
#172 King Vidor Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9091.msg727371#msg727371)

Not done with Agnes Varda, not even close, but since I don't want to binge her filmography I thought it might be best to balance her out with the next name(s) on the list. Not knowing that next up is King Vidor.

I'm not anti-Vidor. He works in the classic Hollywood style, The Crowd is damn near a masterpiece and he was nominated 5 times for Best Director. However, having seen most of his popular films, I only like about a third of them. He has a number of titles I'm open to seeing and a couple that have been on my Watchlist. Except for his films being weighty fare, a good list to balance Varda with.

DEFINITE:
The Champ (1931)
War and Peace (1956): I endlessly debate if my first viewing of W&P should be this or the 7-hour Russian film MartinTeller loves so much. This one has Henry Fonda and Audrey Hepburn and it's half as long. I'll go unabridged next time.

LIKELY:
The Patsy (1928)
Street Scene (1931)
The Stranger's Return (1933)
Lightning Strikes Twice (1951)
Ruby Gentry (1952)

POSSIBLE:
La bohème (1926)
Comrade X (1940)
H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: pixote on January 15, 2019, 01:47:44 PM
I have fond memories of Street Scene, though my tolerance for cinematic staginess and general early Talkie awkwardness is significantly higher than yours, I think. (I was briefly sad to see Our Daily Bread colored red on your ranked list, but then I remembered that it really just has one good sequence; I can't speak to the quality of the rest.)

pixote
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on January 20, 2019, 12:51:40 PM
Since I started watching Varda and Vidor simultaneously, I've come to discover that I like Vidor more than I expected to, and I'm not enjoying Varda as much as I'd hoped to. I love her approach to making movies but the films themselves I don't find very interesting.

After One Sings, The Other Doesn’t, I'm jumping ahead to Kung-fu Master!. Meanwhile, my Vidor list is chronologically up to Comrade X.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Josef von Sternberg
Post by: 1SO on January 29, 2019, 10:52:23 PM
Looking ahead before I finish War and Peace (1956)


#173 Josef von Sternberg Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9092.msg667868#msg667868)

When I was discovering films, JvS never entered my orbit. My first taste was in 2012 when I watched The Blue Angel and The Last Command (http://1strongopinion.blogspot.com/2012/03/why-i-love-emil-jannings.html), and this was because of Emil Jannings. The Marlene Dietrich films came later. I like the bold strokes JvS gives his melodrama, though they sometimes fall into silliness.

My titles to watch are connected to the stars, which makes sense because he was great at filming movie stars like royalty.

An American Tragedy (1931) w. Sylvia Sidney
The King Steps Out (1936) w. Franchot Tone
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Erich von Stroheim
Post by: 1SO on February 01, 2019, 01:29:26 AM
#174 Erich von Stroheim Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9093.msg803241#msg803241)

I liked Greed.
He's also great in Sunset Blvd.

Not very fond of his work.  "Overindulgent" is the word that comes to mind.
That's it. There's an unlikable arrogance to him that comes through his films.

There are some lesser-known films I haven't seen, ones where IMDB lists another director, but his reputation is built on six films, and I've seen them all.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Post by: 1SO on February 01, 2019, 01:49:25 AM
#175 Apichatpong Weerasethakul

I don't have a Ranked List because I haven't connected with him yet. I've seen three. Uncle Boonmee is my favorite(?) I guess. Tropical Malady did nothing for me and two viewings of Syndromes and a Century left me thinking this isn't going to work out.

It's clear from his thread (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9094.0) that many people have. The thread's praise raises my own enthusiasm to enjoy some Joe. I'm going to take it one title at a time.

Mysterious Object at Noon (2000) - Might as well start at the beginning
Blissfully Yours (2002)
The Adventures of Iron Pussy (2003) - I know this one is low rated, but that title! Watch it end up my favorite.
Cemetery of Splendor (2015) - Guess I'll catch up with this 2010s blind spot after all
 
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Wiliam A. Wellman
Post by: 1SO on February 01, 2019, 02:29:41 AM
I'm going to reuse my idea from my Varda/Vidor pairing and put some space between the Weerasethakul films by shuffling them into some classic Hollywood from Wellman.


#176 William A. Wellman Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9101.msg715046#msg715046)

I haven't been aiming to watch Wellman, but because he's worked with some of my favorite actors - including 5 starring Barbara Stanwyck - I've been picking off his filmography through the years. His two most high profile - Wings and The Public Enemy - are also two of his most dated, while also being groundbreaking for the time period. It's The Ox-Bow Incident that has crept up to being his Masterwork.

He still has enough titles to keep me busy for a couple of weeks.

DEFINITE:
Wild Boys of the Road (1933)
Battleground (1949)

LIKELY:
Love Is a Racket (1932)
Heroes for Sale (1933)
Looking for Trouble (1934)
The Iron Curtain (1948)

POSSIBLE:
Beggars of Life (1928)
Safe in Hell (1931)
College Coach (1933)
Call of the Wild (1935)
Reaching for the Sun (1941)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Post by: MartinTeller on February 01, 2019, 07:40:08 AM

The Adventures of Iron Pussy (2003) - I know this one is low rated, but that title! Watch it end up my favorite.

It’s his most conventional narrative.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: roujin on February 01, 2019, 08:40:25 AM
Regarding Wellman, Wild Boys of the Road and Heroes for Sale are both incredible!
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - John Woo
Post by: 1SO on February 10, 2019, 12:32:43 AM
#177 John Woo Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9102.msg521796#msg521796)

I often think about which directors I would love to cut from this sub-board. Bret Ratner and Uwe Boll are obvious candidates from among this list (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=13595.msg825305#msg825305), but I would make a case for John Woo. He's a filmmaker who burned too bright for too short a time (approx. 1986 - 2000), threatened to change the game before becoming a parody of himself. He returned to Hong Kong to make historical epics I couldn't get into and is now threatening a Hollywood comeback with a remake of his most famous film, The Killer, starring Lupita Nyong'o.

On the thread I wrote...

I have a great nostalgia for Woo's ultimate cool.  I fear it won't hold up. 
This was my thought on what to watch. I'm not the person I was when I discovered Once a Thief and Bullet in the Head, I'd rather hold onto the memories and move on.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on February 10, 2019, 01:56:05 AM
He lost a step somewhere along the way for sure. You just don't get a pass for the stuff that you got a pass for 20 years ago. Guns with bottomless clips, excessive bullet-dodging, a sorry excuse for a plot. And honestly... there are just SO FEW good action films being made (of the sort he is known for). People seem to like John Wick (I don't), and The Raid (never seen it)... Bourne/MI/Bond all dead series at this point (as far as I'm concerned)... Baby Driver (terrible)... Expendables (a joke)...

His forays into sci fi have been awful, and the same goes for anything historical (he would waste an intelligent script if it came to him). So what's he going to do? Try and out-John-Wick John Wick, which is already an exceedingly rare sucess? I find it pretty much impossible to be optimistic.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Olivier Assayas
Post by: 1SO on February 10, 2019, 10:30:04 AM
#178 Olivier Assayas Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9103.msg759705#msg759705)

There's a healthy list of directors where I don't get the acclaim, though most of them have an easily identifiable style. (Ozu, Fellini, Claire Denis). Maybe it's due to my indifference to Assayas I've spaced out the 4 films of his I've seen and haven't noticed what it is that he does well. Maybe this trilogy will clue me in.

Cold Water (1994): much discussed on the thread and the favorite of goodguy
Demonlover (2002): his most divisive, with a premise that makes it sound like his Trouble Every Day or Iron Pussy
Carlos (2010): on my 2010s catchup Watchlist. One of the first films to make that list (because of length).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on February 10, 2019, 02:59:39 PM
Oh man, I love Assayas. He's always doing something different and provoking with each film.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Carné, Marcel
Post by: 1SO on February 14, 2019, 07:28:54 PM
#179 Marcel Carné  Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9104.msg769228#msg769228)

Two in a row that I'm not a fan of. Carné has had a much longer career than his poll indicates. 22 features, though he's best known for Children of Paradise, with Port of Shadows and Le Jour Se Leve a solid step below it. I've seen those three and don't have enough interest to do an extensive Marathon. ICM has Les Visiteurs du Soir on the most lists, but Hotel du Nord is higher rated and more popular on IMDB (and 30 minutes shorter). In fairness, I may try Children of Paradise again since it's the masterpiece and it's been 7 years since I've seen it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Carné, Marcel
Post by: PeacefulAnarchy on February 14, 2019, 08:27:22 PM
#179 Marcel Carné  Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9104.msg769228#msg769228)

Two in a row that I'm not a fan of. Carné has had a much longer career than his poll indicates. 22 features, though he's best known for Children of Paradise, with Port of Shadows and Le Jour Se Leve a solid step below it. I've seen those three and don't have enough interest to do an extensive Marathon. ICM has Les Visiteurs du Soir on the most lists, but Hotel du Nord is higher rated and more popular on IMDB (and 30 minutes shorter). In fairness, I may try Children of Paradise again since it's the masterpiece and it's been 7 years since I've seen it.
I like them both. Hotel du Nord is a proto noir on the vein of Le Jour Se Leve, while Les Visiteurs du Soir is a surreal gothic story. I would have said the first was a better bet for you, but since you don't like Le Jour Se Leve that may not be true.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Claude Chabrol
Post by: 1SO on February 14, 2019, 11:42:04 PM
#180 Claude Chabrol  Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9105.msg771807#msg771807)

Back in film school, I got off on the wrong foot with Chabrol. He was described to me as a French Hitchcock and I rented The Butcher with great excitement. Turns out, accent on the French and cross out Hitchcock. Ifelt burned by that setup. Fast forward to last November when I watched La Cérémonie (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14896.msg895164#msg895164) for the Top 100 Club. Not only was it a successful experience, it got me wondering if I was finally in tune with the French Thriller experience.

While I'm not looking to make a big project out of this, Chabrol has quite a few titles I'm interested in. (A career spanning Six Decades will have that effect.)

DEFINITE:
The Good Time Girls (1960)
This Man Must Die (1969)

LIKELY:
Le Beau Serge (1958)
Story of Women (1988)

POSSIBLE:
Just Before Nightfall (1971)
Blood Relatives (1978)
L'Enfer (1994)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jacques Demy
Post by: 1SO on February 20, 2019, 01:16:32 PM
#181 Jacques Demy Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9106.msg777832#msg777832)

My ranking comes with the quote, "I feel a little guilty -- and a little dense," which is cute but doesn't sound like something I would say. Reading the thread, it's actually part of a wonderful comment from MartinTeller.

Movies are not universal experiences, but I always feel a little guilty -- and a little dense -- when a much-heralded "classic" leaves me cold (perhaps in this case, "lukewarm" fits better).  In the end, I'm the one who's missing out.  But for me, this film doesn't work.  It is an admirable experiment (with points for a high degree of difficulty) and I would say that thematically, it's more successful than I initially gave it credit for.  I just don't enjoy watching it very much.

It's a good lens to view how I look at Demy and why I haven't done a deeper exploration. I'm not looking to do one now either. There are three 2nd Tier Demy films to watch, but I'm just going to look for the one Martin rates highest, Bay of Angels, which Martin Reviews (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9106.msg779424#msg779424) in the thread.

Une chambre en ville and Model Shop will have to sneak up on my some other time.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - William Dieterle
Post by: 1SO on February 21, 2019, 01:44:00 PM
#182 William Dieterle Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9107.msg778597#msg778597)

One of those directors from Classic Hollywood, so I've stumbled onto a bunch of films, but I wouldn't call myself a fan. (7 of his 10 Lt. Green titles I'd Rate OKAY.) He's the dramatic version of Lloyd Bacon, where the films I like are often due to the performances and an occasional above average script. Looking forward to a rewatch of The Life of Emile Zola in a couple of years, his one true masterpiece, but again, that's because of the acting and script.

There are a number of my favorite actors with titles I haven't seen, but with most of them the story doesn't excite me.

LIKELY:
The Last Flight (1931) - a pixote recommendation (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9107.msg778170#msg778170) (I think).
Syncopation (1942)
Paid in Full (1950)

POSSIBLE:
Man Wanted (1932)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Robert J. Flaherty
Post by: 1SO on February 23, 2019, 03:16:14 PM
#183 Robert J. Flaherty Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9108.msg898135#msg898135)

Flaherty brings me back to film school. In my first year, the first documentary we watched was Nanook of the North, which seems to be the template you compare and contrast all other types of documentaries to. It wasn't until this decade that I was even aware of the filmmaker as somebody who made more than one film, possibly because half of his features have co-Directors.

With few features to choose from, I'm planning to watch Moana (1926) because I can't resist that title, and White Shadows in the South Seas (1928), which shares credit with W.S. Van Dyke and won the Oscar for Best Cinematography.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Victor Fleming
Post by: 1SO on February 23, 2019, 09:11:50 PM
#184 Victor Fleming Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9111.msg726386#msg726386)

I'd love to hear from someone whose first memory of the name Victor Fleming isn't in connection to Gone With the Wind and Wizard of Oz being released in the same year. That was the beginning and the end of my knowledge until Always (1989) was released and I heard it was based on Fleming's A Guy Named Joe. (Still took until 2015 to watch it.)

Fleming's actual deserved credit gets complicated because he was the credited director on two of 1939's biggest films, winning the Oscar for Wind, but since then it's come out that a lot of cooks had a hand in Wind and Oz. The Good Earth is often listed as one of his pictures, though his contribution is uncredited.

I got a fresh start with Fleming after smirnoff's review of Captains Courageous (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=7872.msg588059#msg588059) got me to see the film, and I loved it. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9536.msg726384#msg726384) Fleming has been one of my Old Hollywood regulars ever since.

Treasure Island (1934) - I should watch this, and it's got Lionel Barrymore who i will always see, but I don't feel like I need yet Another version of this story in my life.
Tortilla Flat (1942) - Spencer Tracy, Hedy Lamarr and John Garfield
Joan of Arc (1948) - I've had the DVD sitting around the house for years. Put off by its length, now seem the time to watch it.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: smirnoff on February 23, 2019, 09:58:40 PM
A little Flemathon would probably do me good. Revisiting Captain's Courageous and Wizard of Oz would be nice, just to see where I stand. And seeing Gone with the Wind for the first time feels like something that needs to happen sooner or later. It's one of those big classics I've never caught up with. :)

Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: 1SO on February 25, 2019, 11:50:46 PM
Checking in on this...

If anyone is interested, I would happily team up to watch that trilogy and talk about Roeg's mark on cinema.
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)
All three of those could end up on a Top 100 of mine, but I don't know if I have much worthwhile to contribute as they all primarily have been gut level experiences, that may be a bit hard to account for verbally. I and Sandy watched Walkabout earlier this year and I'd like to revisit the other movies as well, time permitting.

I have seen Walkabout, and the other 2  are a strong interest for me. I will see if I can source the 3 films.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kinji Fukasaku
Post by: 1SO on February 26, 2019, 12:00:55 AM
#185 Kinji Fukasaku Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9112.msg865020#msg865020)

Starting with Battle Royale, I thought I had discovered a new favorite director. I bought The Yakuza Papers Box Set, and dove in. I quickly grew tired of Fukasaku's style, favoring scenes of violent chaos. Endless fights breaking out, I started to get a negative reaction every time one of these brawls interrupted the tedium and overly-complicated plots. I'm not even sure if I finished the set. (It gets complicated trying to keep track of all the titles.)

I'd like to find a new way in, but I'm not sure what approach would be best. He's made a number of terrible space films and the one comedy I saw, Fall Guy, turned me way off when it got to making rape jokes, by which I mean comedic bits happening while someone is being raped. (A cultural bridge too far.)

Availability may be a factor.
Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) - the obvious choice, but he's one of two Japanese directors credited, so not a fair look at his work.
Under the Flag of the Rising Sun (1972) - the title I'll be looking for.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Abel Gance
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2019, 01:29:35 AM
#186 Abel Gance Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9113.msg845038#msg845038)

Director of the definitive film on Napoleon. That was all I knew about Gance and it wasn't until I could see the film in its proper format (with the VHS breaking into widescreen when the three images are playing together) that I finally watched Gance's masterpiece. (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9917.msg659921#msg659921) Later on I caught La Roue, probably his 2nd most popular film, but it was the two versions of J'Accuse! I remember better because of the way they're indirectly Horror films.

That does leave me with some titles, but none I'm interested in. I'm good with moving on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Henry Hathaway
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2019, 01:56:56 AM
#187 Henry Hathaway Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9114.msg706484#msg706484)

Pretty long list, and not because I'm a fan but because he keeps working with those Old Hollywood Actors I love. I often seem him listed as a master of Westerns and maybe he is with 8 of his 23 credits rating above 7.0 on IMDB. I find Hathaway very hit and miss, often dragging scenes out longer than necessary. There's no consistency with his war or Noir films either. He's made 7 film each with John Wayne and Gary Cooper and they're a mixed bag too.

LIKELY:
Diplomatic Courier (1952)
Nevada Smith (1966)

POSSIBLE:
The Desert Fox: The Story of Rommel (1951)
Shoot Out (1971)

MAYBE:
Go West Young Man (1936)
Woman Obsessed (1959)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on February 27, 2019, 03:05:33 AM
Checking in on this...

If anyone is interested, I would happily team up to watch that trilogy and talk about Roeg's mark on cinema.
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)
All three of those could end up on a Top 100 of mine, but I don't know if I have much worthwhile to contribute as they all primarily have been gut level experiences, that may be a bit hard to account for verbally. I and Sandy watched Walkabout earlier this year and I'd like to revisit the other movies as well, time permitting.

I have seen Walkabout, and the other 2  are a strong interest for me. I will see if I can source the 3 films.
I'd happily commit to this after I've handed in the Filmspots 2018 ballot. :)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on February 27, 2019, 05:46:11 AM
Checking in on this...

If anyone is interested, I would happily team up to watch that trilogy and talk about Roeg's mark on cinema.
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)
All three of those could end up on a Top 100 of mine, but I don't know if I have much worthwhile to contribute as they all primarily have been gut level experiences, that may be a bit hard to account for verbally. I and Sandy watched Walkabout earlier this year and I'd like to revisit the other movies as well, time permitting.

I have seen Walkabout, and the other 2  are a strong interest for me. I will see if I can source the 3 films.
I'd happily commit to this after I've handed in the Filmspots 2018 ballot. :)

I have yet to find the other 2 on streaming. Still based on rep I should just buy them.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: 1SO on February 27, 2019, 09:35:19 AM
I have yet to find the other 2 on streaming. Still based on rep I should just buy them.
Roeg is such a unique character that I wouldn't recommend buying his work sight unseen.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kon Ichikawa
Post by: 1SO on March 03, 2019, 11:02:26 PM
#188 Kon Ichikawa Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9115.msg898506#msg898506)

I owe this one to MartinTeller, and while I'm decidedly mixed on Kenji Mizoguchi, Ichikawa is a filmmaker I've never given proper attention to. Everything is possible, including rewatches of the three I've seen. I'm using MartinTeller's reviews as my guide, or else I'd probably watch Princess from the Moon (1987)

LIKELY:
Tokyo Olympiad (1965)
An Actor's Revenge (1963)

POSSIBLE:
Kokoro (1955)
The Burmese Harp (1956)
Fires on the Plain (1959)
The Inugami Family (1976)
47 Ronin (1994) - if I can find better subtitles than what Martin endured

MAYBE:
Punishment Room (1956)
The Devil's Ballad (1977)
The Devil's Island (1977)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: 1SO on March 08, 2019, 03:18:38 PM
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

KOL and Dave (and anyone else who is interested)...

How do you feel about marking this for the Summer. One a month in June, July and August?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on March 08, 2019, 03:44:49 PM
I think that is an great idea. Go for it!
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kon Ichikawa
Post by: 1SO on March 11, 2019, 03:46:38 PM
#188 Kon Ichikawa Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9115.msg898506#msg898506)

I owe this one to MartinTeller, and while I'm decidedly mixed on Kenji Mizoguchi, Ichikawa is a filmmaker I've never given proper attention to. Everything is possible, including rewatches of the three I've seen. I'm using MartinTeller's reviews as my guide, or else I'd probably watch Princess from the Moon (1987)

LIKELY:
Tokyo Olympiad (1965)
An Actor's Revenge (1963)

POSSIBLE:
Kokoro (1955)
The Burmese Harp (1956)
Fires on the Plain (1959)
The Inugami Family (1976)
47 Ronin (1994) - if I can find better subtitles than what Martin endured

MAYBE:
Punishment Room (1956)
The Devil's Ballad (1977)
The Devil's Island (1977)

Disappointed that most of Ichikawa's work is still hard to get a hold of - been looking all morning - especially when my rewatch of Burmese Harp left me with a higher opinion of the film, especially the way the story is told. I will be able to rewatch Fires on the Plain and Actor's revenge, but the only new titles I can find are Tokyo Olympiad and The Inugami Family.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kon Ichikawa
Post by: PeacefulAnarchy on March 11, 2019, 07:50:36 PM
#188 Kon Ichikawa Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9115.msg898506#msg898506)

I owe this one to MartinTeller, and while I'm decidedly mixed on Kenji Mizoguchi, Ichikawa is a filmmaker I've never given proper attention to. Everything is possible, including rewatches of the three I've seen. I'm using MartinTeller's reviews as my guide, or else I'd probably watch Princess from the Moon (1987)

LIKELY:
Tokyo Olympiad (1965)
An Actor's Revenge (1963)

POSSIBLE:
Kokoro (1955)
The Burmese Harp (1956)
Fires on the Plain (1959)
The Inugami Family (1976)
47 Ronin (1994) - if I can find better subtitles than what Martin endured

MAYBE:
Punishment Room (1956)
The Devil's Ballad (1977)
The Devil's Island (1977)

Disappointed that most of Ichikawa's work is still hard to get a hold of - been looking all morning - especially when my rewatch of Burmese Harp left me with a higher opinion of the film, especially the way the story is told. I will be able to rewatch Fires on the Plain and Actor's revenge, but the only new titles I can find are Tokyo Olympiad and The Inugami Family.
Which ones would you like to find?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on March 11, 2019, 10:16:06 PM
The 3 Maybe titles sound like the type of films I like.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on March 11, 2019, 10:27:17 PM
I think there's a decent chance you'd like Alone Across the Pacific.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on March 11, 2019, 10:44:54 PM
I defer to you as the Ichikawa expert. I'll look for it tomorrow.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on March 12, 2019, 07:43:39 AM
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

KOL and Dave (and anyone else who is interested)...

How do you feel about marking this for the Summer. One a month in June, July and August?

Excellent, I have found 2 of the films (both on Amzaon, 1 on Prime, the other a rental), just working on the third.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kon Ichikawa
Post by: Antares on March 12, 2019, 04:32:13 PM
LIKELY:
An Actor's Revenge (1963)

Definitely make time for it, it's a very good film... http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12095.msg741243#msg741243 (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=12095.msg741243#msg741243)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on March 12, 2019, 05:05:48 PM
I've got it right here. It's the one I was definitely going to watch again because it was my introduction to Ichikawa and I've developed a lot since seeing it, which my review from 2011 (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9536.msg560778#msg560778) shows. (It's like something DH would've written.)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Maurice Pialat
Post by: 1SO on March 18, 2019, 07:50:06 PM
#189 Maurice Pialat Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9116.msg880721#msg880721)

By my comments here you wouldn't guess I took a French Cinema class in college. It seems the focus was on contemporary filmmakers because I was never exposed to most of the French directors on the sub-boards. I've stumbled into watching three of Pialat's dozen(ish) features, and never really formed an opinion one way or the other.

On the thread, goodguy has an extensive ranked list and worm@work posted a number of reviews. Looking over the titles, here's what I'm interested in. It depends on availability and I don't plan to watch all four.

We Won't Grow Old Together (1972)
The Mouth Agape (1974)
Loulou (1980)
Under the Sun of Satan (1987)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on March 19, 2019, 10:38:38 PM
Never mind. Having seen the first two, I definitely plan to watch all four and may add Police (1985).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Pen-Ek Ratanaruang
Post by: 1SO on April 04, 2019, 11:55:53 PM
#190 Pen-Ek Ratanaruang

One of the more obscure names in our sub-board, I don't have a ranked list because I've only seen Last Life in the Universe, which I didn't like. Been meaning to see 6ixtynin9, a favorite of MartinTeller that sounds more like the genre cinema I love than the WKW moodiness of Last Life. (I thought I had seen it, but what I watched was the Japanese roommate horror comedy 2LDK.) Depending on how that goes, I'm also interested in Headshot (2011)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Barbet Schroeder
Post by: 1SO on April 08, 2019, 12:34:31 AM
#191  Barbet Schroeder Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9118.msg899512#msg899512)

Here's a name that's fallen off the cultural map. I'd make the argument for removing him from the Directors Board, having been a force in cinema from 1987 (Barfly) through 1990 (Reversal of Fortune) after which time he hacked his way down into obscurity.

Then again, I haven't seen Martin's Top 4 and he started this thread. I'll look for General Idi Amin Dada (1974) and Maitresse (1976). can't fake interest in Koko: A Talking Gorilla.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on April 08, 2019, 11:17:17 AM
I'm surprised I left La Vallee and More off of the poll choices... both are significant because of the Pink Floyd connection.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 08, 2019, 11:38:33 AM
You didn't. When I corrected the poll, I moved the two Any options to the top.  La Vallee and More had no votes and from what I read General Idi Amin Dada is what first put him on people's radar.

What is the Pink Floyd connection?
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on April 08, 2019, 12:37:00 PM
Pink Floyd did the soundtracks for both ("Obscured by Clouds" is the soundtrack to La Vallee).
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Victor Sjöström
Post by: 1SO on April 10, 2019, 08:52:41 PM
It's rare that I do this, but I don't even want to spend the $3 to rent General Idi Amin Dada online. Part of what was keeping me motivated is that I'm not initially excited by the next name either.

#192 Victor Sjöström Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9119.msg701302#msg701302)

It boils down to my unpopular opinions on The Phantom Carriage (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg642446#msg642446) and The Wind (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9546.msg675658#msg675658), and if I don't like the great stuff what chance do I have to appreciate his lesser works. He Who Gets Slapped (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg642446#msg642446) is the one I like.

I might watch The Scarlet Letter (1926) or I may come back later tonight to talk about - checks list - Seijun Suzuki! There's a name I'm interested in.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Seijun Suzuki
Post by: 1SO on April 11, 2019, 12:27:56 AM
#193 Seijun Suzuki Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9124.msg899620#msg899620)

I first heard of Suzuki before I even knew of Japan's nutty super happy fun culture. The descriptions for Branded to Kill and Tokyo Drifter sounded unreal - a chipmunk cheeked hitman thwarted by a butterfly, an assassin who whistles his own theme song - and in a pre-Tarantino world, this level of "go for broke" creativity was all I wanted to see.

I'm kind of in the same head space today. I don't even know which films I want to see (and availability is bound to be an issue), but I'm ready to do a mini-marathon and play inside Suzuki's brain for a few.

LIKELY:
Tokyo Drifter (1966)
Branded to Kill (1967)

POSSIBLE:
Youth of the Beast (1963)
Gate of Flesh (1964)
Pistol Opera (2001)

MAYBE:
Take Aim at the Police Van (1960)
Detective Bureau 2-3: Go to Hell Bastards! (1963)
Tattooed Life (1965)
Fighting Elegy (1966)
Princess Raccoon (2005)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Victor Sjöström
Post by: PeacefulAnarchy on April 11, 2019, 01:08:49 AM
It's rare that I do this, but I don't even want to spend the $3 to rent General Idi Amin Dada online.
It's on the new criterion streaming thing if you have that.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on April 11, 2019, 09:49:21 AM
I don't. I've always loved the idea of the Criterion collection, but my opinions of their titles have not been as highly favorable as I would've hoped. I've never even been driven to complete their list on ICM.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Yasujiro Ozu
Post by: 1SO on April 12, 2019, 09:45:09 AM
#148 Yasujiro Ozu

There is no Ranked List for reasons you can find all over my posts on Ozu (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9049.msg783047#msg783047). I have seen 15 of his films and couldn't tell you one from the other. That sameness combined with his uncinematic formal approach gets under my skin, and I realized I have two options here. I could do like with Jean-Pierre Melville, wipe the slate clean and start from the start. (I've been told repeatedly when you Marathon Ozu the subtle differences from one film to another make each one special.) However, since that's not something I'm interested in doing at this time, I'm going with the other option and moving onto the next director.

When the time is right, you know it. This may get me to sign up for Criterion's Streaming channel, which also has a lot of the Seijun Suzuki I'm looking for. Bouncing between Suzuki and Ozu may be the way to go, or they may create too much of a contrast. This is my ambitious slate for Ozu, and I may choose to abandon it if this turns out to be a mistake.

I Was Born, But…   (1932) - 2nd Viewing
Passing Fancy   (1933)
Dragnet Girl      (1933)
A Story of Floating Weeds   (1934) - 2nd Viewing
The Only Son      (1936) - 2nd Viewing
There Was a Father   (1942) - 2nd Viewing
Record of a Tenement Gentleman   (1947)
A Hen in the Wind      (1948)
Late Spring         (1949) - 2nd Viewing
Early Summer         (1951) - 2nd Viewing
Flavor of Green tea      (1952)
Tokyo Story         (1953) - 2nd Viewing
Early Spring         (1956) - 2nd Viewing
Tokyo Twilight         (1957) - 2nd Viewing
Equinox Flower      (1958) - 2nd Viewing
Floating Weeds      (1959) - 2nd Viewing
Good Morning         (1959) - 2nd Viewing
Late Autumn         (1960) - 2nd Viewing
The End of Summer   (1961) - 2nd Viewing
An Autumn Afternoon   (1962) - 2nd Viewing
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Anh Hung Tran
Post by: 1SO on May 15, 2019, 11:48:59 PM
Miles to go before I sleep.


#194 Anh Hung Tran

Back in Dec. 2011 (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg647843#msg647843), I spent a couple of days with Martin and Sandy discussing Anh Hung Tran. Reading those reviews makes me wonder how much my tastes have developed since then, not that I want to get into rewatches. I'm also disappointed that the director has had trouble getting his projects filmed, with very few new choices. It's between Cyclo and Norwegian Wood and there's a current of danger to Cyclo that has me more interested.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Luchino Visconti
Post by: 1SO on May 21, 2019, 05:10:19 PM
#195 Luchino Visconti Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9126.msg726876#msg726876)

Except for Sergio Leone, I generally rate Italian directors below most. Visconti gets a lot of time in the great Scorsese doc. My Voyage to Italy, where he goes in depth on the director's love of details. There's no consistency as to what I like or don't like about the filmmaker. Even Death in Venice I often recommend and think that I like more than my review and rating say. Because of that, I'd like to revisit either The Leopard (1963) or Rocco and His Brothers (1960). Maybe both. I also plan to watch Bellissima (1951), which stands out as a major work I haven't seen.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Dexter Fletcher
Post by: 1SO on May 28, 2019, 08:53:54 PM
Jumping the queue here with the newest Director (roughly #793) Dexter Fletcher, who has Rocketman opening. I wanted to do a primer so I've lined up all his previous features.

Wild Bill (2011)
Sunshine on Leith (2013)
Eddie the Eagle (2015)
Rocketman (2019)

I imagine by the time he comes up in the queue proper he'll have another movie out.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Andrzej Wajda
Post by: 1SO on June 03, 2019, 01:22:27 AM
#196 Andrzej Wajda Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9128.msg802457#msg802457)

Another case where my exposure begins (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg648607#msg648607) and ends (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg649650#msg649650) with my original Directors of Shame Marathon. I'm pretty convinced my opinions of both film would be slightly higher after 8 years of cinematic evolution, but I also have plenty of new stuff to watch for.

The Promised Land (1975)
Man of Marble (1977)
Man of Iron (1981)
Danton (1983)
Katyn (2007)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Raoul Walsh
Post by: 1SO on June 11, 2019, 12:38:51 PM
#197 Raoul Walsh Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9129.msg791243#msg791243)

With a recent run of International filmmakers, I've been wondering when this Marathon would get back around to someone I know well. Looks like I've landed in my cinematic backyard with one of Warner Bros. most prolific directors from the classic Hollywood era. I've seen about a third of his features and I own my 6 favorites. Three of these - They Drive By Night, The Strawberry Blonde and Manpower - came out within a year.

Walsh has made a lot of mistakes. His color photography often looks crude and he's usually terrible when it comes to special effects, even for the time period. It's all come together enough times to where I repeatedly watch those Top 6, some of the best movies starring Cagney, Bogart, Raft and Flynn.

So I'll be here for a few.

LIKELY:
Sadie Thompson (1928)
The Bowery (1933)
Northern Pursuit (1943)
Salty O'Rourke (1945)
Pursued (1947) - REWATCH
Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N. (1951)
The World in His Arms (1952)

POSSIBLE:
Artists & Models (1937)
Band of Angels (1957)

MAYBE:
Every Night at Eight (1935)
Battle Cry (1955)
The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (1958)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 21, 2019, 09:01:04 PM
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

KOL and Dave (and anyone else who is interested)...

How do you feel about marking this for the Summer. One a month in June, July and August?

Excellent, I have found 2 of the films (both on Amzaon, 1 on Prime, the other a rental), just working on the third.

Ok, which one are we going to do first? I am going to suggest The Man Who Fell to Earth.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 21, 2019, 11:12:59 PM
I'm fine with that. Let me know when you're going to watch so I can queue it up. I'll let you post first since I think it's his most successful effort.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on June 22, 2019, 01:02:08 AM
For me anything goes.

I am in France right now and will be home on the 26th.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 22, 2019, 05:46:35 AM
Ok I will try and get it watched in the next day or two.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Anthony Asquith
Post by: 1SO on June 24, 2019, 01:47:39 AM
#198 Anthony Asquith Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9130.msg759870#msg759870)

I blame Martin for introducing me to Asquith, and I know his likely reply is that nobody is twisting my arm for me to watch these films. I wish I liked Asquith more because I'm frustratingly close to it. There's just a dry approach to his scripts that doesn't work for me.

Because I'm so often unsatisfied with the results, I have a number of films I'm interested in but haven't seen because Asquith is the director. I'm not going to watch all of these, but am unsure what to select.

Escape from Dartmoor (1929) - the ICM suggestion
The Winslow Boy (1948) - highest rated on IMDB and I really enjoyed Mamet's version
Libel (1959) - I have this one in my pile to watch already... Olivia de Havilland
Two Living, One Dead (1961) - the MartinTeller pick
The V.I.P.s (1963) - Margaret Rutherford, whom I adore, won an Oscar for this
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on June 24, 2019, 09:56:57 AM
Nobody is twisting your.... oh.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 24, 2019, 02:01:11 PM
Perfect response.

I've decided on Escape from Dartmoor (aka. A Cottage in Dartmoor) because it's on youtube, Libel because it's in my watch pile and The V.I.P.s because it's the one I most want to watch.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Jacques Becker
Post by: 1SO on June 24, 2019, 11:38:29 PM
#199 Jacques Becker Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9131.msg714419#msg714419)

Becker's career can be boiled down to three titles, the only ones with votes on his thread. The combined votes of all three are less than "haven't seen any". While there's the possibility of hidden gems and a couple I'm curious about - Modigliani of Montparnasse, The Adventures of Arsène Lupin - I'm looking at the nearly 600 names still ahead in this Marathon and my slower viewing habits and I've decided to continue on.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nuri Bilge Ceylan
Post by: 1SO on June 24, 2019, 11:49:39 PM
#200 Nuri Bilge Ceylan Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9132.msg770710#msg770710)

Every new Ceylan is a gamble with my ability to slow my rhythm and enjoy the mood. So far I'm 50/50, with the glacial Winter Sleep being the most difficult challenge (which I failed.)

Three Monkeys (2008) has been deep down my Watchlist. I'll look for that.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Victor Erice
Post by: 1SO on June 25, 2019, 11:30:18 PM
#201 Victor Erice

8 years ago I watched Spirit of the Beehive (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg607598#msg607598),as unique a cinema experience as Woman in the Dunes. With Erice getting compared to Malick, my positive opinion defied expectations, something that didn't happen when I watched The Quince Tree Sun years later.

Erice has a very small filmography, but El Sur (1983) is a big ICM blind spot.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nicolas Roeg
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 26, 2019, 06:50:52 AM
Walkabout (1971)
Don't Look Now (1973)
The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

KOL and Dave (and anyone else who is interested)...

How do you feel about marking this for the Summer. One a month in June, July and August?

Excellent, I have found 2 of the films (both on Amzaon, 1 on Prime, the other a rental), just working on the third.

Ok, which one are we going to do first? I am going to suggest The Man Who Fell to Earth.

I have posted my initial comments/review of TMWFtE over in Roeg's director's page, here (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9079.msg900953#msg900953)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Nobuhiko Ōbayashi
Post by: 1SO on June 27, 2019, 12:48:28 AM
#202 Nobuhiko Ōbayashi

When I saw the name I got excited thinking I was in for some samurai action. Turns out I was confusing this director with Kihachi Okamoto (#318). Ōbayashi is the director of Hausu and if you've seen anything by Ōbayashi, it's probably Hausu. (It has 20,000 ratings more than his 2nd most popular movie on Letterboxd.)

I imagine I'm not the only one curious to see if Hausu is a singular achievement or if that's the style he normally uses, and for what to watch next I look to MartinTeller's reviews (and availability).

LIKELY:
Emotion (1966)
The Aimed School (aka. School in the Crosshairs) (1981) - Intriguing Premise

POSSIBLE:
The Little Girl Who Conquered Time (1983) - Like this story but hold the animated version fondly

MAYBE:
Sada (1998) - MT's review goes hard against the original, In the Realm of the Senses, which I liked a lot.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: roujin on June 27, 2019, 08:56:48 AM
Obayashi is a lot more than House. The current critical landscape has Bound for the Fields, the Mountains and the Seacoast as his most likely masterpiece, the most representative of his style and concerns.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on June 27, 2019, 10:32:31 AM
Obayashi is a lot more than House. The current critical landscape has Bound for the Fields, the Mountains and the Seacoast as his most likely masterpiece, the most representative of his style and concerns.

Oh sure, I do a deep dive on Obayashi and the "critical landscape" picks one of the ones I haven't seen. Fine, adding it to my watchlist....
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: roujin on June 27, 2019, 11:12:40 AM
Those 80's works are the ones on my radar the most at the very least. His Motorbike, Her Island, Exchange Students, The Discarnates, and going into the 90's Futari and The Rocking Horsemen.

The clips I've seen of his last film, Hanagatami, look incredible. There's lots of stuff to see.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Ritwik Ghatak and Rene Clair
Post by: 1SO on June 29, 2019, 09:35:05 AM
#203 Ritwik Ghatak. Having seen his two most acclaimed/popular films I could not be less enthused to watch more. I need to learn more about him before exploring his career any further.



#204 René Clair Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9140.msg753422#msg753422)

I think of Clair as a more frivolous Jean Renoir and I mean that as a compliment. Though his stories are often TV sitcom thin, there's a playfulness I occasionally enjoy. It brings an odd quality to And Then There Were None, his masterpiece. The Agatha Christie story itself is a masterpiece in its mechanics and not taking it too seriously turns out to be the right approach. (Plus, the casting is largely brilliant. Where else do I get Walter Huston AND Barry Fitzgerald?)

As for what to watch, all options are on the table, but my #1 pick would be Man About Town (1947), which is highly regarded and stars Maurice Chevalier.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Clément and Dovzhenko
Post by: 1SO on June 29, 2019, 02:42:26 PM
phooey! It seems I've already seen more than my fair share of René Clair and finding another that interests me has proven difficult. On the other hand, I'm kind of liking this little bit of skipping ahead, and it looks like this is going to continue.

#205 René Clément Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9143.msg753504#msg753504)
I can't even fake interest. I was most disappointed by Purple Noon, which is like a Tom Ripley story told as if nothing actually happens. I was surprised to learn I've seen 4 of Clément's films. That's more than enough.


#206 Aleksandr Dovzhenko Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9144.msg781825#msg781825)
With early Russian Cinema there is Eisenstein and there is everyone else. I have found Frontier (1935) and Ivan (1932) on YouTube and I will watch those.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: MartinTeller on June 29, 2019, 11:15:54 PM
It's nice to see you being willing to skip when you feel like it, not letting yourself be a slave to the marathon. I'm wondering, are there any Hollywood directors you would skip? Seems like when it comes to American movies, your appetite is insatiable.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Miklós Jancsó
Post by: 1SO on June 30, 2019, 12:02:46 AM
#207

I dove blindly into Miklós Jancsó during my original Directors of Shame Marathon (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg613423#msg613423). While I wasn't bowled over by either film, the filmmaking intrigued me with its deep focus and complicated long takes. I'm happy to get another shot since it's been far too long. Maybe by now, availability won't be so difficult.

LIKELY:
Red Psalm (1972)

POSSIBLE:
My Way Home (1965)
Silence and Cry (1968)
Electra, My Love (1974)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 30, 2019, 12:08:55 AM
It's nice to see you being willing to skip when you feel like it, not letting yourself be a slave to the marathon. I'm wondering, are there any Hollywood directors you would skip? Seems like when it comes to American movies, your appetite is insatiable.
Probably true. The worst American Directors that have threads are modern, so when I got to Brett Ratner I was drawn to the star power of Tower Heist and Hercules. I did skip Kevin Smith (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=14547.msg876750#msg876750) and without looking deep into their catalog I can imagine skipping Dennis Dugan (#667) and Simon West (#728).
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Miklós Jancsó
Post by: MartinTeller on June 30, 2019, 09:50:53 AM
I dove blindly into Miklós Jancsó during my original Directors of Shame Marathon (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=10148.msg613423#msg613423).

I'll have you know this sent me down a half-hour rabbit hole of re-reading that thread.
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on June 30, 2019, 09:55:27 AM
Glad to see my links being useful.

I’ve dug many deep holes in the Forum.

I go back to that Marathon often. It’s thinking is occasionally outdated but I use it like a digital reference book.
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Kalatozov and Phil Karlson
Post by: 1SO on July 04, 2019, 02:19:49 PM
#207 Mikhail Kalatozov Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9146.msg755490#msg755490)
Another case - like Jacques Becker - where the acclaim currently focuses on a trilogy of titles I've already seen. I'm a fan of the images, but not the films. Like Martin says...
I want to see more by cinematographer Sergei Urusevsky, who deserves much of the credit for making these films as astonishing as they are.


#208 Phil Karlson Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9149.msg813476#msg813476)
Hello Noir!
Introduced to Karlson through my Noir Marathon. I like him, but he's not dependable. Not afraid to go cheap and dirty, and his star-based thrillers can be electric (Scandal Sheet) or sterile (Tight Spot). After a brief international tour, I'm ready for this.

LIKELY:
The Brothers Rico (1957)
The Silencers (1966)

POSSIBLE:
5 Against the House (1955)
Hell's Island (1955)

MAYBE:
Key Witness (1960)
The Wrecking Crew (1968)
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Joseph Losey
Post by: 1SO on July 12, 2019, 07:52:30 PM
#209 Joseph Losey Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9151.msg901194#msg901194)
What do I think of Joseph Losey? I never have actually. I mean I Rated him a 4 for the Directors Rating Project. (His week was won by Phil Karlson.) I never made a Ranked List until just now, and I don't connect the titles as coming from the same director. Same with the titles on my Watchlist. I have a few, but considering the amount of success I'm probably not going to watch too many.

LIKELY:
The Big Night (1951)
Mr. Klein (1976)

POSSIBLE:
Concrete Jungle (aka. The Criminal) (1960)
Accident (1967)
Secret Ceremony (1968)

MAYBE:
The Lawless (1950)
King & Country (1964)
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors
Post by: 1SO on July 14, 2019, 11:41:00 AM
I like seeing how this project is (Necro)bumping up some threads and getting fresh posts. #YayMe
Title: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Alexander Mackendrick
Post by: 1SO on July 23, 2019, 01:02:04 AM
#210 Alexander Mackendrick Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9156.msg901323#msg901323)
Curious why Martin started this thread when it seems pretty obvious that Sweet Smell of Success would be the runaway option. (I know people sometimes start threads to bring attention to a director and I wonder if that was the case here?) Mackendrick's filmography is rather small - and oddly full of alternate titles - but there are two on my Watchlist because of the cast. (Something that went poorly with Joseph Losey's Secret Ceremony.)

LIKELY:
Sammy Going South (1963) with Edward G. Robinson
A High Wind in Jamaica (1965) with Anthony Quinn
Title: Re: 1SO vs. All the Directors - Alexander Mackendrick
Post by: MartinTeller on July 23, 2019, 10:09:38 AM
#210 Alexander Mackendrick Ranked List (http://forum.filmspotting.net/index.php?topic=9156.msg901323#msg901323)
Curious why Martin started this thread when it seems pretty obvious that Sweet Smell of Success would be the runaway option.

At the time I was just doing one for any director who had made a canonically significant film.

I would think there'd be more votes for Ladykillers, though. I thought that one was quite popular.