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Filmspotting Message Boards => No Movie Talk Allowed => Topic started by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 04, 2018, 09:55:22 AM

Title: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 04, 2018, 09:55:22 AM
Let's talk about board games!

I'm gonna copy over my list of anticipated board games from the video game thread.

Most Anticipated Games of 2018:

1.Rising Sun

(https://i.imgur.com/fIi3LSM.png)

Folklore Samurai area control game with a heavy emphasis on diplomacy? Yes, please! It's like someone tapped into my brain and asked what my idea "minis on a map" game would be. I backed this on Kickstarter and it should be shipping any day now...

2. 7th Continent

(https://i.imgur.com/OcEI19Y.jpg)

This looks like a roguelike distilled into a board game and I want to see how it works. I know a lot of people complained that the actual writing of the story wasn't great, but I hope it's able to capture the experience of swapping stories with people about the unique situation you encountered and how you dealt with it. Also backed this one on Kickstarter and it should come out in March.

3. Altiplano

(https://i.imgur.com/mUTOV6s.jpg)

If you want to play something different, I'd tell you to play Orelans, a game where you build your resources but draw them blindly from a bag. It's a super fun system, but with enough depth that you've almost always got two or three interesting choices to make. Altiplano is the followup to Orelans, but instead of boring trade in medieval France you're breeding alpacas in the Andes! Now that sounds like a fun theme.

4. Gloomhaven (Retail Release)

(https://i.imgur.com/gizholO.jpg)

As legacy games become more of a thing, I think the initial sheen is going to wear off and we're going to have to deal with whether or not the systems are good. Gloomhaven looks like the core dungeon crawl combat campain I wanted out of Star Wars: Imperial Assault. The fact it's also an evolving legacy game is just the cherry on top. The only problem is going to be selling people on committing to a campaign of this.

5. Hunt for the Ring

(https://i.imgur.com/ccWh2HT.jpg)

I love War of the Ring, but it only plays two and is a beast of a game as it can easily reach 4 hours of playtime. This looks to add in more players and distill the hidden movement mechanic of War of the Ring into something I could play with my family. Unless this one ends up being a dud, I feel like this might be the hidden movement game for my collection.

6. Batman: Gotham City Chronicles

(https://i.imgur.com/hDJP9Ms.jpg)

Conan looked like an interesting combat campaign system but the theme is so off-putting that I have no interest in playing it. The idea of wrapping those mechanics into a Batman game--meaning it's also something I could probably convince family and hardcore tabletop gamers to play--makes it a perfect way for me to finally experience a game I'd love to play but with a theme/aesthetic that won't make me squirm.



Give that I just got a handful of games for Christmas and I've got those two kickstarters coming in over the next couple of months, I'm going to try to hold off buying any more board games until April. We shall see if I withstand temptation. (I've already thought about some light cheating by picking up a couple of expansions.)
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Corndog on January 04, 2018, 10:01:40 AM
This will be good for me to follow because my family loves games, but don't know much other than the major popular games.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on January 04, 2018, 09:37:58 PM
"minis on a map"  :)  Yes, please!

This will be an elementary question, since I too am not well versed in the less mainstream games. I've never played Dungeons or Dragons and have only played The Hobbit (a co-operative game) once. I found the game to be wholly unsatisfying. Basically, the person who knew the game best, guided us through each of our turns to help him in the best manner possible. My presence was essentially superfluous and rather boring. Am I missing something? Are there great reasons to love a co-operative game? Or, am I just too competitive to want to work with others? ;)
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 04, 2018, 10:02:56 PM
That's a problem with certain cooperative games. If one person just tells you what to do every turn, it can feel like you're not part of the process. It's more of a people problem than a game problem. I try to let people work out things even if I know it might mean we lose. Some people find that infuriating, but I find it engages people more if I only point out critical problems to keep an eye on or give a suggestion when asked.

I would say try something like Pandemic, though. That one has some satisfying elements where each player has his/her own special ability and even if you take other people's suggestion, you often find after a while that you'll make observations the other experienced player might have overlooked. Still, more pushy players will just constantly tell other people what to do each turn. But since most people aren't exactly approachable about being controlling in a game, there are some alternatives.

One possible solution is playing a coop that has a traitor element like Battlestar Galactica or Dead of Winter so that players are more coy about what the strategy is because someone in the group wants to ruin that strategy.

The other is to play a one vs many game. So for instance you could play Specter Ops where one player is a spy running through a maze and the other players are working together to hunt down the one player. You give the expert the harder hidden role and then everyone else gets to work out as a team how to hunt down the other player.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: oldkid on January 05, 2018, 02:43:35 AM
My daughters and I agree that we need a board game about breeding alpacas in the Andes.  How could we possibly live without this?
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on January 05, 2018, 03:59:59 AM
I'm an avid boardgamer, grew up playing Settlers of Catan as well as the mass-market classics and still play very regularly today, both with family and friends. Over the holidays, we played Mysterium, Splendor, 7 Wonders, Concordia, Mah-jong (we have our own simplified rules), Crossing, and others I can't think of right now... but my favorite part was teaxching my 8-year old nephew Dominion (which is my favorite game), and him not only liking it, but being rather good at it and even winning a 4-player game.

@Sandy: What you're describing is a common problem with cooperative games, known as the alpha player problem. I'd disagree with Sam's proposal of Pandemic, as I think that game is just as subject to alpha gamers as most cooperative games... instead I would suggest Hanabi. It's a small card game where you're trying to make fireworks (represented by numbered cards of different colors), but the twist is: you don't know what your own cards are. Everyone else sees them, and they have to make you understand what to play with limited means (and you do the same with them): it completely shirks the alpha player problem since no one has a full picture, and it's surprisingly addictive.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on January 05, 2018, 04:04:43 AM
My daughters and I agree that we need a board game about breeding alpacas in the Andes.  How could we possibly live without this?

Contact Uwe Rosenberg, I'm sure he'd be interested. If he can make a great game out of 18th century Bavarian farmers (Agricola), he can certainly do this one too.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on January 05, 2018, 12:36:13 PM
Oooh! I remember now playing a game called Clue: The Great Museum Caper, a long time ago, which sounds like the concept of Specter Ops and had a lot of fun with it. I also like the idea of a mole. Anything to break up the Alpha stranglehold!

Thanks for the suggestions, Sam and Teproc. I won't give up hope on cooperative games just yet. :)



My daughters and I agree that we need a board game about breeding alpacas in the Andes.  How could we possibly live without this?

:))   This is a game I'd come to Portland for, just to sit and play with you and the kids.

I've bought two alpacas in the Andes, through Heifer International. I hope they're breeding well!
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: DarkeningHumour on January 05, 2018, 12:41:07 PM
The answer is simple. Do no play cooperative games. Buy competitive games and impose your dominance as you crush your rivals' hopes and dreams.

I wish I knew enough gamers to get more into boardgames. Getting trashed every other day is nice and all, but there are other indoor things people can do together.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on January 05, 2018, 01:56:40 PM
The answer is simple. Do no play cooperative games. Buy competitive games and impose your dominance as you crush your rivals' hopes and dreams.

I wish I knew enough gamers to get more into boardgames. Getting trashed every other day is nice and all, but there are other indoor things people can do together.

Yes on both counts :)

Does anyone still play Balderdash? It's a family favourite. Best with 5 or more though imo, so it doesn't come out that often.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on January 05, 2018, 03:55:19 PM
We've played a homemade version of Balderdash. I'm surprisingly good at tricking people with my made up definitions. I think people trust me too much. :)

@ DarkeningHumour     :))   Yes! Now that's what games are for!
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 05, 2018, 04:12:43 PM
I got burnt out on that game because it used to be the game my mom wanted to play all the time. I've heard boardgamers still consider it one of the better party games, I just haven't ever felt the need to return to it in a long time.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 05, 2018, 04:54:07 PM
They just announced a Hellboy boardgame (https://icv2.com/articles/news/view/39271/hellboy-gets-board-game-treatment?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter). It's a co-op where you go around to locations recovering artifacts and stopping evildoers(combat?) Obviously, we haven't heard many details yet, but maybe this could be a lighter, more streamlined Eldrich Horror?And if this has Mignola art...Oh man, that would just be too much.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: oldkid on January 05, 2018, 08:19:35 PM
We've played a homemade version of Balderdash. I'm surprisingly good at tricking people with my made up definitions. I think people trust me too much. :)

Sandy: Expert deceiver.  Just one step closer to international spy.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: jdc on January 10, 2018, 10:12:02 PM
The answer is simple. Do no play cooperative games. Buy competitive games and impose your dominance as you crush your rivals' hopes and dreams.

I wish I knew enough gamers to get more into boardgames. Getting trashed every other day is nice and all, but there are other indoor things people can do together.

Why can't the two hobbies be combined?
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 10, 2018, 11:17:16 PM
Board game cafes are rather big in Europe. The one I have in the states has beer on tap.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on January 11, 2018, 04:22:08 AM
Board game cafes are rather big in Europe. The one I have in the states has beer on tap.

I don't know that they're a bigger thing here than in North America, some of the biggest board game cafés in the world (Snake & Lattes in Toronto for example) are in North America. It's still a somewhat nascent thing here too for the most part.

Getting further into Pandemic Legacy Season 2, which is even better than season 1. We just finished August, and... things are happening. I'm surprised by how much I'm enjoying it, given my indifference towards the original game.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on January 14, 2018, 09:55:41 AM
Played a 2-player game of Terraforming Mars this afternoon: it works surprisingly well with 2 players. It's not even less tense really, because those attack cards are much more worthwile, and drafting to block someone is much more relevant. Really love this game, and I got to win this time (pretty comfortably too). The thematic element is so strong, which is what really elevates those big eurogames (Agricola being the classic example) for me, even though I still like the themeless point salads like Trajan and Concordia too.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on January 28, 2018, 07:20:50 PM
Played through a 12 game campaign of a game called Charterstone. We did it with just 2 players and 2 automated players, and had a good time. It would be a really neat game to play with 6 people, if you coordinate it.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: tinyholidays on January 28, 2018, 09:43:02 PM
We had a great time playing Hardback (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/223750/hardback) the other night.  It's a Dominion-style deckbuilder, but you're making words. I bet a lot of you on here would enjoy it.

We moved back to Los Angeles recently and had to leave most of our board game collection in a storage unit in Canada, but we've been picking up a few new games for our empty shelves. I received Azul (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/230802/azul) for Christmas. It's an abstract tile-laying game. I really like it but it is very competitive with only two players.

Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on January 29, 2018, 03:41:19 AM
Played through a 12 game campaign of a game called Charterstone. We did it with just 2 players and 2 automated players, and had a good time. It would be a really neat game to play with 6 people, if you coordinate it.

We're in the middle of our own campaign (5 games in I think), it's interesting so far. We're also 4 players, but completely blanked on the automated players thing and decided not to go back and fix it, so I suspect our development is a little slower. It's interesting, but the campaign aspect isn't quite as exciting as in something more narrative like Pandemic Legacy.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: MartinTeller on January 29, 2018, 09:43:20 AM
What Do You Meme? is a pretty terrible take on the Apples to Apples/CAH formula. So many variations on the same dumb jokes (haha parents + sex = awkward!) and I would say half the time I didn't have a good match to play. Five people in their 30's and 40's needed our teenage houseguest to explain several of the memes, so it's probably not a game for my generation.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on February 04, 2018, 02:37:58 PM
@MT
I enjoy The Metagame more in that respect because it has a brief description of each cultural item at the bottom of the card. It usually sales at B&N and they've got a few expansions coming out this year, one being movies! I played it with several groups and it's been a big hit as it goes all the way back to the 60s.

So many games now want to be Cards Against Humanity style humor and we need to grow up a lot and quit being antisocial jerks at the table. Basically any game that has a NSFW edition or disclaimer is an automatic pass for me. The Metagame does have some PG-13 humor, but it's all stuff kids should know about by now, especially with the Internet.

@tinyholidays
I did just get Hardback last weekend but haven't had a chance to read up on all the rules as I've been sick the last week. Game looks great. Azul is also on my shortlist for games to pick up this year as that one looks like a beauty.

Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: MartinTeller on February 04, 2018, 10:29:23 PM
Metagame looks intriguing.

they've got a few expansions coming out this year, one being movies!

Unfortunately, no one in our circle is anywhere near the movie buff I am.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on February 05, 2018, 01:17:56 AM
Rising Sun adds monster from Wikipedia (http://johnbrieger.com/blog/?p=321).

I find this equal parts funny and sad. It was inevitable that someone would make millions on Kickstarter and accidentally mess up the theme behind the game. Haven't gotten mine yet so I wonder if they're taking this part of the game out.

This is the risk you always make with Kickstarters where the high concept is great but the execution end up not having quality control issuesl. I only backed because it looked like the Japanese monsters is read behind but I guess I should have done research on the stretch goals as well..Still think I'll get a great game but if my copy has the figure, I'm going to shelve it as a reminder to always check your sources.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 25, 2018, 03:04:47 PM
I've played so many board games this year I'm not even sure where to start.

Oh, I know where to start! We finished Pandemic: Legacy Season 1. If you have a regular group of people to play with or maybe even just a partner/spouse, this is such a fun experience as it's an ever evolving game of Pandemic where the rules and mechanics change month by month. We got a good 16 plays out of it before finishing the campaign.

Firefly Adventures: Brigands and Browncoats is another one that we've gotten a bit of circulation with in my group. It's a coop game where the clock is constantly ticking as you try to finish a job, grabbing as much money as you can before leaving. It usually results in things falling apart and some improvisation, which makes it feel a lot like the show.

Finally got a play of Scythe and it was...okay. I liked it more than I thought I would but it felt very slow and lethargic as you slowly stretch out only to discover half of what you need is in a place you probably won't be able to get to or someone else reaches first. Maybe on another play the puzzle will reveal itself, but it felt like a lot of time was spent waiting to execute plans that would take a series of moves that might just get undone by one player and given how long each turn might take, it felt tedious.

Fate of the Elder Gods is a tight little worker placement game. I like that it's simultaneously about getting what you want while also making other places either completely blocked off or less enticing to the next player. The spell system gives you a way to mitigate some of that so you never feel truly locked out of choices and gives the game a lot of flexibility.

Watson & Holmes plays up to 7 people in a game of deduction as you venture to various sites surrounding a crime and try to answer key questions about the case. It was a fun first game but some of the wording on the cards were a bit suspect and misleading which makes me hope future cases are better written.

Finally got the chance to play a game of Eldrich Horror. It lived up to my expectations. The game oozes theme and a lot of times you're forced to make choices that you know will probably suck but if you don't do will likely cost the whole game which made losing at this game a fun sequence of things gone wrong which feels in the true spirit of cosmic horror.

The 7th Continent has been sitting on my shelf unwrapped since I moved back in with my parents and I finally decided last week to crack it open. What a disappointment. I played a good five hours and the game never hooked me. The initial story hook didn't go anywhere in my hours of play as I explored the island and found the game played as a rather bland survival game with a unsatisfying card action system where I lost by a random card draw instead of something mechanically interesting happening.

Also so much of the game is managing all the cards and shuffling up cards and spreading out this whole map of cards on the table and then discovering you have to go around something which means you shift all the cards down the table and then end up at some dead end. It's just tiresome and the physical act of playing never felt satisfying for what I was supposed to be doing. I love exploration games, but I'm not sure it translates well into this card system The 7th Continent built.

Last night I finally got a play of Hardback in and this game was a lot of fun. I had played Paperback before, which is good, but this one felt like it had more interesting depth to it and I love the push your luck mechanic of drawing more cards but then having to use the extra cards you draw in your word. This is a superb spelling game and I hope to get more plays out of it.

There were a few other games I played and a handful of replays, but that was most of the notable new games I played that I had something to say about. As for the future, I sorted Rising Sun into one box yesterday and I'm hoping to get a play of that sometime soon because it's been hard for my group to get enough people to play for a long enough time. I'm also looking at playing some Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective by myself because while I love playing games with other people, I'm wanting to try solo experiences more as i'm not always in the mood to play games with other people every night.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on June 27, 2018, 01:37:18 PM
Sam and everyone,

If you could only have one board game, which one would it be?
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 27, 2018, 02:26:31 PM
Cosmic Encounter

It's a goofy game with wacky alien races that break the rules of the game. You're never likely to play the same game twice because of the alien power combinations and the whole thing tends to result in laughter, surprise, negotiation, betrayal and most of the emotions I tend to love in gaming.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on June 27, 2018, 03:00:46 PM
Dominion. My favorite game, and an infinitely replayable one with expansions.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on June 27, 2018, 10:54:37 PM
Cosmic Encounter

It's a goofy game with wacky alien races that break the rules of the game. You're never likely to play the same game twice because of the alien power combinations and the whole thing tends to result in laughter, surprise, negotiation, betrayal and most of the emotions I tend to love in gaming.

Next game I buy, it's going to be this one! :)) Thanks! With all the games you're familiar with, I know your pick is going to be a lot of fun.

Dominion. My favorite game, and an infinitely replayable one with expansions.

Great choice! I love Dominion. I don't own it, but have a few family members who do, so play when I'm with them. What I enjoy most about it is, I feel like I'm playing against myself almost more than I'm playing against others. Improving my strategies, while adapting to new details, is really rewarding to me.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on June 27, 2018, 11:15:37 PM
I played Codenames with some friends a while back. I loved it.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Junior on June 28, 2018, 12:16:40 AM
I was gonna suggest that one too. Very simple but hasn't gotten old for me yet.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Corndog on June 28, 2018, 07:29:25 AM
Ticket to Ride
Harry Potter: Battle of Hogwarts
Dragon Run
Codenames
Latice

Those are probably the games we play the most.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: oldkid on June 28, 2018, 10:50:28 AM
Go.

I like strategy games and Go is the simplest of concepts and there is always opportunities to learn with a new opponent.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on June 28, 2018, 03:01:43 PM
I was gonna suggest that one too. Very simple but hasn't gotten old for me yet.

I like that the result never feels at all predetermined. That is to say, before the game has started you can't look at the board and immediately see advantages to certain players based on board position or turn order. Risk, Smallworld, Catan... you play them enough you begin to see the game unfolding before it's even started. And by a quarter of the way into the game things are already leaning towards a certain outcome barring a lucky streak to change the trajectory of the game. Is there anything worse than having to continue playing a game when you're clearly out of contention?

Codenames feels like pure wits and people reading.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on June 29, 2018, 01:34:59 AM
I played Codenames with some friends a while back. I loved it.

I've played this once. I don't think we really understood the rules well though. We had fun, but I will definitely read up on it before i play again.


Ticket to Ride
Harry Potter: Battle of Hogwarts
Dragon Run
Codenames
Latice

Those are probably the games we play the most.

I didn't know there was a Harry Potter board game! I haven't heard of Latice and Dragon Run either. Ticket to Ride is one I really like, because it's fast moving and I love maps. Thanks for the list! I'm interested in looking into these.

Go.

I like strategy games and Go is the simplest of concepts and there is always opportunities to learn with a new opponent.

I've never played this! Next time I'm in the Pacific Northwest, please let me be the new opponent! :)

I was gonna suggest that one too. Very simple but hasn't gotten old for me yet.

I like that the result never feels at all predetermined. That is to say, before the game has started you can't look at the board and immediately see advantages to certain players based on board position or turn order. Risk, Smallworld, Catan... you play them enough you begin to see the game unfolding before it's even started. And by a quarter of the way into the game things are already leaning towards a certain outcome barring a lucky streak to change the trajectory of the game. Is there anything worse than having to continue playing a game when you're clearly out of contention?

Nope!

Much like the latter part of all Monopoly sessions.

Quote
Codenames feels like pure wits and people reading.

My kind of game!
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Corndog on June 29, 2018, 07:20:23 AM
Ticket to Ride
Harry Potter: Battle of Hogwarts
Dragon Run
Codenames
Latice

Those are probably the games we play the most.

I didn't know there was a Harry Potter board game! I haven't heard of Latice and Dragon Run either. Ticket to Ride is one I really like, because it's fast moving and I love maps. Thanks for the list! I'm interested in looking into these.

Oh yea, the HP game is an addictive, cooperative deck building game. Lots of fun! Dragon Run is super simple and easy, perfect for playing with kids! Latice is a newer one for us. I like how complicated and strategic it can be.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on June 29, 2018, 10:49:20 PM
I have an aversion to cooperative games and would need persuading to come to see their merits. The only ones that make sense are jigsaw puzzles and even then my favorite way to enjoy them is to have two identical puzzles and two teams competing against each other. ‘Cause isn’t that the point of games? Competition? Cooperation should have no place in board games, unless you need to trade sheep for ore for your own benefit. *the dark side of me* :)

Corndog, The fact that you put a cooperative game as one of your favorites is a strong first step toward persuasion. :) The other two are easy to get enthusiastic about!


Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on July 01, 2018, 01:06:21 AM
I have an aversion to cooperative games and would need persuading to come to see their merits. The only ones that make sense are jigsaw puzzles and even then my favorite way to enjoy them is to have two identical puzzles and two teams competing against each other. ‘Cause isn’t that the point of games? Competition? Cooperation should have no place in board games, unless you need to trade sheep for ore for your own benefit. *the dark side of me* :)

Preach! :)
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sandy on July 02, 2018, 10:38:02 PM
Preach! :)

:)
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: DarkeningHumour on July 09, 2018, 09:03:08 AM
Isn't D&D a cooperative game? Your party vs the world.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 09, 2018, 10:09:50 AM
More like your party vs. the DM.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: DarkeningHumour on July 09, 2018, 10:41:08 AM
They are one and the same.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 29, 2018, 08:46:41 PM
Been living more of that boardgame life:

Arcadia Quest felt way too light and loose for a grid based combat game for me. Almost felt like this would be something you'd play with six-year-old kids because of how simplistic it all felt. Also, the chibi art doesn't help the fact this feels like a kid's game. It's supposed to have this sprawling campaign but it would take a lot to get me to play this game again. If the draw of your game is a lengthy campaign, I'm going to want some meaty mechanics for the core experience.

Lanterns is a lovely little filler game that moves quickly with a simplistic blend of tile laying and set collection. The fact you're getting a card each time someone plays based on what color tile is facing you keeps you constantly invested in other player's turns and the whole thing is so lovely and elegant that I could see it becoming one of my favorite filler games.

Finally busted out Rising Sun for a play and it did not disappoint. I like the area control and bidding combat for sure, but it's the different interplay of the factions, the fragile alliances and the political mandates that made the buildup to combat a good bulk of the game. The combat felt like an exclamation point on a game of political intrigue which makes it a dream game for me. I'm going to try to get this one to the table often.

I gave Fallout another shot and it didn't make the cut. The scoring system is so broken and everyone agreed the fact we can finish each other's quests felt both unfair and unthematic. Maybe it would work as a solo game, but honestly at that point I'd go play Fallout on my computer. It's a shame because the story deck is cool and a lot of the systems are there, but the actual drive to keep playing just dwindles away the longer the game continues.

Got another play of Star Trek: Ascendancy and this was with four players. That was a mistake. All of a sudden, the core flaw of the game stuck out like a wart: the length of player turns. Each player has a number of command tokens to do actions and they get to use them all in one go. This means if you are the fourth player in a round, you can spend a good hour watching everyone else slowly expand out and mull over decisions only to get a turn where your plans fall apart after your second command and you're set back so far on resources you just have to wait until next phase to further your plans. That happened to me twice! Two turns I had command tokens unspent at the end because there were no valuable actions I could take and ended up having a 5 minute turn while I watched everyone else spend 15+ minutes having their turn. It's one of the most miserable experiences I've had with a game.

Sheriff of Nottingham is becoming a family favorite. It's a great game of bluffing where you go around taking turns as the sheriff while other players bring goods to market. You have to declare goods but you can always lie and try to smuggle in contraband, which is worth a lot. Do you take the risk and you might make it big or be honest and slowly build wealth by collecting the most of certain resources? It usually depends on which person you think you can bluff or bribe your way past. I'm generally terrible at this game but I don't care because it's so much fun watching family lie through their teeth and get away with a big haul of contraband or see someone pressure a sibling to up his/her bribe. It's as much about playing people as it is about playing the game and that's always a plus for me.

Finally got a play of Inis with four people and this has probably solidified itself as my favorite area control game. The wonky combat and card drafting system takes a while to fully comprehend, but once you do it's this great game of constantly shifting plans as each player does something that will throw off your tempo until victory seems at hand right before it's snatched away for a moment where once again someone else could run away with it all.

Azul seemed to be the game of 2017, running away with all the awards and accolades. It's easy to see why. It's a gorgeous package with nail-biting decisions as you try to balance what you need to score points against how to deny other players from running away with the game. It's a magnificent puzzle of a game and one I'd be eager to return to again.

La Granja is a medium weigh euro that I enjoyed well enough but there wasn't particularly anything that hooked me in the game. It's got a lot of mechanics at play which create for these tight turns where you're always an action or two short of doing everything you want to do. Maybe it's the fact I played it with two players which meant a lot less competition for resources that would probably be scarcer at a higher player count.

Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island is one of those cooperative games that has a reputation for being brutal. It certainly lived up to its reputation as the game constantly kept us running behind on resources. To me, this felt a lot closer to what I wanted from The 7th Continent. More nuanced survival mechanics at interplay with each other, a gradual sense of exploration with a bit of flavor to it all. I'm eager to return to this one again as I could see it becoming a favorite.

Cthulhu Wars gets a fair amount of rotation in our group as the big minis on a map beating up each other game. I love the asymmetrical factions and the general spectical of the game. At some point someone is going to stand up and chuck a big handful of dice across the board and a big blob of minis is going to slowly decrease until everyone licks their wounds, builds forces back up, and does the whole thing all over again. It's big, it's dumb, it's not that Lovecraftian, but I don't care, I love every damn minute of it.


On the other end of the spectrum, Near and Far is about as cute and light of a game that my group would go for. A grab bag of systems, it's a jack of all trades master of none type of game. There was never a moment where it all clicked for me. It's another game touted for its campaign features, but much like Arcadia Quest, the fundamentals are not here. Pandemic Legacy works because the fundamentals of Pandemic are already great, but so many of these campaign games I encounter feel like they'd be completely forgettable if not for the campaign feature.



Looking to the future, I've decided to jump on board the sinking ship of Android: Netrunner now that the game will end printing in October. For whatever dumb reason, knowing there are only a finite number of cards out there makes me more willing to try it even if the lack of future support means its far less likely I'll find new people to play with. I ordered a revised core set as they are selling out like hotcakes and I'm going to try some games with it first to see if I want to dip any further into buying cards before scarcity drives up prices.

My new most anticipated game on the horizon is Goodcritters. It's a retheme of a German game in which you're splitting money between all the players and everyone votes on whether or not they're for or against the deal. There's a bit more to it than that, but it looks like yet another game with lots of deal-making, bribes and negotiation.

Beyond that, I'm still haven't seen Gloomhaven get reprinted and one person in my group is not thrilled about the idea of playing it. Also, I'd love to get my hands on Altiplano at some point but I think it's going to be a hard sell for the people I game with so I'm holding off on getting it for now.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on July 29, 2018, 09:08:28 PM
Got another play of Star Trek: Ascendancy and this was with four players. That was a mistake. All of a sudden, the core flaw of the game stuck out like a wart: the length of player turns.

Word. Games live and die on how fun they are, or how occupied you are, when it ISN'T your turn. Games with too much going on are often that way. :-\

I played Founders of Gloomhaven earlier this week with 4 players. Took about 3.5 hours, and it was everyone's first time through. Not a bad game, but it takes a while to wrap your head around some of the rules of the map (sometimes it's really not intuitive). It seemed to have good balance and was competetive right to the end. We all led at some point. It has a good variety of game mechanics to be mindful of, but of course that means a lot of blown turns due to a rule mix up or forgotton draw, etc. Even on a 3'x6' table it was tough to fit everything comfortably. On the upside, it never felt like you were idle for too long, because in between your turn your also getting miniturns after everyone elsess turn. Very little in the way of interactivity though, aside from occasionally building where someone else had planned to build. I wouldn't mind playing it again though.

Also played one quick round of Beasty Bar. An excellent and super simple to learn card game. Quick turns, lotta screwing each other over, and overall just a lot of fun. Would def play again.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: DarkeningHumour on July 30, 2018, 03:31:59 AM
Got another play of Star Trek: Ascendancy and this was with four players. That was a mistake. All of a sudden, the core flaw of the game stuck out like a wart: the length of player turns.

Word. Games live and die on how fun they are, or how occupied you are, when it ISN'T your turn. Games with too much going on are often that way. :-\

Complex games can go fast when people know what they're doing. It's when people wait for their turn to start thinking about their next moves, or insist on rereading all of their cards and the instructions manual that things go awry. I've played games where we had to repeat every instruction three times to some first timer before they got it.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Bondo on July 30, 2018, 04:58:07 AM
I recently played the HP cooperative game on a date. The date didn't work out as hoped so I bought my own version of the game. Admittedly I've played it solitaire a bit, even though it says "2-4 players". Probably an advantage that it can be played that way because I own Dominion but have almost never played it because fulfilling the conditions of having friends together AND them picking to play that game is limited. Plus, I feel like the cooperative aspect is very on message for the Harry Potter world.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on July 30, 2018, 03:03:44 PM
Complex games can go fast when people know what they're doing. It's when people wait for their turn to start thinking about their next moves, or insist on rereading all of their cards and the instructions manual that things go awry.

That does drive me a bit crazy.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 11, 2018, 03:56:03 PM
Another six weeks pass, another batch of games played.

Path of Light and Shadow is a pretty good deckbuilder that takes place over a map where you're fighting for territories that score you points. There are a number of factions who all have a different split of card types and you can upgrade your cards to better versions of those cards which means you're balancing getting new good cards with upgrading cards so you don't end up flooding your hand with cards that are too weak by the late game. Also, as a fun side-note, we played for over an hour with the towers upside down and it was a pretty funny moment when we realized it.

Android: Netrunner ended up being about as magical as I could expect it to be. The asymmetrical factions makes for a game with so much depth and the amount of hidden information at play makes for lots of great mind games. It's a shame this game is going out of print. I kinda hope it comes back under a new IP, ideally Cyberpunk. I'd kinda dislike it being a CCG, but given that the markup price for Android is now absurd and you can only really get sets instead of single cards means my chance of getting much new stuff with it is slim.

Root is another asymmetrical game that is a blast to play. It's area control with each faction feeling completely different. One plays with a lot of base-building, another is this rebel group that can crop up anywhere on the map, the third is a faction that has to program the possible actions it can do and the final is a single powerful character that can run around the map doing their own missions and making alliances or battling different players.

I dunno if it was dipping my toes into Android: Netrunner, but deckbuilding started calling to me and one of the guys in his group bought his decade old Magic: The Gathering cards. I'm in so much trouble. I played this game several times in the past and always enjoyed it, but never had reliable partners to play it. My brother and I played some but neither of us got deeply invested in it. Well, my brother got the few Magic cards I ever bought and I collected those mixed with a handful of cards I bought from the local comic shop and now I'm deep into building a deck and quickly realizing how expensive this hobby could be if I don't set some hard limits.

Fortunately, unlike Netrunner, I can buy a lot of single cards super cheap and my ideal deck right now is filled with cards I can get for a quarter a piece. The more expensive cards I might get one or two of a month. I'm also planning on trying the prerelease at the end of the month with the guy who reeled me in which is slightly slanted towards the deck I want to build so it might give me with some inspiration. Also, I should mention Android: Netrunner and Magic: The Gathering are both designed by Richard Garfield so the guy has quite the record when it comes to designing card games.

Evo is a cute looking game that looks like something for kids but is probably one of the most tight and vicious games I've played. You're a pack of dinosaurs trying to survive drastic climate changes which means waring over certain biomes as the temperatures rises and falls. You can also evolve your dinos to be more effective at different things like movement, attacking and climate survival.

City of Remnants is another asymmetrical area control game. This is probably the worst first experience I've had with a game. My dice rolls were horrible. I would bear down on my enemies and then just get the most flat rolls. The result is my combat heavy faction absolutely did not perform to its strengths and I got trounced. I'd be willing to try it again but I need a few months to pass to let the sting of such a bad experience fade.

Space Hulk was also a dice-heavy game and also asymmetrical, but this one worked so well for me as it's essentially a miniatures game with modular board elements. The ruleset is elegant, the timed turns for humans keep the pressure up and the alien hoards flowing in frantically. It's the closest I've felt to playing Aliens in a boardgame form. We played two scenarios and I'm hungry for more.

Caverna is one of those lauded euro games where you chow down on a point salad with an absurd number of paths to victory. Essentially a worker placement game, the mechanisms are simple but there are so many choices. If you play with anyone who takes too long to take a turn, you best not play this game with this person. It took about four hours, probably, and that was with four of the faster players I've played games with.

Treasure Hunter is yet another Richard Garfield game, this one a card drafting game where you compete over three colors for either high or low scores based on what treasures come into play. This game is so smart and tight as you are constantly strung between wanting to compete for three different colors as well as snagging special powerup cards and dog cards that ward off goblins who will steal gold from you. It's also a cute theme, so I think this would be a great family weight game and might even make it into my collection.



Beyond that, I had a lot of replays of games I've talked about before: Coup, Biblios, Cosmic Encounter, Spartacus: A Game of Blood & Treachery, Century: Golem Edition and good old War of the Ring.

As for potential future plays, I'm seeing lots of Magic in my future. Might start going to some of the Friday night events if I can get my deck to fit Modern format. Also looking to get another game of Rising Sun in if possible. Goodcritters looks like it might not release until next month, which is good for my wallet.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: MartinTeller on September 11, 2018, 04:19:20 PM
Played a couple of card-based games with friends this past weekend:

Joking Hazard is a great take on the CAH formula, where you create 3-panel comic strips. The judge pulls the first panel from the deck, then plays the second panel from their hand. All other players submit a punchline panel and the judge picks the best/funniest. We had a lot of fun with this one... occasionally the first card just doesn't work as a starting point (unless you get weird with it) but it's easy enough to just pull a new one. There are tons of cards, and tons of laughs.

F*** That, on the other hand, was a boring mess. Basically you're given a scenario with 5 things you can do. You pick between 1 and 4 (you could pick 5 but it'd defeat the purpose) that you'd be comfortable with, and the other players have to guess which ones you picked. There's a lot of reading which is always a speedbump, and the cards aren't very funny or thought-provoking. The game doesn't really do much to test how well you know each other. Snoozefest, we abandoned this one early on to go back to more Joking Hazard.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on September 12, 2018, 02:32:38 AM
Caverna really shouldn't take four hours. Was it everyone's first time playing it ?

I've been playing some Cubirds recently, which is a pretty smart card game with a unique design (cubist birds, as the name indicates). It's pretty interesting mechanically and quite unique in how it looks, I'd recommend it heartily.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 12, 2018, 08:58:47 AM
Caverna really shouldn't take four hours. Was it everyone's first time playing it ?
It was for two of us.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on September 12, 2018, 11:28:31 AM
Caverna really shouldn't take four hours. Was it everyone's first time playing it ?
It was for two of us.

Hm. Were the other players surprised it took that long ? I guess I haven't played it that many times, but 3 hours already seems pretty extreme to me. I'd recommend Agricola instead, if you enjoyed the core mechanics: I guess it would still take some time with your group, but you have cards (instead of the many buildings) which elp focus your strategy and might make it more fluid.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on December 04, 2018, 01:40:43 PM
Time for a big dump of new plays:

Saga is a rather lightweight miniatures game that played rather fast. I didn't do particularly good at this game. Some of it was horrible rolling, some of it was just not quite fully understanding the system. I'm not huge into miniatures game, but I'd play this one again as it went rather quick and your actions are dictated by dice which means you basically work with what you have instead of thinking out a myriad of choices.

Clans of Caledonia is a lovely little euro about farming in the Scottish countryside. It's quite the vicious game with a lot of blocking each other off from spaces and competing over a market that rises and falls based on a basic simulation of supply and demand. The market is definitely the part that made this game tick the most for me. I quite liked this one and would certainly play it again.

Praetor is a tile-laying worker placement game where you're building this city and then placing workers to get things from those various buildings. If you built the place someone uses, you get the payment for using that place, which made for some great strategies where certain players would try to corner the market on a good or a certain action to reap more rewards. It had a big table presence which it didn't quite need and I'm baffled by the added system of having scoring based on matching colored corners, especially since the corner-matching was not friendly for our sight impaired players. It seemed like a goofy addition to a rather straightforward game.

The Expanse Board Game is based off the TV show and all about area control throughout the solar system based on playing cards for either events or action point values. It plays a lot like the GMT games like Twilight Struggle. I did horribly, but I liked it well enough to want to try it again, especially since I got a better understanding of how the factions differed. Also, it got me into the show which is great.

Concordia, oh what a beautiful game. You get a deck of cards, a couple of workers, and are tasked with expanding out from Rome to gather goods in order to either build more facilities to generate more goods or gather more cards to perform more actions. I could see this becoming a favorite with more plays as you've got this tight board you're competing over while also trying to figure out which goods to snatch up first so you don't have to pay more for them later.

It's a game where you'll line up several turns based on your cards, have to shift strategies halfway through executing a plan, buy a new card to pursue just one more action and then find you're awkwardly left one card short of doing everything you want to so you have to spend a turn picking up your whole hand of cards and man it's way more tight and exciting than it sounds and I'm eager to play it again.

Keyforge: Call of the Archons is the latest from Richard Garfield of Magic fame. The actual trappings and ultimate goal of the game is rather boring, but I could sort of say the same thing about Magic. Basically, you're trying to forge three keys before your opponent does the same and you do that by picking one of three houses in your deck to play cards of every turn. This leads to times when you have to decide between playing one or two killer cards that could give you great tempo in the game or play a middling set of 3-4 cards and hope your draw gives you some other cards to add to that one house you really want to play.

The main hook is that each deck is a completely unique combination of cards and you buy decks as a set thing that can't be mixed or matched with another deck. As someone who really enjoys the deckbuilding of Netrunner and Magic, this is somewhat of a turnoff but for anyone who wants to play a card game without feeling the siren card to constantly buy more, this could be the solution. The base box comes with 4 decks, 2 everyone gets as the two starter decks, and 2 completely random decks.

Minerva felt super similar to Praetor but instead of building one common city, each person built their own city and then activated rows and columns of tiles instead of just one tile. I liked this one much more than Praetor. Placement was a lot more important and choices felt a lot more weighty. It was also satisfying to build your own thing and then having a combination pop off.

Dice City wasn't much to write home about, but amusing enough. You roll a set of colored dice, match them to a personal grid you have, and then have the option of performing that action or the action of the spaces on either side. Choices felt rather limited and certain strategies seemed to snowball a lot faster than others. Maybe with a higher player count it would play nicer, but with only two, it wasn't fantastic.

Replays through this period include: Pandemic, Watson & Holmes, Star Realms, 7 Wonders, Eldrich Horror, The Castles of Burgundy, Kemet, Rising Sun and lots of games of Magic: The Gathering.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: sdb_1970 on December 17, 2018, 03:42:31 PM
My spouse and I play all sorts (although not so much with the legacy games), but over the last few years, Seven Wonders Duel (with the expansion and extra wonders in play) is our favorite for sure.  We ended up purchasing the metal coins and other pieces.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on December 17, 2018, 04:49:55 PM
Concordia might be the purest design of any heavy eurogame. So smooth, so simple and so rewarding.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: philip918 on January 14, 2019, 02:53:15 PM
My wife suggested playing some board games and partly inspired by lurking in this thread I picked a few up over the weekend.

Scrabble
We started with a classic. This was my "family" game growing up. My grandma loved it and we'd always play when we visited. What's there to say really?

Codenames
We are just playing two-player, which clearly isn't this game's strong suit. I read the Duets version is better. Look forward to playing with a couple more people to see how it goes.

Exploding Kittens
This is a fun one. We only played one round, but can see that once we're comfortable with the rules it will play really quickly.

Gloom
This was the standout. From the Edward Gorey-inspired artwork and the macabre goals to the simple, but very clever, card play, we ended up playing four games in a row.

I have Azul ordered. Really looking forward to that.

Happy for any other recommendations. Leaning toward smaller and simpler for now. Not huge boxes with hundreds of pieces.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on January 14, 2019, 03:33:07 PM
Azul is pretty great. In that style (as in: 2-4 player games that takes 45 minutes and has strategy without being overwhelming, and also looks nice), I'd recommend Reef, in which each player is putting pieces of coral on their board to complete objectives you have on your cards. It requires some thinking ahead because playing a card makes you place corals and check for an objective, but the corals on the card are never the ones required for the objective, so you're always planning for the next few turns. It's puzzly, but still quite fluid and easy to play.

And yeah, Codenames is not the best with two. I'll note that if you enjoy word games (which it seems like you do), I'll recomment Decrypto, which is a brainier Codenames basically. You have two teams, they each have four words that everyone in the team knows, and every round each team has someone draw a "code" (a sequence of four numbers which indicate which of the four words you have to get your team to guess and in which order) and must get their team to get that code... but the other team is listening, and if you use obvious words, they'll eventually "intercept" you. I don't know if that's clear, but anyway, it has that Dixit tension of "I must be clear but I can't be too obvious" and it gets really interesting as the rounds go by, really recommend it.

And if you're looking for a two-player game, 7 Wonders: Duel is the gold standard currently, in case you don't know about it.

Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 14, 2019, 04:00:39 PM
Been about six weeks since the last time I commented in here. Time for all the new plays:

Discover: Lands Unknown is a game I demoed once but I actually got to play it and it's basically a easier Robinson Crusoe. That's not entirely fair as there is a lot more interaction on the board as far as things moving around and having to go to specific places to move forward the story arc, but a lot of the mechanics feel the same. I like it. I'd rather play Robinson Crusoe again, but I'd certainly play this again if someone else initiated play.

Ingenious is a simple little tile laying game where you have hex shaped dominoes that all fit in a giant hex and you're trying to score over six colors as evenly as possible as your lowest score is your final score. (So if you have 16 in purple but your lowest color is blue at 7, you're final score is 7.) I like it as a little abstract puzzler. It's a bit on the ugly side, though and I would love to see an updated version of this as game aesthetics have improved a lot in the past 15 years.

Santorini is a prime example of how you can make a gorgeous abstract game. You play  the pawns of Greek gods building towers where the only point is to place one of your two workers on the top level of a three level structure. It sounds simple but this two player game becomes devilishly hard, especially once you introduce the god powers into the mix. I've been eyeing this game since it came out and I'm glad I finally got to play it. I can see this becoming one of my go-to two player games.

Commands & Colors: Ancients is more Commands & Colors goodness. I already love that system and playing another version of it is just experiencing more goodness. This version's leader system added in with some of the more nuanced stats of each unit made for some great play. I was getting stomped early on, but threatened to come back at the final hour of the game with a heroic push back. Alas, it was not meant to be.

Hunt for the Ring is a hidden movement game that's also a sort of board game prequel to War of the Ring which is the big ole two-player strategy game titan of board gaming. It's a much lighter game but boy did I find myself straining just as much to make my choices and double guessing everything. I played the Ringwraiths and found myself completely in the dark for most of the game and seeing how close I was so many times makes me want to play again.

Villainous is a gorgeous looking game with a cool theme where you try to fulfill your wicked goal as a villain from one of the Disney films while foiling ever other villains' wicked plan. Each villain plays very different and has a unique win condition. Some want the hero's plan to progress only to make for a dramatic finish while others simply try to stonewall the hero. And then there's Prince John who just wants lots of money. It's super thematic, I can't think of another game that plays quite like it, and I think most Disney fans will enjoy it. The only downside is that I thought the card art not being actual stills from the film and instead new renderings was a big misstep as some of the card art is highly inferior to the film versions.

Sushi Go Party! is a card drafting game that has already gotten a lot of play with my family. You pick a card, pass your hand to the next person, score points once all the cards are gone, and then do it all over again until you finish a third round. It's simple, the art is gorgeous, the Party version allows for tons of variations of the kinds of cards you can add and take out of each draft, making each game we've played so far result in very different strategies. I love card drafting and this one makes it so easy to pick up and play that I think I'll get a lot of mileage out of this one.

There were also a lot of replays over the holidays. I got in games of The Expanse Board Game, Watson & Holmes, Century: Golem Edition, Lanterns, Pandemic and Ghost Stories (which we actually won).

Since the new year has come I actually haven't gotten much of a chance to play board games, which makes me kinda sad. This weekend is not looking like I'll have much of a chance either so January might be a dry month for me.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: philip918 on January 14, 2019, 04:24:24 PM
I'd recommend Reef, in which each player is putting pieces of coral on their board to complete objectives you have on your cards

I'll recommend Decrypto, which is a brainier Codenames basically.

And if you're looking for a two-player game, 7 Wonders: Duel is the gold standard currently, in case you don't know about it.

Thanks for these recs, Teproc! I'll definitely check them out.

Santorini is a prime example of how you can make a gorgeous abstract game. You play  the pawns of Greek gods building towers where the only point is to place one of your two workers on the top level of a three level structure.

Hunt for the Ring is a hidden movement game that's also a sort of board game prequel to War of the Ring which is the big ole two-player strategy game titan of board gaming. It's a much lighter game but boy did I find myself straining just as much to make my choices and double guessing everything. I played the Ringwraiths and found myself completely in the dark for most of the game and seeing how close I was so many times makes me want to play again.

Really piqued my interest with Santorini, and my wife loves Lord of the Rings, so maybe I'll surprise her with one of these.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on January 15, 2019, 01:11:28 AM
Scrabble
We started with a classic. This was my "family" game growing up. My grandma loved it and we'd always play when we visited. What's there to say really?

Any house rules? We're pretty lax in my family when we play about looking up words. If I recall correctly though, according to the rules the dictionary is only to be consulted if someone were to challenge someone's word. We just kind of use it whenever to look up spelling or to see if a particular two-letter word is a thing, etc. It is however frowned upon to simply go skimming for words at length.

We also count the center tile as a double word, so starting player gets a double word off the hop. Not sure if that is by the book or not.

One tradition I enjoy in our family is that when someone does get a scrabble they record the word, the score, the date in the back of the dictionary.  It's always a fun moment to add to that list and neat to look back and see some of the excellent plays and recognize whose handwriting it was. Our dictionary is from 2002, and is starting to run out of free pages. :)
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: philip918 on January 15, 2019, 12:26:41 PM
We took pretty much the same informal approach. Dictionary use was allowed if it wasn't excessive, and we also counted the star tile as a double word score. Really like the idea of keeping track of "scrabbles"!
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: smirnoff on January 26, 2019, 05:45:02 PM
My buddy has the Viticulture: Complete Collector's Edition (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/156455/viticulture-complete-collectors-edition) and we've played that quiet a bit. It's a pretty satisfying worker placement type of game. It definitely favours the player who can optimize the order and timing or their future turns (and in that way it gives you quite a bit to ponder while it's not your turn). Lots of stuff to juggle and remember. The interactivity between players comes mostly from the limited number of workers than can be placed on particular slots during a round. If you happen to find yourself in step with another players harvest cycle it can be a real struggle to accomplish the work you want to get done. The various expansions in this set seem to keep the game interesting. I enjoy this one, but you need 3 or better to make it play well imo.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: tinyholidays on January 27, 2019, 11:25:30 AM
Viticulture is a nice worker placement! I think it's still in our storage unit in Canada.

We played Great Western Trail for the first time last night and loved it so much we played it twice in a row. And I could've played a third time. A euro in the style of Russian Railroads with deck-building. Moved quickly, didn't feel overprone to analysis paralysis.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on January 27, 2019, 03:35:17 PM
I've been wanting to pick up Great Western Trail for a while now.
Title: Re: Board Game Banter
Post by: Teproc on January 27, 2019, 03:42:05 PM
It's a very solid worker placement game.