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Filmspotting Message Boards => Marathons => Topic started by: oldkid on July 21, 2010, 01:26:05 AM

Title: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 21, 2010, 01:26:05 AM
So the next top 100 is in December*, and I'm getting revved up for it.  I've been examining last year's top 100, and my list is so... inadequate.  It needs some serious help.  There's a lot I want to add, and some I need to seriously consider.  So I've got more than a hundred sixty on my possible list.  That means I'd better get started right away.  So I will.  But to fill it out, I need your help.

Take a look at my list, if you care to.  Then, many of you knowing the kind of film I like, tell me what you think is missing off of my list.  I'll pick 25-30 of them to watch and add to my list.  Then I will be watching every movie by December (I hope), and my final list will be formed, bit by bit.  Thus, it will be a bunch of movies I loved with a few that my friends think I will love.  It's a win-win for me.

Let the discussion begin!  :)

*It turns out I was in error about the top 100-- it was in September only a month after I began this marathon of a marathon.  So I guess I'm getting ready for next year!  This means a more flexible, longer marathon and more fun to be had!

My "Table of Contents" is on the next post where each review posted is linked.

Movies I'm Adding to my Top 160 at the Recommendation of My Friends:
Die Hard
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Canterbury Tale
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
Three Kings
Repulsion
The New World
Ratcatcher
The Great Dictator
Army of Shadows
Night at the Opera
Grizzly Man
A Letter To Three Women
A Woman In The Dunes
Harold and Maude
The Conversation
Gallipoli
Breaker Morant
Scarecrow
Emperor of the North
The Science of Sleep
Au Revoir Les Enfants
The 400 Blows
Do The Right Thing
The Big Lebowski
Black Narcissus
The Red Shoes
The Life And Death of Colonel Blimp
The Apartment
Mister Roberts
Ed Wood
Three Comrades
Lucky Star
Grave of the Fireflies
All About My Mother
Adventures of Robin Hood
Hero
Wild Strawberries
Wings of Desire
Still Walking
Nights of Cabiria
Fizcarraldo
Hidden Fortress
Ran-- Why do I have this on my list? I already saw it and feel solid about my evaluation
Out of the Past
Ostrov
Vanilla Sky/Open Your Eyes
Walkabout
Picnic At Hanging Rock
Night Moves
Notorious
Rebecca
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 21, 2010, 01:29:27 AM
Oldkid's Top 160 (or so) in no particular order:

Red Beard
Sunrise
Pyassa
Raising Arizona (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg482789#msg482789)
Dear Zachary
The Passion of Joan of Arc
Joyeux Noel
Son of Rambow
Notting Hill
In America (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg482401#msg482401)
Secondhand Lions
Planet Terror
A Serious Man
Where The Wild Things Are
The Brothers Bloom (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg483623#msg483623)
A Short Film About Killing
A Short Film About Love
Ordet
The Double Life of Veronique
Hunger
The Lives of Others
Requiem for a Dream
Spirited Away  
The Mission  
8 ½  
Wall-E
Wendy and Lucy
Finding Nemo  
Pan’s Labyrinth
Apocalypse Now (Redux)
Being There
Memento
Pulp Fiction
The Godfather Part II  
Synecdoche, New York
Lawrence of Arabia
Modern Times
Adaptation  (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg489024#msg489024)
American Splendor
AI: Artificial Intelligence
M
Dead Man Walking
Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
Seven Samurai
Unforgiven
Before Sunset
Three Colors: White  
City Lights  
Saving Private Ryan
City of God  
Paprika
Blade Runner
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
Sling Blade
Network
Dr. Strangelove or, How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love The Bomb
Brazil
Rashomon
Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Children of Men
The Player
Hotel Rwanda
The Fog of War
The Princess Bride
The Lion King
Rear Window
The Emperor’s New Groove
Duck Soup
Three Colors: Blue  
When Harry met Sally
Up  
Once Upon A Time In The West  
Rainman
Lars and the Real Girl
Kill Bill Vol. II
Edward Scissorhands (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg503354#msg503354)
Taxi Driver
To Kill a Mockingbird
Le Samourai
Shaun of the Dead
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade coming soon!!!
2001: A Space Odyssey
Silence of the Lambs
Schindler’s List
Fantasia
A Scanner Darkly  
Cast Away
Gladiator
Amadeus
The Fisher King
Big Fish
Elephant
Gosford Park
Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl  (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg502009#msg502009)
It’s a Wonderful Life
Lord of the Rings: Return of the King
Citizen Kane
Star Wars Episode IV—A New Hope  (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg486558#msg486558)
The Prestige
Salaam Bombay
The Dark Knight The Dark Knight (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg482401#msg482401)
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
The Empire Strikes Back  (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg489104#msg489104)
United 93
O Brother Where Art Thou?
Mary Poppins
Schitzopolis
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World
The Third Man
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Princess Mononoke (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg486133#msg486133)
The Gods Must Be Crazy
The Green Mile  
Nightmare before Christmas
Brick
Paranoid Park
The Man Without A Past
50 First Dates
The Matrix
The Pianist
Kung Fu Hustle  
Zelig
Fight Club
Young Frankenstein
Serenity
This is Spinal Tap
The Perfect Storm
Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
The Truman Show
Parenthood
Finding Neverland
Rushmore
My Man Godfrey
Traffic
Stranger Than Fiction
Happy Feet
Chinatown
West Side Story
Buckaroo Bonsai Across the Eighth Dimension coming soon!!!
About A Boy
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire  coming soon!!!
The Queen
The Ten Commandments
A Man For All Seasons
Fiddler on the Roof
Double Indemnity
There Will Be Blood
I Heart Huckabees (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg493871#msg493871)
Bloody Sunday
My Neighbor Totoro
Toy Story 2
Redbelt
His Girl Friday
Malcolm X
You Can’t Take It With You
District 9 (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg493730#msg493730)
A Night At Maud’s
Groundhog day
In the Mood For Love
2046
Tideland (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg489465#msg489465)
Lilo and Stitch
I'm Not There
Amelie  (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg492462#msg492462)
Terminator 2
The Last Temptation of Christ
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Die Hard
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Canterbury Tale
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg501843#msg501843)
Three Kings (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg492110#msg492110)
Repulsion
The New World
Ratcatcher
The Great Dictator
Army of Shadows
Night at the Opera
Grizzly Man
A Letter To Three Women
A Woman In The Dunes
Harold and Maude  coming soon!!!!
The Conversation
Gallipoli
Breaker Morant
Scarecrow coming soon!!!!
Emperor of the North
The Science of Sleep (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg493720#msg493720)
Au Revoir Les Enfants
The 400 Blows
Do The Right Thing  (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg502356#msg502356)
The Big Lebowski
Black Narcissus
The Life And Death of Colonel Blimp
Grave of the Fireflies
All About My Mother
The Apartment
Y Tu Mama Tambien
Adventures of Robin Hood
Hero
Wild Strawberries
Wings of Desire
Still Walking
Nights of Cabiria
Fizcarraldo coming soon!
Hidden Fortres
Ran
Out of the Past
Ostrov
Vanilla Sky/Open Your Eyes
Walkabout
Picnic At Hanging Rock
Night Moves
The Son (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg492116#msg492116)
Mister Roberts (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8453.msg492256#msg492256)

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on July 21, 2010, 01:40:03 AM
I don't see Die Hard or Back to the Future on your list.

I have to ask about...

Night of the Hunter
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Singing in the Rain

Also, I plugged your index into IMDB keywords and their best match was Operation Dumbo Drop
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 21, 2010, 01:46:14 AM
I don't see Die Hard or Back to the Future on your list.

I have to ask about...

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Singing in the Rain

Also, I plugged your index into IMDB keywords and their best match was Operation Dumbo Drop

I should throw Die Hard on there, that's true, just to see where it lands.  Sorry, BttFites.

The only time I saw One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest was less than a year after I had read the novel, so I hated everything it changed from the novel.  I suppose I can watch it again because after more than 20 years a few of the details have faded.

Singing in the Rain?  Good, but not good enough to get on my top 100.

Operation Dumbo Drop?  Really?  After Netflix is back online, I'll see what they consider my opinion of this... movie... will be.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Junior on July 21, 2010, 01:49:34 AM
I feel like any marathon in this vein has to have some Borzage (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=7342.0) in it. So, depending on your access and their availability, I reccomend Three Comrades (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=7342.msg415859#msg415859), The Mortal Storm (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=7342.45), or Lucky Star (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=7342.msg404709#msg404709). The Mortal Storm is coming to TCM on August 16th and Lucky Star is on Netflix. Three Comrades is orderable from the Warner Archives  (http://www.wbshop.com/on/demandware.store/Sites-WB-Site/default/Search-Show?q=three+comrades)but is also kind of expensive.  Or you can watch Three Comrades on youtube if you don't mind the idea of it.

Here's the first section.

thcoa (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imaAHJBeC3w#)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 21, 2010, 02:09:31 AM
In the last couple weeks I've already watched a couple of my marathon picks, so I suppose I'll start with them.



The Dark Knight

(http://cueballcol.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/the-dark-knight-joker-imax.jpg)

My second watch, this time on my laptop screen instead of IMAX.  It was just as amazing.  Christopher Bale is pretty dull in this, but Heath Ledger and Aaron Eckhart (who I just saw in Black Daliha)  and Gary Oldman more than make up for Bale’s Keanu-Reeves-ness.  It is smart reflection on human nature.  And the variety of ethical parables that make up this film make my heart beat faster than five hours of top notch special effects.  It is also refreshing to have a truly evil villain—not strictly mad, but completely and brilliantly sociopathic— in order to experience true fear of him. Perhaps it is a little bit of a mess.  If so, it is a perfect messterpiece.  I don’t see how Nolan can top this.  If Inception comes even close to this, it will be worth the money wasted on the theatre that ruined my experience of Toy Story 3.  

Technical-- 4/5-- The storytelling is convoluted a couple times.  Generally excellent, however.
Interest-- 5/5-- Never a dull moment.  Sometimes I needed to pause just to catch my breath.
Tension--5/5-- One of the most intense movies I've ever seen.
Emotional--3/5-- I really struggled personally with some of the situations the Joker set up. 
Characters--3/5-- Ledger's Joker is perfect.  Bale's Batman was a bit dull.  Overall, alright.
Theme-- 4/5-- Holding to one's principles in the face of pure evil.  Well done, even if the theme does get muddied in the plot.
Ethics--5/5-- Not because the ethics are perfect, but because of the ethical struggle the whole movie posed.  I prefer an ethical exercise rather than a sermon.
Personal--3/5-- In general, I can resonate with the struggle to maintain principle when it doesn't seem correct.  But the stakes in the movie are too high to really identify with.


In America

(http://l.yimg.com/eb/ymv/us/img/hv/photo/movie_pix/fox_searchlight/in_america/_group_photos/djimon_hounsou3.jpg)

Also my second watch.  In the family, every character is distinct and well developed, but the family as a unit is also perfectly realized.  And then the inclusion of Djimon Hounsou to shake the family up is simply wonderful.  This is the only movie I can think of that both times I watched it I thought, "This is a perfect film."  There are other films that hit all the emotional moments and have wonderful characters, but few that I appreciate so much being a part of their lives, if only for a short time.

Technical-- 5/5-- Well crafted film.
Interest-- 4/5-- I only lost interest the first time I watched the first scenes.  But they soon captured me.
Tension--4/5-- The scene at the carnival.  The dual sickbed scenes.  Totally intense.
Emotional--5/5-- I cried both times I saw this film.
Characters-- 5/5-- This is the real strength of the film.  I have never seen a whole family, including children, presented with such completeness.  I know these people.  I want to know them better.
Theme--2/5-- Not literary in that way, really.  Allowing oneself to feel is a major theme.
Ethics--3/5-- The occasional interesting ethical situation.  How should we deal with addicts who ask us for money?  How do we best raise our children in a frightening environment? 
Personal--3/5-- Just in the raising of my two girls. The joy of the family reminds me of the best times with my family. 


Top 100 List, thus far:
1. In America
2. The Dark Knight
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on July 21, 2010, 02:34:22 AM
I'm not recommending Op Dumb Drop.  Far from it.  Just saying...

stevekimes Top 100 Index

Movies about war

Dystopias

A dystopia is often characterized by an authoritarian or totalitarian form of government. It usually features different kinds of repressive social control systems, a lack or total absence of individual freedoms and expressions and a state of constant warfare or violence. A dystopian society is also often characterized by mass poverty for most of its inhabitants and a large military-like police force.
PLOT:
To keep the loyalty of an impoverished native village during the Vietnam war, an Army unit struggles to deliver a live elephant.

Disney, not including Pixar

Movies whose soundtrack or score would have made them great on their own
"GIMME SOME LOVIN'" - Performed by The Spencer Davis Group
"YOU'SE A SON OF A GUN" - Performed by Marvin Gaye
"(YOUR LOVE KEEPS LIFTING ME) HIGHER AND HIGHER" - Performed by Jackie Wilson
"HANG ON SLOOPY" - Performed by The McCoys
"THINK" - Performed by Aretha Franklin
"QUEEN OF THE NIGHT ARIA" - from "The Magic Flute" - Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
"WHEN I SEE AN ELEPHANT FLY" - From Dumbo

Movies based on real historic events

Movies involving social criticism

Movies involving France
- (Tchéky Karyo has a large part in it)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 21, 2010, 02:52:49 AM
I'm not recommending Op Dumb Drop.  Far from it.  Just saying...

stevekimes Top 100 Index

Movies about war

Dystopias

A dystopia is often characterized by an authoritarian or totalitarian form of government. It usually features different kinds of repressive social control systems, a lack or total absence of individual freedoms and expressions and a state of constant warfare or violence. A dystopian society is also often characterized by mass poverty for most of its inhabitants and a large military-like police force.
PLOT:
To keep the loyalty of an impoverished native village during the Vietnam war, an Army unit struggles to deliver a live elephant.

Disney, not including Pixar

Movies whose soundtrack or score would have made them great on their own
"GIMME SOME LOVIN'" - Performed by The Spencer Davis Group
"YOU'SE A SON OF A GUN" - Performed by Marvin Gaye
"(YOUR LOVE KEEPS LIFTING ME) HIGHER AND HIGHER" - Performed by Jackie Wilson
"HANG ON SLOOPY" - Performed by The McCoys
"THINK" - Performed by Aretha Franklin
"QUEEN OF THE NIGHT ARIA" - from "The Magic Flute" - Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
"WHEN I SEE AN ELEPHANT FLY" - From Dumbo

Movies based on real historic events

Movies involving social criticism

Movies involving France
- (Tchéky Karyo has a large part in it)

LOL.  Wow, poverty, war, Motown and France.  How could this movie miss?

And yet... it does. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Verite on July 21, 2010, 03:11:29 AM
Out of the 160, which ones haven't you seen?

Didn't like Three Colors: Red as much as the other two?

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on July 21, 2010, 03:15:07 AM
How about some Powell & Pressburger?  The Red Shoes and Black Narcissus of course, but I bet you'd really like A Canterbury Tale.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on July 21, 2010, 04:01:36 AM
I notice a heavy Ghibli presence on your list but no Grave of the Fireflies, if you have not seen it, it is impossible to recommend that movie enough.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Emiliana on July 21, 2010, 05:58:53 AM
Can I ask how you know that the next top 100 is in December?

I'd like to second sdedalus' Powell & Pressburger suggestion!

I don't think I see any Bergman on your list - I'd suggest The Seventh Seal.

And have you tried Almodóvar? Maybe All About My Mother?

Also: how about The Adventures of Robin Hood? A Letter to Three Wives?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on July 21, 2010, 07:33:42 AM
Just a heads up: you've got Roger Rabbit on the list twice.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on July 21, 2010, 08:37:16 AM
Studied your list for a bit looking for trends... here's what I came up with. I expect you've seen a few or all of them but here they are nevertheless. Maybe one or two of them will interest you enough to seek out. I chose them for being slightly unconventional in their style of storytelling, also I think they're just damn fine films.  ;)

Blair Witch Project
Hero
Joy Luck Club
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
Three Kings
Topsy-Turvy
Touching the Void
Vanilla Sky

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on July 21, 2010, 08:46:52 AM
Oldkid's Top 160 (or so) in no particular order:
Pyassa

Nothing productive to add, but Bollywood represent!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on July 21, 2010, 09:11:45 AM
Several lack of Bergman: Wild Strawberries.
I see Chinatown: so do Repulsion too.
I see 8 1/2: La Dolce Vita is better (though I am aching for a rewatch of 8 1/2).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 21, 2010, 09:43:13 AM
Days of Heaven? The New World?

You know me, if it's Malick, it should be in your top 100.  ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on July 21, 2010, 10:00:54 AM
A few more suggestions:

Wings of Desire
Ratcatcher
Still Walking

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on July 21, 2010, 11:04:39 AM
I've found no evidence that you've seen these, and I think you really should. Our taste seems to overlap a lot, and I think there's a good chance you could love these as much as I do. I'm prepared to try and sell you on them further if necessary ;D

1. The Great Dictator
2. Nights of Cabiria
3. High and Low
4. Army of Shadows
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: michael x on July 21, 2010, 11:07:01 AM
Awesome marathon. Here are my suggestions. I don't know your tastes that well yet, so I'm kind of guessing based off what's already on the list.

Animal Crackers and A Night at the Opera. I see Duck Soup already on there. These two have equally funny gags, just not quite the lean mania found in Duck Soup, so they tend to be under-appreciated.

Grizzly Man and Fitzcarraldo. Didn't see any Herzog on the list. Have you seen either previously? I think you would like both.

The Hidden Fortress and Ran. Saw some Kurosawa and Star Wars on the list already. What continues to stick in my mind is the epic scope and spectacle of Ran. I find it really cool to see King Lear get a treatment like this. As for The Hidden Fortress, the sense of adventure and entertainment is the equal of anything Spielberg or Lucas has done in my mind.

Out of the Past. This is a dense noir with a terrific mystery. Kind of like The Big Sleep, but with the love story the focal point (like Double Indemnity) and Robert Mitchum instead of Bogey.

Ostrov. A recent Russian film about a man who becomes an Orthodox monk out of guilt. He has keen insight into the human heart, but can't forgive himself his past sin. The other monks misunderstand and mistrust him, as his holy fool antics and spiritual gifts make them feel embarrassed and inadequate.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 21, 2010, 11:24:20 AM
Great suggestions, folks.  Let's see...

Three Colors: Red-- I think I have Kieslowski pretty well represented.  Have to draw a line somewhere.
Need one Powell and Pressburger-- All three you suggested sound great.  How about Canterbury Tale, then
Grave of the Fireflies-- I've seen it, and it didn't stir me at all.  Perhaps I was having a bad day?  If I have time, I'll fit it in again.
Seventh Seal-- Didn't care for it
The Almadovar I've seen is good, not great.  Couldn't actually sit through Bad Education (the relationship was TOO dysfunctional), but I liked Volver.  If I have time I'll do All About My Mother.
Adventures of Robin Hood-- I should watch it
A Letter to Three Wives-- didn't seem that interesting, why do you recommend it?
Blair Witch Project-- Good horror, but not a top 100 for me
Hero-- Hmmmm
Joy Luck Club-- I loved the book, so I've been avoiding the movie.  You think I'd like it?
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring-- I clearly need to watch this
Three Kings-- On my shelf to watch.  Putting on the list.
Topsy Turvy and Touching the Void-- Don't know anything about these films.
Vanilla Sky-- Tom Cruise is usually a death-touch for a movie for me (Although Magnolia is an exception)
La Dolce Vita-- I strongly prefer 8 1/2... it's close, but I don't think so.  I'm not ready to watch it again yet.
Repulsion-- I love Polanski.  I'll try it
Wild Strawberries-- I haven't really cared for a single Bergman I've tried.  I don't have high hopes, but if I have time, I'll watch it.
Days of Heaven-- Watched it.  Didn't quite make the cut.
The New World-- On my shelf.  I'll give it a whirl.
Wings of Desire-- Good, but didn't quite make the cut.  Maybe I should give it another chance.
Ratcatcher-- I really need to see this one.  On the list.
Still Walking--Interesting.  If I have time.
The Great Dictator-- I really should see this
Nights of Cabiria-- Hmmm.  Fillini.  If I have time.
High and Low-- Saw this.  Good, but in my opinion, not great, although Mifune is fantastic, as usual.
Army of Shadows--I should see this.  On the list.
Animal Crackers and Night At The Opera-- Seen both, but I've got Night at the Opera on the shelf.  I have no excuse not to see it again.
Grizzly Man and Fizcarraldo-- I've been meaning to catch these, especially Grizzly Man.  I'll try it out.
The Hidden Fortress-- Hmmm.  Maybe.
Ran-- Saw this.  It is gorgeous and my favorite version of Lear.  I should try it again, but it's so long... Ah, going on the list
Out of the Past-- Can you say that Double Indemnity really had a "love" story?  Anyway, sounds interesting.  If I have time.
Ostrov-- Never heard of it, but your description makes it sound compelling.  Maybe...

Oh, and RJ-- I've seen all the 160, this is my best of what I have seen, but I am willing to take suggestions as to what I've forgotten or haven't yet seen.  

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Verite on July 21, 2010, 01:19:07 PM
How about:

Silent Light - story that takes place in a Mennonite community in Mexico; the director feels that the film is like a little brother to Ordet
Children Underground - documentary about homeless children in Romania
Diary of a Country Priest, The Apostle, and Day of Wrath - since you're a pastor

?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on July 21, 2010, 01:31:40 PM
Blair Witch Project-- Good horror, but not a top 100 for me
Hero-- Hmmmm
Joy Luck Club-- I loved the book, so I've been avoiding the movie.  You think I'd like it? Hmm, in that case... it's risky. Made my top 100, but I've never read the book (which I'm sure is amazing). I think the story is intact (and really that's the best part) but the acting is hit and miss. You're call. If you've read it, maybe there's no need.
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring-- I clearly need to watch this I think you'd at least like it. Hard to say more than that. Ferris loves it, and others around do too iirc.
Three Kings-- On my shelf to watch.  Putting on the list. I look forward to your thoughts. It's definitely good for at least one viewing.
Topsy Turvy and Touching the Void-- Don't know anything about these films. You can watch the first 50 seconds here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7zadH1ZqAE) (but stop after that because the film deserves a higher quality than youtube can offer!). Definitely one of the most amazing stories I've ever heard, told brilliantly. If it catches your interest... you know.
Vanilla Sky-- Tom Cruise is usually a death-touch for a movie for me (Although Magnolia is an exception) This might be the best use of Tom Cruise yet imo. Because of the nature of the role he's the perfect choice, and he does a brilliant job. I hold this movie in very high regard, higher than any of the above films. I should say though, I don't think most filmspotters share my enthusiasm for it. :-\ (nobody go and spoil it now!)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 21, 2010, 02:23:48 PM
O yea, watch Ostrov for sure! It's way up there for me.  I imagine you will identify with the protagonist, a crazy Russian priest.  ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 22, 2010, 01:28:06 AM
Raising Arizona
A wonderful light-hearted Coen Bros. romp.  Every actor is pitch-perfect. The last scene in the Arizona nursery tears me up every time-- I'm not sure why.  However, I doubt it will stay on my top 100.  I don't know, I just have a feeling.  Sometimes it's a hard world for small things.

Technical--5/5-- Even in their first big film, the Coens had it.  In spades.
Interest-- 5/5-- Not a dull moment.  Funny, visually interesting.
Tension--3/5-- It's all played for laughs, so the tension is lessened, but some of the stuff the baby has to go through is difficult to watch.
Emotional-- 4/5-- A couple of the scenes were really touching, especially at the end.
Characters--3/5-- Most of the characters were stereotypes, but I believed in Ed, H.I. and Mr. Arizona.
Theme--3/5-- I guess it might be "Don't take shortcuts", but that's pretty weak.
Ethics-- 5/5-- A very ethical film.  H.I. talks us through the whole moral argument of taking the baby and then dismantles it.  An interesting exercise in moral reasoning.
Personal--2/5-- Not really personally engaging except for the stupid things you forget when distracted by raising a baby.  It's tough to balance day care and bank robbing.


1. In America
2. The Dark Knight
3. Raising Arizona
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Emiliana on July 22, 2010, 05:12:18 AM
A Letter to Three Wives-- didn't seem that interesting, why do you recommend it?

This is why:
A Letter to Three Wives (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1949)

I believe this film is pretty much perfect. On a day out with no means of communication, three friends receive a letter, informing them that a fourth friend has run off with one of their husbands. Then, as each of them wonders if it is her husband that has left her, we get three portraits of the three marriages in three flashback sequences. What an amazing concept and structure! And it is executed with an impeccable feeling for tone and atmosphere, and absolutely wonderful performances - I felt I knew everything about these characters and their lives together. After the first flashback, I was convinced that that one would be my favourite, but it just kept getting better and better...
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Mr C on July 22, 2010, 07:31:05 AM
Days of Heaven? The New World?

You know me, if it's Malick, it should be in your top 100.  ;D
Or better still Badlands.

Also go for Open Your Eyes instead of Vanilla Sky.

For 70s greatness you could also add Harold & Maude or Thunderbolt & Lightfoot  or Blue Collar or The Conversation or........
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on July 22, 2010, 04:32:39 PM
Woman in the Dunes is my #1 movie of all time, it is also an almost completely forgotten masterpiece.  You should really give it a chance.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on July 22, 2010, 04:37:53 PM
A Letter to Three Wives-- didn't seem that interesting, why do you recommend it?

This is why:
A Letter to Three Wives (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1949)

I believe this film is pretty much perfect. On a day out with no means of communication, three friends receive a letter, informing them that a fourth friend has run off with one of their husbands. Then, as each of them wonders if it is her husband that has left her, we get three portraits of the three marriages in three flashback sequences. What an amazing concept and structure! And it is executed with an impeccable feeling for tone and atmosphere, and absolutely wonderful performances - I felt I knew everything about these characters and their lives together. After the first flashback, I was convinced that that one would be my favourite, but it just kept getting better and better...
You've convinced me, Em. Reserving it now . . .
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 22, 2010, 08:36:39 PM
Em, you convinced me, too.  I'm putting A Letter To Three Wives on my list.

Badlands-- I saw this.  I like Days of Heaven better, although the acting in both movies was simply the tops.
Woman in the Dunes-- It's on my queue.  Netflix says I'll think it's a 4.0.  It's worth a shot.
Vanilla Sky/Open Your Eyes-- Both star Cruz?  That's interesting.  I'm getting intrigued... It'd make for an interesting double feature.
Harold and Maude-- I have gone through enough of my life not seeing this film.  I'm putting it on the list.
The Conversation-- I feel like I'm giving in too much, but this is a must.
Thunderbolt and Lightfoot-- No, I put my foot down!  There we go...


Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Mr C on July 23, 2010, 02:50:53 AM
Vanilla Sky/Open Your Eyes-- Both star Cruz?  That's interesting.  I'm getting intrigued... It'd make for an interesting double feature.

Thunderbolt and Lightfoot-- No, I put my foot down!  There we go...
[/quote]
Open Your Eyes does have Cruz but she's much sexier in her native Spanish tongue (so to speak...)

T&L is a great little road movie and is one of those 70s American films very much of its time. I could recommend 70s American films until my nose bled - Panic In Needle Park, Night Moves, Dog Soldiers (aka Who Will Stop The Rain?), Emperor of the North, Prime Cut, Scarecrow, Straight Time, God Told Me To, The Last Detail... sorry I'll stop now...

Or maybe some of Alejandro Jodorowsky's titles?

.....
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Emiliana on July 23, 2010, 05:42:24 AM
You've convinced me, Em. Reserving it now . . .

Yay!

Em, you convinced me, too.  I'm putting A Letter To Three Wives on my list.

Double Yay!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Verite on July 23, 2010, 06:27:48 AM
T&L is a great little road movie and is one of those 70s American films very much of its time. I could recommend 70s American films until my nose bled - Panic In Needle Park, Night Moves, Dog Soldiers (aka Who Will Stop The Rain?), Emperor of the North, Prime Cut, Scarecrow, Straight Time, God Told Me To, The Last Detail... sorry I'll stop now...

Fat City is one of the best American films of that period, too.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on July 23, 2010, 08:04:10 AM
Vanilla Sky/Open Your Eyes-- Both star Cruz?  That's interesting.  I'm getting intrigued... It'd make for an interesting double feature.

I expect it will be the case that whichever one you watch first will be the "better" one in your mind. It's up to you. I say why not watch the one with Tilda Swinton, Timothy Spall, Cameron Diaz, Kurt Russell, Jason Lee, Michael Shannon and a better soundtrack? Also, it's in English. Also imdb rates it lower so it's likely better.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 24, 2010, 01:56:16 AM
The Brothers Bloom

(http://www.collider.com/uploads/imageGallery/Brothers_Bloom/the_brothers_bloom_movie_image_rachel_weisz.jpg)

I watched this for the second time with a dumb smile on my face the whole time.  The first time, Bang Bang enchanted me.  This time, I fell in love with the whole cast.  I understood what was going on, which made me lose some of the mystery, but it was just as good.  The storytelling motif is not just interesting, but important. Oh yeah, this is a keeper.

Technical-- 5/5-- Johnson is an amazing filmmaker.
Interest-- 5/5-- There isn't a frame without something amazing taking place.  Unbelievably entertaining.
Tension-- 3/5-- The tension was certainly less the second time around. But the final scene was still intense.
Emotional 2/5-- This film doesn't really stir my emotions, which is why it won't make my top ten.
Characters 4/5-- Not only was I entertained by these characters, I almost believed in all of them.
Theme 5/5-- The idea of life as story and the power of writing one's own story is excellent.
Ethics 3/5-- Well, conning is bad.  But making sure that everyone gets a benefit from the arrangement is good.  Perhaps it is self-deception on Stephan's part, but interesting to think about.
Personal 1/5-- Didn't really connect personally, but you can't have everything.


1. In America
2. The Dark Knight
3. The Brothers Bloom
4. Raising Arizona
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 24, 2010, 11:31:32 AM
I don't get all the people who say this film is too convoluted or confusing. Johnson gives just the right amount of exposition so that the audience is never completely lost but leaves enough unexplained to keep us intrigued.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on July 24, 2010, 12:10:24 PM
I don't get all the people who say this film is too convoluted or confusing. Johnson gives just the right amount of exposition so that the audience is never completely lost but leaves enough unexplained to keep us intrigued.

I'm often someone making that type of claim but that wasn't my problem with Brothers Bloom. My problem with it was that the characters and their plight weren't interesting in the least to me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 24, 2010, 12:15:37 PM
I don't get all the people who say this film is too convoluted or confusing. Johnson gives just the right amount of exposition so that the audience is never completely lost but leaves enough unexplained to keep us intrigued.

I'm often someone making that type of claim but that wasn't my problem with Brothers Bloom. My problem with it was that the characters and their plight weren't interesting in the least to me.
Really? I found it intriguingly meta and an interesting take on the nature of con films.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on July 24, 2010, 01:14:58 PM
The Brothers Bloom

I watched this for the second time with a dumb smile on my face the whole time.

What more can you ask for? ;)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on July 24, 2010, 04:10:38 PM
The Brothers Bloom

I watched this for the second time with a dumb smile on my face the whole time.  The first time, Bang Bang enchanted me.  This time, I fell in love with the whole cast.  I understood what was going on, which made me lose some of the mystery, but it was just as good.  The storytelling motif is not just interesting, but important. Oh yeah, this is a keeper.
Yay!! :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 24, 2010, 04:34:51 PM
Ok, great marathon, but I am going to have to suggest a few Australian (or near Australian) films for your list:

Gallipoli - Mel before he was shown to be a drunken lunatic.
Breaker Morant - 2 wrongs don't make a right
Walkabout - Wilderness journey
Picnic at Hanging Rock -a well respected film

And one that probably won't end up on the list, but I love to recommend it:

Bad Boy Bubby
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on July 24, 2010, 05:22:35 PM
Breaker Morant - 2 wrongs don't make a right

This an exciting, tragic, and incredibly effective movie.  I second it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 25, 2010, 10:09:03 AM
I don't get all the people who say this film is too convoluted or confusing. Johnson gives just the right amount of exposition so that the audience is never completely lost but leaves enough unexplained to keep us intrigued.

I'm often someone making that type of claim but that wasn't my problem with Brothers Bloom. My problem with it was that the characters and their plight weren't interesting in the least to me.

I didn't find it confusing at all.  Neither did Mercy.  So the participants who found it too convoluted for them, well, I hate to compare their intelligence with my 9 year old, but then again.... well, Mercy's pretty smart.

I can understand not really connecting to the characters.  But this is a film that I appreciate more intellectually rather than emotionally, like A Serious Man.  I see this as a kind of Marx Brothers movie-- zany comedy against a backdrop that we think we know what's happening, but we really don't.  And like the best comedies, it is still funny and cheers you up even in multiple viewings.  For me, the characters aren't there for me to identify with. They are there for me to appreciate and enjoy.  Which I do.  Immensely.

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 25, 2010, 10:33:50 AM
Since it's my marathon, I get to double post, right?

Gallipoli-- It's already on my queue and I've really liked Peter Weir films, so it goes on
Breaker Morant- Two recommendations?  Okay, it goes on the list.  The description on Netflix doesn't do anything for me, but they say I'll give it four stars.  That's enough to try it out.
Walkabout-- Do you think this is better than Rabbit Proof Fence? 
Picnic At Hanging Rock-- I want to say yes, but I have to draw the line somewhere.

Panic in Needle Park-- Emotionally, I can't deal with another drug movie right now.  Too close to home, too soon after watching Requiem for a Dream.
Scarecrow-- Pachino, Hackman, character study... I need to see this.  But in this marathon?  We'll see...
Night Moves-- Interesting.  If I have time.
Dog Soldiers, Who'll Stop The Rain-- Just not compelling enough for me.
Emperor of the North-- Borgnine in a tough role and hobos v. cops?  Oh yeah...
Prime Cut-- Interesting.  But not for now.
Straight Time-- There seems to be a theme of revenge in these 70s movies you picked.  Not my kind of thing.
The Last Detail-- Not for me, sorry.
God Told Me To--Definitely not for me.
Fat City--Interesting.  Put it on my queue, but probably won't watch it in this marathon.








Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 25, 2010, 04:03:20 PM
Since it's my marathon, I get to double post, right?

Gallipoli-- It's already on my queue and I've really liked Peter Weir films, so it goes on
Breaker Morant- Two recommendations?  Okay, it goes on the list.  The description on Netflix doesn't do anything for me, but they say I'll give it four stars.  That's enough to try it out.
Walkabout-- Do you think this is better than Rabbit Proof Fence? 
Picnic At Hanging Rock-- I want to say yes, but I have to draw the line somewhere.


I am pleased about the first Gallipoli and Breaker Morant, and understand about Picnic. As for Walkabout or Rabbit Proof Fence, tough call. They are both great films with stunning scenery. So it is a choice between 2 children learning the harsh realities of the dessert, or 2 children learning the harsh realities of white Australian society. While Walkabout is still talked about now, more than 30 years after it was released, Rabbit Proof Fence keeps slipping through the cracks. Walkabout is better, so pick that.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on July 26, 2010, 08:10:20 AM
Rabbit Proof Fence is horrid, stay away.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on July 26, 2010, 11:17:43 AM
Rabbit Proof Fence is horrid, stay away.

You people have no heart.  That movie almost made me tear up, how can you not like it?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on July 27, 2010, 06:27:12 AM
Rabbit Proof Fence is horrid, stay away.

You people have no heart.  That movie almost made me tear up, how can you not like it?

Because I've grown up seeing this shit my whole life, it's heaped on so freaking thick and it pisses me off how this is the way other countries see Australia because these are the type of films that get made.

Not all Germans are Nazis.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 27, 2010, 04:13:55 PM
Rabbit Proof Fence is horrid, stay away.

You people have no heart.  That movie almost made me tear up, how can you not like it?

Because I've grown up seeing this shit my whole life, it's heaped on so freaking thick and it pisses me off how this is the way other countries see Australia because these are the type of films that get made.

Not all Germans are Nazis.

Rabbit Proof Fence is the only Australian film that deals with the stolen generation (although there is one character in Blessed from the stolen generation). Also it has only been in the last few years that this has become an issue, generally Australia has been in denial about the worst aspects of its past. Of course ,the younger you are, the more of your life that would be in the last few years.
From talking to people here and overseas there are many different views of Australians, not all of them good. The drunken yobbo factor when we are overseas, tarnishes peoples view of us (to the point of travellers not wanting to visit Australia). Our appalling treatment of refugees tarnishes us. That said most people think of us positively and think of our abundant natural wonders, if they think of us at all.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on July 27, 2010, 05:51:37 PM
The drunken yobbo factor when we are overseas, tarnishes peoples view of us (to the point of travellers not wanting to visit Australia).

This is why I have a positive view of Australians; they seem like they know how to have a good time :D.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 28, 2010, 01:34:53 AM
I brought up Rabbit Proof Fence because I already saw it and Walkabout seemed similar.

I really appreciated RPF and I generally recommend it.  I do not blame all of Australian society for this racist act, even as I do not blame all of American society for Henry Ford's racism, nor do I see modern Lutheranism carrying on Martin Luther's antisemitism.  It was a period of history in which racism was rampant among intellectuals and governments (even H.G. Wells suggested genetic manipulation of "lesser" races).  But we cannot put this on a whole society or nation.  Amidst the worst slavery in the U.S. there was a strong abolitionist movement.  Amidst South African apartheid, there were many who called for change, and not only among the blacks.  If there weren't such voices in each and every society, then change wouldn't happen.

I don't think that RPF condemns all of Australia.  In fact, it seems to focus on one charismatic individual to blame for the treatment of the children. 

Anyway, thanks, Dave for the comparison.  Walkabout does sound good.  I won't be watching RPF for my marathon.  It wasn't that good.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on July 28, 2010, 04:42:58 AM
Not everyone is so discerning oldkid and this is the problem.

The movie Australia being called Australia was the final straw for me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on July 28, 2010, 05:56:42 AM
Not everyone is so discerning oldkid and this is the problem.

The movie Australia being called Australia was the final straw for me.

I think you are being oversensitive Chardy.  Compared to almost any other developed nation Australia has a pretty clean record, I mean Israel or Germany or USA or Russia or Turkey have alot more to apologize for.  99% of foreigners know nothing at all about Australian aborigines.

On the other hand I fully hold you people responsible for Mel Gibson, what the hell Australia?.         
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on July 28, 2010, 06:14:09 AM
Not everyone is so discerning oldkid and this is the problem.

The movie Australia being called Australia was the final straw for me.

I think you are being oversensitive Chardy.  Compared to almost any other developed nation Australia has a pretty clean record, I mean Israel or Germany or USA or Russia or Turkey have alot more to apologize for.  99% of foreigners know nothing at all about Australian aborigines.

On the other hand I fully hold you people responsible for Mel Gibson, what the hell Australia?.         

It's pretty funny you mention a clean record when our first citizens were convicts!




This is the topic of my movie called Australia:

(http://i27.tinypic.com/r9n2qd.jpg)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Mr C on July 28, 2010, 07:03:43 AM
The Last Detail-- Not for me, sorry.
Fair enough but you are going to miss probably one of the most under rated films of the 70s. Oh and if you don't watch it I'm going to hunt you down and seek revenge.......  ;) :D and :P
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on July 28, 2010, 07:56:13 AM
nor do I see modern Lutheranism carrying on Martin Luther's antisemitism.

But his personal engagement with shite demons is totally still a key to Lutheranism ;D Sometimes crazy people do useful things.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 28, 2010, 09:37:19 AM
On the other hand I fully hold you people responsible for Mel Gibson, what the hell Australia?.         

What do you mean, we handed him over in good condition, don't blame us if the engine falls out when you're driving him.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on July 28, 2010, 10:47:18 AM
On the other hand I fully hold you people responsible for Mel Gibson, what the hell Australia?.          

What do you mean, we handed him over in good condition, don't blame us if the engine falls out when you're driving him.

Here he is, good as new.  We want out money back.   ;D
You can have the beaver for no extra charge.

(http://hollywooddame.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/mel-gibson-molesting-beavers.jpg)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on July 29, 2010, 04:27:46 PM
On the other hand I fully hold you people responsible for Mel Gibson, what the hell Australia?.          

What do you mean, we handed him over in good condition, don't blame us if the engine falls out when you're driving him.

Here he is, good as new.  We want out money back.   ;D
You can have the beaver for no extra charge.


Good as new, you have run way too many miles on him. If you pay us we will take him as scrap.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 29, 2010, 09:00:09 PM
Princess Mononoke

(http://www.stomptokyo.com/guests/img/mononoke-drown.jpg)

Have I ever mentioned that Miyazaki is among the most imaginative geniuses ever?  Not only did he create one amazing world with only small inspirations here and there, he created four.  Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, My Neighbor Totoro and Naussicaa are all completely realized fantasies, with completely realized worlds with completely realized unique characters.  It would be difficult to find anyone in any realm of imagination who has done this remarkable feat.  

Not only this, but Princess Mononoke is also an exciting and complicated adventure story, one of the greats along the lines of Lawrence of Arabia or the Indiana Jones films.  Even if somehow, after many watchings, one can finally understand what the movie is actually about, it still has all the excitement, intensity and joy of the first watching.  

Technical- 5/5- An almost perfectly made film.
Interest- 5/5- If the plot ever lingers, there's always gorgeous scenery to look at.
Tension- 5/5- On my third viewing, I am still at the edge of my seat.
Emotional- 3/5-- I am excited at the adventure story, but little really emotionally moves me.
Characters- 4/5-- Some of the smaller characters are best-- the women at the bellows, the wise woman in the village, the wolf god.  Ashitaka is a great hero, but still a bit mystifying to me, as are the two Princess Mononokes.
Theme--5/5-- Miyazaki is great at themes.  This is about the necessity to unify humanity and nature.
Ethics--5/5-- Miyazaki is not creating a simple ethical solution.  The whole movie is about how difficult it is to get two opposing factions to work together.  Perhaps it is still a bit too simplistic, and thus not realistic, but wonderfully moral.
Personal--1/5-- Not really much for me to relate to, personally.  I've never had to face down a boar god, or stop a town from destroying a forest.


If you haven't seen it, see it.  If you have seen it once, watch it again.

It is only with great difficulty that I put this film below In America.  It is mostly because I emotionally resonated with In America more.  However, both films certainly are among the greatest I have ever seen.  

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. The Brothers Bloom
5. Raising Arizona
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on July 29, 2010, 09:20:31 PM
Princess Mononoke
If you haven't seen it, see it.  If you have seen it once, watch it again.

What if I've seen it twice?

Of the four zaki's you mention, Mononoke sadly is the one that doesn't quite connect for me but there is still a decent amount to appreciate.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on July 29, 2010, 11:41:18 PM
Wonder what your #1 will be... ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 29, 2010, 11:55:23 PM
Wonder what your #1 will be... ;D

I really am curious as to what my #2 will be.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on July 30, 2010, 05:03:41 AM
I'm still so very happy you loved this Steve!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 30, 2010, 06:48:37 PM
Star Wars Episode IV : A New Hope
(http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/dynamic/imgs/040713/165732__starwars_l.jpg)

Along with almost every member of my generation who loves movies, this is the one that got me started on movies.  Sure, I saw movies before, but this is what made them a pastime, a frequent topic of conversation, a part of our lives rather than simply an entertainment.  Thus, in watching this one film for my top 100, the aura of nostalgia is really heavy.  Not only do I react to the film, but I remember my first reactions to it as a seventh grader with hundreds of other kids around me, thrilled and confused and stirred by the heroics and the storyline.  This is THE movie of my generation.

(http://www.mattfind.com/12345673215-3-2-3_img/movie/j/j/i/star_wars_episode_iv_a_new_hope_1977_434x289_229259.jpg)

And it still makes an impact more than thirty years later.  I still laughed at barbs and though I've seen this film some fifteen to twenty times, some of the action still is exciting.  I still like Mark Hamil's innocent naivete, even though I know part of that is poor skill. I still think Harrison Ford is amazing.  And I love the imagination Lucas put into the film.

The most brilliant part of the film, in my opinion, though, is beginning with the fourth episode of nine.  If Lucas had begun with Episode I, the story would have been trite all throughout, plodding along at the slowest possible pace.  We would have begun Episode IV already knowing that Luke and Leia were brother and sister, already knowing the history of Darth Vader, and the whole thing would have just slogged along, like much of the prequels did.   Instead, we are dropped into a universe with a rich history, with much to figure out.  Why does Darth where a helmet, but Obi Wan doesn't?  Why has Obi Wan taken such interest in Luke?  What is this "Clone War"?  There are many mysteries to solve and backgrounds to delve into and it gives a lot of rich fodder for the imagination.  I personally feel the prequels did us a disservice by spelling all of that out.  But this film, standing on its own without prequels to explain anything, is just marvelous.

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:vXUgU8LqTqkQZM:http://www.demotivatorblog.com/wp-content/uploads/yapb_cache/ignorance.e8eibgsxmk0s008w8w8cck84k.ap2qhjyqp08cgc0c80ss4cco4.th.jpeg&t=1)

But not everything in this film is good.  The emotional resonance is awful.  Luke spends some time sorrowing over Obi Wan whom he only got to really know over the last few days, but the death of his Uncle and Aunt who raised him barely gets a mention, let alone a tear.  Luke seems to not be unhappy for their massacre for the sake of his own ambitions.  Leia doesn't seem terribly broken up by the destruction of the world in which she was raised, as well.  She sees the act of killing an entire planet as monstrous, but the only time the act is discussed, she waves it away, saying that there's more important work to do.  Lucas continually has a problem with making a film emotionally impactful.  The only ones of the Star Wars films that really work emotionally is Empire and Return.  And that, only sometimes.

And the additional material Lucas added to this original film is simply awful.  It fills in the scenery a bit, but the one gag in Mos Eisley falls flat.  And the scene between Han and Jabba was not only unnecessary, but also it made Han's statement about needing to hurry make no sense.  If he had just killed the bounty hunter and knew Jabba was on his track, then he needed to go.  But if he had smoothed things over with Jabba, then why rush?  Han wasn't in any hurry with Jabba and didn't know stormtroopers were after him (since they weren't after him, but the droids).  Okay, I'm sounding like a fanboy, here, but the scene just wasn't needed.  Some of the cleanup work was good, like the shadow of Luke's hovercar.  But generally it was pointless and distracting.

Nevertheless, it was good.  It was great.  I enjoyed it all over again.  It is still one of my favorites.  If you want to blame part of that on nostalgia, so be it.  But I still thrilled to see Obi Wan raise his light saber so Darth Vader could strike him down.  I still was impressed by the fast editing at the end of the Death Star to heighten the excitement, which worked even though I noticed it.   I laughed at the antics of the two droids, even though I've seen them play the routine again and again.  It works.  And it deserves to be in my top 100.  

(http://www.mattfind.com/12345673215-3-2-3_img/movie/j/j/i/star_wars_episode_iv_a_new_hope_1977_719x302_481588.jpg)

EDIT:
Ratings:
Technical  -3/5 -- A couple marks off for later CGI additions and the choice of Mark Hamill
Interest  4/5-- There was enough action and humor to keep me interested, but I was thinking of it as a movie this time, not fully engulfed
Tension-- 3/5-- I lost quite a bit of tension over the multiple viewings, but there were still scenes I wanted to see.
Emotional-- 2/5-- I didn't have much emotional connection this viewing, mostly because of the lack of emotion in pivotal scenes.
Characters-- 4/5-- Some classic meta characters here, especially Princess Leia who is relatively new. 
Theme-- 3/5-- "Mysticism is good" is as much as I can come up with
Ethics-- 2/5-- I've always had problems with Star Wars ethically.  The stormtroopers are killed off in droves without any remorse or even character because they're "bad guys". 
Personal-- 3/5-- Like other youths, I originally identified with Luke, seeking adventure.  I still feel a little of that, but at this stage of life, I'm probably more like Obi Wan-- old and my time is winding down, ready for the next stage of preparing the next generation.  Do I get to state nonsensical aphorisms now?


Of course, the question is, will it stay in my top 100?  I have no idea.  I can see myself grading it a bit lower because the faults of the film are more obvious to me and because I have too many excellent films to squeeze into a mere 100.  For now, I'd say that TDK has a strong lead over it, but it just sneaks in above The Brothers Bloom.  That's the nostalgia at work.  

EDIT: Now that I've done my ratings, I am more disappointed in A New Hope than before.  It is still enjoyable, but I think that The Brothers Bloom has got more going for it now.  So I'm switching their spots:

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. The Brothers Bloom
5. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
6. Raising Arizona
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 01, 2010, 03:37:38 PM
I've decided for my films in this marathon to give a multiple rating system, not unlike what ferris did with his classics marathon.  I wish I had a clever format for them, like ferris, but they do need a little explanation, so I'm doing that here:


Technical—The specific way a film was made which, in my mind, includes direction, editing, casting, and at times the acting.  Although acting in a way that a character wouldn’t is a different story.  I mostly notice when these movie-making issues

Theme—In my mind, most (but not all) great movies have a theme, a concept that ties them together.  Sometimes I make up this theme myself, it seems, but if I see it then I believe it’s there and it makes the movie better for me.  Ties it all together, making the movie more literary.

Emotional Resonance—This is really important and I think that all of my top movies (say, top 10 or so) will have this.  This is, of course, very personal, but if there is at least one deeply emotional moment that is resonating throughout the film, then I’m a goner.   Interestingly, it is under this section that I will mention songs or a soundtrack.  If music is successful in a movie, then it struck me emotionally.

Interest—The film has to have something that keeps my attention.  This might be similar to Bondo’s “iPhone rating”.  If I find myself wanting to do something else, then I might not give it as high of a rating here.  A great film, in my opinion, will have a puzzle or a relationship or a plot point or an interesting concept that I want to see worked out.  Also, if there’s continually something gorgeous to look at (like scenery, not Megan Fox), then that will add to interest rating. As well, humor can certainly add to interest.  Surrealism and self-referential issues seem to hold a lot of interest for me.

Tension—There should be at least a moment in which there is strong anticipation to see what happens.  If a film can still create such a tension on multiple viewings, then it certainly is a winner.

Characters—It helps if I enjoy or like at least one central character.  But it isn’t necessary for a movie to be great.  But at least the characters have to be believable and I want to follow them to see what is happening to or in them.  If I don’t connect with any characters, then I probably won’t see the film as great.

Ethics—For me, a movie can rise or fall on the ethics it promotes.  This is not the same as the ethics one sees in the film.  Certainly there’s not a lot of positive morality going on in There Will Be Blood, but the movie doesn’t promote either of the two leads’ ethical system.  In fact, it shows them as being mutually destructive.  But if the ethical system of a movie matches mine, I will give it higher points.  Which doesn’t mean I give preachy films higher status.  Although preaching doesn’t bother me (obviously), neither does subtlety.  In fact, I think we learn better by demonstration rather than monologue.  

Personal Connection—I’ve mentioned a number of times my personal response to a movie, but this is something more specific.  For the films that I will personally rate highest, there seems to be a theme or a character or a situation that I personally have experienced or consider important.  I suppose this could be listed as an “interest” point, but it means more than any other issue.   I will rate a good plot about the homeless higher than great plot about gangsters (Which certainly doesn’t mean that The Soloist will rank higher than The Godfather).  If a movie is good on these other levels, a personal connection will certainly push it higher than it would for other people.

I do wish I could put these ideas in a clever format like ferris’, but that can be confusing and I like the straight forward statements.  So I will be rating these items and making comments on them.  It will be interesting what films I don’t necessarily rate high in these categories, but they still make my list.

I will go back to the movies I've already listed and put this list of ratings on them.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: edgar00 on August 01, 2010, 05:55:30 PM
Interesting rating system.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 04, 2010, 03:52:03 PM
Okay, we got some catch up to do here...

Adaptation

(http://www.offoffoff.com/film/2002/images/adaptation.jpg)

Charlie Kauffman is the screenwriter of Adaptation.  And this film is the story of how he wrote this film.   Right there is everything I love about this film.  The fact that he’s writing a movie based on a book that had no right to be a movie because there’s no real plot.  That there may be more to the story than is in the book.  That Donald, Charlie’s twin brother (who doesn’t actually exist) writes the final third of it, at which point there is a distinct change of style and plot direction.  It is so smart, and well done.

But there are things I find myself wishing this movie would do better.  I wish there was a likable character.  Just one that I could relate to.  I wish the shift to the final third wasn’t so obvious.  Charlie asks Donald, “Why don’t you finish it” and he clearly does.  I wish that the end didn’t seem so contrived.  I could see it happening, but because the characters don’t seem real, they just seem to be going through the motions.  This is not to say that the actors didn’t do a good job.  They were all fine.  They just seemed to be trapped by these characters that could be described in one line. All the characters are just aspects of characters, ideals without balance.  Charlie is too full of self loathing, Donald is too sure of himself, Susan is all about being passionate about other’s passions, etc.  I didn’t feel like these are real people.  And Charlie is simply too whiney.  It got irritating.

There is a lot about Charlie Kauffman films that I love.  I love the self-referential, I love the time shifts, I love the changing point of view.  All of this is challenging.  However, I am finding, that there are some things I don’t care for as well.  The complaining about life and age.  The lack of any moral core, that it all has to do with personal experience.  Eternal Sunshine will certainly make my top 100 and Synedoche will probably make it, too.  But I was more irritated by Adaptation this time than entertained.  I’m dropping it down from a 5/5 to a 4/5. Ouch.

Technical—5/5—Very well done, of course. 
Interest—5/5— The shifts that happen throughout are fascinating.  I really liked the process of figuring out the film as the film was going on. 
Tension—3/5-- The end was good, but not as intense as it was the first time, of course.
Emotional—2/5—It was difficult to relate to the characters and so difficult for me to find the emotions for me to relate to.
Characters—2/5—This is where I had the most problem with the film.  Theme—5/5 Giving in to one’s passion.
Ethics—2/5 When “passion” is the main theme, then people do things for passion that the film simply winks at.  That bothers me a little.
Personal—3/5—However, as a person who is passionate, I understand the drive. 

I want you to remember that Adaptation is still a great movie in my estimation, it just won't make my top 100.  It will certainly make my top 200, though.

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. The Brothers Bloom
5. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
6. Raising Arizona
7. Adaptation
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 04, 2010, 04:41:43 PM
Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back

(http://images.picturesdepot.com/photo/t/the_empire_strikes_back-1202.jpg)

Alongside the original Star Wars and Raiders of the Lost Ark, this film has the highest possibility of having a high nostalgia impact upon me.  There was a lot of anticipation for it back in 1980 and it (unlike some other films I might mention) did not fail.  Interestingly enough, even though I’ve seen it so many times and know just what is going to happen, there was much in this viewing I never saw.  

In watching it before, I noticed the plot and the different mood, and the continuing character development.  But this time, I noted that the whole movie is about setting aside hate, even in the face of evil.  And it is fascinating how the very Christian theme of faith being a necessary component to set aside hate is woven in.  

(http://www.calendarlive.com/media/photo/2005-05/17543702.jpg)

I also really appreciate the introduction of Yoda much more after having seen his whole character arc.  In other films he is wise, often judgmental and even a bad ass.  But right at the beginning he is introduced as being silly and jolly and a bit dim just like… a muppet.  Considering that he IS a muppet and has the wonderful voice of Frank Oz of Grover fame, that would be expected.  Then, on a dime, Yoda becomes cynical and bitter.  What a wonderful trick was played upon us, and what a joy it was to experience that change again.

Everything in Empire is darker than the first film.  Not only is the subject darker, but all the characters have gone through a transformation that difficulties often bring.  Luke is still naïve, Leia is still angry royalty, Han is still smug, but they are all more serious, even in their jokes.  They aren’t happy-go-lucky, on top of the world after destroying the Death Star.  We believe that these characters wouldn’t just break down at the tragedy that is happening in the last third.  

(http://liveforfilms.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/hansolo.jpg)

It is very well done.  The perfect Star Wars film.  Of course, Return of the Jedi must follow.  We can’t be left here.  But only half of Return is worth following in my opinion.  So I leave on the best of Star Wars.

Technical- 5/5- Perfectly made, and the frequent darkness just made it more interesting.
Interest- 5/5- The plot was excellent, better than the first.  
Tension- 5/5- When Luke and Darth meet up, you could cut it with a knife.  Even though I know what’s going to happen, I still wonder if I’m right…
Emotional- 3/5- Certainly this film has lost some of the emotion at the time.  One of the best romantic scenes in a Lucas film, but it still misses the mark.
Characters- 4/5- I like the way all the characters remain the same—Luke is still naïve, Leia is still angry royalty, Han is still smug—but they all go deeper and darker
Theme—4/5 Hatred brings you to evil, even when you have good reason to hate.  It comes together in a way no other Star Wars film does.
Ethics—3/5—The “anti-hate” message is good, but it persists the idea that you can threaten someone with a deadly weapon and that isn’t a form of hate.  Even though that is the double standard of our society and almost all the world of movies, it still bugs me.
Personal—2/5—Maybe a little nostalgia, but not much else.

Still, Empire is going to get a good placement in my top 100 because it was so well made.  Three great scenes and no bad ones, indeed.

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
5. The Brothers Bloom
6. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
7. Raising Arizona
8. Adaptation
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on August 04, 2010, 04:49:59 PM
Best line in the movie: "Whoa, that got him!"

I hate the internet for not providing me with a sound clip just now.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 05, 2010, 12:22:27 AM
Tideland

(http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/images/reviews/76/1172431889.jpg)

This is easily the most hated of all films by Terry Gilliam.  It is also easily the most difficult one to watch.   And these two facts are certainly not disconnected.  We have an adorable, likable nine year old girl put in many situations we would never want to see a nine year old girl in.  Addicted, selfish parents who barely raise her, but her situation is much worse after they die.  Then she is faced with a dangerous psycho, pedophilia, live ammunition, and starvation.  Not only does she survive, she thrives.  Simply because of who she is as a child.  Because of her imagination, her gift at re-telling the story around her, and her imaginary friends she is able to avoid trauma.  Just like any gifted child might.

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ILxC2gx5BQ5qEM:http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w197/oilgun/tideland-4.jpg&t=1)

Jodelle Farland, the actress who plays Jeliza Rose, the girl in question, is a vision.  This is a role she was meant to play.  Rarely is a child actor so able to play a child.  She is just playing by herself in front of the camera.  Because of this, we don’t see her as a mature child, able to deal with the situations before her age.  Rather, she is completely childish.  Just like my daughter Mercy, who is the same age, using whatever resources at her disposal to get what she wants and to survive.  Her only problem is that she doesn’t have her priorities straight.

(http://twitchfilm.net/mastheads/uploads/tideland01_2.jpg)

The other characters are completely realized as well. The landscape is like Days of Heaven, but every time one goes inside a building it is more like the Matrix. 

I completely understand why some people don’t like this film.  Emotionally, it is very difficult.  But like all great adventure stories, it is only in the most difficult of circumstances that the heroine shows her true powers.  This is what we have here.

Technical—5/5—Top notch Terry Gilliam. He put all his skills as an artist and a director behind this.
Interest—5/5—Never looked at the time once.
Tension—5/5—How close to pedophilia will they get?  Every little thing that happens to the girl is felt intensely.
Emotional—4/5—I feel Jeliza Rose’s pain more than she does at times.
Characters—4/5—Almost all of Gilliam’s films are filled with characters who are “acting”, as if each film were a stage production of Shakespeare instead of a film of the last two decades.  But Jeliza Rose should be acting.  She has to be.  And somehow, all of these characters—the friendly-but-self-centered addict, the mother who demands love, the on-the-edge psychopath, the innocent developmentally disabled man—although they seem like stereotypes, I know these people.  My children are surrounded by these people.  It all is “acting” (except for Jeff Bridges and Brendan Fletcher) but I believed them anyway.
Theme—5/5 Children are resilient. Brilliantly realized and communicated.  Our acceptance of this film is dependant on our belief in the theme.
Ethics—4/5—Of course, some very evil things happen to this child.  And Eliza Rose is sometimes brutal, sometimes selfish, sometimes betrays her friends.  But I truly see this film as being truly descriptive, not prescriptive, a first for Gilliam, perhaps.
Personal—4/5—I know many of these characters.  And I can see my daughters playing in just such a way in just such a circumstance.  In my fatherly adoration, I’d like to think they are as strong as Jeliza Rose.

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
5. Tideland
6. The Brothers Bloom
7. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
8. Raising Arizona
9. Adaptation

All right, I'm certifiably insane.  This is the absolute proof.  Go ahead, bring on the hate!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Junior on August 05, 2010, 12:26:15 AM
I've always been interested in checking this one out. Your praise only makes it bigger on my radar.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on August 05, 2010, 12:31:02 AM
Sounds cool, I thinks its the only Gilliam I haven't seen.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 05, 2010, 12:33:50 AM
Interesting. Never heard of it. I'll have to check it out.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 05, 2010, 12:09:34 PM
Well, that was unexpected.  I hope my review wasn't too spoilery. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: IdeaThy12 on August 05, 2010, 03:38:39 PM
I'm watching the movies with him.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Junior on August 05, 2010, 03:43:35 PM
Awesome.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on August 05, 2010, 03:46:10 PM
Sounds cool, I thinks its the only Gilliam I haven't seen.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on August 05, 2010, 04:46:25 PM
Awesome.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 05, 2010, 08:36:38 PM
Mercy's watching some of them with me.  I struggle with letting her watch Tideland.  I was going to do it, and then I decided that her mother would kill me.  Not my goal, to put my wife in prison for the rest of her life.  So I opted not to.

Nor did she watch Adaptation with me.  But some we certainly have plans to watch together: Groundhog Day, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, and many more. 

It'd be great, Mercy, if you could post some more reviews.  Like, say, of A New Hope and Empire????????
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 05, 2010, 08:38:49 PM
Okay, I was about to say...watching Tideland with your kid? Gotta draw the line somewhere.

Groundhog Day, now that's a good kid's movie. It's like Bill Murray in the book of Ecclesiastes.  ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 06, 2010, 01:38:19 AM
You on an Ecclesiastes kick today?  I approve...
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 06, 2010, 10:04:08 AM
I have been for years.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on August 06, 2010, 10:15:33 AM
This too is meaningless. :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on August 06, 2010, 10:16:19 AM
Don't even get me started.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 10, 2010, 09:11:44 PM
Three Kings
(http://cdn-www.cracked.com/articleimages/dan/kings.jpg)

A really fun and intense war film. 

Technical—5/5—Amazing filmmaking.  The filming and special effects were truly the stars of the film.
Interest—4/5—A little slow at first, but it quickly picks up about a third of the way through.
Tension—5/5—Not as much as The Hurt Locker, the other great film about the Iraq War, but still…
Emotional—3/5—Not much, except in the torture scenes.  Those were intense.
Characters—3/5—I saw stars, not real people.  That was George Clooney, Ice Cube and Matt Da… I mean Mark Wahlberg.  Good acting, for celebrities.
Theme—2/5—I think it would be, “War is more complicated than you think.”
Ethics—4/5—Wicked greed surrendered for the good of those who were in real need.  Okay, I like that.
Personal—2/5—Not really a personal connection.

Probably won’t make my top 100, but it was worth considering.  4.5/5 overall.

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
5. Tideland
6. The Brothers Bloom
7. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
8. Raising Arizona
9. Adaptation
10. Three Kings
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 10, 2010, 09:21:03 PM
The Son
(http://novemberslight.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/the_son_le_fils_dvd_425x270.jpg?w=425&h=270)

Perhaps because Bill dictated this film to me (months ago), I imagine that Bill is somewhat like Oliver, the lead of this film.  Oliver is kind hearted, a carpenter who apprentices boys who are struggling with life.  He himself is touched by tragedy.  For all that, he isn’t soft.  His love is very masculine, very tough.  He also has a bad back.  Just thought I’d mention that last bit.
   His tragedy of the past suddenly is very present and powerful when a boy appears in the center he works in.  He takes the boy on as an apprentice, but there is something wrong, and Oliver is acting strange.
   This film is perfectly presented.  Everything is very real, as we follow Oliver for two days.  Oliver, his ex-wife, the boy they are all spot on and the movie unfolds carefully and slowly, which only adds to the mysteries of it.  Very well done.

Technical—4/5—Everything was done well.  Kind of gritty, which added to the realism.
Interest—3/5—My interest was up and down.  Once I understood what was going on, it was high.  Probably will be higher in my next viewing.
Tension—4/5—Very high at the end.
Emotional—4/5—By the end of the film, I was yelling at it.  Well, I would have been yelling at it if I weren’t in a silent Trappist Monastery.
Characters—5/5—Perfectly realized.  I got to know these people, even though they didn’t say much.
Theme—5/5—Love your enemies even though it’s hard.
Ethics—5/5—Very practical examination of an ethic almost always kept in one’s head.
Personal—3/5—I understood and appreciated the approach although Oliver is very unlike me.

4.5/5 overall

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
5. Tideland
6. The Brothers Bloom
7. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
8. The Son (2003)
9. Raising Arizona
10. Adaptation
11. Three Kings

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: rambler on August 10, 2010, 09:43:26 PM
I like your style man.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 11, 2010, 02:05:11 AM
Mister Roberts

(http://cache2.asset-cache.net/xc/3120872.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=45B0EB3381F7834DB41F62160B2F7408FC880443A5DCF3EE11D40A26B3E28636)

This was a recommendation from my wife.  Seeing on the library shelf, I picked it up and we watched it the same day.  Considering that she was ten when she originally saw it, she was surprised to find it was not the heavy drama she remembered it as, but a light comedy about a cargo ship that never sees action, except when they pull into port for leave.  She thought it would be up my alley, but it really wasn’t.  Oh well, it’s always good to try new things.

Technical—3/5 Pretty standard stuff from films of the era.  Nothing special.  But what really stands out is the awful overly-dramatic music.  More than distracting, it completely takes away from the charm of the film.
Interest—3/5—Fun, but not laugh out loud.
Tension—2/5—Not really any tension.  I knew what would happen at the end.
Emotional—2/5—Not much to be emotional about.  They aimed for the heart-strings at the end, but missed.
Characters—4/5—The greatness of this film lies in the performances of the three main characters—Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon and William Powell.  You could believe everything they say.  Often, like in Some Like It Hot, Lemmon is too excitable, but here he plays it smooth and perfect.  Cagney is clearly in it for a good time, and he could have done it like a Captain Bligh, but he ends up acting like a buffoon.  Sure, he’s having a good time, but not really believable.
Theme—4/5—Greatness in overcoming boredom.
Ethics—4/5—Certainly some questionable acts, but Mister Roberts compassion and readiness to sacrifice his desires for the well being of others is marvelous.
Personal—3/5—I’d like to have the chance to be like Mister Roberts someday.  But not in the Navy, that’s for sure.

Just a lark with a couple great performances.  3.5/5

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
5. Tideland
6. The Brothers Bloom
7. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
8. The Son (2003)
9. Raising Arizona
10. Adaptation
11. Three Kings
12. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on August 11, 2010, 01:57:13 PM
The Son
(http://novemberslight.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/the_son_le_fils_dvd_425x270.jpg?w=425&h=270)

Perhaps because Bill dictated this film to me (months ago), I imagine that Bill is somewhat like Oliver, the lead of this film.  Oliver is kind hearted, a carpenter who apprentices boys who are struggling with life.  He himself is touched by tragedy.  For all that, he isn’t soft.  His love is very masculine, very tough.  He also has a bad back.  Just thought I’d mention that last bit.
   His tragedy of the past suddenly is very present and powerful when a boy appears in the center he works in.  He takes the boy on as an apprentice, but there is something wrong, and Oliver is acting strange.
   This film is perfectly presented.  Everything is very real, as we follow Oliver for two days.  Oliver, his ex-wife, the boy they are all spot on and the movie unfolds carefully and slowly, which only adds to the mysteries of it.  Very well done.

Technical—4/5—Everything was done well.  Kind of gritty, which added to the realism.
Interest—3/5—My interest was up and down.  Once I understood what was going on, it was high.  Probably will be higher in my next viewing.
Tension—4/5—Very high at the end.
Emotional—4/5—By the end of the film, I was yelling at it.  Well, I would have been yelling at it if I weren’t in a silent Trappist Monastery.
Characters—5/5—Perfectly realized.  I got to know these people, even though they didn’t say much.
Theme—5/5—Love your enemies even though it’s hard.
Ethics—5/5—Very practical examination of an ethic almost always kept in one’s head.
Personal—3/5—I understood and appreciated the approach although Oliver is very unlike me.

4.5/5 overall

1. In America
2. Princess Mononoke
3. The Dark Knight
4. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
5. Tideland
6. The Brothers Bloom
7. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
8. The Son (2003)
9. Raising Arizona
10. Adaptation
11. Three Kings



Glad you loved it my man, at least it sounds like you really liked it and will love it with repeated viewings. In fact I am in a lot of ways like Oliver, so good catch there, especially the bad back.  :D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 11, 2010, 04:08:29 PM
Actually, on your recommendation, and the marvelous sale at Hollywood Videos, I purchased The Son.  I look forward to watching it many times.

Time for the next review:



Amelie

(http://www.hello.nl/photos2/bb-amelie.jpg)

The Brothers Bloom, at times, wants to be Amelie.  And my favorite parts of the Brothers Bloom is when it reflects Amelie.  In a word, Amelie is adorable.  Yes, the character, but the whole movie.  It is joyful, cute and imaginative.  It is a number of events strung together with only a light plot.  But who cares?  

Technical—5/5 The cinematography is fantastic, every scene could be framed.  This is Wes Anderson as a motion picture instead of still life.  Everything is beautiful and fluid.

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:tDlk7vfLW6t9tM:http://thequicky.net/blogger/big/amelie.jpg&t=1)

Interest—5/5—This isn’t a cerebral film or a heart-wrenching one.  But the visuals, the humor, the even pace, the enjoyable characters, and the imaginative actions are all fantastic.  I couldn’t turn away from it.  It is a desert island movie because you can watch it again and again without boredom.
Tension—3/5—This movie isn’t about tension, but certainly it is frustrating when the romance is drawn out.
Emotional—5/5—If you don’t feel joy from this movie, you’re dead.

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_sEJbeq8xMIc/SuE1thKZxmI/AAAAAAAAAYA/q_NOBMX5wYA/s640/amelie_enfant.jpg)

Characters—5/5—No one is necessarily believable, but everyone is charming and you want to take each one out to lunch just to hang out with them.  The details we get about each character is so intimate and happy that we feel good about each one (except for the cart owner).
Theme—5/5—Random acts of kindness brings joy.  And I mean random.  

(http://www.photobooth.net/movies_tv/img/amelie_02.jpg)

Ethics—3/5—Ethically, this movie is interesting.  On the one hand, it takes lightly some serious subjects, like relationships and sex and oppression.  And Amelie does some seriously creepy things, serious invasion of privacy.  Yet we forgive her everything.  We look at almost everyone with a rose-colored lens.  Why?  Because in the end, it’s the results that matter.  Amelie brings joy (and justice), even if it does make someone uncomfortable for a while.  We see her father’s gnome travel around the world, sending photos back, and the joy of the idea and the hilarious response from her father is glorious.  So what if she really worried her father?  But if Amelie wasn’t in this fantasy world, she’d be put in jail.
Personal—3/5—The only "Amelie act" I can think of myself doing is buying my fiancé (now my wife) twenty long stem roses, having half delivered to her at work and then sprinkling the rest of them in various places that she would be the rest of the evening.  Perhaps this is why Amelie is thought to be romantic although it has little to do with romance.  Because it displays the kind of joyful acts someone does when they are in love.

Yeah, this one's going near the top.  You probably guessed.  

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
9. The Son (2003)
10. Raising Arizona
11. Adaptation
12. Three Kings
13. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Verite on August 11, 2010, 04:19:11 PM
Amelie
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 12, 2010, 02:38:50 AM
Amelie

So many reviews, so little time to check spelling...   :-[
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on August 12, 2010, 02:59:40 AM
Ahem: Amélie.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on August 12, 2010, 10:24:04 AM
Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on August 12, 2010, 02:53:46 PM
You guys suck. Read the review, it's a good one. ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 15, 2010, 12:59:27 AM
The Science of Sleep
(http://images.pingmag.jp/images/title/gondry.jpg)
Stephan is tricked by his mother to move to Paris, who tells him he can be paid to work on his art.  Instead, he is stuck in a dull job, across the hall from a pretty girl he has his heart on.  But things get complicated when he cannot separate his dreams from reality. 

(http://snarkerati.com/movie-news/files/2009/02/science-of-sleep.jpg)

Technical—4/5—I was a little distracted by some of the make-shift quality of the sets and animation.  However, they were all so full of imagination, that I forgive them much.
Interest—4/5—Very interesting plot, full of dream sequences and joyful humor.
Tension—3/5—Not much in the way of tension, but the romance had it’s interesting ups and downs.
Emotional—3/5—As the movie went on, I found myself less and less identifying with Stephan.  At first, I felt sorry, but eventually he just seemed pathetic.
Characters—4/5—But consistent.  I believed in the two main characters and Stephan’s mother.  Even for all of Stephan’s weaknesses, they were weaknesses I believed in.
Theme—3/5—I’d have to watch it again.  The divide between reality and hope?
Ethics—3/5—Not a lot of ethical content. 
Personal— 1/5 Not much content I can connect with.

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:xXMSe4k2qeD23M:http://www.scene-stealers.com/images/uploads/the-science-of-sleep.jpeg&t=1)

A very interesting film I’d like to see again, but it was difficult to keep it all together, and the ending was kind of pathetic.  4/5

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
9. The Son (2003)
10. Raising Arizona
11. Adaptation
12. Three Kings
13. The Science of Sleep
14. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 15, 2010, 01:21:34 AM
District 9

(http://www.shockya.com/news/wp-content/uploads/district_9_mnu1.jpg)

I despised Wikus from the very beginning of the film.  He was weak, pandering for respect and although he had some knowledge, he had little wisdom.  Even to his gorgeous wife he seemed a bit fawning.  Certainly he wanted to please his father in law and boss.  But as this action movie progressed, his character developed.  It is amazing, but to be a fully mature man, Wikus had to become an alien.  He had to learn about what it meant to be outcast, and eventually he learned about true sacrifice.  The climax of the film, for me, was when he turned to Chris and told him to go to his son.  Wikus knew that he would likely be killed, or torn apart by scalpels.  But his compassion for Chris and the suffering of their race finally overwhelmed him.  That was a great moment.  Yes, the combination of the action, science fiction and social conscience was powerful.  It made it a good, even unique film.  But the addition of the development of Wikus’ character from a wimp to a martyr made this film great.

(http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6a00d8341c630a53ef0120a4f63ac9970b-600wi)

Technical—4/5 It was all believable and well produced.  It was too reliant on shaky-cam, but it was rarely distracting. 
Interest—5/5—Couldn’t take my eyes on the screen throughout almost all of the film.  Visuals, plot, the thought that went into it, it all worked well together.
Tension—5/5—What an intense film.  A bit of gore increased the tension, but it wasn’t the center of it.  Rather it was the intensity of the situations and the character development that really made it work.  This is one of the few films that actually retained the tension past the closing credits.  I wondered what would happen next.  Would the aliens return with a vengeance?  Or, like a human society, would the aliens not care about their cast offs, no matter how they were treated by others?  How could Chris get his society to defend his people without destroying the human race?  But for all this, I don’t want a sequel because my imagination creates greater possibilities than a sequel would.
Emotional—4/5—I believed in the film, the developing care.  The care for the characters was well built.  All the emotion was earned.
Characters—4/5—To me, the greatness of this film is the development of Wikus. 
Theme—3/5—Probably the hidden strengths of the oppressed.
Ethics—3/5—The development of Wikus’ character was an amazing moral tale.  However, in the end, the killing of whoever was the ‘bad guy’ didn’t change.  The race changed, but not the fact that killing them was more than justified.  “I thought we weren’t going to kill anyone.” “They shot at me!”

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:rO1GYkSbkMg_3M:http://www.empiremovies.com/_word_press/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/district-9-01.jpg&t=1)

Personal—4/5—Recognition that it is suffering that creates maturity and sacrifice as something that I experienced.  This is a marvelous moral.

It is one of the best of the traditional sci fi films out there, and it really struck me, personally.  So it has a shot at being in my top 100.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8. District 9
9. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
10. The Son (2003)
11. Raising Arizona
12. Adaptation
13. Three Kings
14. The Science of Sleep
15. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on August 15, 2010, 12:51:13 PM
Em, you convinced me, too.  I'm putting A Letter To Three Wives on my list.

Badlands-- I saw this.  I like Days of Heaven better, although the acting in both movies was simply the tops.
Woman in the Dunes-- It's on my queue.  Netflix says I'll think it's a 4.0.  It's worth a shot.
Vanilla Sky/Open Your Eyes-- Both star Cruz?  That's interesting.  I'm getting intrigued... It'd make for an interesting double feature.
Harold and Maude-- I have gone through enough of my life not seeing this film.  I'm putting it on the list.
The Conversation-- I feel like I'm giving in too much, but this is a must.
Thunderbolt and Lightfoot-- No, I put my foot down!  There we go...




Harold & Maude does seem like a film for us 44 year olds. Time to order it ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 15, 2010, 01:41:45 PM
Em, you convinced me, too.  I'm putting A Letter To Three Wives on my list.

Badlands-- I saw this.  I like Days of Heaven better, although the acting in both movies was simply the tops.
Woman in the Dunes-- It's on my queue.  Netflix says I'll think it's a 4.0.  It's worth a shot.
Vanilla Sky/Open Your Eyes-- Both star Cruz?  That's interesting.  I'm getting intrigued... It'd make for an interesting double feature.
Harold and Maude-- I have gone through enough of my life not seeing this film.  I'm putting it on the list.
The Conversation-- I feel like I'm giving in too much, but this is a must.
Thunderbolt and Lightfoot-- No, I put my foot down!  There we go...




Harold & Maude does seem like a film for us 44 year olds. Time to order it ;D

I guess we're more more on the Maude side than the Harold at this point.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 15, 2010, 01:50:33 PM
I [heart] Huckabees

I love well done philosophical discussions, especially when they are infused with comedy.  This is why Plato’s dialogues are such a treat, as well as Peter Kreeft’s early books.  And this, along side of A Serious Man, is among the best of philosophy films.  Not just films that include philosophy, like Groundhog Day, but films that are about philosophy.  I would certainly include some Bergman and Allen in this category, but I haven’t yet found that any of their philosophical films—such as The Seventh Seal or Crimes and Misdemeanors—to really be enjoyable for me.  Huckabees has that perfect balance of humor and ideas, my favorite kind of comedy.  

(http://www.offoffoff.com/film/2004/images/ihearthuckabees.jpg)

One of the things I love about I [Heart] Huckabees is that it acts as if philosophy matters in real life.  The fact is, philosophy does matter.  We use philosophical ideas to act or to justify our acts all the time.  And the main struggle in this film, between the connection of all things v. the insignificance of any connections is something we deal with on a regular basis.  We just don’t think of it in these terms.  Instead, the struggle is placed in, for instance, our grandmother in a coma who has to be cared for—should we continue to feed her or let her die?  The real question behind this is: Do we still have a connection to grandma or is this a body that is simply eating up our resources that could be used for the living?  Is there a connection or not?  When we decide to help the poor or not, when we determine what course of studies we will pursue for our future—all of this has to do with the connections or disconnections we sense and believe in.  It also comes down to a subject which is central to the film—should we love our enemies?  And so the subject of this film is essential.

(http://www.reelfilm.com/images/iheart.jpg)

   But put in stark philosophical terms, we find ourselves distanced from it.  And I believe that the filmmakers wanted us to be distanced from the subject at first.  They give us distance so we can laugh at the silliness of people taking philosophy so seriously that they would peep into people’s windows and run through sprinklers and splash themselves with mud in pursuit of it.  And yet, at the same time, the filmmakers are making the ideas intriguing.  The ideas pass by quickly, too quickly, for us to really understand.  It isn’t simple.  So maybe we’ll watch the movie again.  And this time, instead of focusing on the comedy, we can take some time to think about the ideas and see just how real they are.  I think this approach is brilliant, if perhaps it over estimates the majority of the movie-going audience, who would prefer their truth neatly packaged, Avatar-style.

(http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/lilyt.jpg)

Technical—4/5 Well done, but the Wes Anderson style is a little distracting.  That style always keeps me a little removed from the players, as if they were on stage and not real people.
Interest—5/5—I either have ideas or laugh out loud comedy to keep me occupied.  Just wonderful.
Tension—3/5—The major source of tension is found in the struggle between the completing philosophies struggling for our protagonist’s well-being and life.  
Emotional—4/5 I really appreciated the dilemmas the characters had to face, especially the supporting characters played by Jude Law and Naomi Watts.  They are so shallow at first, but when they realize their shallowness, they are truly tragic.
Characters—4/5—There is a lot of good acting here, but the actors sometimes don’t know how to approach the occasional one-dimensionality of the characters.  One of the things I like about this film and A Simple Man is the psychological recognition of how philosophy effects our motivation and actions.  However, in Huckabees it is sometimes well done and sometimes just shallow.
Theme—4/5 This one was spelled out for us—We are all connected, but human drama is the balance between desire and suffering.  One point off for making it too much in your face.
Ethics—5/5 Ethics plays a huge part here and the metaphysical reason for ethics is significant.  I tend to be more of a “connection optimist” (like Dustin Hoffman’s character), but I think that this discussion about ethics is significant, so I really appreciate it.
Personal—5/5—Honestly, I just love the smart discussions and how they play out in life.  I wish I could just live my life for these kinds of discussions.

(http://www.alternatetakes.co.uk/images/articles/pic15.jpg)

Overall, I love Huckabees.  I mean, really.  I can’t wait to see it again.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8.  I [Heart] Huckabees
9. District 9
10. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
11. The Son (2003)
12. Raising Arizona
13. Adaptation
14. Three Kings
15. The Science of Sleep
16. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on August 15, 2010, 02:38:07 PM
I <3 Huckabees is a top 10 film for me. Everyone in this is doing hilarious, hilarious things. It's infinitely rewatchable, so I hope you hit it up again soon, Steve. I'd start listing the things I love about it, but I'd just end up replaying the film scene-for-scene. So, I'll just leave with one compound word: breastfeeding. That is all.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on August 15, 2010, 03:36:22 PM
"What does that even mean?"

Jude Law's delivery of this line is awesome. Otherwise I greatly disliked this film. I blame the Shwartz.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 15, 2010, 04:26:54 PM
"What does that even mean?"

Jude Law's delivery of this line is awesome. Otherwise I greatly disliked this film. I blame the Shwartz.

Actually, the few things I didn't like about the movie would all be based around Jason Schartzmann as well. But they are so minor, that it doesn't disturb my love of the film overall.

And I didn't mention this, but it's my second viewing of the film, as almost all of the films I'm watching in this marathon are re-watches.  But not all.

Breastfeeding... *snicker*
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on August 27, 2010, 02:05:44 AM
I've been keeping up on my marathon.  I just haven't been keeping up on writing reviews.  I've got a lot to catch up on, but we'll get them in soon!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 02, 2010, 07:39:54 PM
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter… and Spring

(http://content6.flixster.com/photo/11/18/60/11186096_gal.jpg)

This is a meditative film.  It fully embodies the hermitage that acts as the loci of the events and seasons.  It provides nature and humanity in a perfect meditative balance, so both provide the opportunity to reflect on nature’s changing beauty, humanity’s cycle of weakness and strength and how these interact with each other.  Perhaps next time I want to do a retreat I will just take this film and Into Great Silence and just watch them repeatedly.

(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/c5/9d/0632793509a004146f9a4110.L.jpg)

Technical— 5/5 Very well done.  Almost flawless.
Interest— 4/5Every scene was beautiful, and although it all took place in the same valley, visually it never got boring, partly because of the seasonal changes.  Also, the story was interesting, although a little slow.
Tension—3/5 I could see some of what was coming up, so when it happened it wasn’t really a shock.  But the point of this movie isn’t the surprise, but the cycle.  But there were a couple times—like when the boy dragged the rock around the lake—I wasn’t sure what would happen.
Emotional—3/5—Again, there was little to shock me, and it seemed somewhat predictable.  Still, there were a couple times that were quite touching.
Characters—5/5—Amazing.  Perfect.  This, and the beauty, is where this movie shines.  
Theme—5/5—How human lives cycle, as the seasons.
Ethics—5/5—I love the way the master deals with the irrationalities of the boy, whether minor or major.  He does it with gentleness, patience and discipline.  It is interesting how the gentleness encourages the boy to take on the discipline himself.
Personal—2/5—Not especially personal, except in the way that every man learns to be kind from regretting his cruelty.

(http://www.reelingreviews.com/springsummerfallwinterandspringpic.jpg)

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2026/2390665420_df9b8bdeeb.jpg)

(http://www.lumiere.net.nz/reader/media/images/img_springsummer.jpg)

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring certainly deserves to be on my top 100.  In this experience of it, however, I think that it probably won't make it.  However, when I watch it again-- which I certainly shall-- it will probably rate higher as I meditate upon it more.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8.  I [Heart] Huckabees
9. District 9
10. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
11. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
12. The Son (2003)
13. Raising Arizona
14. Adaptation
15. Three Kings
16. The Science of Sleep
17. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 02, 2010, 07:43:14 PM
You ranked it ten spots too low. ;D I saw this earlier this year and was blown away. I'll have to watch it again in a couple years but for now it has a place in my top-100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 03, 2010, 10:16:31 AM
I will probably fudge with my list a bit before I give my final tally, and I have the sense that you are right... S,S,F,W...aS deserves a higher ranking.  But for now, what I have written, I have written.



Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl

(http://i.ytimg.com/vi/0Z1XpfbuZOA/0.jpg)

I’m one of those folks who grew up in Orange County, CA, so I went to Disneyland almost every summer.  And one of the rides we were required to ride is Pirates of the Caribbean.  In seeing this film the first time, I didn’t expect much, as the ride was slight entertainment with no plot.  If anything, PotC:CotBP is just the opposite—extremely plot heavy.  This is both its joy and its albatross.  For those who like unraveling complicated plots, this is fun.  But it is a bit much for summer fare, which the physical humor and the Johnny Depp lite clearly is about.  But it hit the right balance for me, and I’ve loved it from my first watch.

(http://images.zap2it.com/movies//35032/35032_ba.jpg)

Technical—4/5—The CGI is stretched to its limit, and sometimes a bit more.  But good swordfights, and the acting was adequate for what was necessary.
Interest—5/5—What a riotous movie.  Complex plot, funny, lots to look at.  A great summer film along the lines of 2009’s Star Trek.
Tension—4/5—Although I’ve seen it four times now, the plot is complicated enough for me to wonder how they get from one scene to another.  It was fun to find out, and I still gasped a couple times.
Emotional—2/5—Not really emotional, unless LOL is an emotion.

(http://www.toddalcott.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/url-300x154.jpg)

Characters—4/5—Orlando Bloom and Kira Knightly didn’t do anything for me here.  But Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush and Kevin McNally make this film both fun and believable.
Theme—2/5—Sometimes you’ve got to be a pirate to do right. Maybe.
Ethics—2/5—Horrible.  And the law isn’t unjust, just strict.  We turn our heads away from the violence, shaky spiritualism and outright theft because Orlando seems so noble.  Nobly wrong, but whatever.
Personal—1/5—Nah.  I just like to laugh and be entertained sometimes.

(http://i.ytimg.com/vi/1Yt9bZ5gecA/0.jpg)

Pirates is certainly a personal favorite, and I enjoy it each time I watch it.  But it’s all entertainment.  Nothing else.  Is that enough?  Well, often, that’s just right.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8.  I [Heart] Huckabees
9. District 9
10. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
11. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
12. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
13. The Son (2003)
14. Raising Arizona
15. Adaptation
16. Three Kings
17. The Science of Sleep
18. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on September 03, 2010, 10:39:00 AM
You and I might be the only people who've posted a review of Pirates 1 (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=7319.msg426137#msg426137) on these boards.  Glad to see you're just as willing to step up and admit how much fun the film is.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on September 03, 2010, 10:46:00 AM
The first Pirates movie is just a really great film.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 03, 2010, 12:21:47 PM
I liked it the first time I watched it. After that, it got much worse with each viewing.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on September 03, 2010, 03:40:35 PM
I'm glad to see SSFW...&S clicked with you enough to get top 100 consideration.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8.  I [Heart] Huckabees
9. District 9
10. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
11. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
12. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
13. The Son (2003)
14. Raising Arizona
15. Adaptation
16. Three Kings
17. The Science of Sleep
18. Mister Roberts

Just an observation... I can see that your are ranking these by feeling. Interestingly though, if you take the cumulative value of the criteria listed for each film, the ranking would be completely different.

For example:
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter.... & Spring = 32
Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl = 24

Were you to calculate this for every film you might come to some interesting conclusions by the end of this marathon regarding what aspects of films are more important to you (if you don't already know). I just think that would be neat. :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 03, 2010, 11:50:01 PM

Just an observation... I can see that your are ranking these by feeling. Interestingly though, if you take the cumulative value of the criteria listed for each film, the ranking would be completely different.

For example:
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter.... & Spring = 32
Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl = 24

Were you to calculate this for every film you might come to some interesting conclusions by the end of this marathon regarding what aspects of films are more important to you (if you don't already know). I just think that would be neat. :)

Fascinating.  Perhaps I should have two lists--one which adds the various calculations, and one which gets at my core feelings.

Part of this is figuring out why I like these movies, and comparing/contrasting them is part of it. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 04, 2010, 02:04:28 AM
Do The Right Thing

(http://alt.coxnewsweb.com/cnishared/tools/shared/mediahub/08/81/15/slideshow_1158188_do_the_right_thing007.JPG)

This is a movie about racism.  Well, not just about racism.  Perhaps it’s not about racism, but just about misunderstandings.  Or cross-cultural communication.  Or is it just about a neighborhood?  But wait, it is certainly about violence.  I know that.  I think.

(http://cdn.mos.totalfilm.com/images/d/do-the-right-thing-1989--630-75.jpg)

To be honest, I think it has to do with dealing with conflict and the assumption of oppression.  Is there oppression or isn’t there?  There is certainly prejudice, but who has it worst?  And it deals with the tension of race relations that MLK Jr. and Malcolm X dealt with—should violence be used to obtain freedom?  And what kinds of freedoms should we demand?

(http://ahistoryofnewyork.com/pictures/drt_wall-thumb-480x270.jpg)

I know a great movie when I see it.  This is a great movie.  The questions it leaves me with proves it.  I just have a hard time describing what is so great about it.  I need to see this again.

(http://alt.coxnewsweb.com/cnishared/tools/shared/mediahub/01/82/15/slideshow_1158219_do_the_right_thing003.JPG)

Technical—5/5—Spike Lee is a master filmmaker and knows the excellent people for every aspect of his films.
Interest—4/5—The first half of the film seemed pretty rambling and confused at first, until it all comes together in the second half, which is riveting.
Tension—4/5—An immense amount of tension, especially as tempers explode in the last half hour.
Emotional—4/5—I’m angry with some of the characters and angry at some of the characters, and saddened by the whole situation.  Played me perfectly.

Characters—3/5—There were too many times I asked myself, “Would this character do that?”  The “Mayor” of the neighborhood who was supposed to be a drunk, but he never acted drunk.  Was that on purpose?  The radio deejay who sat there stunned as the riot happened.  Mookie—would he really have thrown that chair?  Why?  But these questions just deepen the idea that I need to know these characters better.  Perhaps it is accepting the assumptions, the subtexts the surroundings give me, that cause misunderstandings.  Maybe if I saw the consistency in these characters, I would know better what they would do.

Theme—5/5—Communication and conflict, and how race relations intensifies that.
Ethics—5/5—This is less of a moral tale and more of a case study.  There are no easy answers provided by the movie, but lots to chew on.
Personal—3/5—I have never dealt with these racial issues in such an intense situation before.  But I recognize the cultural conflict in my own community and wonder how long before it breaks into open violence.

(http://www.thestencil.com/archives/images/do-the-right-thing-water.jpg)

My overall impression is confused.  Certainly this film is great, important, well made and thoughtful.  But did I LIKE it?  I don’t know.  I really don’t.  I’m just throwing it on my list, but it will certainly be in a different place after the next time I experience it.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Princess Mononoke
4. The Dark Knight
5. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
6. Tideland
7. The Brothers Bloom
8.  I [Heart] Huckabees
9. District 9
10. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
11. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
12. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
13. The Son (2003)
14. Raising Arizona
15. Do The Right Thing
16. Adaptation
17. Three Kings
18. The Science of Sleep
19. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 04, 2010, 03:13:05 AM
I'm like totally running a multivariate regression analysis on you component ratings vis a vis overall ranking when you are dine.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 04, 2010, 10:58:50 AM
That frightens me, Bondo.  Even more so that I'm not sure what you just said.

I think that my components add to my appreciation of a film.  But my list is mostly based on one component: Did I like and enjoy the experience?  This could mean that it left me feeling happy, like Amelie, or that I appreciated the excitement and the thoughts it made me think, like the Dark Knight, or that it gave me an experience that I used in my life, like The Mission.    And so, while both ways of evaluating are ultimately personal, the components are what can be compared to movies.  I think one other thing would have to be included, which is what made this movie special or unique.  Often a film for me can be rated high simply because of that.

Pirates is unique in that it kept me entertained throughout the whole film, each time I saw it.  And I laugh each time because the humor is rather quirky.  But Amelie is better at this same quality.  And since I place my own personal enjoyment as the highest quality, Amelie is over Pirates.  Pirates, at this time, however is over Spring, etc. because all I got out of Spring was some marvelous images and a pretty basic story, although well told.  However, Spring, I believe, is supposed to give more the more you watch it.  Pirates is the opposite.  So I strongly suspect Spring... will end up rising in my estimation over time, while Pirates will go down.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 04, 2010, 06:28:38 PM
That frightens me, Bondo.  Even more so that I'm not sure what you just said.

LOL...just read my own post...that's what I get for posting from my phone while hammered.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on September 04, 2010, 07:31:58 PM
That frightens me, Bondo.  Even more so that I'm not sure what you just said.

LOL...just read my own post...that's what I get for posting from my phone while hammered.

Bondo, I do really want to know what it means that Steve is dine.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 04, 2010, 08:52:26 PM
That frightens me, Bondo.  Even more so that I'm not sure what you just said.

LOL...just read my own post...that's what I get for posting from my phone while hammered.

Bondo, I do really want to know what it means that Steve is dine.

I wondered if it was some cannibal lingo.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 05, 2010, 02:06:41 AM
I will join the others who have expressed confusion over the rankings. Spring... gets 4 5/5's and only 1 2/5, Do the Right Thing 3 5/5's, yet both are ranked lower than Pirates with 1 5/5, and lots of 2/5. It just seems weird.

It is very confusing.  ???
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: rambler on September 05, 2010, 04:14:46 PM
I will join the others who have expressed confusion over the rankings. Spring... gets 4 5/5's and only 1 2/5, Do the Right Thing 3 5/5's, yet both are ranked lower than Pirates with 1 5/5, and lots of 2/5. It just seems weird.

It is very confusing.  ???

I dunno, I think it's a verbalization of subjectivity.

The ranking is his relationship to the film, which is a lot more than just the sum of it's categorized ratings.

By offering both he's expressing a state of mind. "This was perfectly executed. But fails to actually, you know... be interesting" or "This has some MAJOR technical weak spots, but I'm so busy being entertained that I don't notice."

There's been plenty of films I would credit with "amazing visuals" and being "artistically daring" that I wouldn't rescue from the 5$ bin at walmart.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 05, 2010, 04:21:49 PM
I will join the others who have expressed confusion over the rankings. Spring... gets 4 5/5's and only 1 2/5, Do the Right Thing 3 5/5's, yet both are ranked lower than Pirates with 1 5/5, and lots of 2/5. It just seems weird.

It is very confusing.  ???

I dunno, I think it's a verbalization of subjectivity.

The ranking is his relationship to the film, which is a lot more than just the sum of it's categorized ratings.

By offering both he's expressing a state of mind. "This was perfectly executed. But fails to actually, you know... be interesting" or "This has some MAJOR technical weak spots, but I'm so busy being entertained that I don't notice."

There's been plenty of films I would credit with "amazing visuals" and being "artistically daring" that I wouldn't rescue from the 5$ bin at walmart.

This is all true.  rambler hit it right on the head that my categorization isn't all there is in a movie.  It's just an interesting group of categories that I can wrap my mind around.  And it does help me in my evaluation.

But the fact is, I appreciated my time with Pirates, for the fifth time, than my first viewing of Spring...   To watch Pirates again would be relaxing, enjoyable, and I recognize that watching Spring again, for all it's fantastic qualities, would be work.  Over time, less so, but still...

However, I appreciate what Dave is saying.  I'm confused by the difference as well.  The simple answer is what rambler is saying.  But I want to spend some time thinking about what really makes the difference for me.  Is there a sixth sense of movie watching?  Is there a hidden conspiracy that is forcing me to put movies that are entertaining but not necessarily thoughtful above movies that are clearly great?  

I will investigate and let you know...

EDIT: Sorry, rambler,  I don't know why I got confused, but I fixed it now...
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: rambler on September 05, 2010, 04:35:07 PM
Is there a hidden conspiracy that is forcing me to put movies that are entertaining but not necessarily thoughtful above movies that are clearly great? 


Hahaha yes there is a hidden conspiracy called "common sense".

If you're going to say you prefer Caviar over Pizza it better be because you truly enjoy it more, not because it ranks 5/5 in exoticness and expensiveness.  :P
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 06, 2010, 03:37:36 PM
I will join the others who have expressed confusion over the rankings. Spring... gets 4 5/5's and only 1 2/5, Do the Right Thing 3 5/5's, yet both are ranked lower than Pirates with 1 5/5, and lots of 2/5. It just seems weird.

It is very confusing.  ???

I dunno, I think it's a verbalization of subjectivity.

The ranking is his relationship to the film, which is a lot more than just the sum of it's categorized ratings.

By offering both he's expressing a state of mind. "This was perfectly executed. But fails to actually, you know... be interesting" or "This has some MAJOR technical weak spots, but I'm so busy being entertained that I don't notice."

There's been plenty of films I would credit with "amazing visuals" and being "artistically daring" that I wouldn't rescue from the 5$ bin at walmart.

This is all true.  rambler hit it right on the head that my categorization isn't all there is in a movie.  It's just an interesting group of categories that I can wrap my mind around.  And it does help me in my evaluation.

But the fact is, I appreciated my time with Pirates, for the fifth time, than my first viewing of Spring...   To watch Pirates again would be relaxing, enjoyable, and I recognize that watching Spring again, for all it's fantastic qualities, would be work.  Over time, less so, but still...

However, I appreciate what Dave is saying.  I'm confused by the difference as well.  The simple answer is what rambler is saying.  But I want to spend some time thinking about what really makes the difference for me.  Is there a sixth sense of movie watching?  Is there a hidden conspiracy that is forcing me to put movies that are entertaining but not necessarily thoughtful above movies that are clearly great?  

I will investigate and let you know...

EDIT: Sorry, rambler,  I don't know why I got confused, but I fixed it now...

Ok, I will take your rankings as a distillation of all your feelings for the film, not just the defined ones. I suppose part of my problem was that Pirates very rapidly diminished with a repeat viewing.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 06, 2010, 08:46:00 PM
Well, I am not going to try to defend my opinion of Pirates.  It would be a guilty pleasure, if I felt any guilt over it.  One hint that I did give on my stated preference is the level of "interest" in each film.  That's a big marker for me.  Do the Right Thing and Spring, Summer, ... etc only got 4/5 in interest, while Pirates got 5/5.  That's probably a good clue as to why I'm ranking them as I do. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on September 06, 2010, 08:47:48 PM
First Pirates film is great. Still haven't seen the sequels.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 06, 2010, 08:58:18 PM
Edward Scissorhands

(http://cine35mm.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/edward_scissorhands15.jpg)

I have seen this film many times and appreciate it more every time I watch it.  I love Grimm’s fairy tales and this is a perfect Grimm tale set in any suburban town in the mid 70s.  There is much for me to love, as I explain below...

(http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/image/hdtv/Samsung-LE40F86BD/edward-scissorhands.jpg)

Technical—5/5—The sets were amazing and everything was full of spit and polish.  Well done.
Interest—5/5—A wonderful fairy tale with stark colors and stereotypes.  There is such a wonderful contrast between the castle on the hill and the colorful community down below.  This is one for the ages.  
Tension—5/5—I am astounded at my anger at the wrongs done to Edward and at my anxiety for his well-being.
Emotional—5/5—I ended up seeing this film over two days with the final half hour interrupted by my daughter who was relating to me her plans for her birthday.  I still cried at the end.

(http://x6a.xanga.com/9f3f210619035229707951/m180969836.jpg)

Characters—4/5—Okay, so all the characters were flat.  That isn’t a problem in a clear fairy tale.  The stereotypes help us identify who we are and other people we know.  Like all fairy tales, flat characters aren’t done for laughs, but to make the story more universal.  That was very successfully done here.  How I love so many of the characters—Johnny Depp—so different from Pirates, and yet just as believable.  Vincent Price in his final role—how much fun!  Dianne Weist is completely believable and wonderful.  (The one exception is Wyona Rider as the grandmother—wow the bookends were terrible in this film)

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:v1jIlfb114dXvM:http://www.moviepro.net/images/movies/46134_still_2_1045444.jpg&t=1)

Theme—5/5—“People who are different eventually become the outcast.”
Ethics—4/5—The main themes around being outcast are powerful and multifaceted.  My only problem is with the end.  The “best” place for the outcast is segregated from the community.  That is just wrong.
Personal—5/5—Only in this last experience of the film did I realize just how personal this was.  The timeframe of the film is early 70’s suburbia, with some lat 80s tech thrown in.  But I grew up in this suburb. The sameness of all the homes, the “all-knowing” father, Avon door to door, the hairstyles, the community phone sessions—yeah, it was all there.  When I read that Tim Burton based it on his neighborhood in Ventura, CA, it all made sense.  He and I grew up in the same time, in the same kind of suburbs, just in different parts of Southern California.

(http://www.city-data.com/forum/attachments/austin/22298d1214763832-how-do-you-define-cookie-cutter-scissorssuburbia.jpg)

But also, I personally see the emergence of the outcast in traditional communities disrupts the community.  Almost all of my work right now is to keep an Edward Scissorhands situation from happening.

I’m really surprised, but I’m going to have to place Edward pretty high up on the list.

(http://tshirts.name/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Edward_Scissorhands_Team_Edward_Women_s_T_Shirt_Movie.jpg)

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Edward Scissorhands
4. Princess Mononoke
5. The Dark Knight
6. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
7. Tideland
8. The Brothers Bloom
9.  I [Heart] Huckabees
10. District 9
11. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
12. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
13. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
14. The Son (2003)
15. Raising Arizona
16. Do The Right Thing
17. Adaptation
18. Three Kings
19. The Science of Sleep
20. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 06, 2010, 09:02:26 PM
Awesome. Yea, it's a pretty fantastic film. I still think Ed Wood is slightly better though.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on September 06, 2010, 09:08:18 PM
Oh Tim Burton, you are a genius. Great write up. I should watch this film soon.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 07, 2010, 12:21:26 AM
Awesome. Yea, it's a pretty fantastic film. I still think Ed Wood is slightly better though.

I haven't seen Ed Wood yet.   :-[
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 07, 2010, 04:18:47 AM
Awesome. Yea, it's a pretty fantastic film. I still think Ed Wood is slightly better though.

I haven't seen Ed Wood yet.   :-[

I would recommend Ed Wood, particularly if you have an interest in Wood's films. Another great write-up, and the photo of the street is so clear, I feel I could step into (if it was not only 3 inches high).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 07, 2010, 10:22:08 AM
Okay, I'm putting Ed Wood on my list.  As if it weren't long enough.  But, hey, I've got a year to work on it now, right?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 07, 2010, 10:56:59 AM
Fitzcaraldo

(http://www.realpoliticalfacetalk.com/r/i/fitzcarraldo3.jpg)

The story of a man who would do anything to bring the opera to his hometown in the middle of the South American jungle.  And he was so obsessed with this crazy idea, that he made another crazy idea to fund it—buy a rubber plantation that no one can get to and then drag the 300 ton boat over a tall hill from one river to another.  And Fitzcaraldo is just smart enough and crazy enough to do it.

Although this is roughly based on a true story, I think that it is really a semi-autobiographical piece.  After all, the real Fitzcaraldo took apart his 30 ton boat and had it carried piece by piece to the other river.  The power of this film, the heart of it, is that Herzog Meier was crazy enough to actually drag a 300 ton steam boat over a hill, using only wood and rope and the steam engine itself.  Who is the real crazy genius, Fitzcaraldo or Herzog?  Perhaps Herzog saw parts of himself in the Fitz.

(http://www.konradprojects.net/blog/uploaded_images/Fitzcarraldo2-711143.jpg)

BTW, an excellent article comparing the real "Fitzcarraldo" with the movie can be found here. (http://www.iquitosnews.com/page14a.html)

Technical—4/5The quality of the film used was distinctly low-budget, as if it were a documentary.  But in the end, it didn’t matter. Of course, the star of the film was the feat of getting the 300 ton boat over the hill.  A marvelous achievement.  Even if this were a documentary about that event, it couldn’t be more wondrous.
Interest—3.5/5—My interest went up and down in the film, but the setting, the characters and the boat over the hill stunt kept me fascinated.
Tension—4/5—I could hear every piece of wood of the boat straining as that solid weight was dragged up by the pulley.  The drums increased the tension tremendously as they drew closer to the indigenous peoples.   If only I cared as much about the concerns of the main character.

(http://www.iquitosnews.com/Fitzcarraldo02-wm.jpg)

Emotional—2/5—This is where the movie fell flat for me.  In the end, there wasn’t anyone I cared about or identified with.  
Characters—4/5—They were all very well realized, especially Fitzzcaraldo and the Indians.  Oh, and Molly—what a wonderful, enjoyable character!
Theme—4/5—Not a powerful theme, but probably, “Every great idea, even a failure, is an epic and deserves to be sung.”  Another theme is the cross-cultural power of music.
Ethics—2/5—Not much here ethically.  The greatness is in the determination, not in how well it works for everyone.  
Personal—3/5—Like Fizcaraldo, I have had ambitious ideas that everyone told me would fail, which I did anyway.   But my ideas, unlike his, were for the benefit of all,  not just a crazy whim that others indulged.  

(http://www.passportdiary.com/images/fitzcarraldo1.jpg)

Good movie, but it was the stunt that interested me more than anything else.  Not going to make my top 100.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Edward Scissorhands
4. Princess Mononoke
5. The Dark Knight
6. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
7. Tideland
8. The Brothers Bloom
9.  I [Heart] Huckabees
10. District 9
11. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
12. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
13. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
14. The Son (2003)
15. Raising Arizona
16. Do The Right Thing
17. Adaptation
18. Three Kings
19. The Science of Sleep
20. Fitzcaraldo
21. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: michael x on September 07, 2010, 11:54:45 AM
Obviously I like it quite a bit more than you did - Fitzcarraldo's love of opera, replete with the dueling music scene really added something to the film for me. The bittersweet ending really resonated for me. Is it ethics? Perhaps, perhaps not; but Herzog is certainly trying to express the the meaning of life and the essence of the human experience. Herzog's grounded, unromantic view of life is a breath of fresh air in film.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 08, 2010, 12:13:22 AM
Obviously I like it quite a bit more than you did - Fitzcarraldo's love of opera, replete with the dueling music scene really added something to the film for me. The bittersweet ending really resonated for me. Is it ethics? Perhaps, perhaps not; but Herzog is certainly trying to express the the meaning of life and the essence of the human experience. Herzog's grounded, unromantic view of life is a breath of fresh air in film.

It isn't great ethics, but you are right it is refreshing.  And enjoyable.  Just not "great" for me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 10, 2010, 01:46:41 AM
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

(http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/666/666084/harry-potter-and-the-goblet-of-fire-20051115044927918_640w.jpg)

The Harry Potter franchise is just fun.  Recently I’ve been listening to the first book on audio and then I watched this film.  And I made a couple discoveries.  The first is that I much prefer the books.  They have the charm and humor that much of the adaptations lack.  The second is that the movies—at least this one—are really well done and entertaining.  They pack in too much plot in their run time (which is not the fault of the filmmakers) and so lack in character development and theme.  However, as a simple spectacular, it succeeds. 

(http://images.starpulse.com/Photos/Previews/Harry-Potter-Goblet-15.jpg)
 
Technical—4/5—Even the CG is well done here.  Everything is spot on.  Marvelous.  Perhaps the script could be written better.  Okay, of course it could.
Interest—5/5—A fantastic spectacle, and the plot moves on fast enough to not really know what’s coming next. 
Tension—3/5—This dropped considerably at the third time of experiencing the story.  Except when Harry fell off his broomstick, being chased by the dragon.  That was intense.  But the climatic scene in the cemetery seemed a bit old hat this time.
Emotional—2/3—Lots to see, not much time to feel anything.
Characters—2/3—The only character that was given time was Harry.  Everyone else was just passing through, really.  Which is a shame because the book spent some time developing Ron’s feelings about having his best friend be the most well-known person in his world.
Theme— 2/5There should have been a strong theme about celebrity, as there is in the book.  But there isn’t.
Ethics—4/5—I would love to write a book about the complexity of ethics in Harry Potter as compared to other children’s lit.  Here, the ethic is pretty simple—Harry ultimately wins because he sacrifices his own ambitions for the well-being of others, even though he does this naively.
Personal—1/5—Nothing to connect to, here.  I’ve never been a celebrity wizard, I guess.

(http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/661/661287/harry-potter-and-the-goblet-of-fire-20051025084457737_640w.jpg)

I enjoyed it, but Harry won’t stay on my top 100.  I have been reading the Harry Potter marathon where it seems that the general consensus is that Goblet of Fire is one of the worst, if not the worst HP films.  I liked it the best on first viewing, but that's probably because I liked the fourth book the best.  But I will not be watching all of the HP franchise just to see if it makes it on my top 100.  Unless Mercy makes me.

1. In America
2. Amelie
3. Edward Scissorhands
4. Princess Mononoke
5. The Dark Knight
6. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
7. Tideland
8. The Brothers Bloom
9.  I [Heart] Huckabees
10. District 9
11. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
12. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
13. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
14. The Son (2003)
15. Raising Arizona
16. Do The Right Thing
17. Adaptation
18. Three Kings
19. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
20. The Science of Sleep
21. Fitzcaraldo
22. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 10, 2010, 08:30:59 AM
Now if it was Order of the Phoenix....I actually don't care much for this one, maybe because I love the book so much and didn't like what they pulled out. It's okay, but 3 and 5 are much better IMHO.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 10, 2010, 10:14:24 AM
Here's my vote for Mercy making you at least watch 3 and 5 again, neither of them make my top 100 but they are both at least in the ballpark. Apparently I'm not so much the SSM on this topic.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Junior on September 10, 2010, 10:23:48 AM
Now if it was Order of the Phoenix....I actually don't care much for this one, maybe because I love the book so much and didn't like what they pulled out. It's okay, but 3 and 5 are much better IMHO.

Word.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on September 10, 2010, 10:35:54 AM
Now if it was Order of the Phoenix....I actually don't care much for this one, maybe because I love the book so much and didn't like what they pulled out. It's okay, but 3 and 5 are much better IMHO.

I feel like they just took the book and pulled out random pages until they decide it was short enough. They took some good things out but also kept some useless stuff in. They kept the Rita Skeeter scene but never did anything with it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: THATguy on September 10, 2010, 01:12:02 PM
As someone who didn't read the books (and doesn't particularly care to), the graveyard sequence is the best thing in any HP film, and because of that, Goblet of Fire is probably my favorite.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 10, 2010, 03:01:43 PM
My favourite scene from Goblet of fire is the chaos of the Quidich world cup after the Death Eaters attack. It was a very well done scene.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 12, 2010, 01:46:48 PM
As someone who didn't read the books (and doesn't particularly care to), the graveyard sequence is the best thing in any HP film, and because of that, Goblet of Fire is probably my favorite.

And that's the scene I most liked in both the movies and the books-- it's the turning point for the whole series.  At this point, everything turns dark and the light children's literature turns and the stakes get much higher at this point.  Before this, we were convinced nothing would really happen to the main characters.  After this, anything was possible.  But is this a strength of the movie, or simply the power of Rowling's writing?  I don't know.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 12, 2010, 01:55:22 PM
Rear Window

(http://www.tcf.ua.edu/Classes/Jbutler/T112/HitchRearWindow02.jpg)

I am not a Hitchcock fan.  There are many of his films that I think are perfectly adequate suspense thrillers, such as The 39 Steps and North By Northwest, but I often think he tries too hard and, at least for me, he fails.  I am not a fan of Vertigo, The Birds or Rope and Psycho I thought was okay, but I don’t feel the need to revisit it. 

Rear Window is different altogether.  Here, I think Hitchcock finally has accomplished the pinnacle of the thriller genre.  It is perfection in every way.  There is not a single misstep, and there is so much detail to linger on and to consider, as well as many personal and ethical questions to consider.  This is what movies can rarely accomplish—a fine example of what I love about movies.

(http://archive.sensesofcinema.com/images/29/rear_window_ring.jpg)

Technical—5/5 In every way this is a film in which I award that rare label “perfect.”  The writing, the camera work, the pacing, the editing, the lighting—it all works together as a coherent whole to tell a unique story.
Interest—5/5  It fed me just enough information to keep me intensely interested and just enough character development that I wondered what would happen to these sometimes likable folks.

(http://www.filmsquish.com/guts/files/images/rear%20window%20Alfred%20Hitchcock%20-%20Masterpiece%20Collection%20DVD%20Review_0.jpg)

Tension—4/5—I’ve experienced movies with more tension, but the final 15-20 minutes kept me at the edge of my seat.
Emotional—3/5—Not deeply emotional, but it is a perfect film to engage the mind.
Characters—5/5—Jimmy Stewart is almost always one of my favorites, but he is surrounded by other amazing performers, including Grace Kelly and Raymond Burr.  I believed each character, and almost every action made perfect sense.

(http://www.fashioninfilm.com/images-pages/Rear-Window-004lg.jpg)

Theme—5/5 –Observation and responsibility.  I love some of the critical analysis of this film which says that the film is pointing the “peeping tom” blame upon the movie observer, which gives us a limited responsibility to that which takes place on the screen.
Ethics—5/5—There are a number of ethical questions that come up here, both about responsibility and relationships.  None of them are clearly answered, but the ideas are there.
Personal—4/5—The deepest personal connection is that I find myself observing other people’s lives and my wife and I are often discussing their issues from a distance, having little ability to do anything about it.  We often struggle with the balance between boundaries and personal responsibility.

(http://middleager.com/images/Rear_Window.jpg)

I fell in love with Rear Window all over again and so it is being placed surprisingly high:

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. District 9
12. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
13. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
14. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
15. The Son (2003)
16. Raising Arizona
17. Do The Right Thing
18. Adaptation
19. Three Kings
20. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
21. The Science of Sleep
22. Fitzcaraldo
23. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on September 12, 2010, 01:59:37 PM
I love Rear Window, but Grace Kelly really drags the movie down for me. Would be top level Hitchcock with someone like Kim Novak or Eva Marie Saint, Kelly is too flat for my liking.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on September 12, 2010, 02:06:02 PM
I love Rear Window, but Grace Kelly really drags the movie down for me.
This.  

The film feels slow, much slower than it should be.  So there isn't a constant, growing suspense so much as a couple of really intense scenes.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 12, 2010, 02:26:22 PM
That's funny because I think that Vertigo jumps the gun and doesn't stretch it out enough.  On the other hand, I considered Rope to be without any suspense.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on September 12, 2010, 02:37:16 PM
I would put your point about this film's perfection like this. I think of Rear Window in the same way as one of those flawless three minute pop songs (God Only Knows, Teenage Kicks for instance); perfectly formed not a beat out of place, doesn't outstay its welcome. It is effortless in the same way and that's why it is my number two film. I also saw it at the cinema as a teenager (on re-release I'm not that old) and at the right time to turn me on to films as something more than sci-fi, action films or comedy. As such I am powerless to resist it; in the same way as if Grace Kelly walked into the room in that dress.

Hitchcock draws you further and further in; makes all those little window peeping vignettes so attractive and then turns around smacks you on the nose and says hey you perv no peeking! Such a wicked sense of humour.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 13, 2010, 10:22:31 AM
Yea, it's a great one. You must be watching the wrong Hitchcock if you don't like him. Check out Notorious and Rebecca.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on September 13, 2010, 11:58:54 AM
Yea, it's a great one. You must be watching the wrong Hitchcock if you don't like him. Check out Notorious and Rebecca.

Second that
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 13, 2010, 01:08:28 PM
I'm in the "loved Rear Window, dislike Hitchcock" sort of realm...though that is an overstatement since I do like Psycho and Stranger on a Train. Still, so much of his stuff (Vertigo and Notorious especially) is overrated. Rebecca is up first when I start the second round of my classics marathon so I'll have to see which side that falls on.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 13, 2010, 01:16:11 PM
How can you like movies and dislike Hitchcock?

O, wait.  :P
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 13, 2010, 01:40:35 PM
I've never seen Rebecca or Notorious, so I'll throw these on my list.  Bondo, are you recommending Stranger on A Train for my list?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 13, 2010, 01:49:44 PM
Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension

(http://www.alicia-logic.com/capsimages/bb_049HedayaLloydSchiavelli.jpg)

In 1984, Buckaroo Bonzai was my favorite movie of the year, hands down.  I had large sections of the movie memorized and the throw away line, “No matter where you go, there you are” was my favorite quote.  Last year, I put BB on my top 100 simply on the memory of this movie, as I have not watched it since the 80s.  So I was curious as to how this movie survived the ravages of time and movie experience.

(http://outofambit.blogspot.com/BuckarooBanzai.jpg)

“Comic book” is the description most frequently associated with this film, but for the comic of the 80’s I read, this has more of a feel of a 90’s graphic novel.  Not quite as developed as some character-driven graphic novels, but more complex and interesting than almost any superhero-style comics.  It has more in common with 40s and 50s sci-fi—movies and stories—than anything else, I think.  Which is why the connection to War of the Worlds is quite fitting, I think.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQpxxvC5MM7ZJcUYnfO6o8gaAZOua9jeg-AjOOsxMhnkcnYMso&t=1&usg=__-gJCeBc30NZtQlr-MQmUhZwlmc0=)

Technical—4/5—There were a lot of errors in the film, not least a few flubs in one scene with the president alone. The acting was only occasionally good.  But the plot was tight and twisted and the details were funny and strangely intricate.  Why did there have to be a motorcycle convention going on during the press conference?  We don’t know, but it is one of the many fine details I love.
Interest—4/5—I knew everything that was going down, of course, having once practically memorized the movie.  This reduced my interest a little, but the web of plots and throwaway details were enough to keep me mesmerized. And the humor, sometimes subtle, often over-the-top, was always wonderful.

(http://www.ifc.com/movies/310x229_buckaroobanzai1984.jpg)

Tension—3/5—Rawhide’s injury really did provide some tension for me.  Apart from that, of course we knew from the beginning Buckaroo would save the day.
Emotional—2/5—Not really any emotion to speak of here.  Just a good yarn.
Characters—4/5There are a number of characters I really like.  Jeff Goldbloom is almost always good. John Lithglow and Christopher Lloyd are wonderfully strange here.  Rawhide is my favorite for some strange reason.  No one has enough screen time to really delve into the character deeply, but they are either campy enough or realistic enough to win my acclaim.
Theme—2/5—No real theme, here.  Just a fun sci-fi.

(http://www.cedmagazine.com/uploadedImages/Ced/articles/LordJohnWhorfin.jpg)

Ethics—2.5/5—Well, you have the common question of nuclear war that was hanging over all of us in the 80s, and what should really be done.  Although the solution of the film is to hand our lives over to a genius renaissance man.
Personal—3/5 The only personal stuff in the film is nostalgia.  That’s enough to make me feel good, I guess.

In all fairness, I can’t say it’s a great film.  I’m not even sure I can say it’s a good film.  But I love it, and that’s good enough.  However, I doubt after this last showing that I’m going to love it enough to have it remain on my top 100.  But I do love it enough to have me smile every time I think of it.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. District 9
12. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
13. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
14. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
15. The Son (2003)
16. Raising Arizona
17. Do The Right Thing
18. Adaptation
19. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
20. Three Kings
21. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
22. The Science of Sleep
23. Fitzcaraldo
24. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on September 13, 2010, 02:07:57 PM
Notorious over Rebecca. Cary Grant gets to be soooo bad. Take or leave Strangers... it is very clever (some of the devices used) but it sounds like you might find these off-putting.
Anyone like Dial M for Murder? It might be more in line with Rear Window but it is minor Hitch for me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 13, 2010, 02:47:03 PM
Bondo, are you recommending Stranger on A Train for my list?

Eh? It's not top-100 good, just second best Hitchcock I've seen good.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on September 13, 2010, 03:20:02 PM
Hey monkey boy (or are you a Bob Marley or a Lobster), your review of BB reads like the way I will feel about it if I watch it again. I am just happy it did not end up on the bottom of your list.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 13, 2010, 09:18:22 PM
Hey monkey boy (or are you a Bob Marley or a Lobster), your review of BB reads like the way I will feel about it if I watch it again. I am just happy it did not end up on the bottom of your list.

"It's not my g-d planet, monkey-boy!"
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 17, 2010, 12:14:16 AM
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

(http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/709/709898/last-crusade-grail_1148452486-000.jpg)

Growing up, the Indiana Jones trilogy was some of the most thrilling blockbusters out there.  They are full of action with the right mix of comedy and lots of fun.  So what that the historic “fact” had as much speculation as anything else.  It’s all fun, right?

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_4rSBQ6e20Uo/TDwrSIJxZMI/AAAAAAAAO3A/8uz_Vzij9Do/s1600/sheard1.jpg)

In the last few years, returning to Raiders of the Lost Ark with my kids I found myself squirming at Indy’s bloodthirstiness.  Even though he was killing a bunch of Nazis (which seems to be a virtue in many movies), he was acting like a serial killer, murdering anyone who got in his way, whether in self-defense or not. 

(http://www.indygear.com/images/gear/guns/IndyGuns-hd.jpg)

But the third episode has many things that increased the pleasure ratio for me above the first (or the grotesque second): although the action didn’t wane, the killing decreased significantly.  The religious themes weren’t so patronized or horrible—religion was portrayed in a much more balanced way.  And most of all, there was Sean Connery as Indy’s father.  Their exchanges are my favorite scenes in any of the movies.  Hilarious and perfectly portrayed.  To have these scenes by two of the best action performers (with only Bruce Willis missing—couldn’t Spielberg have fit him in, too?) is a gem of cinema. 

(http://www.grouchoreviews.com/content/films/3066/52.jpg)

But what about the movie as a whole?

Technical—5/5—Spielberg and Lucas, in general, are at their height of moviemaking at this time.  The writing was excellent, the cinematic quality great and the only thing that lowers the quality of the movie even a little bit is the love interest. 
Interest—5/5—I love the humor, the scenery (PETRA! Yea!), the action and the quest aspect.  It’s all fun.

(http://images.inc.com/slideshows/12-ways-to-live-like-indiana-jones/01.jpg)

Tension—3/5—Not much tension this time around.  I’ve seen it before.  I remember it all.  I wasn’t concerned.
Emotional—2/5—This movie isn’t about tugging the heartstrings.  It’s just bombastic entertainment.
Characters—4/5—Harrison Ford as Indy is classic, of course.  Sean Connery is amazing, fantastic.  I can’t praise him enough.  Where did they get that woman from, though?  Wow, was she irritating.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:v4wtXTdRHjW6tM:http://i766.photobucket.com/albums/xx302/ajithrockscc/Movies/Indiana-Jones-and-the-Last-Crusade-.jpg&t=1)

Theme—3/5—Yeah, there’s themes there.  The relationship between father and son and the nature of obsession.  Interesting stuff, but that’s certainly not what the movie’s about.  It’s about drawing you to the next action sequence.
Ethics—3.5/5—As in all the Indy movies, murder for the sake of archeology seems pretty acceptable.  However, the development of the father/son relationship is well done, especially the surrender of the quest at the end.  The great mystery of the movie is really what is the quest for—for power, for conquest or for knowledge?  This is, I think, what really pushes this movie above the others because of this clear emphasis on illumination instead of possession.  Wonderful.

(http://www.indianajones5trailer.com/indiana_jones_and_the_last_crusade/young_indiana_jones.jpg)

Personal—2/5 I can appreciate Indy’s feeling of being ignored by his father.  But his anger seems misplaced.

I appreciated the film and am glad I own it.  However, I think it will just miss my top 100.  I could be wrong, though.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. District 9
12. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
13. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
14. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
15. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
16. The Son (2003)
17. Raising Arizona
18. Do The Right Thing
19. Adaptation
20. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
21. Three Kings
22. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
23. The Science of Sleep
24. Fitzcaraldo
25. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 17, 2010, 01:26:16 AM
However, I think it will just miss my top 100.  I could be wrong, though.

I'll spare you the uncertainty, if it misses your top 100 you will be wrong :D I'm getting into the series for my Spielberg marathon. I like your comments comparing the first and third as I've always been more enamored of the third (which is on my top-100) and I think it is partly because of it being a little more fun and about the father-son relationship and a little less about bloodthirsty ambition.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on September 17, 2010, 01:32:16 AM
Technical—5/5—Spielberg and Lucas, in general, are at their height of moviemaking at this time.  The writing was excellent, the cinematic quality great and the only thing that lowers the quality of the movie even a little bit is the love interest. 

This was the film that taught the 13 year old me what a continuity error was.  I think this and the 4th Indiana Jones are Spielberg at his sloppiest.  Also, is this the area where you deduct points for the terrible performance by that blonde woman?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 17, 2010, 11:21:54 AM
Technical—5/5—Spielberg and Lucas, in general, are at their height of moviemaking at this time.  The writing was excellent, the cinematic quality great and the only thing that lowers the quality of the movie even a little bit is the love interest. 

This was the film that taught the 13 year old me what a continuity error was.  I think this and the 4th Indiana Jones are Spielberg at his sloppiest.  Also, is this the area where you deduct points for the terrible performance by that blonde woman?

I deducted points in the area of character.  I could have here, too, the performance was awful. 

And, I am ashamed to say, I didn't notice a continuity error here.  What was it?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on September 17, 2010, 01:15:12 PM
imdb has the longest list of errors (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097576/goofs) I've ever seen.

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 17, 2010, 01:32:00 PM
imdb has the longest list of errors (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097576/goofs) I've ever seen.

I feel like these are the sort of things you only notice if you are looking for them/feeling superior because you are finding them. It seems like finding unnecessary excuses not to like things and I find plenty of reasons not to like things without going to extra lengths. But then I have a splendid capacity not to notice things.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on September 17, 2010, 01:40:58 PM
imdb has the longest list of errors (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097576/goofs) I've ever seen.

I feel like these are the sort of things you only notice if you are looking for them/feeling superior because you are finding them. It seems like finding unnecessary excuses not to like things and I find plenty of reasons not to like things without going to extra lengths. But then I have a splendid capacity not to notice things.

I'm the same way. Plus, the I think great direction obscures continuity errors (I'm looking at Scorcese.) Last Crusade is so well-directed that the only error I ever picked up on was Indy not being wet after coming out of the water in the catacombs. But the that particular error happens in many movies and has always been a pet peeve of mine. To give an example of how good the execution of the film is, until looking at that list it never even occurred to me that there are no catacombs in Venice. OBVIOUSLY there aren't. I should know that. There's no place to have catacombs at all in a city founded on water and mud. But in the moment it doesn't matter. Those scenes simply work. Spielberg is da bomb!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on September 17, 2010, 01:51:30 PM
At 13 I was not looking for reasons not to like what had been my favorite movie because I wanted to feel superior to Steven Spielberg, who was the only director I knew by name.

But watching the movie several times, as I did, because I loved it, I noticed a lot of these (but by no means most of them).  I didn't say it made the movie bad.  It's sloppy.  

A filmmaker as good as Spielberg should be expected to do better.  I think the sloppiness in this film is indicative of Spielberg's attitude toward his mainstream audiences in the wake of Empire of the Sun.  I think he put a lot of effort into his "grownup" movies (Schindler's List) and tossed off his mainstream films as quickly as possible (War of the Worlds, Indy 4) regardless of their quality.  The exception is Jurassic Park, with its technological challenge keeping his interest.  You can see this not only in the continuity errors and plot holes, but also the laziness and infantilization of the characterizations (is Raiders the last Spielberg action film to not have a child protagonist, if you don't count River Phoenix and the Henry/Indy dynamic in Last Crusade?)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on September 17, 2010, 02:53:02 PM
At 13 I was not looking for reasons not to like what had been my favorite movie because I wanted to feel superior to Steven Spielberg, who was the only director I knew by name.

But watching the movie several times, as I did, because I loved it, I noticed a lot of these (but by no means most of them).  I didn't say it made the movie bad.  It's sloppy.  

A filmmaker as good as Spielberg should be expected to do better.  I think the sloppiness in this film is indicative of Spielberg's attitude toward his mainstream audiences in the wake of Empire of the Sun.  I think he put a lot of effort into his "grownup" movies (Schindler's List) and tossed off his mainstream films as quickly as possible (War of the Worlds, Indy 4) regardless of their quality.  The exception is Jurassic Park, with its technological challenge keeping his interest.  You can see this not only in the continuity errors and plot holes, but also the laziness and infantilization of the characterizations (is Raiders the last Spielberg action film to not have a child protagonist, if you don't count River Phoenix and the Henry/Indy dynamic in Last Crusade?)

Continuity errors are part of the game, especially with big movies like that. Continuity errors do not equal sloppiness. The mark of good direction is that you don't notice those errors because the film itself is keeping your interest and the errors are well hidden by editing and such. Obviously if you've seen the movie tons of times you start picking up on things, but that doesn't mean much. There are also a lot of errors involving things switching sides, but more often than not these are deliberate choices in the sense that the shot was flipped in editing. Film is like one big magic trick, and part of that is hiding all the little things that could give away the illusion. You look hard enough and you'll start to see them, but otherwise if the direction is good the magic just works.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on September 17, 2010, 03:37:48 PM
I've never noticed any such things in Jaws or Raiders.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on September 17, 2010, 03:58:39 PM
I've never noticed any such things in Jaws or Raiders.

Oh boy. Jaws and Raiders have TONS of errors.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on September 17, 2010, 04:40:40 PM
Uh (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073195/goofs) Oh (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082971/goofs)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on September 17, 2010, 04:56:00 PM
I've never noticed any such things in Jaws or Raiders.

Oh boy. Jaws and Raiders have TONS of errors.

That's possible.  There's a lot on the imdb pages.  But not as many as in Last Crusade, and more importantly: I never noticed them.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 17, 2010, 07:01:16 PM
I think part of what makes a good entertainment for us is if we are able to not see the errors, not if there aren't any.  I agree that a good director who is involved in a project will try to reduce such errors to a minimum.  But it shows a good director that even when a project is "throw away" (which I think you make a case for Spielberg), that it is still highly entertaining and the errors become invisible or insignificant.

Now that I read the list, I DID notice a couple of the errors watching the film.  The catacombs were in Rome, not Venice and the whole thing with the burning oil was just silly.  But I was still willing to ignore these errors or see them as insignificant in light of the overall enjoyment of the film. 

Still, for a person who wasn't enjoying it as much, I can see that these errors would be glaring.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on September 17, 2010, 07:54:36 PM
An example of a similar error to the "Venice catacombs" but badly directed is in Transformers 2, when they go to see some jet at the Smithsonian in Washington, and walk out the back door and end up in the desert. It's jarring!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 21, 2010, 07:22:21 PM
Harold and Maude

(http://www.bluoz.com/blog/uploads/maude2.jpg)

A joyful movie about a boy who feels compelled to commit suicide.  It was quirky, and kept reminding me of British films like Billy Liar.  In fact, I had to check at one point to see if it was British or American. 

Technical—4/5—While the quality of camera film isn’t great (due to budget and year made, probably), certainly the special effects and the set design was marvelous.
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_SeQMOBdy_Oc/TD0kAOXJyCI/AAAAAAAAADY/1CLXy0hVzIg/s1600/harold+suicide.jpg)

Interest—4/5—It had one marvelous scene after another, but between these scenes were point that were dull and I was wondering what was going on.  I think my interest waned sometimes because throughout much of the movie they were doing all the work of interest-keeping for me.  Oh, and I have a couple more Cat Stevens songs I need to get.  I love Cat Stevens.
Tension—3/5—They had me going at the end, for a second. 
Emotional—4/5—I felt for Harold’s struggles with his controlling family.  And it got a bit misty-eyed at the end.
Characters—3/5—Harold was wonderful, once he actually opened his mouth and expressed himself.  Before that, it seemed that he was just a prop in his own suicide stunts.  Ruth Gordon was fantastic, of course.  But even so, her character was just one note played over and over again.  I would have liked to see her have regret or doubt, if only for a moment, just so I know that she’s really human. I also wish that Harold’s mother and uncle were played with a little more subtlety.

(http://www.bluoz.com/blog/uploads/maude1.jpg)

Theme—5/5—A very strong theme emphasized over and over again in all ways—Freedom.  The fact that Harold doesn’t have freedom to do what he is personally compelled to do and that Maude has all the freedom she wants, simply because she wants it, and the songs—they all hammer home the fact that freedom is the most joyful, exciting thing.  And I think that this movie defines American freedom in the late 20th century perfectly—the ability to pursue one’s joy and personal meaning without others telling us what it should be.  While this might seem stereotypical now, Harold and Maude is the perfect sermon for this hippie ideal.

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:Iiyq18Iyfvo1MM:http://brella.org/sandpebbles/Harold%20&%20Maude.jpg&t=1)

Ethics—2/5—And this very strength of the film is what I had the most difficulty with.  Maude, the great example of free-living, is also the most self-centered of characters.  She steals from others without thought of their need.  When I saw her steal a car, I was thinking, “How is that guy going to get to work tomorrow?”, even assuming that his car was to be found again and that he wouldn’t have to buy another one.  The scene with the officer was funny, really funny, but her stealing his motorcycle was insane.  And the end, I think, shows her selfishness and callousness about Harold clearly.  I think it worked to move Harold out of his malaise into a different pattern, but is the new pattern really any better than the first?
Personal—2/5—No real connection here. 

(http://www.jagweb.com/jaguarmodelclub/TVjags/HM/Jaguar%20EType%201961%20Harold%20%20Maude%202.jpg)

Overall, this was a fun film, and there is much to like but wouldn’t be one of my top favorites.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. District 9
12. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
13. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
14. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
15. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
16. The Son (2003)
17. Raising Arizona
18. Do The Right Thing
19. Adaptation
20. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
21. Three Kings
22. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
23. The Science of Sleep
24. Fitzcaraldo
25. Harold and Maude
26. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 22, 2010, 01:18:28 AM
Dog Day Afternoon
(http://www.annyas.com/screenshots/images/1975/dog-day-afternoon-title-still.jpg)


A typical day at a typical bank and everyone’s just about ready to close up.  Then the bank robbers show up.  What a bummer.  Talk about overtime. 
I haven’t watched this film since the 80’s, but the situation, the characters, even the end were all crystal clear for me.  It made a remarkable impression on me then and it remains a fantastic film even now.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:k2zVKtaCtcckAM:http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/bramafear/Mcce/Dog-Day-Afternoon-np06.jpg&t=1)

Technical—5/5—I really felt that I was there.  I remember when I watched this back in the 80’s, I sought out information about the real bank robbery because it just seemed so real.  The settings, the acting, the writing.  Not perfect, but excellent.
Interest—5/5—Again, the settings, the writing, the acting, the situation.  Just fantastic.
Tension—4/5—A really intense situation, and Sonny is without fear when in front of the crowds.  As intense as Die Hard at moments and with the humor to balance it.

(http://thisdistractedglobe.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/dog-day-afternoon-1975-pic-4.jpg)

Emotional—3/5—Not a really emotional movie, but I really felt for Sal. 
Characters—5/5—There is not an unbelievable character in this whole film.  The final third of the film, before the limo arrives, is all about Sonny’s character background and not only is this an interesting placement, but an excellent communication of it.  But the actors are truly marvelous.  Every character, even the minor ones are perfectly played and written.  Not only believable, but fascinating in this context.  Fantastic.  Also, Al Pacino’s best performance that I’ve seen.

(http://www.rowthree.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/dogdayafternoon1.jpg)

Theme—3/5-- I don’t know if there is really a theme, but there is certainly a sense of “what if” in this movie.  What if you were in the bank when these robbers came?  What would you do in Sonny’s position?  Which style of philosophy of police negotiation would you take in this situation?  So many things to think about.
Ethics—4/5—Okay, bank robbing is bad.  I don’t think the movie needs to emphasize that.  And I don’t think anyone thinks that things turned out well for Sonny or Sal.  But the ethical questions and situation is excellent.  How does one react in a hostage situation?  The bank manager was great.  And the police were both clever and humane.  The question is, is there an ethical way for the one who takes hostages to act.  And this one of the amusing aspects of the film.  As opposed to a film like Die Hard where those who take hostages are assumed to be bad through and through, here the criminals are constantly being told how to act ethically.  They have a role and they are required to act ethically within that role.  And Sonny does, consistently.  He is smart, and deals with each unique situation excellently, but he is also concerned about the well-being of the hostages.  I love this!

(http://www.cosmoloan.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/dog-day-afternoon.jpg)

Personal—2/5-- Never been in a bank robbery.  But I’ve never had more fun in being in a bank robbery.

I really enjoyed this again.  It’s going to get pretty high marks from me. At least worth the second half of my top 100, if not higher.
1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. Dog Day Afternoon
12. District 9
13. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
14. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
15. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
16. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
17. The Son (2003)
18. Raising Arizona
19. Do The Right Thing
20. Adaptation
21. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
22. Three Kings
23. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
24. The Science of Sleep
25. Fitzcaraldo
26. Harold and Maude
27. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on September 22, 2010, 02:36:56 PM
Sorry Steve, I liked DDA a bit, but I found massive chunks of it to be really boring.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 22, 2010, 07:11:40 PM
Sorry Steve, I liked DDA a bit, but I found massive chunks of it to be really boring.

To each their own.  (http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs47/f/2009/222/b/2/My_first_Emoticon___Shrug_by_mrballoonatic.gif)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on September 22, 2010, 07:17:22 PM
There aren't even any dogs in the film.  >:(
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 22, 2010, 07:28:39 PM
There aren't even any dogs in the film.  >:(

Mercy was really disappointed to find that out, as well.

EDIT: Turns out she thought I was talking about The Shaggy Dog
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 23, 2010, 01:14:54 AM
Scarecrow
(http://youoffendmeyouoffendmyfamily.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/scarecrow.jpg)

It was fascinating watching this the same day as Dog Day Afternoon.  The 70s Pacino is simply stunning.  He puts his all in every role, and each character is completely believable and amazing.  He’s still okay, but never amazing like these early years.  A genius.

Technical—4/5—Good.  Nothing to complain about, but nothing amazing, either. 
Interest—4/5—It was really all about the people.  Either you found the characters interesting or not.  I pretty much did.

(http://img.youtube.com/vi/mWpyll8GVGg/0.jpg)

Tension—4/5—I haven’t been so tense about a Gene Hackman character since Unforgiven.  I had no idea what he would do next.  That’s wonderful.
Emotional—3/5—No strong feelings really until the end.  I felt wronged by the last quarter of the film.  But this wasn’t bad.  Just wrong.
Characters—5/5—Excellent.  Every actor was fantastic, including the smaller roles.  This is a group of real people and everything said and done was spot on.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:pJz9imRip1ybKM:http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff141/shimmygirl_ca/scarecrow1.jpg&t=1)

Theme—5/5—This is all about two ways of responding to people—aggressive or people-pleasing.  And it explores both the positives and negatives of both kinds of personalities. 
Ethics—5/5—This isn’t preachy and it doesn’t land on one kind of reaction.  For this reason, it is a brilliant exploration of how to respond to people and how we can do that. 
Personal—2/5—It didn’t really give me much to explore personally.

This film is a “true” film, and wonderful for that.  But it just didn’t touch me deeply.  I will always recommend it, but it won’t make my top 100.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. Dog Day Afternoon
12. District 9
13. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
14. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
15. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
16. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
17. The Son (2003)
18. Raising Arizona
19. Do The Right Thing
20. Adaptation
21. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
22. Three Kings
23. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
24. The Science of Sleep
25. Scarecrow
26. Fitzcaraldo
27. Harold and Maude
28. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 25, 2010, 01:06:30 AM
Brick

(http://assets.flicks.co.nz/images/movies/large/00/00ec53c4682d36f5c4359f4ae7bd7ba1.jpg)

Dang, but I love Ryan Johnson.  Not like, personally.  I’ve heard interviews with him, and he’s nice, but…. Okay, that’s not the point.   He’s only made two films and I adore them both.  They are smart and just get better each time I watch them. 

The concept of a noir in a modern high school is excellent.  But if that were all it was, I wouldn’t be that impressed.  It’s the combination of smart writing and fun acting that I love about Brick.  Not all the acting is method or even believable.  But it works for the film, and is always entertaining or engaging.  That’s good enough.

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:aOuK6Or3YyNq1M:http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v24/Green13/images%20for%20blog/Brick.png&t=1)

And even if I didn’t love the movie as a whole, the scenes where Brenden “convinces” Tug to take him to the Pin and all that part in the Pin’s house is so funny and clever and intense… I would want the film just for that part.


Technical--  5/5—Excellent.  Not only is the script smart, but so is the camera work.  Great stuff for a low budget.

(http://us.movies1.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/focus_features/brick/joseph_gordon_levitt/brick.jpg)

Interest—5/5—Didn’t turn away from it for a second.  Sure, some parts might have been dull, if I weren’t so intent on the plot.  But I was.  So they weren’t. 
Tension—4/5—Brenden gets himself pretty abused in proper noir fashion.  It’s pretty painful to watch sometimes.
Emotional—3/5—This was more an intellectual delight for me than an emotional one. 
Characters—4/5—I loved all the characters.  The only reason I give them a point down is because they aren’t really believable.  But they are entertaining and fascinating.

(http://www.celebritywonder.com/wp/Matt_O%27Leary_in_Brick_Wallpaper_2_1024.jpg)

Theme—4/5—It’s really about love and who really loves who.  These issues are confusing in high school anyway, but in Brick the confusion is layered with deception and hidden dealings. 
Ethics—3/5—Noir isn’t supposed to be ethical.  That’s part of it’s draw—it’s a dark world and people need to do dark things to get at the truth.  What is rarely asked though is, Is the truth worth the dark dealings?  Is justice worth what it does to one’s soul?  Brick hints at these questions, but never fully asks them.  I think it would have been a better film if it explored them more.
Personal—3/5—In high school I wanted to be someone like Brenden.  Smart, faced with a puzzle no one wants to solve, and emotionless in his pursuit of truth.  Of course, I didn’t get the opportunity to solve a murder like him.  Still, there’s a little bit of a connect.

(http://www.cclapcenter.com/archives/brick04.jpg)

I really enjoyed my time with this film and I’m glad to have it on my list.  I think it will make my top 100—I hope it does—but it has some stiff competition.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. Dog Day Afternoon
12. Brick
13. District 9
14. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
15. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
16. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
17. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
18. The Son (2003)
19. Raising Arizona
20. Do The Right Thing
21. Adaptation
22. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
23. Three Kings
24. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
25. The Science of Sleep
26. Scarecrow
27. Fitzcaraldo
28. Harold and Maude
29. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on September 25, 2010, 01:11:17 AM
Very cool. I find myself liking Brick (and Rian Johnson) more and more.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 25, 2010, 10:20:49 PM
Repulsion

(http://www.cinemademerde.com/Repulsion-cower.jpg)

I really didn’t know what to expect of this film.  I figured it would be a psychological drama.  But I certainly didn’t get anything I could have expected.  It is really more of a Hitchcockian thriller.  It shocked me many times.  And, honestly, I haven’t yet seen Rosemary’s Baby and now I’m a little nervous about seeing it.  Not because it won’t be good, but because I think it might really scare me.

Technical—3/5—On the greatness of the film, this seems an earlier, weaker work by Polanski.  The music was overstated, the acting was occasionally off and the camera work was, for the most part, uninspired.  However, certain scenes, especially in the final third of the movie was excellent.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_29WlDIl0Qbo/Sm2qc7iemoI/AAAAAAAAATQ/9EGr4LfbuXY/s400/R02.jpg)

Interest—3/5—The first half was pretty dull.  Honestly, I would have turned it off were it not for my compulsion to finish films on my marathons.  But in the second half  I was literally on the edge of my seat.
Tension—5/5—The second half was as intense as any horror film I’ve seen.
Emotional—3/5—I’m conflicted.  She’s clearly mentally ill and I have some sympathy for that, but the movie didn’t connect me with her.  I understood intellectually why she was doing this, but I didn’t feel it.
Characters—4/5—This was primarily a character study.  And for that character, it was well done.  But the supporting roles I felt were weak.  I just didn’t see them as real people—except for her sister.

(http://www.retrosellers.com/images/hf1111.jpg)

Theme—5/5—The theme of an imbalanced life is clear.  The case focused on her disgust of sex, but I think it was stronger than that.  Her repulsion was of the male sex almost altogether.  She could tolerate them from a distance, but even that was difficult.  This is what happens when a large portion—any portion—of humanity is seen as a personal insult.
Ethics—3/5—It certainly deals with ethical themes, but doesn’t explore them.  It is as if the ethical side of this isn’t important.  As if the man who busted in her door was reacting perfectly naturally.  Except for the landlord, I don’t feel like anyone was really seen as acting unethically.  But the fact is, they almost all were, except perhaps her sister.
Personal—2/5—Didn’t touch me there.

(http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/os8.jpg)

This is a film which makes me want to run out and see more Polanski.  But it won’t be one of my personal favorites. I am placing it low, not because I disliked it, but because there are so many that I like above it.   In this, what Pix said is correct-- It is difficult to appreciate a movie if you are looking for something to go on your top 100.  This is a good movie that I really appreciated.  It just isn't top 100 material for me.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. Dog Day Afternoon
12. Brick
13. District 9
14. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
15. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
16. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
17. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
18. The Son (2003)
19. Raising Arizona
20. Do The Right Thing
21. Adaptation
22. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
23. Three Kings
24. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
25. The Science of Sleep
26. Scarecrow
27. Fitzcaraldo
28. Harold and Maude
29. Repulsion
30. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on September 26, 2010, 03:36:24 AM
Completely agree. I watched this a couple of months ago and it has stayed with me and not faded in intensity. It feels like a matched set with Psycho and Peeping Tom like a very sixties genre where sexual repression unravels but not into 'free love' but into aberrant behaviour perhaps like a moral warning. When you get to the full on horror genre of Halloween etc the pretty young things are always punished for their loose morals. The more intellectual seeds are in these films.
I think the film succeeds in conveying a disgust in physical attraction; the opposite to the normal reaction on film and in life. It obviously isn't comfortable to watch as a result. The success is in showing you almost alien, inhuman emotions, which is why it plays as a horror film.
Rosemary's Baby has some very interesting things to say about religion and religious belief which you might find interesting. But it isn't Repulsion in any way. I'm not sure you can tell its the same director even! Just like trying to connect Repulsion with Chinatown is difficult. RB is full of great characters even if some of them are doing evil things!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 27, 2010, 02:10:44 AM
I’m Not There

(http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/05/magazine/07haynes600.1.jpg)

The master of hyperbole strike again.  This is the most imaginative, most conflicting and most thought provoking biopic ever made.  It is brilliantly conceived, excellently crafted and amazingly acted.  If Bob Dylan were a filmmaker, I could see him making this film.  Oh yeah, I liked it, too.

Technical—5/5—Really well made.  Perhaps it was occasionally unnecessarily confusing, but I like films that make me work for it.   Todd Haynes is a master at both writing and filmmaking.

(http://www.reelingreviews.com/imnottherepic2.jpg)

Interest—5/5—I was trapped by making connections between the snapshots and trying to put it all together.  It was only when I realized that it was pointless to try to make a coherent “life” from this film—there were too many fictional elements—that I better had an idea of what it was trying to accomplish.  And then it really became interesting.
Tension—4/5—There was a lot of tense moments in this film, but it rarely followed through on the tense moments.  Just one snapshot after another.
Emotional—4/5—Because of the scattershot approach, there was little to become emotional about.  Dylan, like most celebrities, doesn’t stir pity.  Those who have the power doesn’t stir pity as much as anger when we see the careless oppression they visit upon others.
Characters—5/5—Every actor was great.  Heaps of praise is lavished on the six actors who played Dylan, and all of them deserve the praise.  But not enough notice is given to Charlotte Gainsbourg, who played his wife, Claire.  She was excellent as well.  The Dylan actors, in a sense, had an easier time of it, for they only had to play one aspect each of Dylan’s character, although that was complex.  She was a fully realized person, really the only one in the film.  It was all done well.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Y9PUoSNVo7E/Ry9Buf0tlGI/AAAAAAAAAEc/g9NQzuf22sE/s400/cgainsbourg2rs1.jpg)

Theme—5/5—Who are you when all you are is a series of masks?  This aspect was brilliant, because although all the aspects of Dylan are often conflicted, yet it all worked together to this theme.  To me, it really all came together in the Riddle sequence.  Everyone there wears masks and Billy the Kid is hidden for years.  But he has to come out of hiding when his town is threatened.  But who is he really?  He doesn’t know, he just moves on to the next stage. 

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_pabYYe08NRg/SmxMa6lvvRI/AAAAAAAAAOE/YiwtQh6NViA/s400/costumes+in+riddle.bmp)

Ethics—5/5—Okay, I don’t know how ethical this is, but it certainly relates philosophically to the nature of personality.  Is it unified, as we all like to claim, or is our personality simply a conglomeration of a variety of drives, emotions, responses and reasonings?  Can we ever truly say who we are?  And if we can’t, then what are we responsible for?  I don’t think there are any good answers to these questions, but they are good to explore.
Personal—4/5—Like Dylan, I need to ask who I am, and I need to realize that I may not come up with a reasonable answer.  Perhaps I could give a better answer to Mr. Jones than Quinn did, but is that simply because I am a better hypocrite, or perhaps better at self-deception? 

(http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/85.jpg)
I'm pretty sure this image is a rip-off of 8 1/2, but that's all good, since the issue of identity and art is dealt with in that film as well.

I am floored. Although not emotional, it is an intellectually powerful film.  I can see watching this again and again.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. I’m Not There
12. Dog Day Afternoon
13. Brick
14. District 9
15. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
16. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
17. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
18. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
19. The Son (2003)
20. Raising Arizona
21. Do The Right Thing
22. Adaptation
23. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
24. Three Kings
25. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
26. The Science of Sleep
27. Scarecrow
28. Fitzcaraldo
29. Harold and Maude
30. Repulsion
31. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on September 27, 2010, 02:43:04 AM
Yeah, 8 1/2 and Godard's Masculin feminin are two of the main visual influences on the film.

I'm glad you liked it, it's such a great movie.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on September 27, 2010, 10:54:31 AM
Repulsion will probably make my top 100 next year.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on September 27, 2010, 12:59:20 PM
Repulsion will probably make my top 100 next year.

Same here its second only to Rosemary when it comes to the Polanski filmography.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on September 27, 2010, 01:40:51 PM
Go Rebel. Go Poet. Go Dylan.

If you are like FLY you will think about this film favorably for months, then watch it again and realize it is perfect. Then watch it again and realize it is more than perfect. Then keep watching it, keep loving it, and realize that if it was not for a very slim number of other films you may have just viewed the greatest cinematic accomplishment of all time. Surely one of the masterworks of visual and film narrative. And then you will look back, as FLY has, and realize that we can keep hoping, but there is perhaps no year more perfect for film than 2007.

You just want me to say what you want me to say.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on September 27, 2010, 07:05:17 PM
I stole a former colleagues DVD of I'm Not There after she let me borrow it and said she hadn't liked it. Glad you did, Steve. You get to avoid my thievery for now.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on September 27, 2010, 10:40:00 PM
Repulsion will probably make my top 100 next year.

Same here its second only to Rosemary when it comes to the Polanski filmography.

Is Chinatown third?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on September 27, 2010, 10:46:42 PM
Repulsion will probably make my top 100 next year.

Same here its second only to Rosemary when it comes to the Polanski filmography.

Is Chinatown third?

Yep, sorry, I am just a sucker for moody horror films staring really hot girls.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on September 27, 2010, 10:55:17 PM
Repulsion will probably make my top 100 next year.

Same here its second only to Rosemary when it comes to the Polanski filmography.

Is Chinatown third?

Yep, sorry, I am just a sucker for moody horror films staring really hot girls.

Hmmm... I should see Rosemary's Baby at some point.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on September 28, 2010, 12:11:25 AM
You should also see The Tenant and complete the "apartment trilogy".  IMO, Rosemary's Baby is the weakest of the three.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 28, 2010, 01:08:39 AM
Schizopolis

(http://cinecatastrophe.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/ccblog-schizopolis.png)

The film that this most reminds me of is Monty Python and The Holy Grail.  Both films were low budget, both had a slight and barely coherent plot and both had the same approach—throw out all of the rules if doing so helps make comedy.  While I don’t think this one succeeded as well as MPatHG, (Soderbergh, for all of his brilliance, just doesn’t have the experience of the British troop for making comedy), I still think it succeeds.  I giggle just thinking of some of the sequences.  Husband: General greeting!  Wife: Statement concerning evening meal  Husband: Hyperbolic statement of anticipation!  And so on.  It was silly, and it was funny.

Technical: 3/5—This had to the most low budget of all of Steven Soderbergh films.  The editing was choppy, the camera work was less than stellar, the acting was perfectly awful at times.  But, like Python, even the poor technical work works.  The weaknesses add to the comedy, as if the lack of finances were part of the planning.  

(http://iamastandupcomedian.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/photo.jpg)

Interest—5/5—A general mood of, “What in the hell is he going to do next?” overcame me.  Even though I’d seen it before.  I loved the silly humor throughout the film.  BTW, the director’s audio commentary is almost as entertaining as the film.
Tension—3/5—Curiosity, perhaps, but not really intense.
Emotional—2/5—Not emotional.  Unless LOL is an emotion.
Characters—3/5—Pretty weak.  Soderbergh is an awful actor.  His supporting actors aren’t really great either.  I can’t help but think that it would have been so much better with better actors.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:jlWfEtOe8ggx0M:http://imgkk.com/i/GO6yn5.jpg&t=1)

Theme—4/5—I’m pretty sure the theme was about communication, like one of the characters yells near the end of the film.  Or it just may have been Soderbergh having fun with his friends.  Hard to say.
Ethics—3/5—It’s not really about ethics, as much as the experiment.  But it does bring up questions about stress and sexuality and about communication between the sexes.  
Personal—2/5—Nope.  Never been a dentist or a speech writer for a hack.
(http://images2.cinema.de/imedia/1158/2091158,dCOQ4u8FeJvC5GAvWcZHfjyvTbuPDZQzpwiSPIKb_jV3eIxhH3EBQ3+2fXMdEs_ST2LVZpek6D6430n5Iyqoag==.jpg)

It is mostly experiment without much in the way of characters.  But it’s an entertaining experiment.  
1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. I’m Not There
12. Dog Day Afternoon
13. Brick
14. District 9
15. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
16. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
17. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
18. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
19. The Son (2003)
20. Raising Arizona
21. Do The Right Thing
22. Adaptation
23. Schizopolis
24. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
25. Three Kings
26. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
27. The Science of Sleep
28. Scarecrow
29. Fitzcaraldo
30. Harold and Maude
31. Repulsion
32. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on September 28, 2010, 03:10:19 AM
Hated it! (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=2536.msg228648#msg228648)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on September 28, 2010, 06:50:24 AM
Repulsion will probably make my top 100 next year.

Same here its second only to Rosemary when it comes to the Polanski filmography.

You clowns should have committed to it this year!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 28, 2010, 10:14:46 AM
Hated it! (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=2536.msg228648#msg228648)

I'll let you not like it.  In looking over different internet reviews, I noted that people either loved it or hated it.  I really liked it, but found it could use a bit more polish. 

As tiny would say:

Comedy is subjective
Comedy is subjective
Comedy is subjective
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on September 28, 2010, 11:26:41 AM
You should also see The Tenant and complete the "apartment trilogy".  IMO, Rosemary's Baby is the weakest of the three.

Yes I heard Barton Fink was somewhat inspired by The Tenant so I'm quite interested.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on September 28, 2010, 02:26:04 PM
You should also see The Tenant and complete the "apartment trilogy".  IMO, Rosemary's Baby is the weakest of the three.

Yes I heard Barton Fink was somewhat inspired by The Tenant so I'm quite interested.

I didn't like the Tenant, it definitely the weak link in the trilogy and there is some pretty ridiculous stuff towards the end.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on September 28, 2010, 06:18:31 PM
As tiny would say:

Comedy is subjective
Comedy is subjective
Comedy is subjective

I hadn't even heard of Schizopolis until about 2 minutes ago, but I love that that chant has become a tagline. I'm pretty sure I stole it from Maria Bamford, like most of the things I say.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 29, 2010, 12:22:51 AM
Tiny: I think, in general, movies are subjective as is art.  But comedy even more so.  How else can a single film be so loved and so hated by people who otherwise might agree?

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 29, 2010, 12:36:19 AM
*ucking Amal/Show Me Love

(http://amal.host.sk/script/faset2-01.jpg)

This is a lesbian coming of age story.  And this is a True film.  The people are real, the situations are real and the experiences are real.  No, this particular situation has never exactly happened, probably.  But situations like this happen in almost every town.  Girls like Elin really exists, as do, certainly, girls like Agnus.  And it is touching and heartfelt.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:3pLJP5b30dRRjM:http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c98/kmblog/200608/20060818zf.jpg&t=1)

Technical—3/5—It’s not much to look at, really.  The direction or editing isn’t really inspired.  Nor is the writing.  It’s adequate.
Interest—4/5—The ups and downs of this small scale soap opera is, for the most part, captivating to watch.
Tension—4/5—I know how it’s going to end, but I often wonder how it could possibly end that way.  A lot of romance but very little comedy.
Emotional—4/5— It is often painful to watch because of the conflict and the difficulties involved.  But it is so true.  Teens often say or do, on the surface, spiteful things, because of a social context or a personal conflict.  What I love about this film is that it allows us to see the full context, which none of the characters see.  We know why a character did something spiteful, even when they had no spite in their heart.  Really well done that way.
(http://www.cyfraplus.pl/ms_galeria/galeria/1060_1.jpg)

Characters—5/5—Every character is true.  Not just true, but right around the corner.  I would swear that Elin actually lived in our house for a while (and, yes, she was difficult to live with). 
Theme—4/5—How does an outcast find love?  When everyone thinks you’re weird, how do you find someone who will get close enough to love you back?
Ethics—4/5—Not really an exploration of ethics, but of emotions.  But I liked the different ways Elin tried to escape her true feelings, and how these escapes were far more harmful to others than just accepting the fact of her sexuality. 
Personal—4/5—Like I said, I knew a girl who acted and had attitudes just like Elin.  And I could appreciate the difficult place those who are outcast find themselves in.    But I’ve never been a lesbian, so I suppose there’s a bit of a disconnect there.  Actually, I’ve never been a teenage girl.  In case you were wondering.

(http://i4.ytimg.com/vi/Hmvy8zexhUc/0.jpg)

This is an good film about a segment of people that aren’t talked about much.  Not gays, but specifically lesbians.  In film, lesbians are always treated as some male sexual fantasy.  It was good to see them treated as real people for a change.  However, this probably won’t make my personal top 100, although I highly recommend it.

1. In America
2. Rear Window
3. Amelie
4. Edward Scissorhands
5. Princess Mononoke
6. The Dark Knight
7. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
8. Tideland
9. The Brothers Bloom
10.  I [Heart] Huckabees
11. I’m Not There
12. Dog Day Afternoon
13. Brick
14. District 9
15. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
16. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
17. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
18. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
19. The Son (2003)
20. Raising Arizona
21. Do The Right Thing
22. Adaptation
23. Scizopolis
24. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
25. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
26. Three Kings
27. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
28. The Science of Sleep
29. Scarecrow
30. Fitzcaraldo
31. Harold and Maude
32. Repulsion
33. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 29, 2010, 12:46:33 AM
Obviously given my rankings, that is my clear #1 of the films you've watched in the marathon. It captures all that pain and angst and pressure of teenage life and the constant thought that if only I was someone else, somewhere else, my life wouldn't suck so much. Of course I still kind of feel like that, probably because I assume my life would be better if I was a Swedish teenage lesbian. At least I'd have health insurance.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on September 29, 2010, 12:55:01 AM
Actually, this is one of those films that I wonder if I could have appreciated it more if I had seen it as a teen, or just after that, when all those feelings were fresh in my mind.  I remember them, which is why I can recognize this as a true story, but I am so far removed from them that I wonder if that's why I place it lower than others do.   ???
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on September 29, 2010, 01:12:28 AM
Fair point, I saw it a number of years ago and was at best just a couple years removed from being a teen.

P.S. I was just thinking that it probably makes a great double feature with Let The Right One In. Both Swedish, both coming of age stories, one very real while the other surreal.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 01, 2010, 01:38:02 AM
Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind

(http://chud.com/nextraimages/nausicaa%20(3).jpg)

Nausicaa is one of my top five heroes of all time, along with Francis of Assisi and Father Gabriel of The Mission.  I tend to gush about this film, but I’ll try to keep myself under control.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_EXgDI8DeN_E/TELFQMnuI2I/AAAAAAAAGEc/50rMoV-old0/s1600/Image5.jpg)

Technical—3/5—This is clearly an early effort by Miyazaki, and it shows.  Although I think the washed-out color is on purpose, the poor sound quality and the funky 80s synth music wasn’t.  Nevertheless, the landscapes were phenomenal and the perspective was sometimes stunning.
Interest—5/5—The plot moves quickly from major event to another.  And Nausicaa is marvelous in every scene.

(http://www.yale.edu/anime/imgarchive/nausicaa/nausicaa.gif)

Tension—5/5—As Miyazaki loves to do, everyone, even the “bad guys”, have good reasons for what they do.  It all makes sense.  And because of this, the conflict is phenomenally intense.  Who do we really want to win?  We know, but inside we are conflicted.  And how many times can Nausicaa be captured and still escape?
Emotional—5/5—My tear ducts were full throughout the last twenty minutes of this film.  As they were every other time I saw it. 

(http://chud.com/nextraimages/nausicaa%20(7).jpg)

Characters—5/5—I love every character in this film.  They are all perfectly realized.  However, I will control myself no longer.  I must gush about my favorite character in cinema: Nausicaa.  She is more of a hero than anyone else.  She seeks knowledge for the sake of others and so finds the way to save the world.  She uses violence when necessary (or completely enraged), but she regrets and avoids ever harming another, whether human or animal.  To deal with conflict, she is neither passive nor controlling, rather she sees to the true nature of the other—again, whether human or animal—and finds a way to meet their need, even at her own expense.  She realizes that the fox squirrel is scared to death, so she allows the little creature to bite her finger to let him know that she will not harm him, no matter what.  This eases his fear and she makes a friend who will stick by her through thick and thin.  And she does this with everyone.  She identifies the fear of the princess of the tribe attacking her people, and tells her that she has nothing to fear and so can release control.  Nausicaa is so wise, so humble, so endearing.  I might be a little in love with her.  ;)  I hope my wife isn’t jealous.

(http://kidfenris.com/nausicaalarge1.jpg)

Theme—5/5Certainly Miyazaki is speaking to his common theme—humans and nature living together in peace.  But he also speaks to the releasing of fear, and allowing nature to take its own healing course. 
Ethics—5/5—Ethically, this movie is a miracle.  I have often wondered why our entertainments have to promote evil circumstances and violent people to hold our interests.  It used to be stories of the saints and miracle workers that held sway in storytelling.  Well, here is the story of a saint.  In a post-apocalyptic world and flying ships abound as well as giant insects.  But still, saints are hard to come by.

(http://www.genjipress.com/img/dvd/2005/B0001XAPZ6-090.jpg)

Personal—5/5 More than falling in love with Nausicaa, I actually want to be like her.  I want to deal with conflict like she does.  I want to see into people’s nature like she does.  I want to change the world like she does—through insight and love.  Maybe, if I grow as a person, I will.

(http://www.genjipress.com/img/dvd/2005/B0001XAPZ6-012.jpg)

Perhaps people have been waiting for this, but In America finally loses it’s top ranking.  It will still remain very high, but Nausicaa has taken its place.  This may seem surprising because of the (at best) mediocre marks for technical aspects.  But top marks on interest, character and personal connection help me overlook all of the weaknesses.

(http://ayudaparatublog.com/animeblog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/nausicaa/nausicaa_09.jpg)

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. Edward Scissorhands
6. Princess Mononoke
7. The Dark Knight
8. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
9. Tideland
10. The Brothers Bloom
11. I [Heart] Huckabees
12. I’m Not There
13. Dog Day Afternoon
14. Brick
15. District 9
16. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
17. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
18. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
19. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
20. The Son (2003)
21. Raising Arizona
22. Do The Right Thing
23. Adaptation
24. Scizopolis
25. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
26. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
27. Three Kings
28. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
29. The Science of Sleep
30. Scarecrow
31. Fitzcaraldo
32. Harold and Maude
33. Repulsion
34. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on October 01, 2010, 02:03:30 AM
My favorite Miyazaki, my favorite animated film, and in the upper half of my all time top 100.  This movie is a miracle, how something so kind, well made, and fun can be created is simply amazing.  I love it for all the reasons you do, and agree with you on all but one point:  I like the 80's music, it somehow strangely fits the apocalyptic setting, its not good but it grows on you and kinda fits the movie in a weird way.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on October 01, 2010, 02:19:48 AM
My favorite Miyazaki, my favorite animated film, and in the upper half of my top-ten of all time top 100.

I applaud this praise. Still not sure what happened to this film in the animation balloting.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on October 01, 2010, 06:49:02 AM
So good :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on October 01, 2010, 10:38:19 AM
 ;D

That is all.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on October 01, 2010, 10:17:36 PM
I loved reading this review. I love the movie to death. I even disagree with your technical rating, I find that even if the animation is a bit simplistic at times the art direction is amazing and very well executed. And I will defend the music to the grave. It's great.

But those are small points to hound you on, I totally agree with the rest of your review. Your dissection of the character of Nausicaa is especially great.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 02, 2010, 11:55:32 AM
Thank you all for the positive responses.

The technical rating is partly because of the early scenes in the movie which seems pretty amateurish, and also because they are explaining to the audience what the world is about, which of course, they wouldn't be doing if they were actually in that world.  The animation seems to take a little bit to hit it's stride.  But by the time we are 20 minutes in the movie, all of that is pretty well forgotten.

Except the music.  I hate the music throughout.  It so draws me out of the film.  And I was a teen in the 80's so you'd think I'd be great with it.  Not at all.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 02, 2010, 08:53:44 PM
Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
(http://xbox360media.ign.com/xbox360/image/article/989/989191/cloudy-with-a-chance-of-meatballs-20090601072025898_640w.jpg)

Originally, CWACOM wasn’t going to make this marathon.  But Mercy and I were talking about what movie to watch and we both agreed that this was the best for today.  Wow, how I love this film.  It is just so fun.

Technical—5/5—Nothing jaw-dropping, but still marvelous animation, visually interesting and great voice acting.  
Interest—5/5—Every moment is filled with humor, most of it laugh-out-loud.  

(http://xbox360media.ign.com/xbox360/image/article/989/989191/cloudy-with-a-chance-of-meatballs-20090601072025898_640w.jpg)

Tension—3/5—Not really.  But it was fun.
Emotional—3/5—It’s not emotional.  Just fun.
Characters—4/5—The characters are well plotted and well acted.  Generally shallow, but fun.
Theme—4/5—No deep themes, here.  You got the father/son thing.  You got the listen to the woman thing.  You got the slow down and take precautions thing.  But mostly, it’s just about the fun.
(http://www.zap2it.com/media/photo/2009-09/49258708.jpg)
STEVE!!

Ethics—4/5—Actually, there’s an ethical message about old traditions and new traditions and balancing them.  But really, it’s about the fun.
Personal—3/5—I suppose I can understand the lack of communication with a father.  But, really, its all about the fun.

(http://www.coronacomingattractions.com/sites/default/files/movie_gallery/cloudy_with_a_chance_of_meatballs_002.jpg)

Look, there’s nothing deep here.  It’s not a movie for the ages.  But it is great fun.  And sometimes—heck, more than sometimes—fun is enough.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. Edward Scissorhands
6. Princess Mononoke
7. The Dark Knight
8. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
9. Tideland
10. The Brothers Bloom
11. I [Heart] Huckabees
12. I’m Not There
13. Dog Day Afternoon
14. Brick
15. District 9
16. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
17. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
18. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
19. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
20. The Son (2003)
21. Raising Arizona
22. Do The Right Thing
23. Adaptation
24. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
25. Scizopolis
26. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
27. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
28. Three Kings
29. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
30. The Science of Sleep
31. Scarecrow
32. Fitzcaraldo
33. Harold and Maude
34. Repulsion
35. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on October 02, 2010, 09:30:24 PM
STEVE!

I love your continual mentioning of this movie as "fun". 2009 was an okay year for film, but one of the best things about that year was it gave me Star Trek and Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs. Two films that are not too deep, though emotionally resonant when they need to be (Star Trek moreso). They are both filled with action and humour. And most of all, they are crazy fun from start to finish, and I love watching them whenever I get the chance.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on October 02, 2010, 10:19:48 PM
I'm a big fan of what you're doing, and I'm not writing this as an attack, but if you're going to put films like that in your Top 100 there better be about 15-20 disney films - aside from the entire Pixar catalog - coming up later.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on October 02, 2010, 10:33:21 PM
I'm a big fan of what you're doing, and I'm not writing this as an attack, but if you're going to put films like that in your Top 100 there better be about 15-20 disney films - aside from the entire Pixar catalog - coming up later.

That's not fair. This is a personal thing. Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs clearly feels a connection to the pure fun offered by many other films. And frankly, I would say Cloudy is at least a better film than two of the Pixar films.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 02, 2010, 10:35:51 PM
I'm a big fan of what you're doing, and I'm not writing this as an attack, but if you're going to put films like that in your Top 100 there better be about 15-20 disney films - aside from the entire Pixar catalog - coming up later.

It's funny, but I was thinking exactly this.

Mind you, not necessarily 15-20 Disney, but certainly more animated in general.  There are a number of animated films I love and yet they are not included in my top 100.  After watching CWACOM, I realized that I haven't given my animated list a good chance.  So I'm going to mix more of them in.  Including Disney.  Although, honestly, I'd put CWACOM above all but a handful of Disney.  But still.

EDIT: On the other hand, I never did expect CWACOM to actually make my top 100.  And it won't.  I just put it in because it would make my top 200 and it was being slammed on the "Write About The Last Movie You Watched" thread. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on October 02, 2010, 11:00:46 PM
I'm a big fan of what you're doing, and I'm not writing this as an attack, but if you're going to put films like that in your Top 100 there better be about 15-20 disney films - aside from the entire Pixar catalog - coming up later.

That's not fair. This is a personal thing.
You're right, and I was trying to find the correct way to express my surprise.  I'm currently doing a similar Top 100 Marathon which is starting with me rejecting beloved films (but not Pixote) and then will transition into defending trash I adore.  Down the road I'll be writing about why Streets of Fire is one of the greatest films ever made, a sentiment I'm sure will cause others to have a similar reaction to my finding Cloudy With a Chance here.  It is a very personal thing and I guess after reading oldkid's reasons I remain very unconvinced of why he liked it enough to include it.  There are a lot of 'fun' movies out there, and I defended his inclusion of Pirates 1 (which is higher than Cloudy), but this one I really don't understand.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on October 02, 2010, 11:15:08 PM
I don't understand half the films on your Top 100 of the Decade, 1SO. Steve is hardly the only one here who can choose a film that will make others scratch their heads. Plus, you're wrong anyway. Cloudy is pure awesome distilled into the length of one incredibly beautifully designed and animated film.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 02, 2010, 11:37:39 PM
It seems, then, 1SO, that your confusion is that I didn't seem to defend my placement of it.  I just didn't express it comparatively, is all.  The fact is, CWACOM is one of the most consistently fun movies I have seen.  I literally laughed every minute of this film, sometimes an LOL, sometimes a quiet smirk, but it really was every moment. 

I appreciate that which makes me laugh.  I deal directly with addiction, mental illness, apathy and death every day.  If a film can so wholeheartedly, so completely take me away from that, even ready to go back to it with a smile on my face, that film deserves high praise from me.  Yep, it's escapism, but for me it is utterly successful.  And I need that escape.

 The only reason Pirates gets a higher score is because they have a couple characters that I think are pretty cool and some tension.  Apart from that, my reasons for liking them both are pretty similar.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on October 02, 2010, 11:48:51 PM
In Steve's defense, I expect Steve is planning on putting all films that have monkeys named Steve in them on his list. ;D

See, when I think about the two viewings of Cloudy that I've had I totally get the constant funny jokes thing. I love all the visual bits, especially referencing his early failed inventions repeatedly in the film. But I feel like that isn't enough to make a film and the broader emotional tones and the story of the film were either uninteresting or actively repellant to me. The fun of all the successful gags had to be balanced by the anti-fun of the story.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 02, 2010, 11:50:43 PM
In Steve's defense, I expect Steve is planning on putting all films that have monkeys named Steve in them on his list. ;D

You found me out! 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on October 03, 2010, 12:13:15 AM
Steve Holt!

O wait, wrong thread again.  :P
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on October 03, 2010, 12:20:20 AM
It seems, then, 1SO, that your confusion is that I didn't seem to defend my placement of it.  I just didn't express it comparatively, is all.  The fact is, CWACOM is one of the most consistently fun movies I have seen.  I literally laughed every minute of this film, sometimes an LOL, sometimes a quiet smirk, but it really was every moment. 
That works.  Sometimes it's hard to explains what works for us.  I just watched the Chris Rock version of Death at a Funeral, and not only did I find it funnier than the original, I laughed more than during I Love You, Man.  If someone asked me to explain myself I'd be stuck for a convincing answer.

I hope you don't see me as a jerk, and I really do hope you've got some classic Disney coming up.  If you don't, I'm still going to follow along.  We'll always have In America.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on October 03, 2010, 12:23:18 AM
It seems, then, 1SO, that your confusion is that I didn't seem to defend my placement of it.  I just didn't express it comparatively, is all.  The fact is, CWACOM is one of the most consistently fun movies I have seen.  I literally laughed every minute of this film, sometimes an LOL, sometimes a quiet smirk, but it really was every moment. 
That works.  Sometimes it's hard to explains what works for us.  I just watched the Chris Rock version of Death at a Funeral, and not only did I find it funnier than the original, I laughed more than during I Love You, Man.  If someone asked me to explain myself I'd be stuck for a convincing answer.

I hope you don't see me as a jerk, and I really do hope you've got some classic Disney coming up.  If you don't, I'm still going to follow along.  We'll always have In America.

For the record, I'll see you as a jerk enough for both me and Steve.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on October 03, 2010, 07:26:33 AM
Down the road I'll be writing about why Streets of Fire is one of the greatest films ever made,

It does have one of the best butterfly knife scenes.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on October 03, 2010, 02:22:22 PM
Down the road I'll be writing about why Streets of Fire is one of the greatest films ever made,

It does have one of the best butterfly knife scenes.
That implies there's a better one out there, and there isn't.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on October 03, 2010, 03:49:21 PM
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is fun.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 03, 2010, 10:42:31 PM
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is fun.

Wow, I wish I had said that.  ;)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 03, 2010, 10:57:08 PM
The Red Shoes

(http://themoviehunters.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/the-red-shoes-1948-powell-and-pressburger.jpg)

I was going to wait a couple days to allow this film to gel before I wrote a review, but my head is too full of it.  I can’t escape it.  This is easily one of the best films I’ve ever seen.  I am completely bowled over. 

(http://gravymovie.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/the-red-shoes_1948.jpg?w=420&h=320)
Prototype for the musical, Cats

All three acts are excellent in their own ways.  The first act of two new talents—Victoria, the dancer and Julian, the composer—both given an opportunity to shine by the ballet director, Lermontov is exciting and you can feel the pride and excitement as they prove themselves worthy of greatness.  The final act, as it all crumbles and there is given a spark of hope as it might all come together again until that hope is crushed by the two men, playing tug-of-war with Vickie in between. 

(http://www.thelifecinematic.com/filmcaps/shoes.jpg)
(http://whi.s3.leg.thumbs.lg1x8.simplecdn.net/20090412012454.jpg)


But it is the shortest act, the ballet in the center that is the sparkling gem of the film.  We are told that the dancing was to be spectacular, and the music amazing.  And those aspects do not disappoint—both the music and the dancing are spectacular compared to the work in the rest of the film, which is marvelous.  But the use of film to turn the ballet into something that could not be presented on stage, with one masterful surprise after another.  Some might see it as simple camera tricks to make it more than a ballet, but in fact the cinematography and change of perspective and even the “tricks” enrich the ballet, deepen the story, and so ends up enriching the whole movie.  The way the story is told three times in the film, and yet each time is more powerful than the last.  But the ballet is still the crux, it is what holds the film together.  Ah, this is a masterwork.

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:Mb-s-X5Zh05lUM:http://www.canberratheatre.org.au/pages/event/images/The-Red-Shoe.jpg&t=1)
(http://media.cleveland.com/moviebuff_impact/photo/moira-shearer-the-red-shoesjpg-c741eb60f2835f2e_medium.jpg)
(https://www.editorsguild.com/userfiles/image/Curtain%20-%20Frame%203%2072.jpg)
(http://www.johncoulthart.com/feuilleton/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/red_shoes.jpg)
(http://galenfrysinger.org/movies/red_shoes_c.jpg)

Technical—5/5—Amazing throughout.  Every aspect of this film was top notch—the cinematography, the color, the writing, the direction, the acting.  Not a single miss.  My eyes were wide the whole time.  I almost want to give it six out of five, but that’d be cheating.

Interest—5/5—Obviously.  The music was masterful.  The story was complex enough, but intricately threaded throughout.  Most scenes were visually vibrant, but the ballet… I hated to blink.

Tension—5/5—The final act was full of tension and suspense.  The rest of it wasn’t about tension, but it didn’t need to be.

Emotional—5/5—No, I didn’t cry, but I was still taken on the emotional roller coaster: joy, awe, suspense, mourning, it was all there.

Characters—4/5—This is the only spot where I would mark it a little down.  I wish Julian’s character were a bit more developed, so we could have a little more understanding for him in the final scenes.  Boris and Vickie shone and a supporting character might have an occasional bit of shared glory.

Theme—5/5—Very tight, if difficult to put in a sentence.  Perhaps, “That which is most desired becomes a trap, yes, even a death trap.”  Marvelous development of theme here.

Ethics—5/5—There are many ethical questions that revolve here.  How should Boris and Julian have responded correctly—instead of as boars—even if they thought they knew what was right for Vickie?  Looking at the film from a feminist perspective certainly would see it differently.  Also, what is the best kind of life is best to live—one for love or for one’s innate talent?  Is there a possible balance?  There are a lot of questions, and few answers, but that makes for a marvelous ethical discussion.

Personal—4/5—No, I have never been in any of these situations before.  My love and my talent happened to go hand in hand.  And my talent is not so desired that celebrity comes into play at all.   But I have been given the experience of these young people by the film.  I was there and experienced it in a way that only the best films can convey.  I have to give it high marks for allowing me to have the experience.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_WckQavBHSmw/RmjDejdERPI/AAAAAAAAAWk/_Snt7R_IPXo/s400/TheRedShoes.jpg)

Before this film, I have never seen a Powell and Pressburger.  I expect to see more after this.

I have gushed.  And, of course, I will follow suit in my placement:

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Dog Day Afternoon
15. Brick
16. District 9
17. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
18. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
19. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
20. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
21. The Son (2003)
22. Raising Arizona
23. Do The Right Thing
24. Adaptation
25. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
26. Scizopolis
27. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
28. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
29. Three Kings
30. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
31. The Science of Sleep
32. Scarecrow
33. Fitzcaraldo
34. Harold and Maude
35. Repulsion
36. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on October 03, 2010, 11:03:52 PM
 :D
Steve, you are win.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on October 03, 2010, 11:11:47 PM
Before this film, I have never seen a Powell and Pressburger.  I expect to see more after this.

Oh, you're in for a treat.  Of the 14 Powell/Powell & Pressburger films I've seen, none of them were any less than "very good".  Not a single one.  My personal favorite is A Matter of Life and Death.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on October 03, 2010, 11:15:05 PM
You must check out Black Narcissus.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on October 03, 2010, 11:16:51 PM
You must check out Black Narcissus.

And Colonel Blimp.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 03, 2010, 11:18:45 PM
Both are on my list.  And they are at the top of my instant queue.  And I haven't listened to Adam and Matty's review of either because I am going to watch them first.  In the next few weeks, I hope.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on October 03, 2010, 11:19:21 PM
You must check out Black Narcissus.

And Colonel Blimp.

And Peeping Tom

And A Matter of Life and Death
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on October 03, 2010, 11:20:52 PM
And the oft-overlooked Contraband, which is basically P&P doing British-era Hitchcock.

And Matter of Life and Death, just in case you missed it the first two times.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on October 03, 2010, 11:22:25 PM
Quote
I hated to blink.
The perfect quote for this film, well said.


Before this film, I have never seen a Powell and Pressburger.  I expect to see more after this.

Oh, you're in for a treat.  Of the 14 Powell/Powell & Pressburger films I've seen, none of them were any less than "very good".  Not a single one.  My personal favorite is A Matter of Life and Death.

You are so right MT!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on October 03, 2010, 11:29:21 PM
Can anyone comment on Tales of Hoffmann?  It's a Powell/Pressburger filming of a ballet starring Moira Shearer.  From the youtube clips it looks like a feature length version of the cinematic ballet sequence at the heart of Red Shoes.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on October 03, 2010, 11:33:36 PM
Can anyone comment on Tales of Hoffmann?  It's a Powell/Pressburger filming of a ballet starring Moira Shearer.  From the youtube clips it looks like a feature length version of the cinematic ballet sequence at the heart of Red Shoes.

It's the P&P I struggled the most with, primarily because opera drives me up the wall.  I'll post my old mini-review:

This one is a conundrum.  I was absolutely floored by the eye candy: incredible set design, mouth-watering Technicolor, and a goodie bag full of dazzling technical tricks.  The cinematography rivals Cardiff's work on Red Shoes in terms of sheer gorgeousness.  And I enjoyed the German influence (not just the expressionism, but the story structure greatly resembles Destiny and Waxworks).  The magic fairy tale nature of the story evokes La Belle et la Bete.  Most of the stuff going on here is astonishing, and part of me desperately wants to love this film.  And yet, I can't stomach opera.  It irritates me to have people singing their dialogue, it grates on my nerves, especially with all that showy trilling and soaring.  Even more so in this case, where the libretto was extremely awkward and hard to follow.  Whether that's Offenbach's fault or just a clumsy translation, I don't know, but thank goodness for DVD subtitles... although that's hardly a comfort when you want your eyes focused on the amazing visuals.  Just not my cup of tea, I'm afraid, but I can totally appreciate how someone could become completely enamored with it.  I'd probably give it a 10 if it had been made as a silent.  Rating: 7
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on October 04, 2010, 02:38:00 AM
I'll second the good-but-not-great verdict on Hoffman, if not for quite the same reasons.  As I recall, I found the lead actor lacking, more than anything else.  Being Powell and Pressburger, it's totally worth seeing, but it's a little bit off the mark.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 14, 2010, 01:16:23 AM
50 First Dates

(http://www.reelfilm.com/images/50first.jpg)
Adam Sandler and his beautiful co-star

This is easily in the top five of romantic comedies for me.  Most of the way through this Groundhog Day meets Lars and the Real Girl I was laughing and really enjoying myself.  Lucy wakes up every morning, thinking it is the Sunday in October in which she tragically had a car accident and lost memory of every day since then.  Henry meets Lucy and is really attracted to her, but finds that a relationship with someone with this kind of disability is not only difficult, but seemingly impossible.

(http://www.grouchoreviews.com/content/films/1897/1.jpg)
"Jump, Willie, jump!"

Technical—4/5—Not bad, nothing special.  The script is clever and funny, the acting adequate and the cinematography fine. 
Interest—4.5/5—The first quarter of the film, which established the setup was really uncomfortable for me.  Sandler didn’t seem to fit the character he was playing and the whole situation seemed unbelievable.  Suddenly, when he meets Drew Barrymore, it all clicks in and it is as if the first part didn’t exist. Then it was all humor and emotion and true love and hope and failure and generally a truly human experience.   
Tension—5/5—The tension isn’t “edge of your seat” variety, but it is persistent and believable. The second half truly was tense because there really is a question of how the masquerade could be kept up.  And rather than continue with the fantasy that a woman could really live in the past, the movie allows it all to break down with no clear resolution.  Yes, the break up is typical rom-com, but the situation truly is unique and we wonder how such a relationship could possibly work.  It is resolved both with believability and creativity.
Emotional—5/5  I didn’t tear up (except at some of the more excellent jokes), but I truly felt for all the characters because their dilemmas are borne out of love and compassion.
Characters—4/5  Again, I had a lot of trouble with Sandler’s character at first, but he more than made up for it in the rest of the movie.  Barrymore was adequate, but the supporting cast (except for Ula and Doug) was excellent, subtle and really funny.

(http://shusterman.com/images/penguin.jpg)
One of the great supporting actors of 50 First Dates

Theme—5/5—True love finds a way.  Okay, so it’s a cliché.  And it doesn’t happen often.  But I believed it really could happen in this situation, and I bought it all.
Ethics—5/5—One of my favorite things I like to see in movies is a community that works together to meet a unique problem in an individual. 
Personal—4/5—While I have never met someone with this specific disability, I know many with disabilities that are equally severe.  And sometimes, although rarely, they meet and love the right person for them, making their life a joy.  It happens.  And it is a wondrous thing to see.

(http://bigkev64.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/chinamans-hat.jpg)
Which movie is this from?  Well, it's a shot of some island.  Probably Hawaiian.  It's pretty, right?  Good enough.

I love this film and it is better than most romantic comedies, even though it carries with it many of the difficulties of the genre and the stereotypes.  It has a chance of creeping back on my top 100, but I don’t know.  The competition is fierce.
1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Dog Day Afternoon
15. Brick
16. District 9
17. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
18. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
19. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
20. 50 First Dates
21. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
22. The Son (2003)
23. Raising Arizona
24. Do The Right Thing
25. Adaptation
26. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
27. Scizopolis
28. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
29. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
30. Three Kings
31. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
32. The Science of Sleep
33. Scarecrow
34. Fitzcaraldo
35. Harold and Maude
36. Repulsion
37. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on October 14, 2010, 07:31:45 AM
Haha, it's a blueprint. Great chemistry, love that little song he sings to her. Wonderful finale too.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on October 14, 2010, 07:39:00 AM
People keep telling me to watch it, but I assume it's some kind of elaborate hoax, like Miami Vice.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on October 14, 2010, 08:58:55 AM
I thought it was a nice movie but was put off by a lot of the Sandler film affectations like the brother or Rob Schneider that are so campy and generally not funny. However, the use of Wouldn't It Be Nice is pretty devastating...twas "our song" with my ex and this moviefilm came out just after we split.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 14, 2010, 09:55:48 PM
Zelig

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_4ksGK-UgfSs/Sws8tQequjI/AAAAAAAAAII/vfFcnTO9UOA/s400/aaaaaaaa.jpg)

Zelig is a man who feels he must fit in everywhere, but instead of just changing personality, he changes physical characteristics to be like those he is around.  He becomes a popular fad, but only one female psychologist believes he can be healed. 

Much like Hitchcock, I am not a huge Woody Allen fan.  Frankly, his humor is just too sarcastic and too self-focused to be truly funny over a long period of time.  Zelig is a different kind of a Woody Allen film, without the depressing dialogue, and reminding one of a kind of a Forrest Gump set in the 20’s.  Perhaps because it is set in the 20’s and so is a little removed, or perhaps because it doesn’t seem to be making fun of the handicapped, Zelig comes out way ahead of Forest Gump for me.  There is also the fact that Zelig was made years before Gump.

Technical—5/5—Simply amazing.  I understand Allen and his associates put the film through a bathtub and stepped on the film in order to give it an “old” look.   The splicing in was fantastic, and the look was incredible.  But besides all that, the script was smart.
Interest—4/5—Around the middle of the film I wondered how long it would take to finish and found there was a ways to go.  The time in the cottage was kind of long, and the documentary format just couldn’t hold my interest even for 90 minute length.  Generally, though, it was funny and the visual tricks kept me interested.  The story wasn’t that captivating until the final third, though.

(http://sogniebisogni.ilcannocchiale.it/blogs/bloggerarchimg/sogniebisogni/zelig.jpg)

Tension—2/5—Not really any tension.
Emotional—2/5—I wasn’t that engaged with any of the characters for there to be a lot of emotion.
Characters—2/5—There is a distance from the characters that occurs when they are not given any dialogue, nor even any cue cards.  We are observing them, but they aren’t real people.  They are Woody Allen and Mia Farrow and a bunch of historical figures.  But they aren’t really real.  This may work for a theme of celebrity, which I think Allen is aiming at, but it doesn’t work so well to create an engaging film.

(http://www.webomatica.com/wordpress/images/movies/zelig.jpg)

Theme—5/5—Celebrity and healing don’t mix.  I think it really calls into question the celebrity culture and how one can live a “normal” existence, when one’s every move is put on a screen or in the tabloids.  Really well done, here.
Ethics—5/5—I think it calls into question what “healed” means in psychology and whether one can truly be healthy in the public eye.  Some good ethical questions brought up.
Personal—2/5—It’s not really personal in any way.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:FwHBxvdRJYsFHM:http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f277/si86/zelig.jpg&t=1)

Zelig dazzled me as a smart film when it was released, and it still holds up as highly recommended.  However, it lacks much that I expect in a film that I consider personally great—like characters I could identify with.  Or even a sense of continuous mirth.  I still recommend it, but it certainly won’t make my top 100.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Dog Day Afternoon
15. Brick
16. District 9
17. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
18. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
19. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
20. 50 First Dates
21. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
22. The Son (2003)
23. Raising Arizona
24. Do The Right Thing
25. Adaptation
26. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
27. Scizopolis
28. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
29. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
30. Three Kings
31. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
32. The Science of Sleep
33. Scarecrow
34. Fitzcaraldo
35. Zelig
36. Harold and Maude
37. Repulsion
38. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 21, 2010, 11:08:06 PM
Close Encounters of the Third Kind

(http://organismo.art.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/close-encounters1.gif)

There was a period of time in which to love Spielberg was to reach to the lowest common denominator.  The Academy snubbed him, probably because he made so much money that everyone was jealous.  And his blockbuster films just seemed to be about spectacle—if they weren’t about the spectacle, few people bothered to see them (like 1941, although that was simply bad.  Even John Belushi couldn’t save it).  And, somehow, his money-making reputation and his low brow reputation began with this film.  Before this, his only blockbuster was Jaws, which was a character study, even though everyone went to see the shark.  After his first blockbuster, he could have done anything.  But he made another blockbuster.  Then a disappointing comedy.  And another blockbuster.  And another.  This was his second blockbuster, and it sealed his reputation as a money-grubbing hack.

(http://www.popsci.com/files/imagecache/article_image_large/articles/spielberg_illo.jpg)

And the funny thing is, Close Encounters is anything but a lowest-common-denominator hack job.  It takes a lot of chances.  First of all, it’s a movie about aliens in which you don’t see any until the very end.  Also, there’s no explosions, no fighting.  It is more about obsession and about unpopular truth than anything else.  It spends a lot of time showing what we weren’t expecting to see.  Of course, the music is legendary and the final scenes are locked into the cinematic imagination.  But that’s not where the film is best. 

Close Encounters Mothership Sequence (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coTApGbXwoI&feature=related#ws)

It is much like The Shining, where it spends a long time getting you emotionally ready for the final scene by showing real human drama, real emotion that we can appreciate and connect with.  Roy’s addition to sculpture which is tearing his family apart.  The scene where Jillian is trying to prevent Barry from being kidnapped.  The first scene where we are dropped into a confusing situation with too many people to keep track of, and even when we see the planes we know they are important, but we don’t really know why. 

(http://starflight.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/img_4308-c47.jpg?w=497&h=331)

And the cinematography throughout all these scenes.  We get point of views we don’t expect, but they all lead us brilliantly to a conclusion.  The camera focusing on Roy’s hands playing with his potatoes until they suddenly stop, then it up his torso to his face, which is sad and slightly mortified and then it swings and pans to see his family’s faces, especially Roy’s son who is bursting into tears.  Only then does Roy give his half-hearted explanation.  And the scene in Barry’s room, where the toys go wild.  This gives the child’s view for the first time, which Spielberg will return to time and again.  We see every toy light up, not from above, but on an equal level.  Each toy is large and Barry’s enjoyment is felt, as well as our growing unease, until Julian wakes up and we are fully in adult mode.  Almost every scene is filmed in a thoughtful way, which just adds to the brilliance.

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3209/3033268828_6cc23525a7_o.jpg)

Spielberg was never a hack.  But this film shows his true brilliance, more than almost any other.  Other films, like Saving Private Ryan, has sections which are unparalleled, but this is one of the few Spielberg films in which the whole is masterful.  It isn’t necessarily my favorite of his films—we shall see—but I don’t think I will see another of his films in which I am impressed with his filmmaking as I was with this. 

Technical—5/5—If I could have given it a 10/5, I would have.
Interest—5/5—Not a single scene my focus wasn’t rapt to the screen.  Sometimes it was funny, sometimes it was wrenching, but I think what was most amazing is the visuals.  This isn’t as much a special effects movie as the other blockbuster in ’77, but it gives just as much to see.  I couldn’t turn away from watching.
Tension—5/5—Even though I knew what was going to happen, I was still as tense as the first time—actually, certainly more.  Having children know, I can appreciate Jullian’s emotional trauma and I understand Roy’s addictive issues better, and the fact that he couldn’t stop although he needed to stop. 

(http://dvdmedia.ign.com/dvd/image/article/875/875383/close-encounters-of-the-third-kind-30th-anniversary-ultimate-edition-20080520000645746-000.jpg)

Emotional—4.5/5—It wasn’t a roller coaster, but the emotions were strong and around the middle of the film it was intense.
Characters—4/5—I wish more had been done with Jullian and Barry.  But Roy and his family, and Claude LaCombe were all excellent.

(http://www.johnnycirucci.com/_mgxroot/img_1201912323_15224_1217723826.jpg)

Theme—3/5—There are a lot of themes here, and I’ve mentioned a few.  Obsession, control and a potentially scary event going better than anyone expected.  I give it a low grade on theme because of its lack of focus.
Ethics—4/5—It is interesting because for Roy and Jillian, the ethical is minimal because they really don’t have control over their actions, any more than someone with OCD.  But the ethical heart of the film is LaCombe.  5/5—He is the one both using power for good and attempting to limit that power when it is opposed to what is best.  He is also the one empathetic both to the information of multitudes of peasants and the aliens themselves.
Personal—4/5—The one I most empathize with is Roy.  He is trying to be a good father and a good employee, and yet it all falls apart, outside of his control.  This is something all husbands and fathers have experienced.  At some point we all try to do what is good, but it falls apart, without our desire or knowledge of how things work.
(http://dvdmedia.ign.com/dvd/image/article/838/838392/close-encounters-of-the-third-kind-30th-anniversary-ultimate-edition-20071128021143639-000.jpg)

Close Encounters really effected me, surprisingly.  It was always a fun movie, but this viewing I saw what a great movie it is, both objectively and personally.  Last year, I didn’t even consider putting it on my top 100.  This year, it’s going on

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. Dog Day Afternoon
16. Brick
17. District 9
18. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
19. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
20. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
21. 50 First Dates
22. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
23. The Son (2003)
24. Raising Arizona
25. Do The Right Thing
26. Adaptation
27. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
28. Scizopolis
29. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
30. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
31. Three Kings
32. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
33. The Science of Sleep
34. Scarecrow
35. Fitzcaraldo
36. Zelig
37. Harold and Maude
38. Repulsion
39. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: ses on October 21, 2010, 11:20:08 PM
Great review, it's one of my favorites. Makes me want to watch it again.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 21, 2010, 11:29:59 PM
Great review, it's one of my favorites. Makes me want to watch it again.

Probably the best statement I could hear in response to one of my reviews.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on October 21, 2010, 11:34:26 PM
Great review, it's one of my favorites. Makes me want to watch it again.

Probably the best statement I could hear in response to one of my reviews.

I'd respond the same way, but I'd probably just watch the movie again no matter what your review said. Still, awesome!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on October 21, 2010, 11:36:25 PM
The reviews in the Spielberg marathon thread should be coming before too long.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on October 21, 2010, 11:51:17 PM
One of my favorites by Spielberg, aided in part by happy childhood nostalgia and also bonus Truffaut.  I also find the religious angles intriguing (Roy and the other believers are prophets or disciples of sorts, Roy and the other potential boarders are read to from the Bible, Roy assumes a Christ pose as he's being taken into the ship).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on October 22, 2010, 03:57:53 PM
Cool review as always O. I will disagree with the hackery comment. As I remember he didn't get that label until you get to ET because the strain of sentimentality that was under control, but present in his earlier films, was a strong element in ET. You know the tugging at the heart strings and the feeling you were being manipulated.
Close Encounters isn't just a story of obsession but quite a bit of loss; losing your kid like that and Roy losing his family because they couldn't cope with him. It also manages some slight returns to the suspense of Jaws. The scene at the rail crossing with the whole truck trying lift itself off the ground is a beautiful piece of work with some subtle effects, the radio mic and the rubbish in his truck flying around. As was said earlier you really brought the film back to me, nice one.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 23, 2010, 01:32:00 AM
Rachel Getting Married

(http://videogum.com/img/thumbnails/photos/twmoat_rachel_getting_married/wedding.jpg)
I didn't understand what this scene was doing in the film.  I guess part of the 'perfect wedding' motif?

I didn’t expect to appreciate this film as much as I did. It was just one of the films I didn't get around to seeing last year, and since it was on Netflix instant, I might as well check it out.  I didn't expect the emotions to be so raw.  I didn't expect the movie to be so true. 

The context is this: Kym is returning home after being away for years.  She has been in and out of different rehab programs, and only recently does it seem to actually be taking for her.  However, both she and her family are struggling with emotions and forgiveness for the past, especially one tragic event that Kym was in the center of.  All of this is happening in the context of preparation for Kym’s sister’s, Rachel, wedding. 

The wedding and all of the preparation is pitch-perfect, ideal.  This stands in absolute contrast with the family’s relation to Kym.  The two emotions—joy and bitterness— battle against each other, with one or the other taking dominance in each scene. 

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:hOm2vE9VN11LXM:http://i49.tinypic.com/309mst0.jpg&t=1)

In speaking about this film the other day, ferris mentioned to me how he disliked the movie because he felt that the film was manipulating us to feel sympathy for Kym, which he didn’t at all.  I didn’t sense the film manipulating me, and I honestly had only a little sympathy for Kym—which is much to Anne Hathaway’s credit.  As a person who works with people in recovery, I didn’t find my emotions manipulated at all—this is the real situation.  People just coming out of recovery are self centered, especially in their demand of forgiveness and trust that those who have spent years being manipulated and lied to just aren’t ready to give.  Because of this, I place this film beside Some Kind of Monster as films that tell the truth about the recovery process.  It isn’t pretty.  And recovery isn’t instant and it ends up hurting just as much as addiction does.  It is painful for everyone involved. 

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_9SW2V6PS5sc/SbBprKb2kxI/AAAAAAAAADc/1j69_HZPVn0/s320/06090336_.jpg)
Obviously it is more painful for some than others.


Technical—5/5—The documentary style works well with this film.  We constantly feel that we are a fly on a wall, seeing things we weren’t supposed to see.
Interest—5/5—It is difficult to watch, but intense and powerful.
Tension—5/5—There is a lot of tension all throughout this film, at times it is simply ugly.  But at one point the ugliness all makes sense and the tension mounts, but I was not so uncomfortable with it.
Emotional—5/5—It played me like a cello.  At the point Rachel cleans Kym up, I just broke down and I was just about worthless for the rest of the day.

(http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film2/DVDReviews44/rachel%20getting%20married%20blu-ray/800%20rachel%20getting%20married%20blu-ray8.jpg)

Characters—5/5—Everyone was believable, except perhaps for the groom.  I don’t know why, at some point, he didn’t say, “What’s going on here?  Is my wedding going to be ruined by this?”  Apart from that, everyone was excellent.  During the reception banquet, every speech was spot on.  They were not only perfect reception speeches, they were all believable.

(http://thumbs.fliqz.com/ca93939dd51a47de8236025ad4b7d0f3.jpg)

Theme—5/5—Forgiveness hurts.
Ethics—5/5—I like the fact that every single family member is put through the ringer both emotionally and ethically.  No one is clean, no one is exempt from blame, everyone needs forgiveness, whether they feel like they need it or not.  And there’s no easy fix.
Personal—5/5—I deal with a lot of people in addiction and in recovery, and I’ve seen a lot of families struggle with their “black sheep.”  All I can say is this film is true.

Now I’m in a difficulty.  I think this is the first film I gave a five to every one of my categories.  And I am really shocked at that, but I can’t change a single rating.  On the other hand, this film, like, say, Hunger, is not one that I would just pick up and say, “I think I’ll spend an enjoyable night of watching a family fight each other.”  It is good, even great IMHO, but not enjoyable.  And it is, frankly, too close to what I deal with on a regular basis to really see it as anything other than work.  So, as good as it is, I don’t know that I can put it on my top 100.  We’ll see.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. Dog Day Afternoon
16. Brick
17. District 9
18. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
19. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
20. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
21. 50 First Dates
22. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
23. Rachel Getting Married
24. The Son (2003)
25. Raising Arizona
26. Do The Right Thing
27. Adaptation
28. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
29. Scizopolis
30. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
31. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
32. Three Kings
33. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
34. The Science of Sleep
35. Scarecrow
36. Fitzcaraldo
37. Zelig
38. Harold and Maude
39. Repulsion
40. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: michael x on October 23, 2010, 01:54:21 AM
I also thought RGM was amazing. Like you said, it's not a movie you just pop in a random evening to revisit. In fact, after watching it on Netflix Instant (nearly a year ago now), I bought a copy but have yet to rewatch it. The experience of watching the movie and sharing Kym's emotions is raw and draining.

The people and their feelings seem so authentic, and the way Kym knows she's hurting her family but keeps doing it is agonizing. I never felt manipulated, either, but the emotions are potentially so overwhelming that I can see some people trying to shut the movie out. Wonderful filmmaking.

I'm not big into the whole wedding aspect, though. My feelings towards it veered between sharing their joy and laughing at them for the ridiculousness of it. That's primarily what kept it out of my Top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 23, 2010, 02:04:50 AM
I also thought RGM was amazing. Like you said, it's not a movie you just pop in a random evening to revisit. In fact, after watching it on Netflix Instant (nearly a year ago now), I bought a copy but have yet to rewatch it. The experience of watching the movie and sharing Kym's emotions is raw and draining.

The people and their feelings seem so authentic, and the way Kym knows she's hurting her family but keeps doing it is agonizing. I never felt manipulated, either, but the emotions are potentially so overwhelming that I can see some people trying to shut the movie out. Wonderful filmmaking.

I'm not big into the whole wedding aspect, though. My feelings towards it veered between sharing their joy and laughing at them for the ridiculousness of it. That's primarily what kept it out of my Top 100.

I'm really glad you appreciated it too.  I was wondering if I'd be alone out here...

I agree that the wedding is over-the-top.  The one pic from that ridiculous scene I think is exhibit #1-- what was it doing there?  But I think that the overwhelming joy of the wedding, as well as Rachel's pregnancy, just highlights the contrast of Kym's outsider status.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on October 23, 2010, 02:07:15 AM
Rachel Getting Married

(http://videogum.com/img/thumbnails/photos/twmoat_rachel_getting_married/wedding.jpg)
I didn't understand what this scene was doing in the film.  I guess part of the 'perfect wedding' motif?
This was my complaint.  I was all with the movie until the reception and then it's like Demme pushed the film and characters aside (except for cutaways like the candle on the water) and turned it into Jonathan Demme's Block Party.  I didn't believe that this family would have Brazillian showgirls performing at the wedding recpetion, and more importantly I didn't care because that's not why I was watching the film.

Really good until then, though.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 23, 2010, 02:10:04 AM
And really good after that one scene, in my opinion.   But that scene... wow.  Why?  Why?  Why?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on October 23, 2010, 02:43:40 AM
I was beginning to think this film was another totally overlooked gem. Anne H can act shock. Her sister (name escapes me) has to carry an even greater emotional load throughout trying to hold it all together while this hurricane is running through her wedding arrangements.
I will go further than good going on great and just say it is great. Nice to see Demme still gots it.

Terrible review though!..... No I am just tired of repeating myself, good stuff oh old one.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on October 23, 2010, 08:40:39 AM
I think it was probably a film that never had a chance to be more than a 3/5 with me (which is what I gave it) given my dislike of dislikable characters and awkwardness like the toast scene. I recognize that these things can be very real on poignant, but the fact that I'm sitting their watching, willing to give anything for the scene to end kind of hurts my viewing experience. I like more escapism and a little more joy I guess.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on October 23, 2010, 01:24:27 PM
And really good after that one scene, in my opinion.   But that scene... wow.  Why?  Why?  Why?

I like the craziness of the wedding.  It seems appropriate for these ultra-rich, ultra-liberal music industry types that their wedding would be this kind of idealized globalized mashup of cultures.  Add the tragic family history and Kym's inability to yet fit in to this world, and you've got the central conflict of the film: despite the liberal perfection of the family, it still has this dark tragedy that the main character simply cannot resolve.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on October 23, 2010, 11:43:47 PM
That rating is bizarre given all those 5's. The awkwardness is thrown in your face all film but it's still acceptable. Dishwasher scene springs to mind.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 24, 2010, 09:36:30 AM
That rating is bizarre given all those 5's. The awkwardness is thrown in your face all film but it's still acceptable. Dishwasher scene springs to mind.

The ranking IS bizarre.  Or, perhaps, the number of 5s are.  I don't get it myself.  I was blown away by RGM-- and the dishwasher scene is one of my favorites.  The only thing I can think of is the level of discomfort that exists in the film, as Bondo suggests.  I don't have a rating for that.  For instance, I'd give pretty good marks for Million Dollar Baby overall, but the ending just destroys me, and I will never watch it again.  RGM isn't so bad, because I'm somewhat familiar with the situation, but it hurts watching it.  There is a lot of interest, but for me, the pain overrides the joy-- which is probably the point.  And with other favorites of mine that have a lot of pain-- The Mission and Wendy and Lucy come to mind-- there is nobility behind the pain, and I can appreciate that.  Here, there is no nobility-- except a little when Rachel cleans up Kym-- and so very little to redeem the situation.  I need some redemption in my films filled with pain.

The other thing we need to realize is that a top 100, when we're talking as many films as we've seen, is like arranging our favorite 100 grains of rice out of a 50 lb bag.  Just because they are in the top 100 makes them our favorites, and RGM is in there.  So it doesn't make my top 10 or 20, even with high ratings.   I can't put everything that stands out in a film in my ratings, even though I have more than almost anyone.  And my ranking is pretty much my feeling.  My rating is how I am trying to analyze my feelings.  And I am learning that there is this arbitrariness that comes into every experience.  I have so much to learn about myself.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 24, 2010, 10:36:51 PM
Grizzly Man

(http://pullquote.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/grizzly_man_1.png)
Werner and his new friend

Werner Herzog is a freak.  I know this because I really believe that he makes movies about people who he sees being like himself.  Fitzadcarlo was a freak.  Deiter was a mild freak, but certainly an odd standout.  And Timothy Treadwell was a freak of the highest order.  A nice freak.  A compassionate freak.  But a freak, nevertheless.  And, admittedly, freaks make for compelling film.

Most of the film is edited from Timothy’s more than a hundred hours of film of himself documenting the months he spent each year alone with grizzly bears.  They clearly expressed his philosophy and his reasoning.  But why did Herzog make this film?  Herzog, in his narration, says that he didn’t agree with all—or even most—of Treadwell’s philosophy.  I think that Herzog just found the man fascinating and just wanted to get his story out there.

(http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2005/09/07/grizzly_wideweb__430x328.jpg)

And Herzog did a great job not only showing who Timothy Treadwell was in his complexity, but also the different reactions to him: his ex-girlfriend, his co-workers, his parents, those who thought he was insane, and the schoolchildren whom he spoke to.  This is an almost perfect documentary of a complex man.

Technical—5/5—It is really well edited.  Even Treadwell’s own film was good.  I wish Herzog would get someone else to narrate for him, but even that makes it more of a personal story.  Herzog is a great filmmaker.
Interest—3/5—My interest waned at times.  Treadwell went on and on.  As did Herzog.  There was always something to perk me up after my attention waned, but it was just a bit too long.

(http://www.cinemademerde.com/Grizzly_Man-coroner.gif)
Best. Coroner. Ever.

Tension—3/5—Interestingly, Herzog tells us pretty close to the beginning of the film Treadwell’s fate.  But as we go on there is more and more detail until finally we are told we don’t get any more, and we realize that we really don’t want more detail.  The scene where Herzog and Timothy’s girlfriend are talking about the recording of his final moments is as intense as any re-creation of it.
Emotional—2/5—It all felt very distant.
Characters—5/5—Timothy was a great character, worthwhile doing a movie on.  And Herzog is also a great character.  I love listening to him work.
Theme—4/5—I don’t know if Herzog is saying that we should pursue that which might kill us, or a warning that we might become so single minded that we could die.

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/04/28/article-1174259-04B0348F000005DC-635_634x456.jpg)
After watching the film, my family and I decided to adopt.

Ethics—5/5—There are a lot of ethical questions here.  Should Timothy have done what he did?  Did he help or harm bears?  Was his sacrifice worth it?  Herzog wisely doesn’t answer them, but gives us plenty of information for us to make our own decisions.
Personal—4/5—I, too, am a man somewhat driven by a single passion, like Treadwell.  I, too, have had warnings about my own peril.  And I, too have ignored almost all of them.  I wonder how many people look at me like I see Timothy Treadwell—an obsessed freak.  I’m good with that.

(http://images.allmoviephoto.com/2005_Grizzly_Man/2005_grizzly_man_wallpaper_002.jpg)
The foxes were the real stars of the film.  So cute!

There are a trilogy of films about men who surrender themselves to nature in Alaska and “go native” with the environment: Never Cry Wolf, Into the Wild and Grizzly Man.  I think that Into the Wild is the best made of the trilogy.  Never Cry Wolf is the one I enjoyed most, personally.  But Grizzly Man is the truest of the three.  We adapt to that which we live in.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. Dog Day Afternoon
16. Brick
17. District 9
18. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
19. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
20. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
21. 50 First Dates
22. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
23. Rachel Getting Married
24. The Son (2003)
25. Raising Arizona
26. Do The Right Thing
27. Adaptation
28. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
29. Scizopolis
30. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
31. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
32. Three Kings
33. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
34. The Science of Sleep
35. Grizzly Man
36. Scarecrow
37. Fitzcaraldo
38. Zelig
39. Harold and Maude
40. Repulsion
41. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on October 24, 2010, 11:06:48 PM
I think the fact that I spent most of the film wanting to punch Treadwell in the face got in the way of me rationally considering the documentary's merits. Besides, the bear beat me to it, so that's was a downer. (too soon?)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on October 24, 2010, 11:17:05 PM
The film doesn't ask you to love Timothy Treadwell or feel sorry for him.  I think of one of the great things about Grizzly Man is that Herzog clearly doesn't think much of Treadwell, and yet understands him and is fascinated by him. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on October 25, 2010, 12:10:16 AM
I think the fact that I spent most of the film wanting to punch Treadwell in the face got in the way of me rationally considering the documentary's merits. Besides, the bear beat me to it, so that's was a downer. (too soon?)

I suspect that Herzog agrees with your sentiment, I definetly do as well, though I am also strangely fascinated by him.  Either way the documentary is not meant to show him in a good light, he is a real life Aguirre.  I like your reviews oldboy, but don't understand how either the writing or the various scores correlate with the ultimate ranking of the movie compared to other films.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on October 25, 2010, 12:15:53 AM
I think that Grizzly Man was pretty straightforward as far as ranking.    It wasn't a favorite.  As far as the writing, I am specifically trying to pick movies that I love and asking others to choose some that they think I might love.  So I can give an okay review, but rank it low on the list.  Grizzly man was good, and Herzog is a great director.  But it won't rank high compared to others.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 02, 2010, 12:22:36 AM
In honor of my 5000th post, an epic review of the epic,

The Godfather

(http://pics.livejournal.com/obsessgirl/pic/000b1exe)

In general, I don’t like mobster films.  I don’t like seeing a movie where the point seems to be watching people murder, commit adultery and make excuses for themselves.  But the Godfather films really are different.  Not only are they amazing cinematic achievements, but they are also truly compelling characterizations.  The ensemble of performers are perfect, as is the direction and cinematography.  It is a remarkable achievement.  If only there was redemption as well….

(http://idothings.info/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/morninghorsehead1.jpg)

Technical—5/5—A masterwork.  A marvel.  From the very first few seconds right to the door being closed on Diane Keaton, this has to go next to Citizen Kane as one of the most amazing technical achievements ever.  The editing of the wedding scene and the baptism scene, the way the blood slowly emerges in the horse head scene, the increased use of the musical theme as the movie progresses… it is all a wonder to behold.
Interest—5/5—I started watching at eleven at night.  I said to myself, “I’ll just take a break around the middle and get some sleep.”  Oh, what foolish thinking.  I couldn’t bear to stop it at any point.  Even as I see Michael’s moral self-destruction, I am compelled to watch.
Tension—5/5—Very tense, very powerful.

(http://sites.google.com/site/worldofvisualeffects/_/rsrc/1268397648808/editing-techniques/godfather%20baptism.jpg?height=179&width=320)

Emotional—3.5/5—All the characters were good, but I didn’t feel for everyone.  Part of the problem is the number of characters we are introduced to.  When the baptism scene happened, I couldn’t keep track of all those who were killed or why.  I needed a scorecard.  When a character like Moe is introduced in one scene and then killed in the next one he was in, how is that supposed to have any real impact?  It honestly moved to fast to have much deep emotional impact.  The one scene that really got me is the car exploding in Sicily.
Characters—5/5—Yes, they came and went fast, most of them.  But every character was played perfectly.  Pacino and Brando were stunning.  But a number of the supporting characters were amazing as well.  Lenny Montana as Luca Brasi, Al Lettieri as Virgil Sollozzo, Abe Vigoda as Tessio—these and many other performances were top notch.  Just about the whole cast deserves Oscars.
Theme— 4/5 Honor above ethics.

(http://bluraymedia.ign.com/bluray/image/article/995/995274/Godfather3(Custom)_1245880800.jpg)

Ethics—1/5  The most important idea in The Godfather is honor.  Everyone is expecting “respect” and honor must be shown in every situation.  A man’s life is not as important as his honor.  This is an ancient idea and entire civilizations were built upon it, the Roman Empire not least.  And here we have a movie that speaks of the corruption of honor, how honor can create a monster from a war hero.  But we are supposed to step with Michael every bit of the way.  As a war hero he is supposed to be taking the moral high ground, and that life is really what Kay represents.  Not only does he reject that way of life, but he later puts on the façade of a moral, religious man but in the end allowing honor to corrupt him completely.  We follow this progression, understanding and even agreeing with almost every step he takes.  And this is the moral corruption of the film.  We may not like what Michael has become by the end of the film, but what would we have done differently?  The film doesn’t allow us to question that.  We just find ourselves with Michael as a corrupt individual.  This film is celebrating corruption and evil and just showing what it is.  There is no judgment of it, no reconsideration.  It just is what it is.  And this, I think, is the greatest weakness of one of the most powerful films of all time.
Personal—1/5—I have no personal connection to this film at all.

And this is my dilemma.  I find this to be one of the best made, most stunning film of all time, but ethically I find it extremely weak, and thus disturbing, even a little offensive.  Because of the greatness of the film I might put it in my top 100, but it certainly won’t be as high as years past.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. Dog Day Afternoon
16. Brick
17. District 9
18. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
19. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
20. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
21. 50 First Dates
22. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
23. Rachel Getting Married
24. The Godfather
25. The Son (2003)
26. Raising Arizona
27. Do The Right Thing
28. Adaptation
29. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
30. Scizopolis
31. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
32. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
33. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
34. Three Kings
35. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
36. The Science of Sleep
37. Grizzly Man
38. Scarecrow
39. Fitzcaraldo
40. Zelig
41. Harold and Maude
42. Repulsion
43. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on November 02, 2010, 12:39:14 AM
I actually think the ethics are at points ambiguous and at other very good. You see, it is a tragedy when that door closes at the end. The idea of family respect is great, but the murderous aspects of it here are not supported.

But I complete agree otherwise. An astoundingly well made film to which I have no serious personal investment in and containing well drawn characters that I often don't really care about. As brilliant as the baptism scene is, you're right, It's hard to keep track of who is getting offed and more problematic is that I don't really care to know the who and why.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on November 02, 2010, 06:09:06 AM
A wider point about ethics in film and not a criticism of your conclusions. Films aren't there to teach ethics. However, the tension that is created between one's personal ethics and those of a character in a film, and Mike is a great example; can be tremendously compelling. Hence, the larger the difference in what you see on screen and what you personally believe the more engaged one can be in a film.
Michael Corleone is compelled by family loyalty to do some horrific acts purely because of the world his family operate in. Thankfully, normal people don't get to have the loyalty tested in such extreme ways, but we are watching a man lose himself by following what to his family may seem the 'honourable' path. Ironically the hell he sinks into means he loses the family he tries to create for himself with Kay. The compelling aspects are that you can easily see the course he follows, it communicates easily. The enormous difference in how he ends up in his world to how things go in the normal world, probably is one reasons that this is such a great and revered work.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 02, 2010, 10:48:36 AM
A wider point about ethics in film and not a criticism of your conclusions. Films aren't there to teach ethics. However, the tension that is created between one's personal ethics and those of a character in a film, and Mike is a great example; can be tremendously compelling. Hence, the larger the difference in what you see on screen and what you personally believe the more engaged one can be in a film.
Michael Corleone is compelled by family loyalty to do some horrific acts purely because of the world his family operate in. Thankfully, normal people don't get to have the loyalty tested in such extreme ways, but we are watching a man lose himself by following what to his family may seem the 'honourable' path. Ironically the hell he sinks into means he loses the family he tries to create for himself with Kay. The compelling aspects are that you can easily see the course he follows, it communicates easily. The enormous difference in how he ends up in his world to how things go in the normal world, probably is one reasons that this is such a great and revered work.


Some film IS there to teach ethics, or at least to open up ethical questions or to show an ethical example.  I prefer those, personally, although I can certainly see the greatness in a film like the Godfather that is just observing the ethical downfall of another.  It just won't make my personal top 10.  That's one of the reasons that I have an ethics category in my ratings-- because ethics is an important aspect of film to me.  Not the only one, but one important aspect.

Major spoilers in this paragraph:
However, I don't think he is trying to create a family with Kay.  Kay, at first, was an open display of how he was going in a different direction than his family.  When his family needed him, he had to set Kay aside.  The real family he tried to create was in Sicily, with his wife there.  When that was destroyed by family business, he fully accepted that he needed to defend his honor.  I think that his wife dying is the pivotal aspect of his character-- the murders he does later is not so much out of family honor, but out of revenge for his wife.  He became heartless.  When he approached Kay, note he didn't try to court her or love her, his proposal was simply a business proposition.  He needed a public face of a good citizen with a wife and a child and a religious connection.  But in the end, it was all for business.  Any time he said he cared about his child or wife, it was with the same tone of voice that he carefully lied to Kay in the last scene.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on November 02, 2010, 11:11:51 AM
Some film IS there to teach ethics, or at least to open up ethical questions or to show an ethical example.  I prefer those, personally, although I can certainly see the greatness in a film like the Godfather that is just observing the ethical downfall of another.  It just won't make my personal top 10.  That's one of the reasons that I have an ethics category in my ratings-- because ethics is an important aspect of film to me.  Not the only one, but one important aspect.
Just trying to understand your approach - are you saying that you prefer those films that teach ethics or model ethics that are compatible with your own?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on November 02, 2010, 01:53:20 PM
Oldkid, one of the great aspects of your reviews is that you actually try to include something as difficult as ethics in movies. I respect that immensely. By having it as a category in your reviews, it shows that ethics DO matter and should not be ignored or cast aside, just because this is entertainment, so respect to that.
The Sicilian episode seems like an easy fit to the family life of Omerta. The Kay 'family' (a modern family?) just will not fit into the easier black & white life that the Mafia family offers Michael. Also that Michael is ex-army ie a true American but becomes this throw back to an old European way of thinking, fits with how he takes to that Sicilian way of life. The Sicilian wife is part of that.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: IdeaThy12 on November 02, 2010, 04:50:55 PM
u should rewatch hercules  ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 03, 2010, 12:43:15 AM
Some film IS there to teach ethics, or at least to open up ethical questions or to show an ethical example.  I prefer those, personally, although I can certainly see the greatness in a film like the Godfather that is just observing the ethical downfall of another.  It just won't make my personal top 10.  That's one of the reasons that I have an ethics category in my ratings-- because ethics is an important aspect of film to me.  Not the only one, but one important aspect.
Just trying to understand your approach - are you saying that you prefer those films that teach ethics or model ethics that are compatible with your own?

I like film that deals with ethical issues in a variety of ways.  The Mission, for instance, gives two different ethical approaches to a difficult situation.  It doesn't matter that I prefer one ethical approach over the other, it opens up the discussion, which is what I like the best.  The Decalogue is one of my favorite films on ethics, because it takes something that many people know about and twists it until you feel you have to figure it all out again.

This does not mean that I don't appreciate films that simply present, or forcefully preach, my own ethical point of view, such as Joyeux Noel.  I love that film mostly because I agree with it ethically.

I guess I'm saying I like films that indicate that they give thought to ethics and don't ignore them or hide them.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 03, 2010, 12:48:13 AM
u should rewatch hercules  ;D

I won't be putting Hercules on my top 100, sorry.

But if you make me, I'll be glad to watch it again.  :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on November 03, 2010, 12:56:00 AM
I guess I'm saying I like films that indicate that they give thought to ethics and don't ignore them or hide them.

Isn't the Godfather series about the differing ideas of ethics that Vito and Michael have?

Also, just because a film's characters aren't ethical doesn't mean the film is.  It's possible for a film to portray nothing but immoral actions and still make a morally "correct" statement, isn't it?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 03, 2010, 01:00:27 AM
I guess I'm saying I like films that indicate that they give thought to ethics and don't ignore them or hide them.

Isn't the Godfather series about the differing ideas of ethics that Vito and Michael have?

Also, just because a film's characters aren't ethical doesn't mean the film is.  It's possible for a film to portray nothing but immoral actions and still make a morally "correct" statement, isn't it?

Absolutely.  I just didn't care for the stripping of ethics that happens to the main protagonist.  I agree with Fro Ham's perspective that it is a tragedy, but I wonder if part of the purpose is to actually strip our own ethics by having us follow Michael's path.  Or maybe that's just me.  Or maybe I should stop watching great but complex movies at one in the morning.

I am willing to be convinced of the Godfather's ethical stance, but right now, I am not.  Godfather II will be judged on its own ethical merit.  ;)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on November 03, 2010, 01:05:55 AM
I don't think the film portrays Michael as being made happier by his actions, do you?  Is there anything to endorse his ethical decline in the film?

I think the second one makes this much clearer, and the third puts it in plain English.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 03, 2010, 01:19:12 AM

I think the second one makes this much clearer, and the third puts it in plain English.

I completely agree with this.  And when I saw The Godfather films, it was originally The Godfather Saga, where the first two films are told in chronological order-- thus they are all mixed up.  It has always made it difficult for me to separate the first two films.  This time I want to specifically see them as separate films, not as telling the same story.  And I'm noticing the moral ambiguity of the first film that I think is clarified in the second.  And this is why I'm hesitating about it ethically.  If I throw the second one together with it, it becomes clear, but is the first film really saying that Michael is wrong?  He is certainly successful and he has retained all the power of his father in the way his father approached power.  And he did it all by honoring his family above all.  We know it is wrong, but are his missteps fuzzy?  It seems morally ambiguous in a way the other two are not.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on November 03, 2010, 01:26:29 AM
And the third puts it in plain English.

Which is why the third is the best. I find this discussion of the role of ethics in film interesting because I probably take it even further than oldkid does. I've said on numerous occasions that I have an aversion to films with unlikable protagonists, which is to say protagonists who seem to have no conscience (those who do bad things but ponder them don't necessarily bother me).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on November 03, 2010, 01:41:26 AM

I think the second one makes this much clearer, and the third puts it in plain English.

I completely agree with this.  And when I saw The Godfather films, it was originally The Godfather Saga, where the first two films are told in chronological order-- thus they are all mixed up.  It has always made it difficult for me to separate the first two films.  This time I want to specifically see them as separate films, not as telling the same story.  And I'm noticing the moral ambiguity of the first film that I think is clarified in the second.  And this is why I'm hesitating about it ethically.  If I throw the second one together with it, it becomes clear, but is the first film really saying that Michael is wrong?  He is certainly successful and he has retained all the power of his father in the way his father approached power.  And he did it all by honoring his family above all.  We know it is wrong, but are his missteps fuzzy?  It seems morally ambiguous in a way the other two are not.

I don't think him closing the door on Kay is ambiguous at all.  The tension in the first film is between Michael's desire not to join the family business, to assimilate into America instead of sticking with his home country's mafia (he joins the army, dates a WASP).  He fails at doing that and finds within himself a kind of ruthlessness even his father didn't have (his honoring his family doesn't prevent him from murdering his brother-in-law).  He gives into his dark side and that closes him off from everything he began the film desiring.  Seems pretty tragic to me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 03, 2010, 01:50:59 AM

I think the second one makes this much clearer, and the third puts it in plain English.

I completely agree with this.  And when I saw The Godfather films, it was originally The Godfather Saga, where the first two films are told in chronological order-- thus they are all mixed up.  It has always made it difficult for me to separate the first two films.  This time I want to specifically see them as separate films, not as telling the same story.  And I'm noticing the moral ambiguity of the first film that I think is clarified in the second.  And this is why I'm hesitating about it ethically.  If I throw the second one together with it, it becomes clear, but is the first film really saying that Michael is wrong?  He is certainly successful and he has retained all the power of his father in the way his father approached power.  And he did it all by honoring his family above all.  We know it is wrong, but are his missteps fuzzy?  It seems morally ambiguous in a way the other two are not.

I don't think him closing the door on Kay is ambiguous at all.  The tension in the first film is between Michael's desire not to join the family business, to assimilate into America instead of sticking with his home country's mafia (he joins the army, dates a WASP).  He fails at doing that and finds within himself a kind of ruthlessness even his father didn't have (his honoring his family doesn't prevent him from murdering his brother-in-law).  He gives into his dark side and that closes him off from everything he began the film desiring.  Seems pretty tragic to me.

I would buy that if they had spent more time on Michael's desire to assimilate.  I think it's there, but by the end of the movie, I am no longer convinced of any of Michael's motivations.  I guess it's hard for me to see Michael's moral "downfall" as tragic when I had never seen him doing anything positive.  Sure, he's a war hero, but what does that mean?  That he killed a lot of Nazis?  Perhaps if I had seen more of Michael's earlier life, I'd buy it more.

And I'm not denying what you're saying, sdedalus.  I'm just not convinced it's unambiguous.  It probably better reads the way you are saying.  It just didn't feel that way when I was watching it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on November 03, 2010, 02:01:29 AM
His family didn't want him to volunteer for the war.  It was a sign that he identified as "American" and not as Sicilian.  This is made clear in the scene added to the end of Part II, Vito's birthday where Michael announces that he enlisted.

I don't think it takes a whole lot of reading into his relationship with Kay to see it as a desire to assimilate.  Especially when he says things like "That's my family, that's not me" or his estrangement from his family in Vito's speech about how he never wanted him to join the business, he wanted him to be a senator or president and Michael says he's with the family now.

If it's ambiguous, what other reading of the film is there?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on November 03, 2010, 02:15:07 AM
I'd like to also point out that I'm really annoyed the Godfather films left Netflix Instant before I had a chance to revisit them.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 03, 2010, 01:04:53 PM
I'd like to also point out that I'm really annoyed the Godfather films left Netflix Instant before I had a chance to revisit them.

You know that Netflix also has this great service that sends you disks through the mail?   ;)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 03, 2010, 01:13:06 PM
His family didn't want him to volunteer for the war.  It was a sign that he identified as "American" and not as Sicilian.  This is made clear in the scene added to the end of Part II, Vito's birthday where Michael announces that he enlisted.

I don't think it takes a whole lot of reading into his relationship with Kay to see it as a desire to assimilate.  Especially when he says things like "That's my family, that's not me" or his estrangement from his family in Vito's speech about how he never wanted him to join the business, he wanted him to be a senator or president and Michael says he's with the family now.

If it's ambiguous, what other reading of the film is there?

Again, I've been trying to NOT bring in stuff from II, because I want to have I stand on it's own, with its own perspective, which may differ from II.

But you are right about Michael.  Michael wanted to assimilate.  He just wasn't much of a character at that point, I guess.  Perhaps I have a problem because "assimilation" to American society, from my perspective, is only marginally more moral than getting involved with the mob.

As far as the ethic of the film, it doesn't have to be understood as a tragedy.  It could also be drawing the viewer along Michael's path to see how his ethic works and it is equally viable as non-violent one.  Or it could be taking a non-ethical perspective of all the events, remaining the objective storyteller, making no judgments at all.  It is with this last perspective that I was viewing it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 04, 2010, 09:04:21 PM
Great discussion on The Godfather. Hope to have more like this here.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

(http://www.filmbuffonline.com/FBOLNewsreel/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/RogerRabbit1.jpg)

I believe that this film is my first true casualty of my involvement in Filmspotting.  The first few times I saw this film, I loved it.  The noir style mixed with Looney Tunes and Disney animated characters is brilliant, and the character of Roger, especially is wonderful. 

But this time, it just fell flat.  It wasn’t as funny as I remembered.  And as noir it had some of the stereotypes, but none of the meat or heart, it just an empty shell of noir.  While it had some fun references to Chinatown and other films, they were just references, not even homages. 

(http://www.mouseclubhouse.com/interviews/don-hahn/roger-rabbit-acme.jpg)

Technical—5/5—It really is an achievement.  The animation and the live action blended almost perfectly.  It was really well made.
Interest—3.5/5—Perhaps I was stunned by it’s newness the first couple times, but this viewing really weakened it.  I was like, “Yeah, I know what’s going to happen”, but there was little delight in it.  Only a couple places where I say, “This scene is great”.  I love the scene where Roger is explaining how toons work and why Goofy is great.  And the torchlight scene is wonderful.  Otherwise, meh.

(http://www.punkasspunk.com/videolog/20050224/Who_Framed_Roger_Rabbit_(1988)_4.jpg)

Tension—2/5—None at all this time.
Emotional—2/5—Not really.
Characters—3/5—Some of the toons were really well done, like Roger, Jessica and the taxi.  But the real disappointment are the live action actors.  Perhaps they are supposed to be more cartoonish than the toons, but our protagonist could have been done better.  I just didn’t believe his character—and I think that has more to do with the script than Bob Hoskins.  I could be wrong, though.
Theme—2/5—Not everything is what it seems?  Pretty weak.

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:UBfsJdxEvUzcOM:http://i32.tinypic.com/2exy7h3.png&t=1)

Ethics—4/5—Actually, this is interesting because it deals with the ethical relations between not only two cultures, but two species that respond to reality in deeply different ways.  Eddie’s brother is killed when a piano is dropped on his head by a toon—this wouldn’t hurt the toon, of course.  Eddie could be freely violent and even murderous with toons as one would a human and it is no problem because toons just brush it off.  However, “dip” is truly murder, and truly evil, to a toon.  The interesting thing is how the movie turns on its head the basic ethical principle “do to others as you would have them do to you.”   Because the real meaning of that statement, as show here in Roger Rabbit, is don’t do to others what would harm them, even if the same is harmless to you. 
Personal—3/5—I grew up watching Looney Tunes almost every day, so the themes and humor still touch me, just not as deeply as they used to.

(http://handsomedonkey.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Judge-Doom1.jpg)

Overall, the film was really disappointing to me, although I still strongly recommend it. 

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. Dog Day Afternoon
16. Brick
17. District 9
18. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
19. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
20. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
21. 50 First Dates
22. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
23. Rachel Getting Married
24. The Godfather
25. The Son (2003)
26. Raising Arizona
27. Do The Right Thing
28. Adaptation
29. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
30. Scizopolis
31. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
32. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
33. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
34. Three Kings
35. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
36. The Science of Sleep
37. Grizzly Man
38. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
39. Scarecrow
40. Fitzcaraldo
41. Zelig
42. Harold and Maude
43. Repulsion
44. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: dallegre on November 04, 2010, 09:21:35 PM
I see what you're saying about lack of substance and rewatchability. The film is entertaining as hell though, even if it's purely on spectacle. Plus Jessica Rabbit is one of my all time greatest screen crushes.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on November 04, 2010, 09:24:06 PM
Can't say I agree Steve. Every time I watch Roger Rabbit I fall in love with the film a bit more. It captures noir so well, the blending of the animation always works and I really have a blast with it. It's a great film for sure, and Roger Rabbit remains one of my favorite movies to watch.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on November 04, 2010, 09:29:02 PM
I see what you're saying about lack of substance and rewatchability. The film is entertaining as hell though, even if it's purely on spectacle. Plus Jessica Rabbit is one of my all time greatest screen crushes.

Roger Rabbit is more ambitious, but Back to the Future is just that much better. But I do think Roger Rabbit is really awesome and easily rewatchable. Just not to the extent of BttF.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on November 04, 2010, 09:30:33 PM
I see what you're saying about lack of substance and rewatchability. The film is entertaining as hell though, even if it's purely on spectacle. Plus Jessica Rabbit is one of my all time greatest screen crushes.

Roger Rabbit is more ambitious, but Back to the Future is just that much better. But I do think Roger Rabbit is really awesome and easily rewatchable. Just not to the extent of BttF.

I'd say the opposite myself. Both are fun, but Rabbit is way more fun. From a technical aspect Rabbit is better across the board, and it is, as you say, more ambitious. That's why I like BttF, but I love Roger Rabbit.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 04, 2010, 10:54:41 PM
Can't say I agree Steve. Every time I watch Roger Rabbit I fall in love with the film a bit more. It captures noir so well, the blending of the animation always works and I really have a blast with it. It's a great film for sure, and Roger Rabbit remains one of my favorite movies to watch.

That's the reaction I was hoping for, but didn't get  :'(

But I still like it-- it just won't make my top 100 this year.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on November 04, 2010, 11:13:08 PM
Roger Rabbit is pretty amazing. I still remember all those late night staying up thinking of Jessica.  ::)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on November 04, 2010, 11:36:12 PM
I've never seen Roger Rabbit. I have a difficult time working up any interest at all.  :-\

Some film IS there to teach ethics, or at least to open up ethical questions or to show an ethical example.  I prefer those, personally, although I can certainly see the greatness in a film like the Godfather that is just observing the ethical downfall of another.  It just won't make my personal top 10.  That's one of the reasons that I have an ethics category in my ratings-- because ethics is an important aspect of film to me.  Not the only one, but one important aspect.
Just trying to understand your approach - are you saying that you prefer those films that teach ethics or model ethics that are compatible with your own?

I like film that deals with ethical issues in a variety of ways.  The Mission, for instance, gives two different ethical approaches to a difficult situation.  It doesn't matter that I prefer one ethical approach over the other, it opens up the discussion, which is what I like the best.  The Decalogue is one of my favorite films on ethics, because it takes something that many people know about and twists it until you feel you have to figure it all out again.

This does not mean that I don't appreciate films that simply present, or forcefully preach, my own ethical point of view, such as Joyeux Noel.  I love that film mostly because I agree with it ethically.

I guess I'm saying I like films that indicate that they give thought to ethics and don't ignore them or hide them.
Never responded to this - oops! Anyway, gotcha. I, too, often really appreciate films that open up some kind of ethical discussion - and yes, as you say, The Decalogue does that beautifully.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: michael x on November 05, 2010, 11:10:09 AM
Totally agree with you, oldkid. I wanted to like WFRR? but it wasn't funny and the writing and acting in general were extremely weak.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 07, 2010, 01:41:41 PM
How To Train Your Dragon

(http://purenintendo.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/How-to-Train-Your-Dragon-Wii_1.jpg)

This film is like Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs, in that I went with my family to just pass the time, I wasn’t expecting much of it, but it turned out to be such a fun time that I can put it in the running for my top 100.  Look, I really appreciate funny, well told animation films with good characters.  And this film works.  For me, it is probably the best film Dreamworks Animation has produced. 

Not everything works in the film.  Near the end when suddenly all the other students could just ride dragons, in perhaps an hour—I don’t think so.  Some of the student’s characters were just too shallow.  But overall, it is a fun ride.  And it worked for me the second time just as much as the first.

(http://media.theiapolis.com/aR/cDCDCDC/d4/e4/hM8/iKNU/r1/s1/t4/wG4/z23/how-to-train-your-dragon.jpg)

Technical—4/5—Nothing spectacular here, but the computer animation is fully realized and well done.  The script is brilliant and everything works along well with that.
Interest—5/5—Funny, excellent pacing, fun characters and some action.  What a great time at the movies!
Tension—4/5—Because I fully believed in Hiccup’s teen drama, I really felt for his situations.  Especially when the town found out he’d been keeping a dragon.  That was intense.

(http://toonbarn.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/How-to-Train-Your-Dragon-in-Theaters.jpg)

Emotional—3/5—Okay, it was a little dusty eyed when his father accepted him and when it looked like he was dead.  I’m a softy, sometimes, okay?
Characters—3/5—Sometimes they worked, sometimes they didn’t.  Hiccup and his father were excellent.  The one scene after his father returned and Hiccup was some hero and they were trying to have a “real talk”…that was perfect.  So uncomfortable.  Many of the characters didn’t work.  Hiccups love interest sometimes worked, but the other students not at all. Hiccup’s boss and teacher—sure, he was great.  But the focus on Hiccup was great—he was the one really fleshed out character and since the movie was told from his perspective, that’s all that’s needed.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_S4eijoYPUPA/S6yAi1Hn8oI/AAAAAAAACEw/IIBJK0_SyZc/s1600/How+To+Train+Your+Dragon+still.JPG)

Theme—5/5—Hidden talents and the power of understanding
Ethics—5/5—How To Train is like a fantasy movie version of one of my favorite books, The Anatomy of Peace.  Both speak to how one deals with an enemy, even a violent enemy.  There is a reason for the violence, and if we can appreciate the reasoning faculty of those who harm us and speak to them on their level, then peace might be achieved.  This film is a great, if simplified, illustration of that.
Personal—4/5—Look, I was once an awkward teen boy, not knowing how I’d fit in.  Yeah, that works.

(http://www.starshare.ro/bitbucket/How.To.Train.Your.Dragon.2010.BRRip..H264.Feel-Free.mp4_snapshot_00.28.58_%5B2010.10.03_13.45.55%5D.jpg)

It’s not a perfect film, but it’s got a lot going for it, and, frankly, I really enjoyed my time with it.  I don’t know if it deserves a place on my top 100, but it will certainly be seen in my top animated next year.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. Dog Day Afternoon
16. Brick
17. District 9
18. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
19. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
20. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
21. 50 First Dates
22. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
23. Rachel Getting Married
24. The Godfather
25. The Son (2003)
26. Raising Arizona
27. How To Train A Dragon
28. Do The Right Thing
29. Adaptation
30. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
31. Scizopolis
32. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
33. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
34. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
35. Three Kings
36. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
37. The Science of Sleep
38. Grizzly Man
39. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
40. Scarecrow
41. Fitzcaraldo
42. Zelig
43. Harold and Maude
44. Repulsion
45. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 07, 2010, 01:44:36 PM
Why do you have a picture of the video game?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on November 07, 2010, 01:46:02 PM
How to Train you Dragon, a most enjoyable film, not worthy of Top 100 films, but it is also likely to make my top animated films next year.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 07, 2010, 02:01:07 PM
Why do you have a picture of the video game?


Why not?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 07, 2010, 02:03:49 PM
Why do you have a picture of the video game?


Why not?
Fair enough, I was just wondering. It is a fantastic film, my favorite animated film of the year (until I see The Illusionist).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 09, 2010, 10:02:32 PM
The Man Without A Past

(http://www.grouchoreviews.com/content/films/1847/1.jpg)

This is a Finnish film of 2002, about a man who is brutally mugged and so forgets everything about his past, who he is, everything, and then tries to make do amidst the down and out of Helsinki.

I placed this film in my top 100 last year partly because of the characterization and partly because of the personal connections to those struggling to make due in an urban context.  For some reason, there were two things I forgot.  First of all, it’s in color.  I don’t know why I thought it was in black and white, but there you have it.  Secondly, it is hilarious.  The humor is sly and quiet, and I’m sure much of the humor I didn’t get the first time around.  All this to say, I enjoyed this film even more this second viewing.

(http://www.offoffoff.com/film/2002/images/manwithoutapast.jpg)


Technical—4/5—It’s fine.  Nothing special, no tricks, no fuss.  Just basic filmmaking.  Nothing more than necessary.
Interest—5/5—I really enjoyed it this time.  I was hesitating seeing it again because I thought it would be too dull for me to watch only about a year or so since I last watched it.  Oh, I was wrong.  It was great, every scene.  It was good to know the end this time as well because it helped me to recognize where it was all heading.  And this time, I could see the quiet joy in almost every scene.  Wonderful.
Tension—3/5—Not much tension, this time around, except when the muggers show up. 
Emotional—3/5—There is some emotion, but it’s hard to feel when the acting is so dry and flat.  It is flat on purpose, and it helps one appreciate even more the obvious happiness that is there.  But we have to put that in, the actors won’t help us a whit.  On the other hand, see what I say under “personal”.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:gqTHlXIsJrYQqM:http://img256.imageshack.us/img256/1810/bscap0007aq1.jpg&t=1)


Characters—4/5—Excellent.  Sure the acting is flat, but since everyone does it, it looks like Helsinki is just that way.  I suspect that they are playing it as a Finnish stereotype, but it just adds to the humor and the local color.  The characters themselves are wonderful and funny and clever.  I wish more had been done for Kati Oetenin, because she just seemed sad. 
Theme—3/5—It’s not a strong thematic film.  I’d guess the theme might be, “It will all work out” or “There is a place for everyone” or some other generally uplifting cliché.
Ethics—5/5—I love films that show communities that work well, even in difficult circumstances.  The way they took him in and how he was instantly accepted, and the community helped him in quiet, small ways but that brought him life was wonderful to behold.
Personal—5/5—I live and work amidst a community much like this.  Yes, there are struggles and not many resources, but there can also be joy and strength.  This personal connection is probably what really makes me emotional about this film. Not even so much because of these people, but because of the people I know on the streets of Portland and their joys and strengths.  It makes me happy.

(http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/DVDCompare2/manwithoutapast/de-title.jpg)

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. The Man Without A Past
16. Dog Day Afternoon
17. Brick
18. District 9
19. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
20. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
21. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
22. 50 First Dates
23. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
24. Rachel Getting Married
25. The Godfather
26. The Son (2003)
27. Raising Arizona
28. How To Train A Dragon
29. Do The Right Thing
30. Adaptation
31. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
32. Scizopolis
33. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
34. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
35. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
36. Three Kings
37. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
38. The Science of Sleep
39. Grizzly Man
40. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
41. Scarecrow
42. Fitzcaraldo
43. Zelig
44. Harold and Maude
45. Repulsion
46. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on November 09, 2010, 10:32:24 PM
Added it to my queue. I love me some sly/quiet Nordic humor.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on November 09, 2010, 11:49:15 PM
I adore Kaurismaki.  Have you seen any of this other work?  TMWAP is one of the better ones, but it's all good.

Also... what's up fellow Portlander?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 10, 2010, 12:07:58 AM
I adore Kaurismaki.  Have you seen any of this other work?  TMWAP is one of the better ones, but it's all good.

Also... what's up fellow Portlander?

I just found out that this film is part of a trilogy.  I certainly plan on watching more.

You knew I was from Portland, right?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on November 10, 2010, 12:21:12 AM
I adore Kaurismaki.  Have you seen any of this other work?  TMWAP is one of the better ones, but it's all good.

Also... what's up fellow Portlander?

I just found out that this film is part of a trilogy.  I certainly plan on watching more.

You knew I was from Portland, right?

I'm still new here.

Check out The Match Factory Girl... it's my favorite, and Criterion released it on DVD (along with two other Kaurismakis that are also good).

Lights in the Dusk is also available, but is one of his weaker films IMO
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 10, 2010, 01:12:14 AM
Have you ever seen Ariel or Shadows in Paradise?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on November 10, 2010, 08:55:46 AM
Have you ever seen Ariel or Shadows in Paradise?

Yes, both are terrific.  I've seen all of his films except Leningrad Cowboys Meet Moses (which is allegedly terrible, but I still want to see because I love the Leningrad Cowboys).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 11, 2010, 12:09:17 AM
Y Tu Mama Tambien

(http://74.63.2.120/~cineescu/imgs/48492-y_tu_mama_tambien_.jpg)

I had some trepidation approaching this film.  The brief synopsizes I’d read of the film emphasized how “erotic” it was to such a degree that I wondered if it was almost pornographic.  But it was praised so highly by filmspotters, that I figured I’d give it a chance. 

Well, the first scene is pretty explicit, shockingly so.  But it turns out it is a wonderful little drama about two older teenage boys and an older woman who go on a trip to a beach.  Yes, there are a lot of sexual undertones and a couple sex scenes (beyond the first scene).  But the important part of the film is how the woman teaches them to have relationship—not only with women, but with each other.  They gain a full education on what it means to be faithful, to forgive, and to balance responsibility with joy.   This is about character growth, not sex.  Well, not primarily about sex.

(http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38157000/jpg/_38157698_y_tu_mama300.jpg)

Technical—5/5—I loved the camera work here, the unique angles, especially when they were driving and a lot of the shots come from outside. 
Interest—4/5—The earlier scenes which were laying out the boys’ characters were a little dull for me.  But once they went on the trip and their discussions in the car and her deep sorrow—it was all good and I was caught. 
Tension—4/5—Certainly a fair amount of relational tension on occasion, especially in the middle part of the film.
Emotional—3/5—I didn’t really connect to the characters, see below.

(http://img.listal.com/image/741050/600full-y-tu-mama-tambien-screenshot.jpg)

Characters—3/5—Look, I believed in the characters.  I did.  But they were so separated from me or the people I knew that I just couldn’t relate.  So the characterization was fine, but the boys still seemed like cartoons of horny, out-to-have-fun teen boys—but I wasn’t one of these boys and I didn’t know them.  Still don’t.  What the woman was doing made sense by the end of the film, but, again, I don’t know if I know of anyone like this.
Theme—4/5—The need to live life to the fullest in relationship.  Pretty well realized.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_V4B6Gb9FovU/Sw62Otk7QAI/AAAAAAAAAx0/VLg7DR6iK8I/s1600/8_y-tu-mama-tambien%255B1%255D.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—Actually, there are a lot of ethical questions brought up in this film, all relating to the right and wrong in relationship.  It openly talks about faithfulness, keeping to principle, forgiveness and freedom.  Not what I’d call a textbook film, but the questions brought up were excellent.  The most important thing was the hurt that was expressed when an ethical principle is broken.  These aren’t arbitrary ideas that can be thrown away if you don’t care for them.  And the seriousness with which the boys take relationships become the cornerstone of their maturity.  Excellent.

Personal—1/5—There was nothing I could connect to in the film, which really made it fall flat for me.  That was disappointing.

While there’s a lot of things to like about this film, I couldn’t really connect to the characters, and that leaves it off my top 100 for certain.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. The Brothers Bloom
12. I [Heart] Huckabees
13. I’m Not There
14. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
15. The Man Without A Past
16. Dog Day Afternoon
17. Brick
18. District 9
19. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
20. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
21. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
22. 50 First Dates
23. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
24. Rachel Getting Married
25. The Godfather
26. The Son (2003)
27. Raising Arizona
28. How To Train A Dragon
29. Do The Right Thing
30. Adaptation
31. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
32. Scizopolis
33. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
34. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
35. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
36. Three Kings
37. Y Tu Mama Tambien
38. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
39. The Science of Sleep
40. Grizzly Man
41. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
42. Scarecrow
43. Fitzcaraldo
44. Zelig
45. Harold and Maude
46. Repulsion
47. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on November 11, 2010, 12:32:38 AM
Sigh, one of the best films ever made.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on November 11, 2010, 12:44:27 AM
I don't know if it is a film I need to revisit seeing as since I watched it Cauron went on to make my second favorite film of all time and my second favorite Harry Potter film. But yeah, like you I couldn't really relate to the characters that much...and for me there was the dreaded not likable aspect to them. It just seems like there is too much callous disregard for each other. Frankly at this point the first 5-10 minutes is about all I remember. 8)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 12, 2010, 12:36:02 AM
Red Beard

(http://filmjournal.net/mjocallaghan/files/2010/04/red-beard.jpg)

One of the things I love about Akira Kurosawa is his ability to take films that are in completely different situations, and turn them into high drama.  Sure, it’s easy when you are doing a version of Macbeth or King Lear, but this film is about a medical clinic in a poor area of Edo (which in a later era becomes Tokyo).  Could high drama be found here?  Perhaps the stakes aren’t as high as Ran or even The Seven Samurai, but this film expresses the drama of each human life, even the “small” life.  Red Beard is about the drama of compassion.

Technical—4/5—Nothing spectacular, but pretty sharp film quality for its era.  The script and direction are marvelous, if not exceptional.
Interest—5/5—Every time a story arc ends, there is another that has already started.  It is a powerful drama, filled with a number of laugh-out-loud moments, not least the out-of-context fight at the brothel.

(http://moviemasterworks.com/blog/wp-content/PostImages/redbeardblog.jpg)

Tension—4/5—At first, it seems pretty light, but as we follow the experiences of the new doctor, we join him as he bit by bit becomes more involved with those in the clinic.  At first, we have a bit of curiosity, then we experience the horror of death, then we appreciate the tragic story of the life of a good man, and then finally we are weeping at the tragedy of a small character.  I think I lost a bit of tension because I’d seen it just a year ago, but give me another year and I’ll be ready to see it again.
Emotional—5/5—Played me like a yo-yo

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:MVWUXiOYXgHZkM:http://www.thelooniverse.com/movies/japan/kurosawa/redbeard/RB07a.jpg&t=1)

Characters—5/5—This is the final pairing of Kurosawa and Mifune, but Mifune is as brilliant as he ever was.  He plays the title character with that perfect balance of seriousness and willingness to make fun of himself that is so well done.  The character of the girl taken from the brothel is also perfectly played.  I wish that some of the smaller roles were given more room to develop.
Theme—4/5 Compassion over honor.  Pretty basic, but well done.

(http://thestuffyougottawatch.com/picsq-t/rbeard.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—There are no deep ethical questions brought up here, we are all familiar with the stakes here.  However the rewards of a life of compassion, as dubious as they are, are clearly presented.
Personal—5/5—I hope I’m not boasting, but it is my attempt to be a man like Red Beard and to create a community of help like he did.  And I think that this, more than anything else, is what touches me about this film and makes it my favorite of Kurosawa’s films.

(http://www.sensesofcinema.com/wp-content/uploads/images/06/cteq/red_beard.jpg)

It’s a personal favorite, and that’s a good enough reason to put it firmly in my top 100.
1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. Red Beard
12. The Brothers Bloom
13. I [Heart] Huckabees
14. I’m Not There
15. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
16. The Man Without A Past
17. Dog Day Afternoon
18. Brick
19. District 9
20. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
21. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
22. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
23. 50 First Dates
24. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
25. Rachel Getting Married
26. The Godfather
27. The Son (2003)
28. Raising Arizona
29. How To Train A Dragon
30. Do The Right Thing
31. Adaptation
32. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
33. Scizopolis
34. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
35. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
36. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
37. Three Kings
38. Y Tu Mama Tambien
39. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
40. The Science of Sleep
41. Grizzly Man
42. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
43. Scarecrow
44. Fitzcaraldo
45. Zelig
46. Harold and Maude
47. Repulsion
48. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on November 12, 2010, 10:48:29 AM
Glad you like it.  I'll just post my most recent mini-review (from April 2010):

Quote
This has long been one of my very favorite Kurosawas.  This is probably my 5th or 6th time watching it, and every time I think, "Oh, it's not going to be as good as I remember it" and then it proves me wrong.  Although you could rightfully accuse it of being manipulative, you can't deny that it works.  Loaded with tragedy, misery, misfortune and cruelty, and equally full of redemption, kindness and relief (and comedy), it's a heartstring-tugger of the finest order.  And for my money the star is neither Toshiro Mifune in the title role, nor Yuzo Kayama as his protege.  The star of this film is young Terumi Niki, whose portrayal of the abused Otoyo chokes me up no less than FIVE times over the course of her transformation.  I also really enjoy the anecdotal structure, something Kurosawa didn't indulge in very often, but it works beautifully here, with so many memorable mini-stories: the "mantis", Sahachi's deathbed confession, the showdown at the brothel, Otoyo and the bowl, and the fate of little Chobo.  As for the technical aspects, it's elegant without being too flashy.  The compositions are truly masterful, artful yet utterly practical.  The use of sound is striking (Sahachi's chimes, for instances) and even more impressive is the use of silence.  There are long stretches of this movie with very little happening on the soundtrack, which only serves to keep you even more riveted.  Kurosawa's most emotionally rich and satisfying work.  Rating: 10
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on November 12, 2010, 02:20:47 PM
Red Beard is one of the most underrated Kurosawa films (many people have never heard of it despite claiming he is their favorite director).  There is just so much humanity in that movie (Kurosawa is the anti-Kubrick in many ways).  Its the movie that helped push me towards medicine as a career.  Great review.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 13, 2010, 10:19:37 AM
Great review, Martin.

And did it really encourage you toward medicine, zarodinu? 

It's good to know that it's just as powerful to others as to me.  Now we just need to get everyone else to watch it.  :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on November 16, 2010, 11:10:43 AM
Yes it really inspired me to become a doctor.  I think this movie should be mandatory viewing in high schools along with Ikiru, in a society full of selfish brats and sociopathic careerists, it may help some teens develop a conscience. 

Though these days I doubt many high schoolers can even read the subtitles...   

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 17, 2010, 10:59:25 PM
Yes it really inspired me to become a doctor.  I think this movie should be mandatory viewing in high schools along with Ikiru, in a society full of selfish brats and sociopathic careerists, it may help some teens develop a conscience. 

Though these days I doubt many high schoolers can even read the subtitles...   

Mercy probably could.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on November 17, 2010, 11:02:08 PM
Yes it really inspired me to become a doctor.  I think this movie should be mandatory viewing in high schools along with Ikiru, in a society full of selfish brats and sociopathic careerists, it may help some teens develop a conscience. 

Though these days I doubt many high schoolers can even read the subtitles...   

Mercy probably could.

Probably? I'm pretty sure she watched a good number of Bollywood films :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 17, 2010, 11:16:20 PM
Shaun of the Dead

(http://www.best-horror-movies.com/images/shaun-of-the-dead-zombie-group.jpg)

Horror as a genre doesn’t bother me.  However, vampire movies typically bore me with their faux-sexuality and strange rules.  The idea of zombie movies also really turned me off.  Basically, it seems like an excuse to use every day objects as weapons to kill humanoid-like people.  Kinda like kids playing hyper-violent video games.  No thanks.

(http://www.best-horror-movies.com/image-files/shaun-of-the-dead-night.jpg)

However, because of many stirring recommendations, I tried Shaun of the Dead more than a year ago and I found that it was startling enjoyable.  The script was funny, the acting well done, the comparisons between moderns and zombies is poignant and the whole situation as a symbol for a dead-end relationship was brilliant.  I was surprised at how well I loved this film with it’s many laugh-out-loud moments.  Sure, the violence was still off-putting, but I found the situations also strangely human and ultimately humane.  

(http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/538/538309/shaun-of-the-dead-20040922092543119_640w.jpg)

Technical—5/5—Visually, it was almost too effective in the violent scenes.  It was all well done.  A horror/comedy that still remained realistic in both setting and character.  The final “uses” for zombies were especially well done. Looks cool.  Writing's cool.  It's all cool.
Interest—5/5—Frankly, this is a smart film.  It is so well thought out and the consequences to relationships and to life in general is just well done.  But what keeps my interest is the constant humor.  Occasionally there’s too much lull between jokes, but the humor almost always hits.  It isn’t always laugh out loud, but often enough.  And even when it isn’t funny, it’s human and the characters pull it off.  
Tension—5/5—Well, yeah.  I mean, zombies in your backyard.  Duh.
Characters—4/5—Most of the characters were great.  I wish they had done more with Phillip and David, because I think those characters could have been fleshed out (no pun intended) more.  Shaun and Liz were classic characters, Ed was a disappointment because he was so shallow, but that was his place in the film, so its not really a disappointment.

(http://images1.fanpop.com/images/quiz/21920_1214578690610_382_300.jpg)

Emotional—3/5—Perhaps because of the lack of development, there was not much emotionally.  If Phillip had been developed more, then perhaps his transformation would have been emotionally impactful.  Instead, we only see him as Shaun saw him.  And perhaps that’s the one weakness of the film—everything is seen from Shaun’s point of view, and Shaun is emotionally immature.  He only really cares for Liz as a person, and Ed is seen as more of a pet, which makes the end appropriate.  But there isn't any real emotional maturity in this film, so it didn't effect me emotionally, really.  Which is too bad.
Theme—4/5-- Two main themes: Modern life creates zombie-like beings; The safe, boring life isn’t so bad after all.   I wish it was more focused, but the themes are well-developed.

(http://technabob.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/winchester_tavern_shaun_dead.jpg)

Ethics—4/5—I find the ethics of a zombie invasion interesting, and Shaun explores that a little bit.  Killing a human being is wrong, but what about killing a monster made from a human being?  They are already dead, so is it killing at all?  And what happens if a loved one becomes a zombie—are you justified in killing them?  Well, in the film, of course you are, because they have become—through no fault of their own—killers.  What do you do when you are surrounded by serial killers, no matter how inept they are?  Well, you run away and kill them.  But I have a lot more questions.  Could it be possible to just run away?  Even though they are undead, aren’t you actually killing them when you bash out their brains, because they can’t come back, right?  So many questions…
Personal—3/5—The relational aspect is certainly applicable, and most men have felt inadequate in the area of relationships, with or without a zombie attack.  I’ve never had Shaun’s problem, as my wife is more of a conservative in outings than I.  

I guess Shaun made my list last year because it was so surprisingly funny.  It is still quite good and I highly recommend it, but I don’t think it will do as well this year as last.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. Red Beard
12. The Brothers Bloom
13. I [Heart] Huckabees
14. I’m Not There
15. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
16. The Man Without A Past
17. Dog Day Afternoon
18. Brick
19. District 9
20. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
21. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
22. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
23. 50 First Dates
24. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
25. Rachel Getting Married
26. The Godfather
27. The Son (2003)
28. Raising Arizona
29. How To Train A Dragon
30. Do The Right Thing
31. Adaptation
32. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
33. Scizopolis
34. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
35. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
36. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
37. Three Kings
38. Y Tu Mama Tambien
39. Shaun of the Dead
40. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
41. The Science of Sleep
42. Grizzly Man
43. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
44. Scarecrow
45. Fitzcaraldo
46. Zelig
47. Harold and Maude
48. Repulsion
49. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on November 17, 2010, 11:59:21 PM
I'm glad to hear how much you enjoyed it, even if it won't make your top 100. It's a true blast and probably one of my highest ranked comedies of all time. Love it.

Sidenote: I have NEVER noticed Tyres (from Spaced) in the zombie horde from that first picture. That just about makes my day.

*correction
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on November 18, 2010, 12:02:04 AM
Sidenote: I have NEVER noticed Wheels (from Spaced) in the zombie horde from that first picture. That just about makes my day.
Ha, nor I. Cool.


Also, enjoyed your write-up, steve, and glad you like Shaun so much - I wish it'd make your list though. :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: michael x on November 18, 2010, 12:09:44 AM
One (other?) theme I noticed in Shaun was about becoming an adult. Shaun is a man-child in the beginning of the film, relying on his roommate, step-father, and mother. In order to win back the girl, he has to cut the apron strings, take responsibility, and step out on his own. Since it's a zombie movie, of course they become zombies and he has to actually (tearfully) kill them. I found it witty and genuine.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on November 18, 2010, 07:44:11 AM
Maybe it's just me, but I find this film gets aggressively more mean-spirited as it goes on. The ending in particular really bugged me. Maybe it's a male bonding thing...I wouldn't know.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on November 18, 2010, 03:25:36 PM
Maybe it's just me, but I find this film gets aggressively more mean-spirited as it goes on. The ending in particular really bugged me. Maybe it's a male bonding thing...I wouldn't know.

I actually found it more uplifting as it went along.

Anyways, I curious Steve, based on what you said about zombie films, how many of the Romero films have you seen?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 18, 2010, 08:50:22 PM
Maybe it's just me, but I find this film gets aggressively more mean-spirited as it goes on. The ending in particular really bugged me. Maybe it's a male bonding thing...I wouldn't know.

I actually found it more uplifting as it went along.

Anyways, I curious Steve, based on what you said about zombie films, how many of the Romero films have you seen?

I haven't seen a single Romero films, but Shaun has given me the courage to try one, so I shall.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 19, 2010, 01:19:04 AM
Toy Story 2


(http://thecia.com.au/reviews/t/images/toy-story-2-5.jpg)

Woody goes through a mid-life crisis. Chicken Man.  Buzz makes a rescue.  Pylons.  When Somebody Loved Me.  "I'm going to spend some time with my dad." "She's an artist"  Wow, is this movie great.

I consider this the best of the Toy Story trilogy.  It lacks the depth of the ugly side of Woody, but doesn’t lower the stakes one bit.  We meet excellently realized new characters, and see another side of being a toy we never thought of.

If there was one theme that runs through the Toy Story films, it is one’s limitations.  We are not all we hope to be, we will face the end of our usefulness eventually and even our greatest honors can seem empty and fruitless.  And yet these messages are expressed with friendly humor, camaraderie, and real joy.  It’s a lot to put on a group of toys, but they do a marvelous job.

Technical—5/5—Just when you think Pixar can develop no better technology they do it again.  Mind you, Toy Story 1 wasn’t the greatest in computer animation and it looks a little weak compared to today’s standards. Toy Story 2 can hold its own against the very latest technology and match or beat it.  And the script and all was top notch.  It was perfect, not just that we think, “That was well done,” but its perfection got to the point that we forget we are watching a “cartoon” at all.  And just look at the effort in making the Woody's Roundup memorabilia realistic.  Wow!

(http://images.artistdirect.com/Images/Sources/AMGCOVERS/music/cover200/dre200/e254/e25466e52jo.jpg)
The rootinest, tootinest Cowboy in the whole wild west!

Interest—5/5—Funny, heart warming, tears, justified retribution, music, action, a Star Wars joke—it has it all.
Tension—3/5—Maybe only a little tension this… oh… 8th viewing?  Still, who cares?
Emotional—4/5—Yeah, the scene where Woody and Buzz and the gang are making decisions about the future.  And where Jesse sings just like Sarah Maclachlan.  (http://)Gets me every time.

(http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/865/865417/toy-story2_1191022352_1201193044_1207762263-000.jpg)
I told you, the smoking section is 10 feet away from the door-- 10 FEET!

Characters—5/5—How can they make toys so human?  Amazing.  And the supporting characters are just wonderful.  Putting Gerald from the Pixar short is brilliant.  So much good here.

(http://quizilla.teennick.com/user_images/I/IL/ILU/ILUVSONICSHADOW/1249140701_1127_full.jpeg)
Say, "Aah!"

Theme—5/5—Even in the face of risk, faithfulness is most important.
Ethics—5/5—These are questions that adults can’t grapple with.  Should we choose to move away from our friends?  What are the consequences of us moving on?  Are we more concerned about our own safety or others’ need?  And have we ever had lust over a Barbie doll?
Personal—3/5—Not much in the way of personal connection, although I do understand the depth of the questions it asks.

(http://dvdmedia.ign.com/dvd/image/article/694/694804/toy-story-2-2-disc-special-edition-20060310003344420_640w.jpg)
Reach for the sky!

This is not my favorite Pixar.  Thus, this will not be the only Pixar in my Top 100.  Also, I realized that I did Shaun of the Dead a disservice.  I moved him up a bit.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. Red Beard
12. The Brothers Bloom
13. I [Heart] Huckabees
14. I’m Not There
15. Toy Story 2
16. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
17. The Man Without A Past
18. Dog Day Afternoon
19. Brick
20. District 9
21. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
22. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
23. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
24. 50 First Dates
25. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
26. Rachel Getting Married
27. The Godfather
28. The Son (2003)
29. Raising Arizona
30. How To Train A Dragon
31. Shaun of the Dead
32. Do The Right Thing
33. Adaptation
34. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
35. Scizopolis
36. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
37. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
38. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
39. Three Kings
40. Y Tu Mama Tambien
41. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
42. The Science of Sleep
43. Grizzly Man
44. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
45. Scarecrow
46. Fitzcaraldo
47. Zelig
48. Harold and Maude
49. Repulsion
50. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on November 19, 2010, 07:59:17 AM
Hmm, for me I put Toy Story 2 as my least favorite of the trilogy by a long shot with only 1 or 2 other Pixar films below it. Still has its fun moments to be sure but it doesn't resonate for me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on November 19, 2010, 09:14:01 AM
Maybe it's just me, but I find this film gets aggressively more mean-spirited as it goes on. The ending in particular really bugged me. Maybe it's a male bonding thing...I wouldn't know.

I actually found it more uplifting as it went along.

Anyways, I curious Steve, based on what you said about zombie films, how many of the Romero films have you seen?

I haven't seen a single Romero films, but Shaun has given me the courage to try one, so I shall.

I'd be interested to hear what you think, since his films are very societal and use the zombies as symbols as well as horror characters.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on November 19, 2010, 12:12:27 PM
This is not my favorite Pixar.  Thus, this will not be the only Pixar in my Top 100.
;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on November 19, 2010, 12:13:31 PM
This is not my favorite Pixar.  Thus, this will not be the only Pixar in my Top 100.
;D

*1SO and FroHam high five!*
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 24, 2010, 12:54:32 AM
The White Ribbon

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:4MPXhoQS2oNo1M:http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb52/The_Playlist/movies/2009_playlist/White-Ribbon-Haneke-Cabbage.jpg&t=1)
"The sins of the fathers will be visited on the third and fourth generations"

Haneke is becoming one of my favorite directors.  I’ve seen the American version of Funny Games, Cache and now The White Ribbon and there is something brilliantly subversive about these films.  Their critique of middle class values and the reversal of fortunes of the satisfied strikes a chord in me. 

This film differs from the others in that its message is more subtle, and it makes me work harder for the point.  Like Cache, the final seconds open up possibilities. 

Technical—5/5—Cinematographically the smoothest of the Haneke I’ve seen.  It isn’t gorgeous or stunning, but it feels very professional, very pleasant.  Like many of his scripts, it feels subtle and understated, but it is anything but.  It is difficult to avoid a tap of the hammer when it hits you on the forehead.

(http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb52/The_Playlist/movies/2009_playlist/White-Ribbon-Haneke-Girls.jpg)

Interest—4/5—This was an interest of intellectual curiosity more than anything else.  I was curious as to the injuries and killings, and later I was deeply trying to figure out what Heneke was up to, his point.  Like other Heneke movies, my interest was piqued even further at the end of the film, with an immediate desire to re-watch sections of it.  That’s pretty rare for me, but Heneke has gotten this reaction from me more than once.
Tension—3/5—I didn’t feel much tension.  I had no sense of what was to come. 
Characters—3/5—I was really fascinated by the plot, but not a single character engaged me.  They were all played well, especially the children, but they were too cold for me.

(http://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/the-white-ribbon-70463513001.jpg)
Adolph, how long will your kind heart last?

Emotional—2/5—I didn’t feel anything for this film.  It is interesting enough, but I really felt disengaged from everything that was going on.
Theme—5/5—This is the type of context that produces dehumanization and persecution of minorities.  It is quiet and nothing stands out, but that’s why it is allowed.  A powerful, disturbing message.
Ethics—5/5—The ethical statement is so subtle.  “The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.” Edmund Burke.  The good men do nothing about the growing evil in the midst and this is the real message.  Everyone is so passive, so ultimately unconcerned about a growing evil, that the end becomes Nazism.  The other main ethical point here is about the importantance of ethical parenting.  If we make allowances for evil in our children—lack of mercy and punishing the minority—then the next generation will reap widespread hatred and war.  Powerful message.

(http://www.euronews.net/images_old/09/W300px_Michael-Haneke-The-White-Ribbon-cinema.jpg)
"Please turn around."

Personal—3/5—I felt nothing for the characters, but I resonate so strongly with the message that this film is still significant for me.

Heneke is a great director.  I am stunned by his films and I will pursue more of them.  And although I consider this an excellent examples of his filmmaking skills, it still leaves me cold, as if it were a fascinating intellectual puzzle, which I can leave behind satisfied, ready to pick it up another time.  I will watch this film again, in hopes to delve into this puzzle again, but I am not driven to dwell in this town some more, nor was I emotionally engaged enough to be mesmerized.   Like Citizen Kane, it is a brilliant meh.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. Red Beard
12. The Brothers Bloom
13. I [Heart] Huckabees
14. I’m Not There
15. Toy Story 2
16. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
17. The Man Without A Past
18. Dog Day Afternoon
19. Brick
20. District 9
21. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
22. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
23. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
24. 50 First Dates
25. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
26. Rachel Getting Married
27. The Godfather
28. The Son (2003)
29. Raising Arizona
30. How To Train A Dragon
31. Shaun of the Dead
32. Do The Right Thing
33. Adaptation
34. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
35. Scizopolis
36. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
37. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
38. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
39. Three Kings
40. Y Tu Mama Tambien
41. The White Ribbon
42. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
43. The Science of Sleep
44. Grizzly Man
45. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
46. Scarecrow
47. Fitzcaraldo
48. Zelig
49. Harold and Maude
50. Repulsion
51. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on November 24, 2010, 02:23:35 AM
Yay for White Ribbon.

I will now link to my review of the film (http://www.thereelists.com/main/2010/1/26/the-white-ribbon.html).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: rambler on November 24, 2010, 04:08:03 PM

Anyways, I curious Steve, based on what you said about zombie films, how many of the Romero films have you seen?

I haven't seen a single Romero films, but Shaun has given me the courage to try one, so I shall.

I don't like horror movies in general and zombie movies in particular, mostly because I feel that they are trying to appall a reaction out of me rather than thrill me.
But I like "Shaun of" and the original "Night of" they are definitely worth seeing and are towering bookends of a genre that I'd otherwise be happy to write off entirely.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 24, 2010, 07:48:55 PM
Yay for White Ribbon.

I will now link to my review of the film (http://www.thereelists.com/main/2010/1/26/the-white-ribbon.html).

Yeah, I read your review just after I finished the film. Good job.  I think, like Cache, there is more to the story than is openly seen.  I think there is a hint in that final church scene, but I'm not sure what it is yet.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: zarodinu on November 24, 2010, 09:31:20 PM
I am with oldkid, I admire the craft but am put off by the coldness of Hanake's films.  I am glad that the movie has the little romance, and despite my worst expectations, nothing terrible happened to these two.  The romance seems tacked on, and doesn't really contribute to the story, but it gives the movie a glimmer of humanity and warmth.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on November 28, 2010, 03:36:05 AM
I am with oldkid, I admire the craft but am put off by the coldness of Hanake's films.  I am glad that the movie has the little romance, and despite my worst expectations, nothing terrible happened to these two.  The romance seems tacked on, and doesn't really contribute to the story, but it gives the movie a glimmer of humanity and warmth.

Without that small amount of spirit, it may have been as tough a watch as Time of the Wolf. He is always on that edge between unbearable and captivating. So much pain.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 29, 2010, 12:00:05 PM
He is always on that edge between unbearable and captivating.

And I think this is why I am hooked on him right now.  That balance is just so excellent.  Perhaps I am truly a masochist in nature?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on November 30, 2010, 06:07:08 AM
He is always on that edge between unbearable and captivating.

And I think this is why I am hooked on him right now.  That balance is just so excellent.  Perhaps I am truly a masochist in nature?

I've often thought that about myself but then I realise that inkling pales in comparison to Haneke's himself. I'd have a hard time believing he doesn't enjoy the sick things he is filming to some extent. Like, it's a bit too perfect if you know what I mean.  :o
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 30, 2010, 11:53:03 PM
He is always on that edge between unbearable and captivating.

And I think this is why I am hooked on him right now.  That balance is just so excellent.  Perhaps I am truly a masochist in nature?

I've often thought that about myself but then I realise that inkling pales in comparison to Haneke's himself. I'd have a hard time believing he doesn't enjoy the sick things he is filming to some extent. Like, it's a bit too perfect if you know what I mean.  :o

I hadn't thought of that.  But you could say that about a lot of directors, really.  Oldboy?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on December 01, 2010, 02:22:19 AM
He is always on that edge between unbearable and captivating.

And I think this is why I am hooked on him right now.  That balance is just so excellent.  Perhaps I am truly a masochist in nature?

I've often thought that about myself but then I realise that inkling pales in comparison to Haneke's himself. I'd have a hard time believing he doesn't enjoy the sick things he is filming to some extent. Like, it's a bit too perfect if you know what I mean.  :o

I hadn't thought of that.  But you could say that about a lot of directors, really.  Oldboy?

Yeah but Chan-wook Park's films don't show a pattern of these tendencies - like he has a revenge trilogy but even in that things are more symbolic; more shocking than painful to watch.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on December 08, 2010, 08:40:31 PM
I just wanted to let all the followers of this marathon know-- I haven't forgotten about it.  I've just been ill and very busy these last few weeks and haven't had much energy to write more than a paragraph.  But I have a long list of films to catch up on, and I will.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on December 14, 2010, 08:07:11 PM
The cold didn't kill me, so we've got the return of the marathon!  (Honestly, I've been watching marathon movies all along so I've got 17 reviews to catch up on, and the Man With No Name Trilogy waiting for me to watch.  So much work, so little time!)

The Big Sleep
(http://cache4.asset-cache.net/xc/1888890.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=45B0EB3381F7834D934707D7542EE26596835525A691AD1C207CAAE8C4C94190)

I frankly have avoided this film for years.  It’s not that I don’t like Bogie—he’s good for the occasional anti-hero.  But I really didn’t care for The Maltese Falcon and that film and this were strongly connected in my mind.  They were both Bogie noir based on classic detective novels of the 30s.   So if I disliked the one, I should dislike the other, right?

Not at all.  The big difference for me comes in the main characters: Sam Spade v. Philip Marlowe.  Frankly, Sam Spade has few redeeming qualities, and I strongly disliked him.  It must be to Bogie’s credit that just as much as I disliked his Sam Spade, I really enjoyed his Philip Marlowe. Marlowe was funny, smart, laughs easily and is much more enjoyable to spend time with.  And he doesn’t consider violence the first resort, especially in dealing with women.  I appreciate that.

(http://skyjude.users.btopenworld.com/Images/bigsleep03.jpg)

Technical—5/5--In all probability, another aspect I really appreciated about The Big Sleep over MF is the direction in general.  Howard Hawks is one of my favorite directors and I love his dialogue-filled, constantly moving films.  This isn’t as frantic as some of his films, but it certainly has his touch.  Having William Faulkner as a writer for this film couldn’t hurt, either.  The script is smart and the dialogue rich.  And, most of all, the film was humorous throughout, which I didn’t expect, although I should have with Hawks at the helm.
Interest—4/5—Although most of the other characters aren’t as interesting as Marlowe, of course Bacall is fantastic and the plot is interesting.  I can’t say that I was as interested in the mystery itself, but it was fun getting there.
Tension—4/5—There are some real tense moments in there, especially in a couple of the shootouts and in the involvement of Bacall’s sister.
Characters—3/5—It’s difficult to pinpoint my feeling of the characters of this film.  Frankly, few of them were believable.  They were all movie stereotypes (and I recognize that this film helped to create some of these stereotypes) except for Marlowe, who wasn’t really the hard-boiled detective, or perhaps he was but didn’t always act like it.

(http://andrewsidea.files.wordpress.com/2008/09/vlcsnap-7329505.png)

Emotional—3/5— Because I didn’t buy most of the characters, their dilemmas weren’t very compelling for me.  Certainly I was tense when someone got shot, but overall it didn’t matter.
Theme—2/5—I didn’t really catch much of a theme here.
Ethics—3/5—I don’t think the movie is encouraging us to think about ethics, other than the illegality of shooting people for financial reasons.  There is a moment in the DA’s office where Marlowe’s style of solving a crime is held against a police procedure.  The main thing seems to be that Marlowe’s style, although he lies, leaves dead bodies around, spends questionable time with women and sets people up to be shot, but he gets the job done (and he has friends in high places).  That seems to be good enough for the DA, so it should be good enough for us?  Hmmmm.

(http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/images/bsopeningsmoking.jpg)
The real ethical question: Should Bacall be smoking?  In public?

Personal—3/5—I related to Marlowe’s easygoing style, although it is not my own, and I did relate to his use of humor to ease tensions. 

A good movie, really enjoyable.  One I will probably watch again.  But it wasn’t so enjoyable that I’d put it in my top 100.

1. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2. In America
3. Rear Window
4. Amelie
5. The Red Shoes
6. Edward Scissorhands
7. Princess Mononoke
8. The Dark Knight
9. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
10. Tideland
11. Red Beard
12. The Brothers Bloom
13. I [Heart] Huckabees
14. I’m Not There
15. Toy Story 2
16. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
17. The Man Without A Past
18. Dog Day Afternoon
19. Brick
20. District 9
21. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
22. Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
23. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
24. 50 First Dates
25. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
26. Rachel Getting Married
27. The Godfather
28. The Son (2003)
29. Raising Arizona
30. How To Train A Dragon
31. Shaun of the Dead
32. Do The Right Thing
33. Adaptation
34. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
35. Scizopolis
36. Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
37. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
38. *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
39. The Big Sleep
40. Three Kings
41. Y Tu Mama Tambien
42. The White Ribbon
43. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
44. The Science of Sleep
45. Grizzly Man
46. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
47. Scarecrow
48. Fitzcaraldo
49. Zelig
50. Harold and Maude
51. Repulsion
52. Mister Roberts
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on December 14, 2010, 08:20:42 PM
Interesting read. I just watched this last week and was very meh about it. You make a lot of good points, and while I agree with most of the downsides, I think I just wasn't as into the upsides as you were.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on December 14, 2010, 09:17:06 PM
I enjoy The Big Sleep and The Maltese Falcon.  I own Falcon, and am not in a rush to own Sleep even though I know I'll watch it again someday.  Don't know what holds me back with sleep since I love Hawks.  Don't even mind how complicated the plot is cause the dialogue and character interactions are so choice.  Don't know.  They're both better than To Have and Have Not, but I guess I'll take In A Lonely Place over all of them.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on December 14, 2010, 09:20:29 PM
Apparently at this point I'm just meh on Bogie, holding aside Casablanca. But then classic noir has always left me cold. I'd be hard pressed to think of one that I have rated higher than 3/5.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: chardy999 on December 15, 2010, 05:17:38 AM
I gave The Big Sleep a good rating but cannot remember any of the small plot points you mentioned which is probably indicative of how much it cares about evoking a response from its audience beyond "this is fun, that was pretty cool, man, Bacall is smoking hot."
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on January 10, 2011, 02:18:56 AM
I know that you all have truly missed the marathoning, here.  However, I lost my list of movies and reviews when my computer crashed, and then I've been insanely busy because I've been running a growing organization and night shelters in my spare time.  But RIGHT NOW, while I'm sitting around at the night shelter, I'll re-create my list, try to re-write my review of The Big Lebowski, and then we'll see if I can get myself back in shape to continue running this marathon!

(http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh286/cmcbride1/RUNNING.gif)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: michael x on January 10, 2011, 09:30:21 AM
I'll be looking forward to it, whenever you get the chance to restart.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on January 10, 2011, 09:43:06 AM
I'll be looking forward to it, whenever you get the chance to restart.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 09, 2011, 06:11:11 PM
The marathon returns!

I find it unfortunate that I took this winter break from my marathon.

(http://4chanmemeandmotivational.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/regret_-_those_were_the_droids_i_was_looking_for.jpg)


 In some ways, it was necessary because I had an insanely busy winter.  On the other hand, it certainly didn’t mean that I was going to stop watching movies.  So now I have more than 20 films that should be on my marathon, but I didn’t do formal write-ups for.   I’m going to make up for that now.   My plan is to catch up on the writing of the films I have already seen, and to write on any other films that might qualify, and to have it done in the next month or so.  This might mean that I’m going to slack on quality, a bit.  Or it might mean that my writing skills will be honed.  But there it is, one way or the other.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on March 09, 2011, 06:22:38 PM
Hooray! I'm looking forward to your catch-up reviews, however they shape up.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 09, 2011, 06:25:58 PM
The Big Lebowski

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_jwuxVcOFcAo/SEbCDX_jcxI/AAAAAAAAAHI/RX563Wgym4E/s400/the+jesus.jpg)

I hate re-writing reviews.  One of my biggest reasons for avoiding continuing my marathon was that I hadn’t posted my Big Lebowski review before my computer crashed, so it was lost, so I had to write it from scratch.  I hate that.

When I first watched Lebowski, I had high hopes for it.  It was a Coen comedy and I love Coen comedies.  It had Jeff Bridges and John Goodman, which is a great combination.  And it was a cult favorite.  All of which, added together, should mean that I would absolutely adore this film.  But when I watched it, it was completely forgettable to me.  Of no real consequence to my film world.  But due to the high acclaim, I figured that there must be something I’m missing, so I’d watch it again to see if I could acclaim it as much as others.   Let’s run it through my gauntlet of ratings…

Technical—5/5—A very well made film, as all the Coen’s films tend to be.  The camera work was interesting, the acting top notch and even the lighting was noticeably excellent.  

Interest—3/5—Frankly, there is no real grab for me in this film, nothing to capture my attention.  It’s funny enough and some of the characters are well done, but in the end I’m asking, “Why should I care?”  That’s not a good sign for me.

Tension—4/5—Lots of tension around Walter.  Almost every time Walter is on the screen, I’m waiting for something to go wrong.  And it does.  And it is wonderful, I must say.

(http://furiouscinema.com/cms/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/the_big_lebowski.jpg)

Emotional—2/5—I didn’t hit any emotional highs or lows here.  It was just a movie.

Characters-5/5—There are plenty of characters that didn’t do anything for me.  Jesus is memorable, but more offensive than anything else.  It’s a shame that Steve Buscerni didn’t get more of a role, because he’s a great actor, but his character left me out in the cold.  Julianne Moore is good, but, again kind of offensive.  However, Jeff Bridges and John Goodman both give probably their best performances ever in this film.  Unbelievable.   The characters are so overwritten that it is almost imposible for them to be believable.  But they are.  The Dude and Walter are two of the greatest characters ever, and the pairing of this odd couple is one of the greatest cinema genius ideas.   The combination of the The Dude’s hippie, pot-hazed laid-backness and Walter’s paranoid, conspiracy-theory, gun-toting anger is simply perfect.    The movie should be watched if only for this alone.

(http://www.oomska.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/The-Big-Lebowski.jpg)

Theme—4/5—It is often difficult to nail a theme to a Coen Bros movie, because there is the obvious theme and often another theme underneath it.   In the end, I think it is a celebration of being laid-back, of the Taoist humility, of being the water that flows over everything by conforming to each shape that comes it’s way, allowing it to flow.  The Dude truly abides, simply by letting everything else be.  All the other characters are trying to force, to manipulate, to control.  The Dude just is.  And thus, in the end, he saves himself a lot of heartache and pain.

Ethics—4/5—Again, I think the film celebrates a Taoist ideal, recommending it as a way to live.  And, in the best film tradition, it shows this life in the midst of turmoil instead of describing it conceptually.  

Personal—3/5—As much as I admire the Taoist tradition, it isn’t my personality type.  However, I can appreciate it.

I liked The Big Lebowski much more this second watching than the first.  However, a couple caveats:  the constant use of CINECAST really put me off.  I don’t mind it, usually, but the use of such language puts a tiny stress on me.  The word CINECAST was used 2.22 times per minute in the film.  It’s not a record, (which might fairly go to “Nil By Mouth” which uses the word 3.34 times per minute and isn’t directly about the topic of language  Chart of movies that use the word "CINECAST" the most (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_films_that_most_frequently_use_the_word_%22CINECAST!%22)), but it is enough for me to be put off by the language.  And secondly, as much as I appreciated the two main characters and the themes, almost every other character put me off of the film.  

Thus, in the end, although it has much to make it great, it will not be making my top 100.

(http://www.blackouttees.com/media/THEDUDE.jpg)


Marathon change: I'm not going to give my list at the bottom of each review.  Takes up too much room.  In a bit, I'll have a list like sminoff's someone near the top of my marathon.  Links to come.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on March 09, 2011, 06:34:19 PM
I always like reading your 'themes' and 'ethics' segments best. You have such an informed and unique take.

I hate re-writing reviews.  One of my biggest reasons for avoiding continuing my marathon was that I hadn’t posted my Big Lebowski review before my computer crashed, so it was lost, so I had to write it from scratch.  I hate that.

Argh, so frustrating! After I lost enough posts to various mishaps I started to get in the habit of writing anything longer than a paragraph in Google Docs (which auto saves as you go and stores the file to your account, not your hard drive. So not only will in me safe in the even of a meltdown, but you can access it from any computer too!). Anyways, just thought I'd mention it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 09, 2011, 06:36:06 PM
Thank, 'noff.   I'll consider that.  Google docs might make it easier for me to re post as well.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on March 09, 2011, 07:12:20 PM
Yeah, I've always considered The Big Lebowski to be a couple of great characters/performances in great scenes in a fairly mediocre film. It is kind of at the median point for the Coens.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on March 09, 2011, 07:18:48 PM
I love The Big Lebowski, it's a comedy about observing absurdity. The absurd things in The Big Lebowski are funny, but they aren't as funny as the reactions people have to the absurdity that is going on around them. That's what makes it a great comedy and great film period in my eyes.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 09, 2011, 07:53:28 PM
I'm with Bill. It's a brilliant little absurd comedy.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 10, 2011, 11:36:52 AM
Synecdoche, New York

(http://brightcove.vo.llnwd.net/d6/unsecured/media/429149625/429149625_1873047471_synecdoche-new-york.jpg?pubId=429149625)

The final item Ferris was going to do before leaving Filmspotting was to watch SNY and make a line by line audio commentary on it.  We were supposed to get together and comment together, but it just didn’t happen, which is sad.   Ferris and I are both in our forties and we both could appreciate the considerations of late-life themes in the film and the struggles of the protagonist.  Ferris claimed that he had a specific concept of the theme of the film, which I never heard.  Perhaps it is not too late, but we shall see.

So I watched it on my own and I give my own thoughts of this film  I have to say that for about two years I was quite enamored of Charlie Kauffman, but this has become less so of late.  I still appreciate his unique approach to storytelling and his themes are significant.  However, as a unit, his films seem a bit whiney.   Certainly, though, Eternal Sunshine is going to make my top 100.  So what about Synecdoche?

Technical—5/5—For a first film, Kauffman did a fine job on this. Especially the creation of the town and the theatre as the town within the town was marvelously done.  The acting was top notch and the script was intellectually fascinating.

Interest—4/5—There is so much going on in this film that it is hard to turn away.  I’ve watched it almost three times and I feel that I would need to watch it three more times to even catch all the main themes.  There are allegorical pieces, like the house on fire, that seems to conflict with the more realistic approach, but that only increases the mystery of the basic question, “What the hell is this film about anyway?”

(http://www.thedorkreport.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/synecdoche-new-york-1.jpg)

Tension—2/5—There isn’t really much tension in the script.  It is just one damn event after another, and while they are all connected on the surface, one thing doesn’t really lead to another.  Events come out of nowhere, unexpectedly.  Thus, no tension is really built.  The only tension, again, is the meaning of the film.

Emotional—3/5—While the structure of the film makes it difficult to feel emotionally connected to the events, still Phillip Seymour Hoffman makes an empathetic character.  Kauffman’s script doesn’t make this easy, however.

Characters—4/5—Like Ikiru, this is really a one character film.  It is about Caden’s experience of the second half of his life, and everything we see is from his perspective, and most of the lack of realism is because his perspective is so skewed by his constant vision of death.  Thus, in a sense, the entire film is about character.  But this character is so confused, so horrified by his dismantlement of all that was significant in his life, that it is hard to appreciate this perspective.

(http://www.popmatters.com/images/features_art/s/synechdoche-splsh1.jpg)

Theme—5/5—The whole movie is about theme, really.  It is about one’s life when death is at the forefront of it.  There is much made of a near-death experience that gives one a new perspective on life.  However, this film could show the opposite of that.  What if one becomes so focused on death that life becomes meaningless?  So concerned about guilt and regret and health and powerlessness that life itself is simply a regurgitation of itself?  SNY is the perfect example of how obsession, even on a general positive thing, can be taken out of balance so that it becomes destructive, sucking in not only your life but the lives of those around you.

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3210/2982556307_d718bef5ee.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—Caden’s self-focus is so complete in this film that no one else really matters (except, on occasion, Hazel, excellent portrayed by Samantha Morton).  Finally, even he himself doesn’t matter and he allows Dianne Weist to direct every action in his life.  What I don’t know is whether Kauffman is making a sad commentary on Caden’s life—this is what we should avoid—or whether he is saying this is what we all experience.  We will all, eventually, be directed by others to do what we do, we all, at times, obsess on death and we all make errors because of it along the way.  Whichever the case, it is thoughtful and encourages thought.

Personal—3/5—As important as I think SNY is, it doesn’t connect with my life as much as I would think it should.  I am the right age, but perhaps not the right temperament to really see myself as Caden.  Sure, I think about death, although usually in a way looking forward to the break than anything else.   

I think that Synecdoche is an important film about death and life, as important as anything that Bergman has done.  I also think it is a difficult film: it is often unpleasant, often confusing and sometimes seems masturbatory on Kauffman’s part.  It is like a distasteful medicine you take because its good for you, a difficult class in college you take because your major requires it, but there is little pleasure in it, except, perhaps the intellectual pleasure of obtaining a hard-won nugget of knowledge. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on March 10, 2011, 12:26:30 PM
I try not to use the word pretentious casually so that it has more power when I apply it to a movie like Synecdoche, NY. Ugh! :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on March 10, 2011, 01:20:07 PM
I try not to use the word pretentious casually so that it has more power when I apply it to a movie like Synecdoche, NY. Ugh! :)

 ::)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on March 10, 2011, 01:22:03 PM
Very nice review! It's a movie that has grown on me the more it has sat, and as I've revisited it.

Tension—2/5—There isn’t really much tension in the script.  It is just one damn event after another, and while they are all connected on the surface, one thing doesn’t really lead to another.  Events come out of nowhere, unexpectedly.  Thus, no tension is really built.  The only tension, again, is the meaning of the film.

I wanted to address this point, because I think the film has magnificent tension. It isn't really a story tension, but a mood and thematic tension. The drama is continuously escalated by the events of the story, building more and more into the fever-dream world Caden inhabits by the end. The very end also provides a perfect release of tension, so I know it's there! ;)

I also disagree that there is little pleasure in watching it. It's actually a really funny film, and as you say, intellectually fascinating, which gives me more than enough entertainment value. At 22, I don't necessarily relate to Caden, but I enjoy the portrayal of his plight.

I try not to use the word pretentious casually so that it has more power when I apply it to a movie like Synecdoche, NY. Ugh! :)

I don't really object to calling it pretentious, but I think it's pretentious in the best possible way! :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on March 10, 2011, 01:41:52 PM
I try not to use the word pretentious casually so that it has more power when I apply it to a movie like Synecdoche, NY. Ugh! :)

 ::)

Thanks for the fantastic contribution to the discussion.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on March 10, 2011, 01:56:27 PM
I really, really try to avoid using the word "pretentious" but I don't mind it being used to describe SNY.  And don't get me wrong, I like that movie (to the point where I've nearly bought it several times) but it's hard to shake that feeling of "oh Charlie, you are trying way too hard". 

I'm a huge sucker for Tom Noonan, though.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on March 10, 2011, 02:24:34 PM
I try not to use the word pretentious casually so that it has more power when I apply it to a movie like Synecdoche, NY. Ugh! :)

 ::)

Thanks for the fantastic contribution to the discussion.

That's all that your comment needed from me, you didn't make me smile you made me roll your eyes, all there is to it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 11, 2011, 10:19:31 AM
The Apartment

(http://photos.shebloggedbynight.com/images/A_3/5/2/2/12253/faves_apartment2_600_9c80d.jpg)

Billy Wilder is an amazing director, not that he wrote and directed such popular movies, but that so many of his movies are seen as classics more than 50-60 years after they were made.  His movies consistently have stellar performances, often better than the stars shine in films apart from his own.   And many of his films regularly make top lists of all time, including Sunset Boulevard, Double Indemnity, and Some Like It Hot, and he stands with Akira Kurosawa, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorcese as being among the most praised directors of all time.   The Apartment, about C.C. Baxter making his journey from milquetoast to mature man, is one of Wilder’s most popular and highly praised films.

Technical—As Wilder films are opt to be, The Apartment is practically perfect.  A perfectly honed script, fantastic performances by Lemon and MacLaine,  cinematography that may not be the most interesting, but is very functional, especially for a story that exists mostly in offices and apartments.   As if we didn’t know, Wilder knows how to make a film.

Interest—3/5—Here’s my problem with the film, and it is personal, not having to do with the film itself.  I find upward mobility in an office setting to be stifling, even to watch from the outside.  It is great to see the characters grow and become something more than an office flunky, but getting there is so dull for me.  The best thing to watch was the performances.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_C_8M2WVWfgM/TSldkEoJ-6I/AAAAAAAAIVM/gVsm42keEhA/s1600/tn2_apartment_2.jpg)

Tension—3/5—There wasn’t much tension, except for his relation with his neighbors when MacLaine was knocked out in his bed.  The tension of him maintaining his clearly false “tiger” persona in the face of truth coming to haunt him was pretty tense.  

Emotional—3/5—Again, the plot didn’t hold a lot of interest for me, so I didn’t feel very much, except for Fran and her dilemma.

(http://api.ning.com/files/7m6*6ami0Xi2Ba0IPRrsqYnp*VccO6Q9fuJB8w5jmSI2Og1OWDh0F9sBckIQx5a6y0qWUoXJ7PXc7UL1YXL3ME*peIRjAg8C/TheApartment.jpg)

Characters—5/5—Like the Big Lebowski, most of the characters didn’t interest me at all, but Lemon and MacLaine were marvelous, possibly giving the best performances of their careers.   Their chemistry rapport were fantastic and I loved the scenes of them together.  When C.C. gets them to play chess, that was great, so real.

Theme—4/5—Love is greater than ambition.   Sure, its cliché, but it’s a believable cliché here.

Ethics—4/5—I love how we are dropped in the middle of C.C.’s dilemma, with little context of how he ended up loaning out his apartment for his boss’ infidelities.  We don’t need to see what a wimp he is, the situation speaks for itself.  Even when he asserts himself, it is clear who has the power.  At the same time, we know that C.C. has no power because he has granted himself no power.  When he stands at the end we can feel the ethical backbone forming.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSpW4_tq71XUiFntokIM-GoiG0yS0viZJOw93KivTQd8qHJHENbZA&t=1)

Personal—1/5—There was really no personal identification with this film, which is not the fault of the film at all.  It just had no real connection with my life.

This is an enjoyable film and I can say that I can see why it is considered a great film.  But my personal lack of empathy for the characters' situation reduces it in my personal rankings.

(http://pics.livejournal.com/rpowell/pic/001eyfs2/s640x480)

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on March 11, 2011, 10:31:42 AM
I enjoy how many of your films have been a part of my 2 mega-marathons. Interesting read cause I get the sense that you esteem The Apartment, but don't really embrace it.
Here (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=8652.msg532481#msg532481) was my brief take with plenty of FroHam fallout following.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 11, 2011, 10:43:53 AM
1SO, it seems that your main issue with the film is the change of tone, how this film is overwhelmingly melancholic, even though it seems to be on the surface, a screwball comedy.  I personally find the change of tone to be interesting.  If I had gone in expecting a screwball comedy, that might have been disappointing, but frankly, I like the Apartment better than, say, Some Like It Hot, a pretty straightforward comedy.  The comedy in that film was too broad for my taste.  This film is human with a couple of real characters struggling through life.  I guess I might compare it to Punch-Drunk Love in tone, which is not necessarily a bad thing.  Different, unexpected, but not bad.

Again, my issue with it is the lack of personal connection.  It is a well made film, with great performances, but it just didn't do anything for me, personally.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on March 11, 2011, 09:50:47 PM
Don't know if I'm weird or not but I have little personal connection to anything that happens in most movies. When movies have great characters then I connect to the story through them. I connect to their struggles and their obstacles. The Apartment is one of those films for me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sandy on March 11, 2011, 10:41:52 PM
I saw the Apartment so, so long ago, but can still remember the strong reaction I had to it. Here was Fred MacMurray, the perfect Disney dad (Mr. Follow Me Boys himself), doing all sorts of awful things. I still don't know if I have recovered completely.

BTW I hope you keep your review format Steve. I like seeing your take on the different aspects of the films.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 11, 2011, 10:44:34 PM
I saw the Apartment so, so long ago, but can still remember the strong reaction I had to it. Here was Fred MacMurray, the perfect Disney dad (Mr. Follow Me Boys himself), doing all sorts of awful things. I still don't know if I have recovered completely.

BTW I hope you keep your review format Steve. I like seeing your take on the different aspects of the films.

I had the same reaction to Fred MacMurray when I saw Double Indemnity.  The Apartment is tame by comparison.

And I will keep the format.  I find that it really helps me get back into the film, step by step.  So even if no one else liked it, it helps me out a lot.  :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 11, 2011, 11:06:01 PM
I don't know if I have a direct persona connection, but I can certainly relate to a character who's afraid to speak out against the immoral behavior of those around him even as it begins suffocating his own life.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 11, 2011, 11:31:41 PM
I don't know if I have a direct persona connection, but I can certainly relate to a character who's afraid to speak out against the immoral behavior of those around him even as it begins suffocating his own life.

To a certain degree, I can't.  I can't see myself having gotten into that situation in the first place, let alone being afraid to speak out.  I speak out.  It's what I do.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sandy on March 11, 2011, 11:42:21 PM
I saw the Apartment so, so long ago, but can still remember the strong reaction I had to it. Here was Fred MacMurray, the perfect Disney dad (Mr. Follow Me Boys himself), doing all sorts of awful things. I still don't know if I have recovered completely.

BTW I hope you keep your review format Steve. I like seeing your take on the different aspects of the films.

I had the same reaction to Fred MacMurray when I saw Double Indemnity.  The Apartment is tame by comparison.

And I will keep the format.  I find that it really helps me get back into the film, step by step.  So even if no one else liked it, it helps me out a lot.  :)

Maybe that's why I have avoided Double Indemnity all these years. I need to grow up and remedy the situation.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 12, 2011, 12:57:13 AM
Don't know if I'm weird or not but I have little personal connection to anything that happens in most movies. When movies have great characters then I connect to the story through them. I connect to their struggles and their obstacles. The Apartment is one of those films for me.

I agree.  I like movies that allow me to experience things I've never experienced.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 12, 2011, 01:03:26 AM
Don't know if I'm weird or not but I have little personal connection to anything that happens in most movies. When movies have great characters then I connect to the story through them. I connect to their struggles and their obstacles. The Apartment is one of those films for me.

I agree.  I like movies that allow me to experience things I've never experienced.

And I do too.  The problem with a top 100 marathon is that I am explaining why a movie is or is not going to be one of the .1% of the films I've seen.  I am not saying this film or any others is worse than another film.  Rather, I am saying that a personal connection is one of the aspects of a film that helps me rank a film higher.  Thus, even though I felt the characters were real, I didn't empathize with them; and even though the situation was very human, I didn't relate to it.  Thus, the film was quite good, but it didn't connect.

I've never been in war, but the first 20 minutes of Saving Private Ryan helped me empathize with soldiers in a way I never had before.  It doesn't have to do just with being in a situation.  I have to be put in that situation.  I wasn't in The Apartment.  There's still other stuff to appreciate there, but I didn't get personally involved.  It just didn't happen for me.  Oh well.  Often it doesn't.  Glad I saw it, though.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 12, 2011, 01:09:18 AM
Ah, I see, that totally makes sense.

I don't know what I'd call that, but I don't think "personal connection" is quite it.  To me, that means it relates to something specifically in your own life experience.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 12, 2011, 10:33:22 AM
Ah, I see, that totally makes sense.

I don't know what I'd call that, but I don't think "personal connection" is quite it.  To me, that means it relates to something specifically in your own life experience.

Life experience is one aspect of it, but that's not all that I think of when I say it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 12, 2011, 10:38:42 AM
The Philadelphia Story
Jimmy Stewart, Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn.  Three classic performers together in a screwball ménage a trois.   How can this film go wrong?

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_k_axy6QTAZI/TLZfdduOeVI/AAAAAAAAAaE/cQKindcZETQ/s1600/philadelphiastory.jpg)

Hepburn is getting remarried after her failed marriage with Grant.  She is getting married to the opposite of her charming, upper crust, alcoholic ex—a self-made man with old fashioned attitudes about work and gender relations.  In comes Jimmy Stewart, hired by Grant to mix things up in the coming nuptials by being a nosy reporter.   Hepburn of course, falls for Stewart.  Or does she?

Technical—4/5—Well done.  Good, but not great, performances.  Nothing great, but all good.

Interest—4/5—I love screwball comedies and I love the three main performers, so I was all ready to fall in love with this film.  It didn’t quite happen, though.  I think I needed more one-liners and I needed Stewart to stop playing so tough.  Just doesn’t fit.

Tension—3/5—Like most screwball comedies, so much is happening, so many changes take place that it doesn’t really develop tension.  Pretty soon, it just doesn’t matter what Hepburn decides.   You just wish she’d get it over with and decide.

Emotional—2/5—I didn’t really feel for any of the characters.

Characters—3/5—And that’s probably because the characters were played, not lived.  I mean, sure, it’s Grant and Hepburn and Stewart, but they are just being their types, not really real people at all.

Theme—2/5—Ummm.  “Don’t get involved with more than two men at a time”?  “Women shouldn’t be bossy, that should be left to men”?  Although Hepburn was a strong character (probably the strongest in the film) this certainly wasn’t a feminist manifesto.

Ethics—2/5—This isn’t a film about ethics.  Or, if it is, it isn’t about an ethics I appreciate.  I suppose it is the “love conquers all” kind of ethic, where eros holds sway over commitment, faithfulness, gentleness and actual caring for other people.

Personal—2/5—I never had the necessity to marry more than one person at a time.  I am certainly at times unnecessarily bossy. 

It’s okay.  Not one of my favorite screwball comedies.  Its going near the bottom of my top 100 list, although recommended.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 13, 2011, 10:23:23 AM
Citizen Kane

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Lk0WJRrU_Zg/TRAE-v4ycvI/AAAAAAAAAog/Bq7xK6iEt_Y/s1600/citizenkane.jpg)

Orson Welles.  Greatest film of all time.  William Randolph Hearst under cover.  Blah, blah, blah.  Frankly, I’m sick of all the acclaim.  Yeah, I saw it before.  It was okay.  But I think I really liked it because it was so acclaimed so I was ready to like it.  This time, I told myself, I’m going to watch it objectively.   I don’t care what anyone else thinks about this film.  It’s just me and Welles, head to head.  And I don’t think I’m going to like it near as much as I did before.

Technical—5/5—Okay, well everyone knows that this is one of the most technically perfect films ever made.  Welles had too much time on his hands, that’s why its so great.  Look at the camera angles and the lighting, cool.  Yeah, but does it really work as entertainment.  It must be praised because of its technical precision.  Yeah, that’s it.

(http://www.thegamecritique.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/Citizen-Kane-2.jpg)


Interest—5/5   Characters—5/5
I forgot what a fantastic actor Welles was.  I was amazed by Kirk Douglas’ performance as an irritating man who was fascinating to watch.  Welles took it another step.  Not only is Welles fascinating, but he is charismatic, likeable, loveable, even.  No matter what a jerk he is, no matter how self-absorbed, so matter how irritatingly fly by night he is, you want to like him.  You DO like him.  If another actor had been the focus of this script, say someone along the caliber of Philip Seymore Hoffman or Meryl Streep, you’d appreciate the work and the acting would be magnificent and you call this a great film, but not an entertaining one.  Under Welles at both the acting and directorial helm, though, you are laughing, crying, understanding, empathizing, through every scene with this spoiled brat of a man.  I am amazed at this performance, at this character created.

Tension—3/5- This is a biopic and the “rosebud” tactic doesn’t really work to build up tension, nor even much of a mystery. 

Emotional—4/5—Yes, yes, okay.  I got a little dusty eyed.  Perhaps I recognized my own narcissistic tendencies, my own drive to be loved that drives others away.  Maybe I recognize my own frustrations at being unable to connect to others that I long for so desperately.  But this silly multimillionaire made me gushy inside.  Fine.  I don’t care.  I’m man enough to admit it.

(http://27.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ldreyjulB11qf3s7ro1_400.jpg)

Theme—5/5—This isn’t a film about greed or apathy.  That would have been the easy road.  Rather it is about loneliness.  About the need to make a deep, intimate connection with another.   And this is such a universal need, and so often lives are left empty of this, that, amidst all the other reasons is what makes this a great film.

Ethics—5/5—I like the way Kane tries to fill his relational void with many different attempts, but it isn’t obvious that is what he is doing.  It looks like a man who has many interests and the money to make it all happen.  But in the end it is about the search for love and how we can hurt everyone we know just looking and never taking the time to connect.

Personal—4/5—I am Kane, and at one time or another we all are. 

Welles wins again.  Dang, this truly is one of the greatest films of all time.  It probably won’t make my top ten because I need a lot of room for Pixar and Miyazaki :) , but it will be up there, somewhere.

(http://whendesireruns.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/citizenkane460.jpg)
Yeah, fine, Mr. Welles.  Just laugh at me.  Curses, you win again!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 13, 2011, 11:32:24 AM
Agreed on all counts. The more I see it, the more I can relate to Kane, especially when he sits down to make his principles, only to have them shoved in his face down the line. I think we've all had moments like that.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on March 13, 2011, 11:51:07 AM
I'll be watching Kane this week. I hope all the parodies from my Simpsons Marathon don't diminish its greatness. Right now I remember it as one of the great Top 5 Great Technical Achievements, but not an All Time Top 5. Maybe it'll land around 50.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on March 13, 2011, 03:59:41 PM
On one hand I saw Citizen Kane a good few years ago when I was a less refined film watcher. On the other hand, the more recent Welles films have done nothing to think I'd like CK this time around. :-\

Quote
But I think I really liked it because it was so acclaimed so I was ready to like it.

Heh, I liked this quote. That so isn't how I relate to films.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 13, 2011, 04:13:53 PM

Quote
But I think I really liked it because it was so acclaimed so I was ready to like it.

Heh, I liked this quote. That so isn't how I relate to films.

It isn't how I relate to films, now.  But there was a time that I felt that I should like certain films.  I don't have that problem anymore.

Also, each Welles film is completely different.  Don't judge one by another.  And don't judge my enjoyment of Citizen Kane by the fact that I think that F is for Fake is the best documentary I've seen. :)

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 17, 2011, 01:39:07 PM
To Kill A Mockingbird

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_c3Ab_3gRAo0/TEz8Don-FAI/AAAAAAAAAlY/SYyw6t1QCBA/s320/to+kill+a+mockingbird.jpg)
Mercy and I sitting on the porch

I read Harper Lee’s book for high school.  They gave us a semester to read it (wimps!) and I inhaled it over a weekend.  A couple of years later I saw the film.  At the time, it was the only film I had watched that not only captured the book, but it was great even alongside such a great novel.   I am happy to report that my more recent viewing of the film with Mercy (aka Ideathy) was an equally joyful experience.

Technical—5/5—As perfect as a film could be in 1962.  And they could make pretty perfect films then.   Everything was top notch, from the script to the acting to the  camera work, to the pacing—simply perfect.

(http://thebestpictureproject.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/to_kill_a_mockingbird2.jpg)

Interest—5/5—This story reaches my inner mythos.  There isn’t a scene the film couldn’t do without.  Every line is just right.

Tension—5/5—Yes, I know exactly what is going to happen. After all, I've seen it before.  But I was still tense and weepy before the verdict is given.  I still can barely watch what is happening in the woods.

This is one of the more amazing things watching this film with Mercy (who is 10, in case you didn’t know).  The scenes that were tense for her were completely different.  When Scout was about to knock on the Radley house, Mercy turned her eyes and would have refused to watch any more.  She was listening to the cues of the music and was completely empathizing with Scout.  In the scene in the woods near the end of the film, Scout was in confusion, she couldn’t see a thing—and neither could we—and there wasn’t any music to tell us what to feel.  As an adult, I knew what was happening and I was scared.  That was the scene I couldn’t watch.  But Mercy was fine, no tension at all.  That is one of the ways I knew what a masterpiece this film was.  It communicated to both me and my ten year old, but in different ways, at different times.  Amazing.  Simply amazing.

Emotional—5/5—Yeah.  Oh yeah.

(http://upload.moldova.org/movie/movies/k/kill_a_mockingbird/thumbnails/tn2_to_kill_a_mockingbird_1.jpg) 

Characters—5/5—When I watched this film as a teen I already knew that I wanted to be Gregory Peck as a father.  I wanted to be that respected person in the community, the wise person who helped out those in need.  I wanted to be there for my kids, proving that I could both defend them and teach them that they need not harm others.  Mind you, I am not Gregory Peck.  Who could be?  Even Gregory Peck wasn’t Atticus Finch, I’m sure.   But I know for a fact that Atticus was my goal for fatherhood.   If I could be ten percent Atticus, I’d feel successful. 
Mind you, all the other characters are great.  Robert Duvall in his first performance.  Mary Badham as Scout was perfect.  The Sheriff and Mizz Crawford were excellent.  But I will never forget Atticus as long as I exist.

(http://davebpatterson.yolasite.com/resources/MaryB3.jpg?timestamp=1282515119806)

Theme—5/5—Both the principle of not harming the helpless and how to act when one’s own community insists upon doing so.  It is a good year for me to watch this, really, as in my real life I am struggling against a city that is willing to make any excuse to allow the homeless to suffer with hypothermia.

Ethics—5/5—This is one of the most powerful sermons ever preached on film.  It is like Jesus on film, better than any gospel presentation ever in cinema.

Personal—5/5—I’ve said enough, I think.

Yes, this is a perfect film and one of my personal favorites.  It’s goin’ up there.  Way up.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on March 17, 2011, 01:42:17 PM
 ;D

It is great.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bill Thompson on March 17, 2011, 02:59:52 PM
;D

It is great.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on March 17, 2011, 03:53:56 PM
My first To Kill A Mockingbird experience was a staging back in college. Oddly enough when I actually got around to the film, it didn't quite live up to the energy of the live setting. But the story of course is just incredible that I'm sure if I had experienced the film first it would be knocking on the door of the top-100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on March 17, 2011, 05:46:33 PM
;D

It is great.
It's one of my all time favorite books, and the movie didn't hold up to it. But I haven't read the book in forever so I'll definitely give this a rewatch.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sandy on March 17, 2011, 06:27:42 PM
A perfect review for a perfect movie. Thanks.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 25, 2011, 02:03:07 AM
Updated List, including the recently reviewed:

1.   Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
2.   In America
3.   To Kill A Mockingbird
4.   Rear Window
5.   Amelie
6.   The Red Shoes
7.   Edward Scissorhands
8.   Princess Mononoke
9.   The Dark Knight
10.   Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
11.   Tideland
12.   Red Beard
13.   The Brothers Bloom
14.   I [Heart] Huckabees
15.   Citizen Kane
16.   I’m Not There
17.   Toy Story 2
18.   Close Encounters of the Third Kind
19.   The Man Without A Past
20.   Dog Day Afternoon
21.   Brick
22.   District 9
23.   Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
24.   Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
25.   Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
26.   50 First Dates
27.   Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
28.   Rachel Getting Married
29.   Synecdoche, New York
30.   The Godfather
31.   The Son (2003)
32.   Raising Arizona
33.   How To Train A Dragon
34.   Shaun of the Dead
35.   Do The Right Thing
36.   Adaptation
37.   Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
38.   Scizopolis
39.   Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
40.   Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
41.   *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
42.   The Big Lebowski
43.   The Big Sleep
44.   The Apartment
45.   Three Kings
46.   Y Tu Mama Tambien
47.   The White Ribbon
48.   Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
49.   The Science of Sleep
50.   Grizzly Man
51.   Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
52.   Scarecrow
53.   Fitzcaraldo
54.   Zelig
55.   Harold and Maude
56.   Repulsion
57.   The Philadelphia Story
58.   Mister Roberts


Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 26, 2011, 12:06:11 PM
Black Narcissus

(http://www.classicfilmpreview.com/images/bn3.jpg)

A nun is sent by her order to establish a school in the Himilayas, where the church has tried to get a foothold, but failed.  She is young, determined, smart and beautiful.  Of course she will succeed.  Or will she?  This is a film by the daring duo, Powell and Pressburger and you cannot expect the expected with them.

(http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/39/2008/12/medium_BlackNarcissus_04.jpg)

Technical—5/5—As everyone says, visually, this film is stunning.  It is so well made in almost every aspect, it is worth watching just to take in the spectacle.

Theme—5/5—The themes were fantastic.  At first, it seemed as if the film was going to be a chaos v. order theme, in which, of course, order will win.  Because order always wins, especially in older films.  But this film is a slight variation of the theme: Beauty v. Reason.  Yes, Beauty is chaotic and dangerous and causes on to give into lesser emotions… but nevertheless Reason and its lesser sister Order, cannot overcome it.  In the short term, Reason may seem to have the upper hand, but over the long haul, Beauty always conquers, leaving chaos in its wake.    This is the most powerful aspect of the film, what makes it so unique, such a different take, so unexpected.
 
(http://www.familylosangeles.com/blog/uploaded_images/BlackNarcissus3-793947.jpg)

Ethics—4/5—I have to say that this is the rare film where ethics really don’t have much play.  It may seem so… there are certainly right and wrong things that happen in the film.  But in the end, it is all about the two god-like forces battling each other out.  The characters are simply pawns of the forces.  Reason is attempting to break into Beauty’s stronghold, and Beauty fights back with all that she has.  We might even see this as a battle of Apollo and Aphrodite, using humans as their playthings.  What is human ethics in the midst of the war of the gods?

Characters—3/5—However, this powerful theme is also the weakness of the film.  Although the actors were fantastic, I had a hard time seeing these people as real.  They really are pawns, not acting for themselves or real human emotions, but acting as representatives of their god.  This isn’t the Illiad in which human strength and hubris come into play into the will of the gods.  I just found it hard to believe in these people.

Interest—4/5—Thus, my interest was divided.  I’m interested in seeing the film again to see just how these themes play out, because they seem to be the point of the film, but I never identified with a character, so I always felt removed, disinterested, from the human action.

(http://farm1.static.flickr.com/124/413127597_efd87e5c91.jpg)

Tension-3/5—I acknowledge there was tension there, but I rarely felt it.

Emotional—3/5—When the human is marginalized (which it seemed so to me), then you cannot borrow on the emotions of another.

Personal—4/5—I think many of us have felt the struggle of Beauty and Reason in their lives.  So I resonate with the war, if not the way these particular pawns played it out.

(http://www.brightlightsfilm.com/33/33_images/033blacknarcissus.jpg)

Although there is much that must be praised with the film, it did not enthrall me.  I will watch it again and hope to have a better experience, but as for now, although impressed by many things, I will remain a distant admirer
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on March 26, 2011, 12:38:34 PM
I have that on my Instant queue...need to watch it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 26, 2011, 01:35:57 PM
I wouldn't call it "Beauty".  "Passion"  "Chaos" "Emotion" "The Past" all seem more apt for the forces that drive the nuns nuts.  It's also different for each nun, so ultimately it's about the failure of repression.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 26, 2011, 01:55:13 PM
I don't mean to quibble because interpretation is so personal, but the reason I brought up the ancient gods is because I think they really were struggling against the ancient power of Aphrodite/Venus/Eros-- beauty, lust, natural passion, romantic desire.  That's the one aspect of the film that is just crystal clear to me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 26, 2011, 02:00:20 PM
Interesting. I think I like this film a bit more than you do. I think the characters are a bit more complex than you give them credit for and that there's a lot of tension in the last act.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on March 26, 2011, 02:06:18 PM
How about this point of view. If an American evangelical mission set itself up in an Iraqi city or the hills of Afghanistan (c. Restrepo); would the mission change the population or would the mission be changed?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 26, 2011, 02:18:04 PM
Yea, that's a big aspect of it as well. I see it as a critique of mission work that fails due to an inability to understand another culture.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 26, 2011, 02:30:37 PM
I don't mean to quibble because interpretation is so personal, but the reason I brought up the ancient gods is because I think they really were struggling against the ancient power of Aphrodite/Venus/Eros-- beauty, lust, natural passion, romantic desire.  That's the one aspect of the film that is just crystal clear to me.

Odd that you would describe it in terms of Western culture, Greek and Roman gods.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on March 26, 2011, 02:41:48 PM
The idea of cultural imperialism is there (at about the time Britain was being kicked out of India). How military superiority seemed to imply a cultural superiority, of educating the natives, and how we had so much more to learn from them than they did from us. It is an example of lessons learnt in the past not being taken on board in the present. Also Britain's meddling in the 'old world' still has repercussions in British society, and Four Lions might be a comic interpretation of it but it is a consequence of some of what you see in BN. I would expect the US to suffer in exactly the same way unless it learns these lessons. 'Suffer' is harsh because I think the diversity and tolerance that exists here makes the UK a better place.

Mostly though this is a horror film of how the English had lost touch with their basic feeling to the extent that 'over-exposure' to 'savage' sexuality drives some of them mad. Now that makes for a great film! That is why I always find peoples' reactions under-rate this film.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 26, 2011, 02:49:22 PM
I don't mean to quibble because interpretation is so personal, but the reason I brought up the ancient gods is because I think they really were struggling against the ancient power of Aphrodite/Venus/Eros-- beauty, lust, natural passion, romantic desire.  That's the one aspect of the film that is just crystal clear to me.

Odd that you would describe it in terms of Western culture, Greek and Roman gods.

I might do the same with Hindu gods.  However, this is a particularly Western battle of the gods.  There must be one victor, not a compromise between them.   Also the writers were Western, so it is their ideals I am trying to communicate.

And verbALs, the only thing that brought this movie down for me was that the characters didn't really feel fully developed here.  I cannot put that squarely on P and P or certainly not on Deborah Kerr (who was amazing in Colonel Blimp),  (although I found Jean Simmons to be less than convincing), overall I didn't find the reactions to be character-driven.

Again, I am willing to give the film a chance again later, in more than a year.  Certainly there is a great movie there that didn't completely connect to me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on March 26, 2011, 02:53:56 PM
Ok but I thought Jean Simmons was bloody hot! For a 40s film this was incredibly sexually charged and she was a major part of it. It was slightly worrying that she was of indeterminate age (or actually under-age I can't remember)> it isn't the only time Powell did this either Age of Consent is suspect from this point of view.

Anyway Oldkid getting your perspective on this film is really interesting, thanks great review.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 26, 2011, 08:03:38 PM
I might do the same with Hindu gods.  However, this is a particularly Western battle of the gods.  There must be one victor, not a compromise between them.   Also the writers were Western, so it is their ideals I am trying to communicate.

See, for me, it's more a conflict of West vs. East than an internal Western conflict.

The film was written by Westerners, but it's based on a novel by Rumer Godden, who was an Englishwoman who grew up in India (Jean Renoir's The River is also based on one of her books).
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 26, 2011, 08:33:43 PM
And of course, we know that Englishmen and -women who grew up in India during the time of the Raj were completely balanced between the West and the East. 

Anyway, I'm not trying to dissuade you from your view of the film.  Only trying to defend my own. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 26, 2011, 09:46:41 PM
Huh?  Who said anyone was balanced?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 27, 2011, 12:26:57 AM
Huh?  Who said anyone was balanced?

Sorry, misspoke.  I mean that the English who grew up in India didn't necessarily know that much about the philosophy of those around them or had much sympathy for it.  I'd have to read the book to know, but really it is the inescapable power of the region that is being described in the film, not their philosophy or native ideals.  Something non-human was attacking the nuns.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 27, 2011, 01:07:14 AM
Ah I see.  I think Godden is pretty knowledgable and sympathetic towards Indian culture, while still being very English.  I think she's more balanced than most were, at least in my experience of her work.

What the nuns are experiencing very much comes out of their surroundings.  This kind of environmental mysticism, with the spirits of the past physically inhabiting the land and infecting (affecting) the present, is a common theme in Powell & Pressburger's films.  Usually it's more benevolent, as in A Canterbury Tale or I Know Where I'm Going!.  But the leads in those films (also women) are more open to their environments than the necessarily repressed nuns are.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on March 27, 2011, 07:33:01 AM
Ah I see.  I think Godden is pretty knowledgable and sympathetic towards Indian culture, while still being very English.  I think she's more balanced than most were, at least in my experience of her work.

What the nuns are experiencing very much comes out of their surroundings.  This kind of environmental mysticism, with the spirits of the past physically inhabiting the land and infecting (affecting) the present, is a common theme in Powell & Pressburger's films.  Usually it's more benevolent, as in A Canterbury Tale or I Know Where I'm Going!.  But the leads in those films (also women) are more open to their environments than the necessarily repressed nuns are.
I saw a connection also with Powell's Edge of the World the power of the environment and in particular the cliffs that so much of the action centres upon.

I, personally, don't believe spirituality and religion always mean the same thing. The environment's spirit is what is prevalent here.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 27, 2011, 09:56:10 AM
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

(http://blog.bearstrong.net/max256/uploaded_images/The-Life-and-Death-of-Colonel-Blimp-(1943)---Roger-Livesey,-John-Laurie-790944.jpg)
 
I just want to say at the beginning that no matter how many times Powell and Pressberger  show me that they are not telling the run-of-the-mill, expected storyline, yet I still fall into their trap.  This bugs me in the most pleasant way.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRf0Q8ibSEpqExu2OUFyU7KAmXnLZY8hGZoTGAqd_aLgrOM1z_i&t=1)

Technical—5/5—Although not as spectacular as Black Narcissus or The Red Shoes, P and P are nothing if not technical marvels.  Not a single frame out of place.

Interest—5/5—I was most bored at the beginning, trying to get past the whole bio-pic frame.  However, the life is so well told and so many excellent themes are brought in, I was soon drawn in.  And, frankly, this is not the story of a single life, but of a relationship between two men who, given their life context, has a lot of strikes against it.  This is a complex story, with a wonderful composition.  How could I not be fascinated?

Tension—4/5—Not a lot of points of tension, but enough to make the story great.  How will the love triangle work itself out?  Can the friendship be spared through two great wars?   I love the way P and P allow us to draw our own conclusions as to the significance of each event, rather than giving exposition.

Emotional—4/5—There is a lot to be emotional about, but the stoic nature of the men involved prevent one from really seeing their emotion and so one’s own emotion is limited.  Still, it is there.

(http://l.yimg.com/g/images/spaceball.gif)

Characters—5/5—I wish I could express how well these characters are portrayed.  I honestly never want to see this film remade because I cannot imagine anyone portraying Candy, Theo or Edith—Deborah Kerr at her best and that is an amazing statement!—better than they are portrayed.  Anyone else attempting to play these characters would ruin them.

Theme—5/5—To reduce this film to a single theme is to minimalize it.  There is a message about war—one that is so complex that I had to look at the date again to be sure that this film was really made during WWII (certainly not propaganda!).   There is a message about growing older and facing new ideas.  There is the anti-Nazi message which is gratefully short, but a more important message about true patriotism.  And a bittersweet message about regrets.  It all may be focused under a single theme, but it feels more like a real life rather than a bio pic.  This would be a marvelous “desert island” film because there is so much here to tease out, it is worth many rewatchings.

(http://homecinema.thedigitalfix.co.uk/protectedimage.php?image=MikeBaker/blimp2.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—Like the theme, there isn’t a single unified ethical point nor does it seek to preach or give ethical answers.  Yet ethics pervade the film—war isn’t all wrong, but it isn’t all right, either.  Candy is at one point foolish, another noble, even by holding to the same principle.  Teasing out the ethical implications of this film would take a lot of effort, which is one of the glories of it.

Personal—4/5—I haven’t had any of the experiences of Candy.  I’ve never been in war, never been a hero, never been in any kind of love triangle, never had a friendship like Candy and Theo’s.  But one thing I can say: every person is as complex as Candy is portrayed here.  And should anyone wish to tell my story, I would wish it were as complex as this story is told.

(http://content7.flixster.com/photo/84/10/52/8410529_gal.jpg)

I wish that this was the structure that most bio-pics were based on.  I wish that we could see through our stereotypes of individuals and see them as well-rounded persons as this film does.  Every individual human is a culture, an entire species.  I wish we could see them all this way.  Yeah, it’s probably going on my top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 27, 2011, 03:13:42 PM
Ah I see.  I think Godden is pretty knowledgable and sympathetic towards Indian culture, while still being very English.  I think she's more balanced than most were, at least in my experience of her work.

What the nuns are experiencing very much comes out of their surroundings.  This kind of environmental mysticism, with the spirits of the past physically inhabiting the land and infecting (affecting) the present, is a common theme in Powell & Pressburger's films.  Usually it's more benevolent, as in A Canterbury Tale or I Know Where I'm Going!.  But the leads in those films (also women) are more open to their environments than the necessarily repressed nuns are.
I saw a connection also with Powell's Edge of the World the power of the environment and in particular the cliffs that so much of the action centres upon.

I, personally, don't believe spirituality and religion always mean the same thing. The environment's spirit is what is prevalent here.

Yup, definitely in Edge of the WorldAge of Consent too, I think.  Come to think of it, Age of Consent is kind of like a mirror image Black Narcissus.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 28, 2011, 10:42:00 AM
No comments on Colonel Blimp?  Where's the love?


The Secret of Kells
(http://upperplayground.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/14a9538ec1kells.jpg)

Certain genres speak to me more than others.  Admittedly, I’m going to give an animated movie a lot more slack than a documentary or a western.  An animated film usually gives me more entertainment and the better ones speak to me more.   Yes, animated films are more simple (and often, more simplistic) than other films, but that gives me more of a chance to see what else the film has to offer than the basic plot/character devices most movies offer.

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSnXhvS3zJ_v6w65GGBPtr7hRr1FemwB0WUc52Jc4dqV_n7-1TG&t=1)
This is one of the most beautiful films I’ve ever seen.  It has the complexity of design of The Thief and the Cobbler but the composition is from The Book of Kells, one of the most magnificently illustrated books in history. 

(http://www.heyuguys.co.uk/images/2010/11/The-Secret-of-Kells-3.jpg)

I’m not going to bother going though my ratings for this.  Look, the characters aren’t much.  The story is okay, and there’s some tension.   Thematically and ethically, it’s nothing new.  Honestly, I was stunned by this film— hypnotized, really— by its beauty and visual imagination.   This film gave me joy in a dry period of my movie watching and I’m going to give it a lot of credit for that.  I don’t know that I can be really objective about it.  It’s not the best film even of 2010, (I want to give that award to Mother), but its going to fit on my list simply because its beauty overwhelmed me. 

So there.

(http://i.ytimg.com/vi/9oJznFPGJ_w/0.jpg)

(http://www.dailyscrawl.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/The-Secret-of-Kells-city-in-flames.jpg)

(http://www.nypress.com/imgs/blogs/blog7698widea.jpg)

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 28, 2011, 10:53:47 AM
Fair enough, but yea, you admit the shortcomings I could never get past.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on March 28, 2011, 11:02:26 AM
So there.

:)

It is pretty stunning isn't it. A musical/visual feast. I was let down by the story, but knowing what to expect now I think I could go back and really enjoy its strengths. Good review, agree very much.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on March 28, 2011, 08:30:36 PM
Hypnotized is an apt way to describe my reaction to The Secret of Kells also. I know the story isn't entirely there, but so gorgeous. A top-notch in theatre experience.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 29, 2011, 01:20:22 AM
Hypnotized is an apt way to describe my reaction to The Secret of Kells also. I know the story isn't entirely there, but so gorgeous. A top-notch in theatre experience.

Thank you!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 29, 2011, 06:23:12 PM
It Happened One Night
(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRb6sS1DfnYesl9cyAn03IH0sDRVBSU9fKvAZosYMUfigaEFX_mFw&t=1)
Steve and Mercy watching "It Happened One Night"

This is my second viewing of this film, although it must be admitted I don’t remember much from my first viewing.  It was late, I was young.  But it made some impression on me.  Probably because this is the first Frank Capra and the first Clark Gable film I ever saw.  I’ve seen others by both of them now, and I’ve seen a lot of rom coms of which this is one of the earliest.  Does this hold up?

Technical—3/5—It’s not one of the best prints ever, and the shooting was pretty standard, even for 1934.  It has as much imagination as a television show from the 50s.

Interest—3/5—Honestly, it’s pretty standard rom com fare.  I know, it’s really early.  But City Lights was made before this.   It was moderately funny, but no LOL moments.

Tension—2/5—Will they get together?  Oh, of course they will…

Emotional—2/5—Which jerk can I identify with?

Characters—3/5—There were some fine moments, like in the motel room.  But the characters never escaped their stereotypes.

Theme—1/5—Love is greater than disgust?

Ethics—2/5—Don’t sell out a stranger because you might fall in love with her?

Personal—1/5  Never been a newspaperman or a wealthy heiress.

This time around I just didn’t see anything special.  It’s going to the bottom of my list.  But Capra will certainly be seen again.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 29, 2011, 06:26:09 PM
Capra? Get some Hawkes going on instead.  ;)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on March 29, 2011, 06:49:35 PM
Sorry to read that.

I think the script is ripe with one-upsmanship, sexual politics and misunderstandings.  The chemistry between Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert is remarkable, helped along by a constant stream of sharp banter.  I loved the scenes of Gable teaching Colbert how the regular folk make their way through life.  Colbert fights back by bruising Gable's enormous ego and sometimes proving her way is better at getting the job done. 

They can't stand each other.  They're made for each other.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 29, 2011, 07:26:25 PM
Capra? Get some Hawkes going on instead.  ;)

Hawks will also have his turn.

And, frankly, perhaps I didn't care for It Happened as much because Hawks is the master of it.  I think Capra is the master of the high-minded story, the sermon.  For people who really dislike each other, we need some real rapier wit like His Girl Friday.  Even The Philadelphia Story, a good but not great example is better at character than It Happened One Night.  I don't blame It Happened for being one of the earliest examples of this.  It's fine.  It's just that it was done so much better later.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 01:52:58 AM
Wild Strawberries
(http://i.acdn.us/image/A1433/1433256/300_1433256.jpg)
Bergman, Bergman, Bergman...

All around me are Bergman fans.  I tried, I really did.  I watched Fanny and Alexander (twice), The Seventh Seal, Through A Glass Darkly, the first half of Winter Light (I’ll finish it someday)… I’m sorry, folks, they all bored me.  They were dry, unfunny and generally dull.  Watching a bunch of people looking for meaning without a clue—I see that everyday.  The portrayals of mental illness or angst didn’t really seem true to life for me.  So, just to appease Chardy, I agreed to watch Wild Strawberries.  But I don’t expect much from it.

Technical—5/5—Bergman is always a fine filmmaker, nothing to object to.  His actors are all great and his technique is good. 

Theme—5/5—As always, Bergman is thematically rich.  Wild Strawberries is about a man reflecting on what is important in life.  God was never present and science is significant, and he received a lot of honor.  And his life is empty.  What is wrong?  What is he missing?  Relationship, a real connection with others.  That’s a great theme.  Much better than no answer at all.  This reminds me strongly of Ikiru, without the Capra overlay.

(http://img.listal.com/image/736002/600full-wild-strawberries-screenshot.jpg]http://img.listal.com/image/736002/600full-wild-strawberries-screenshot.jpg)

Characters—5/5—But here is what Wild Strawberries has that other Bergman didn’t.  These characters are well portrayed and the development seems natural and powerful.  Victor Sjöström and Ingrid Thulin do especially exceptional work at portraying the aging doctor and his lonely daughter in law. 

Emotional—5/5—Most importantly, I felt for these characters.  Their quiet heartbreak is powerfully told and the realization of their mistakes and regret comes slowly upon them, allowing us to go on the doctor’s emotional road trip with him. 

Interest—4/5—This film grew on me.  At first, it seemed like other Bergman films I found uninteresting, but as I attached to the characters, I wanted more detail, more understanding of the struggles they were going through.

Tension—3/5—Not much in the way of tension, except how the doctor will react.  A very relational film and all the tension resides in how they act toward one another.

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3606/3487636378_1c864d4e93.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—A powerful ethical message, probably the most important of the films I’ve seen by Bergman.  Rather than focusing on what we cannot experience, Bergman shows us what we can, what really is significant in life. 

Personal—4/5—The older I get the more I appreciate the doctor’s position.  Sure, perhaps I’m correct in what I do, but that doesn’t make me right in relationship.  People are more important than ideals.  It is so hard to remember that.

Finally, a Bergman I appreciate and, actually, love.  I like this one better than Ikiru, actually.  It’ll make it, probably.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_3mCOm4wxK3M/SSWIST03HHI/AAAAAAAABHQ/xr_x--ZZl3s/s400/wild+straw.jpg)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on March 31, 2011, 03:21:44 AM
All around me are Bergman fans.  I tried, I really did.  I watched Fanny and Alexander (twice), The Seventh Seal, Through A Glass Darkly, the first half of Winter Light (I’ll finish it someday)… I’m sorry, folks, they all bored me.  They were dry, unfunny and generally dull.

Okay, I'm not even going to touch "dry" and "dull" because I've got my blood pressure to consider, but come on, Seventh Seal has some funny stuff in it.

I'm glad you like Wild Strawberries, though.  I don't think we'll make a Bergmanphile out of you, but there's some others you might appreciate.  For you, I think I would recommend Smiles of a Summer Night, Sawdust and Tinsel, and maybe Scenes from a Marriage (the theatrical version, not the long one).  And finish Winter Light, it seems like it could be right up your alley.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 31, 2011, 04:46:14 AM
The Seventh Seal is hilarious.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on March 31, 2011, 08:22:44 AM
The Seventh Seal is hilarious.

This is very much the case. I watched it for the first time about five years ago as my first Bergman without really knowing what to expect and was completely knocked for a loop at how funny it was and how it didn't feel dated (arguably when you make a period piece it should age well because it is already historic in the era it is made).

Wild Strawberries on the other hand. I think I've watched it twice and both times found it excruciatingly boring and impenetrable. It has scared me away from further exploration of Bergman.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on March 31, 2011, 08:31:49 AM
I have very much the same reaction to Bergman, and to me that includes Wild Strawberries. Scenes From a Marriage is long in its running time, but it's the one Bergman I could watch over and over and over and over.

I haven't seen Smiles of a Summer Night, but I've heard it's very accessible. Will probably be the next one I watch.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 12:13:23 PM
I was hoping that my love of Wild Strawberries might give me some bennie points from the Bergmanphiles, but I suppose my honest opinion of the other films was too much for them to bear.  Sorry. 

As far as The Seventh Seal, I must quote tinyholidays again: "Comedy is subjective."  The Seventh Seal isn't funny.  The Gods Must Be Crazy and the Emperor's New Groove are hilarious.  Take of that what you will.

I won't say that a person who doesn't like Bergman in general will like Wild Strawberries, although I have to say that's what Chardy said and was completely correct in my case.  But perhaps I will try a couple other Bergman films.  At least I need to finish Winter Light.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on March 31, 2011, 12:33:43 PM
The Gods Must Be Crazy [is] hilarious.

Yeah okay, we're on completely different pages, comedy-wise.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 12:40:13 PM
The Gods Must Be Crazy [is] hilarious.

Yeah okay, we're on completely different pages, comedy-wise.

On the other hand, I think that the more subtle comedy of The Man Without A Past was hilarious as well.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on March 31, 2011, 01:35:51 PM
See, I always figured The seventh Seal was Bergman for people who don't like Bergman, and Wild Strawberries was for people who'd probably like the rest of his stuff.  But that's just because The Seventh Seal is the only one of his I like.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 01:49:26 PM
See, I always figured The seventh Seal was Bergman for people who don't like Bergman, and Wild Strawberries was for people who'd probably like the rest of his stuff.  But that's just because The Seventh Seal is the only one of his I like.

That's what I always understood, which is why I watched the Seventh Seal after my second time of watching Fanny and Alexander.  I mean, playing chess with Death is so cool, right?  And it did nothing for me.  I was really disappointed.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on March 31, 2011, 01:52:05 PM
See, I always figured The seventh Seal was Bergman for people who don't like Bergman, and Wild Strawberries was for people who'd probably like the rest of his stuff.  But that's just because The Seventh Seal is the only one of his I like.
Yea, pretty much. I do like Winter Light a lot, too, though.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Antares on March 31, 2011, 03:00:49 PM
I've only seen two...The Virgin Spring and The Seventh Seal. I liked the former, the latter, which surprised me because I've heard such glowing praise, did nothing for me. I plan on re-visiting it in the distant future.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 03:29:29 PM
This discussion on the different reactions to Bergman has been excellent, but there's always another movie!


Exit Through The Gift Shop

(http://pursuitist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Is-Banksys-Exit-Through-The-Gift-Shop-Real.jpg)

Art is often important due to the story behind it.  Some believe that Exit Through The Gift Shop is another excellent Bansky set up.  But the story within the film tells something different, something interesting.  Many of the events in the film are documented, like Mr. Brainwash’s big art exhibition in 2008.  But this doesn’t mean that the story is necessarily true.  Perhaps this is Bansky thumbing his nose at the art world establishment?  Or is it the true, sad tale of a man who just didn’t “get” street art?

Technical—4/5—Like most documentaries, the film isn’t beautiful.  But the editing is excellent, and the story is fantastic.

Interest—5/5—This film is an education in street art, what it is, how it is done, some of the people involved and also what it isn’t.  But what is best about this documentary isn’t what we learn, but how the story is told.  Bansky remains important throughout the story, but he isn’t the focus, just how he likes it.  And we see street art through someone being introduced to it and is influenced by it, and finally misunderstands it completely.  That is a unique approach to documentary, because it focuses on a side story of the main subject, but still communicates the important facts, without you hearing them as facts.

(http://movie2s.com/images/ExitThroughTheGiftShop2010.jpg)

Tension—3/5—There is some tension to the film, about how the exhibitions would be received and who this Bansky really is, but every tension point is passed by matter-of-factly.  As if it wasn’t such a big deal after all.

Emotional—3/5—Not a lot to get emotional about, but there were a lot of jovial moments.

(http://img.listal.com/image/1489043/600full-exit-through-the-gift-shop-screenshot.jpg)

Characters—4/5—Bansky and Thierry are shown off well.  Whether Thierry is a “real” person or not, he is a fun character.  And Bansky, despite his hidden nature and face, comes off as wise and mysterious, just as his art communicates.

Theme—4/5—I think that the film is really about street art, what it is and is not.  Perhaps there is a little competition between street art and commercial art, but its really all about street art.  Thierry isn’t an artist, at first, because he doesn’t care about the audience.  Then, he isn’t a street artist because he’s not actually producing it all himself.  He is the anti-artist all throughout the film.  How wonderful all the street artists are portrayed as mystified about Thierry—which says much about street art right there.
 
(http://www.psfk.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Video-Banksys-Exit-Through-The-Gift-Shop-Preview.jpg)

Ethics—2/5—I don’t think that Exit really deals with ethical questions, which is a shame because there are so many that could have been discussed or at least referred to.  What is the difference between street art and graffiti?  How has street art been used to change people’s perception of the world? 

Personal—3/5—As a dumpster diver and homeless advocate, I also can appreciate the edge of legality and the necessity to sometimes cross over the line.  However, I am not an artist and so that area is still a mystery to me.

(http://thewolfmancometh.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/exit-through-the-gift-shop-banksy-rat.jpg)

This is one of the most entertaining documentaries I’ve seen.  It’s not deep, but tells a good story in a unique way.  I don’t think it will make my top 100, but I am much more likely to rewatch this film than almost any other documentary I’ve seen.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on March 31, 2011, 03:37:22 PM
I don't think Banksy is interested in the question between street art and graffiti, for a couple of reasons. It's already one which has been covered time and again, in news outlets and docs and by people who are agaisnt street art, that making a documentary with bits of street art is already dealing with that question in some way. Also, this is a personal documentary for Banksy, about himself and the street art world, and the people who deal with that question are those of us who watch it and pay attention to it. Banksy already knows his answer to that question, and the questions he asks are the ones he doesn't know his answer to. That's how I viewed it, anyways.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 03:39:59 PM
I don't think Banksy is interested in the question between street art and graffiti, for a couple of reasons. It's already one which has been covered time and again, in news outlets and docs and by people who are agaisnt street art, that making a documentary with bits of street art is already dealing with that question in some way. Also, this is a personal documentary for Banksy, about himself and the street art world, and the people who deal with that question are those of us who watch it and pay attention to it. Banksy already knows his answer to that question, and the questions he asks are the ones he doesn't know his answer to. That's how I viewed it, anyways.

I'm sure it's not an interesting question for Bansky.  I'm talking about what's interesting for ME.   Most of my great films deal with ethical questions.  If there was an ethical question that the film dealt with, instead of just aesthetics, I might have put it on my top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on March 31, 2011, 03:45:14 PM
I don't think Banksy is interested in the question between street art and graffiti, for a couple of reasons. It's already one which has been covered time and again, in news outlets and docs and by people who are agaisnt street art, that making a documentary with bits of street art is already dealing with that question in some way. Also, this is a personal documentary for Banksy, about himself and the street art world, and the people who deal with that question are those of us who watch it and pay attention to it. Banksy already knows his answer to that question, and the questions he asks are the ones he doesn't know his answer to. That's how I viewed it, anyways.

I'm sure it's not an interesting question for Bansky.  I'm talking about what's interesting for ME.   Most of my great films deal with ethical questions.  If there was an ethical question that the film dealt with, instead of just aesthetics, I might have put it on my top 100.

That's fair, I was just kinda talking about how I saw this movie. The ethical question for me is the idea of art, and what is good art and how should we judge good art, and snobbery and whatnot, which is more interesting to me personally then the questions about graffiti. I would love to saee a movie which dealt with the graffiti question specifically though.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 04:00:43 PM
I don't think the film specifically deals with what is 'art' generally.  Technically, the McDonald's logo is art.   I think My Kid Could Paint That deals with value in art and F is for Fake deals with imitation and art.  Here I think it's really more specific about street art.  What Mr. Brainwash did was art, but was it "street" art?  Did it have as much value as street art?  There's no comparison with other kinds of recognized art at all.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on March 31, 2011, 04:28:17 PM
Ethics—2/5—I don’t think that Exit really deals with ethical questions, which is a shame because there are so many that could have been discussed or at least referred to.

I thought it raised a great ethical question about art exhibitions. The street art movement sprung up when talented artists couldn't get their work displayed in a gallery. There was no outlet through the usual channels, so they started posting in the street for free. This is illegal, but it did bring them the attention and acclaim they deserved and ultimately led to some of them getting proper showing.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on March 31, 2011, 07:32:59 PM
Ethics—2/5—I don’t think that Exit really deals with ethical questions, which is a shame because there are so many that could have been discussed or at least referred to.

I thought it raised a great ethical question about art exhibitions. The street art movement sprung up when talented artists couldn't get their work displayed in a gallery. There was no outlet through the usual channels, so they started posting in the street for free. This is illegal, but it did bring them the attention and acclaim they deserved and ultimately led to some of them getting proper showing.

I don't consider this an ethical question, but a business one, and a community decision.  In other words, there is an art community and they decide what is art.  What the street artists have done-- and could have done any number of different ways-- is simply build up an alternative community, one that is more populist in nature.

However, one way or the other, I don't know that this is a question addressed by the film.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 01, 2011, 04:00:42 PM
Finding Nemo
(http://www.vivagoal.com/images/wallpapers/finding_nemo-4.jpg)


My son, on his 18th birthday this last December decided to celebrate this first step into adulthood by inviting a couple of his friends to our home to watch Finding Nemo while eating homemade Portal Cake (recipe changed from the original).  This was a marvelous idea and a great opportunity for me to reevaluate one of my favorite movies of all time.

When I first watched Finding Nemo, my reaction was much like a comment made recently on the forum, “A talking animals movie—how unique!”  The story was simple, and while Dorry is hilarious, overall the impression it left me was “meh”.   After watching it with my children more times than I can count, my appreciation for this film knows no bounds.  This is a deep film, a touching film, a truly human film that has to be told in the sea, for only the sea has the complexity of human society.  Yeah, it’s played for laughs—a lot of wonderful, freeing, joyous laughs—but it isn’t just a funny film.  It’s a film about love and relationships.

(http://www.filez.st/screenshots/66/7182249966_Finding_Nemo_dvdrip.jpg)

Technical—5/5—Amazing.  This is one of the peaks of Pixar’s art.  Every plant, every tentacle, every fin is perfectly realized.  The characters are completely fish and completely human, much in the way Disney has done at their best.  This is a marvel of computer animation.

Interest—5/5—How can I turn away from this film?  Every second is interesting.  It’s funny, then tense, then touching, then funny again. 

(http://www.ohlays.com/wallpapers/nemo2.jpg)

Tension—5/5—This is the first film I remember Mercy and I watching together.  We saw it in the theatre, she was three, and was scared to death.  The sharks, the lantern fish, the whale… it was all too intense for her (she still gets nervous about too much tension).  She wanted to leave, but I just held her in my lap and told her to shut her eyes if it was too much.  By the end of the movie she loved it, but it was touch and go for a bit.  Sure, it’s not really scary for adults, but the lantern fish still creeps me out a bit and the jellyfish scene still makes me tense.

Emotional—5/5—Yeah.  When the Pelican tells Nemo the story of his dad braving all of the dangers of the ocean to find his son, I get tears in my eyes.  Heck, they are there right now, just thinking about it.

(http://karenjlloyd.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/finding-nemo-dory-whale2-300x174.jpg)

Characters—5/5—This is the best.  Rarely is character better shown through plot than in this film.  The prologue which establishes the reason for Marlin’s fears, but especially the time taken for Marlin’s attempt at humor.  He can’t tell the joke because he needs to over explain everything, and that tells us everything we need to know, and we can see from the beginning how this damages his relationship with his son.  And instead of Dory and Nemo just being “the funny one” and “the object of desire”, they are given character arcs as well, where all three of them learn to trust.  Marlin learns to trust his son, Dory learns to trust a family and Nemo learns to trust himself.  Brilliant.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSmmAJfgUXeruG-rTrlt2PeVeKCv66dHeANH1uLkjrdcIaPqx_IPg&t=1)

Theme—5/5—There’s a lot going on in the film, as it is a quest movie.  Most quest stories rely on the next thing coming to keep the interest, as does FN.  But this is the most human of quest stories, because it is about relationships and how trust is essential.  It isn’t just that the father needs to give the son more freedom (like the shallow Little Mermaid), but that they all needed to trust each other, and to trust the love that they have for each other.  And the way to develop trust is to see each other (and oneself) in crisis.  After the worst has happened and every acted heroically, there is no more need for fear.   This is simple, a child could get it.  But there’s enough in the telling of it that a psychologist or ethicist to spend hours on it, understanding how it works.

Ethics—5/5—Fear leads to overprotection, trust—even dangerous trust—builds love.  That’s powerful.

(http://westcoastconnection.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/gill1.gif)

Personal—5/5—Despite it’s depth, its hilarity, its ethical nature… Finding Nemo is a story about parenting.  We all have a tendency to overprotect as parents (unless we are so wigged out on addiction we don’t notice our children).  It is interesting that a significant part of the story is Nemo learning from Gil what Marlin couldn’t teach him.  It isn’t that Marlin didn’t get Nemo back, but Gil is just as important to Nemo’s growth as Marlin was.   Letting go, in parenting, often means letting others teach what you cannot.  That is real trust.  It is hard to let our children go, and necessary.  These are all lessons I am still learning.

Okay, yeah.  It still belongs in my top 5.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 01, 2011, 04:10:02 PM
Countdown update:
Added films in bold. 

Also, there has been enough time elapsed since I began the marathon that I had to make some adjustments for accuracy.  Any film I had to move is in italics.


1.   Finding Nemo
2.   Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
3.   In America
4.   To Kill A Mockingbird
5.   Rear Window
6.   Amelie
7.   The Red Shoes
8.   Edward Scissorhands
9.   Princess Mononoke
10.   The Dark Knight
11.   Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
12.   Tideland
13.   Red Beard
14.   The Brothers Bloom
15.   I [Heart] Huckabees
16.   Citizen Kane
17.   I’m Not There
18.   Toy Story 2
19.   Close Encounters of the Third Kind
20.   Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring (up 5 places)
21.   The Man Without A Past
22.   The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
23.   Dog Day Afternoon
24.   Brick
25.   District 9
26.   Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
27.   Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
28.   50 First Dates
29.   Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
30.   The Secret of Kells
31.   Rachel Getting Married
32.   Wild Strawberries
33.   Synecdoche, New York
34.   The Godfather
35.   Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (up 5 places)
36.   The Son (2003)
37.   Raising Arizona
38.   Shaun of the Dead
39.   Do The Right Thing
40.   Adaptation
41.   Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
42.   Exit Through The Gift Shop
43.   Scizopolis
44.   Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
45.   How To Train A Dragon (Down 10 places)
46.   *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
47.   The Big Lebowski
48.   The Big Sleep
49.   Black Narcissus
50.   The Apartment
51.   Three Kings
52.   Y Tu Mama Tambien
53.   The White Ribbon
54.   Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
55.   The Science of Sleep
56.   Grizzly Man
57.   Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
58.   Scarecrow
59.   Fitzcaraldo
60.   Zelig
61.   Harold and Maude
62.   Repulsion
63.   The Philadelphia Story
64.   Mister Roberts
65.   It Happened One Night
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on April 01, 2011, 04:11:01 PM
I agree with all of that review.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 01, 2011, 04:11:58 PM
I agree with all of that review.

Did you see I moved Ghost Dog up five spots?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on April 01, 2011, 04:20:04 PM
Awesome! Finding Nemo really is a beautiful story. And unlike so many other Disney films, the death of a parent at the beginning is important for more than just adding the touch of loneliness. That scene changes the character and the rest of the film is his journey to learning to live life to the fullest even in the shadow of that tragic incident. It's handled with such a delicate and real touch. Amazing stuff.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on April 01, 2011, 04:31:38 PM
[It is interesting that a significant part of the story is Nemo learning from Gil what Marlin couldn’t teach him.  It isn’t that Marlin didn’t get Nemo back, but Gil is just as important to Nemo’s growth as Marlin was. 

You hardly need me to validate this opinion, but the above statement really shed some light on a part of the film I never thought about before. It's right there when Gil orders the rest of the Tank Gang to not help and then instructs Nemo out. Nemo needs someone like Gil who believes in his abilities. Great observation.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Antares on April 01, 2011, 04:53:03 PM
Finding Nemo

I think it's great because it's the only Pixar film that doesn't follow the good guy/bad guy scenario. It's an adventure from beginning to end, and the characters that are met on the journey are enlightening to the main characters.

Great review
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on April 01, 2011, 05:10:33 PM
5's across the board, nice :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on April 01, 2011, 05:11:30 PM
I agree with all of that review.

Did you see I moved Ghost Dog up five spots?

Actually, I didn't:

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-hfvrjHMjuDg/TVaE2VtdrbI/AAAAAAAACOw/y_r8B3RnkyA/s1600/Yipee.jpg)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 02, 2011, 11:01:41 AM
I wish it were February instead of April... (no, not really...)

Groundhog Day

(http://www.blogcdn.com/blog.moviefone.com/media/2011/02/groundhog-day-530fp020111.jpg)

No use hiding it.  Groundhog Day is a master achievement in entertainment.   Not only is it one of the funniest comedies (according to the AFI) and one of the most interesting fantasies (also according to the AFI), but it is one of the most intellectually stimulating films, all put on the lower shelf so that even kids can appreciate it and understand the main points.

Technical—4/5—The cinematography is nothing special.  Well, at times it looks like a TV movie.  But the comedic acting, especially by Bill Murry is fantastic.  It’s pretty well done, overall.

Interest—5/5—If you think about it, the idea of someone reliving one average day in a small town has got to be the most dull subject anyone has thought of (apart from spending five days with a guy who is stuck under a rock).  However, it is never boring. The comedy remains top notch throughout the film.  It has many laugh out loud moment and a number of just silly moments. It is sometimes touching, sometimes frustrating.  But you never want to turn away. 

(http://thisismylawn.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/groundhog-day.jpg)

Tension—4/5—The highest tension of the film is the question of how Phil can use this life paradigm to get out of the time loop.  He is just guessing and he tries many different ways and just when we think he’s got it… Sonny and Cher sing again.  What an ultimate sign of failure—hearing “I’ve Got You, Babe” at six in the morning. 

Emotional—4/5—I don’t have any deep emotions, but I want to start yelling at the god of the film: “What does this guy have to do?  Is he just stuck?  Why should he live this way?  And how can you possibly keep this from getting boring?”

Characters—4/5—Most of the characters are just throwaway, part of the scenery.  Really, this movie is all about the character arc of Phil Conners, weatherman, almost a one man show.  But Bill Murry is one of the few that can pull this particular character off.  And he does.  It is almost a miracle, but he does.

(http://www.nextmovie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Groundhog-Day-300x220.jpg)

Theme—5/5—The entire film is a thought experiment.  You can hear the scriptwriter saying, “What would you do if you had to relive a random day of your life over and over again?  And it is just an average day, an average town and average people.”  Phil, although a bit more of a jerk than we all pretend to be, is us.  We have to think for ourselves, “What would I do?”  Thus, the film becomes a query about how we live our own average lives, in our own average towns, with our own average people.

Ethics—5/5—And in the end, the film doesn’t just answer how we should live one day of our lives, but how we should live everyday.  The ultimate question of ethics is: “What is the good life?” and this film strives to answer that.  The good life, the goal of Phil’s quest, is to live for others.  The greatest benefit to oneself is to do good for those around you.

(http://www.codinghorror.com/.a/6a0120a85dcdae970b0133f269b445970b-800wi)

Personal—4/5—I am Phil.  And if you were honest, you’d see Phil in yourself as well.  And his quest should be our quest, it’s just that usually we are so caught up in the everyday minor dramas that we don’t have Phil’s luxury of time to meditate on what the best life would be.  Perhaps I should take more time for that.

What a great film.  It is so much fun and so thoughtful.  The perfect sermon, the perfect entertainment.  And one I love to rewatch.  Yeah, it’ll make my top 50, I bet.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on April 02, 2011, 11:52:37 AM
Yup, it's a fantastic film. I disagree about some of the characters being throwaway. I think some of the side-characters are actual rather interesting in their own way.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on April 02, 2011, 02:09:51 PM
I agree about the lesser characters. We get to see them from so many different angles, something a normal timeline doesn't allow you to see. It is a great comedy but how about this for ambition;

1) A trap with no seeming meaning, no purpose, that ends without warning= The Exterminating Angel
2) How does one person's life affect everyone around them= It's A Wonderful Life
3) What can you do with your life to give it meaning= Ikiru

Films that define existence= a mixture of all four.

, and the suicide sequence is one of the most affecting bits in any film, suddenly this film isn't funny at all.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on April 02, 2011, 05:04:08 PM
I just saw Groundhog Day for the first time last month, and it is wonderful. I went "Awww" when I saw your review, Steve. My only real complaint of the film is Andie MacDowell. But Murray makes up for it.

Hoorah for the Tobolowsky still!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on April 02, 2011, 05:07:53 PM
"Watch that first step, it's a doosie!"  ;D
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 02, 2011, 07:48:26 PM
I just saw Groundhog Day for the first time last month, and it is wonderful. I went "Awww" when I saw your review, Steve. My only real complaint of the film is Andie MacDowell. But Murray makes up for it.

Hoorah for the Tobolowsky still!

I've started listening to the Tobolowski podcast, so I thought I'd include him  :)

I probably shouldn't have said "throwaway" about the lesser characters.  It's just that even though we see them from different angles, they don't have an arc.  They are there to react to Phil.

Great summary of the themes, verbALs.  The more I think about this film, the deeper it is, and yet it is so re watchable.  Funny that a movie that shows you a single day 42 times, yet I am ready to watch those 42 versions of one day all over again.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 03, 2011, 04:19:03 PM
Four Months, Three Weeks and Two Days
(http://www.collider.com/uploads/imageGallery/Four_4_Months_3_Weeks/4_months__3_weeks_and_2_days_movie_image_vlad_ivanov__anamaria_marinca_and_laura_vasiliu.jpg)

I don’t know that I am capable of writing a good review of this film.  It is heart wrenching in a way that few films are.  Perhaps United 93.  But I’ll try to make it through my ratings, at least.

Technical—5/5 Well done.  I liked the cinematography, the pacing and the acting.  It all comes together to make a quiet but marvelous film.

Interest—4/5—The first third of the film is confusing to me and I wouldn’t have known anything except for the small amount I had read about it.  It was all subtext which gets my curiosity up.  And my curiosity was burning high until after the midpoint of  the film where I realized what the tragedy was.  And I continued to be fascinated because I had no idea if the tragedy was going to be deeper than it already was.

Tension-5/5—The tension of what is really going on was really strong.   I don’t know if I’d be as interested in the film the second time because I already knew what was going to happen.

(http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-images/Arts/Arts_/Pictures/2007/05/24/fourmonths460.jpg)

Emotional—4/5—Its as if they knew the story itself was emotional enough and so the acting and the filmmaking was really subdued.  They didn’t need to do more than they did.

Characters—4/5—The characterization was good, we clearly got an idea of the three main characters as distinct, but there was little depth there.  It really felt like a documentary, as if we were seeing the events in real time, and there was little background information given.  In general I liked that about the film, we had to work out so much ourselves.

Theme--??—I was so stunned by the story that I really didn’t have energy to consider a theme of the film. Is it simply letting us experience this event?   That is enough, certainly.

(http://www.coffeecoffeeandmorecoffee.com/archives/four-months-three-weeks-and-two-days.jpg)

Ethics—4/5—Clearly this is not a film about "the abortion question".  It isn’t about abortion rights, except that if there were abortions available this scenario wouldn’t play out, but I don’t think that’s what it’s talking about.  I think it has more to do with friendship.  The movie begins with the idea that the abortion was necessary—that’s a given.  The question is, how much is the friend willing to sacrifice for her friend’s need?  And what is the real cost of that sacrifice?  And how does one respond to someone as evil as this who has you over a barrel? What would someone else do in this circumstance?  As many of my favorite ethical films, this film asks questions but doesn’t give satisfactory answers.  We have to answer the questions ourselves.

Personal-- ??—Honestly, this was a difficult film.  It’s hard because I see people forced to make Hobson choices like this every day.  And it is easy to moralize and say, “Well, if they had done what is right they wouldn’t have had to make this choice…” This film doesn’t do that.  We are human.  We make mistakes.  Sometimes our mistakes snowball on us.  And then we are in impossible positions.   Again, I see this all the time.  It is a kind of tragedy I  don’t feel I need to relive.

It is a good film, one I might recommend to some, but it will never be a favorite for me.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 11, 2011, 11:03:27 AM
The Lion King

(http://screencrave.frsucrave.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/the-lion-king-3d-22-6-10-kc.jpg)

The Lion King was the first Disney film that I found emotionally satisfying.  It is actually one of the first films that made me cry (The movie Ghost was actually the very first).  Now I cry if someone looks funny on a film.  I think what really made the difference is having children and feeling that attachment toward them.   When I first watched The Lion King, I had my two year old son next to me.  The question is: does it still stand as a great experience, after many years and many re-watchings?

Technical—5/5—It’s solid animation, with some occasionally excellent scenes, like the stampede.  The voice acting is top notch and the songs are memorable and catchy.  Yeah, it works.

Interest—5/5—It’s high drama with a lot of funny comedy.  Not a boring scene in sight.  Perhaps the romantic scene was unnecessary and distracting.  But I can’t say that about any other scene.  The opening and the closing are still so dramatic and the music is so perfect they make my heart skip a beat.

(http://www.kimbawlion.com/CliffLKAsc.jpg)

Tension—5/5—Just thinking about Jeremy Lions Irons (hee, hee) saying the words, “It’s to die for”, gives me shivers…

Emotional—4/5—It doesn’t make me cry like it used to.  But all the impact is there, the great relationship between Simba and Mufasa, the child accepting responsibility for what he didn’t do… this is powerful drama when we see it in everyday life.

Characters—4/5—Okay, it’s a Disney film.  The characters are created with broad strokes and each one is more of a type than a true person.  But that’s better than a lot of other Disney film where they are two dimensional.  To have the type of the Great King say, “I was scared today that I might lose you.” is wonderfully perfect.  Even Zazu, who is the straight man for the leads gets a clever line “He might make a handsome throw rug.” And even if the dialogue is a bit stilted at times, usually the acting makes up for it.  James Earl Jones can’t say a sentence without gravitas.  Even Matthew Broderick was excellent here.   Fred Savage was great as young Simba. 

(http://www.subliminal-messaging.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/disney-subliminal-message-lion-king-sex-11.jpg)

Theme—5/5—The theme is hammered home many times “The Circle of Life”.  And even though it is explained as some sort of ecosystem, the reality of the theme is to accept the responsibility one is born with.  We are who we are, and we can’t deny our responsibility.

Ethics—4/5—Perhaps the theme might seem fatalistic to an American audience (although the box office didn’t notice any slack).  But it isn’t fatalistic at all.  Simba wasn’t only born king, but he had to choose it as well.  He had the opportunity for a different life and so he had complete freedom.  Interestingly enough, that which prevented him from being his full self was baggage from his childhood.  And this film encourages people to face that baggage down and take up the power that one has within one.  That ends up being a very powerful message.  One that perhaps most self-confident people don’t need to hear, but for those who have experienced damage like child abuse, this is a powerful film.

(http://humordistrict.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Scar-from-The-Lion-King.jpg)

Personal—5/5—Well, I’ve never suffered child abuse nor have I been a king.  But I am a father and a son.  I’ve had ambitions that have been dashed.  I’ve dreamed of “hakuna matata”, but had to work anyway.  Yep, it’s all there.

I still love this film.  I’m so glad I own it.  I’m so happy I’ve showed it to all my kids.  It is easily one of Disney’s best.  It goes on my top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on April 11, 2011, 11:20:57 AM
Awesome. I love The Lion King. And it still makes me tear up, if not all out cry.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on April 11, 2011, 12:07:29 PM
Oh man, that movie is the sex. You know what I mean? All of the STARS...doing voice overs. Seriously though, I love this film and cannot wait to purchase it on Blu-Ray.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on April 11, 2011, 12:35:46 PM
The Lion King is great and the Blu-Ray is going to look amazing. All that being said, Finding Nemo does the father/son theme even better. And I never liked the final battle. They raise the stakes fine with the fire, but they couldn't think of anything dramatic so we just get slow-mo of two lions hitting each other.

And where's you love for Timon and Pumbaa? The two best Disney sidekicks ever. They get a full song plus the hilarious hula number.

(http://i55.tinypic.com/rvbr01.jpg)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 11, 2011, 12:44:45 PM
Hey, I love Timon and Pumba.  But I made the mistake of seeing Lion King 1 1/2.  I just haven't seen the Abbot and Costello of animation the same since. Wow that was sooooooooooo bad.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on April 11, 2011, 12:52:33 PM
Yea, I think Nemo took over the spot in my heart I use to have for The Lion King...and then it got taken over by Paris, Texas.  :o
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Beavermoose on April 11, 2011, 04:31:22 PM
Oh man, that movie is the sex. You know what I mean? All of the STARS...doing voice overs. Seriously though, I love this film and cannot wait to purchase it on Blu-Ray.
(http://www.subliminal-messaging.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/disney-subliminal-message-lion-king-sex-11.jpg)
I see what you did there.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on April 11, 2011, 04:41:05 PM
You never unsee these things, Beavermoose.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on April 11, 2011, 05:39:16 PM
Fred Savage was great as young Simba.

(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d171/flourish_leslie/polls_jtt_shirtless_4359_4819_answe.jpg)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 12, 2011, 02:24:53 AM
Fred Savage was great as young Simba.

(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d171/flourish_leslie/polls_jtt_shirtless_4359_4819_answe.jpg)

I should never trust my memory.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 15, 2011, 06:16:58 PM
Wristcutters: A Love Story

(http://images.fanpop.com/images/image_uploads/Wristcutters--A-Love-Story-shannyn-sossamon-245827_600_337.jpg)

It turns out that instead of suicide victims going to hell like Augustine says, after they die they go to a limbo that is very much like our world, but without passion or extreme emotion.  Everyone lives much like they do in this world—working a job, having mind numbing relationships—but without the joys that make our lives bearable.   Everyone assumes they are stuck living that way for eternity.  But what if there was a way to get back?

Technical—4/5—The “indie” look (low budget film, low budget scenery) works surprisingly well for this film. It fits the idea of being in limbo, which isn’t actually colorless, but is the next best things.  The acting was low key, but again, that fits.
 
Interest—4/5—I was surprised at how many ideas keep coming up in this film.  It is like a well done fantasy novella.  Maybe not a classic one, but an interesting one I would recommend to my friends.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_bPqll7RYGvM/TKTkCkPYRYI/AAAAAAAAAiM/Pfz7m6TXkBY/s1600/Wristcutters%2BA%2BLove%2BStory%255B2006%255DDvDrip%255BEng%255D-FXG%2B03976.jpg)

Tension—3/5—Not really deep, but the end had a few tense scenes.

Emotional—4/5—I really got involved with the characters and felt their plight and loneliness and wanted it resolved as much as they did.

Characters—3/5—I remember the story pretty well, but except for Mikal the characters are pretty much a blur.   Mikal was great, though.

(http://www.chapatimystery.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/11/wristcuttersalovestory30.jpg)

Theme—5/5—It’s pretty subtle, but the theme is hope.  While that might not seem like much, the film lets us know what kind of a world we would have without hope, which makes it seem all that much more important.

Ethics—3/5—This is one of those cases where the rules of a world is different than our own and so ethics can be different.  People still hurt, but it doesn’t seem as important.  Like the look of the cinematography, everything seems covered so that it doesn’t touch one as much.  Nothing is as important, except getting back to life here.

Personal—2/5—Not so much.

Perhaps this film shouldn’t be on my top 100 marathon.  It’s not on my original list.  But it surprised me so much that I thought it needed a shout out.  It’s an excellent little fantasy film and deserves to be seen by more people.  It won’t go on my top 100, but I’d be proud to have it in my top 200.

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on April 16, 2011, 04:27:26 PM
In FLY's youth (some would say this is still occurring, others would just be depressed) he wanted to see this film so bad. So much in fact that he drove an hour away to get to the only screen playing it. It was, sadly, not the experience he had hoped for, but it holds a special place in his heart both because of the journey and the actual plot of the film. It'd odd that other people have seen this film, though I guess Will Arnett is the man, but it's always pleasing when I get to read other opinions on it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on April 16, 2011, 04:46:22 PM
Awesome. I enjoy this.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 16, 2011, 07:52:49 PM
Stalker
(http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/DVDReview/Stalker/dog.jpg)

This is my first film by Andrey Tarkovskiy and I can see what a powerful envelope-pushing director he can be.  I was drawn to Stalker because I heard that it is a religious analogy, and so it is.  But how good is it really?

Technical—4/5—Although the filmmaking was adequate, it wasn’t as sharp or excellently acted as I expected from such a well-known director, one of the Soviet eras best.  It looked and felt like an indie film to me.   Is this because of the era, or did most Soviet films look like this?  Or did he do this to give the sense of loss?

Interest—3/5—The analogy was excellent and the end was brilliant, but frankly, the middle third was dull as ditchwater.  We get the idea that the stalker is leading them around, making strange pronouncements that may or may not be necessary, but was it necessary to keep this going for more than an hour?

(http://i.ytimg.com/vi/rC7CTgHlowE/0.jpg)
We enter the forbidden space...

(http://billsmovieemporium.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/stalker.jpg?w=444&h=326)
Come back!  Don't go on your own!  You need my help!

(http://www.tate.org.uk/research/tateresearch/tatepapers/08autumn/images/bird/Fig-4.jpg)
Mysterious garbage in the murky pond.  Yes, you have to walk through the murk.

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5161/5349060956_03efb9eea2.jpg)
Despair and mysterious creatures in the murk

(http://www.filez.st/screenshots/85/34374343085_Stalker_1979_Andrei_Tarkovsky_2CD_Posters.jpg)
The Pit of Despair!  No, not really.  It's a mysterious cavern, with added murk.  Watch your step!

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_dnmPzxbBNyU/SB_bTDwkh-I/AAAAAAAABOk/JUROrvjTboA/s320/stalker16.jpg)
After an hour of mysterious wanderings, you come out of the cavern to find... more murk!

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5207/5349060974_7aaa089c26.jpg)
Finally, we reach the Place.  Yes, this is it.  It doesn't look like much, but really, this is the Place.


Tension and Emotion—3/5—Whatever tension  or emotion there was drained from me simply by the longevity of the film.

Characters—3/5—The one character I really felt for was the stalker’s wife, who doesn’t really get a scene until the end.  His family are victims, and rather than setting them aside with a sad impulse, Tarkovskiy instead gives them the climax.  That was brilliant.  The problem is, they aren’t real people until the climax, after we’ve been dulled by a trio of men wandering around rocks for an hour.  Gerry’s got nothing on this film.

Theme—5/5—The analogy to religion is powerful.  The stalker is a religious leader with strange rituals no one can understand, but he insists are essential.  Although it is illegal, he brings men close to a place where that can have their hearts desire granted.  In the end, however, it is his family that he has pretty much abandoned that has the true power.  This is a powerful message.  One that I wish would be placed in a more interesting film.

Ethics—5/5—The relation between the believer and the atheist is excellent—both are super-idealists that miss the point. The fact that true power is found in relationship and family is also excellent.

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5045/5349060968_29166454d7.jpg)

Personal—4/5—As a religious leader, this film has a number of messages for me.  Am I putting people through hoops that don’t really help them reach the real goal?  Am I setting aside my family for the sake of religion?  There’s a lot to think about here.   And, frankly, a lot of time to think about it.

The message of the film is powerful and important.  However, it desperately needs some shortening.  A pair of scissors and some tape would do Stalker well.   I’m glad I watched it, but it won’t make my top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on April 17, 2011, 01:48:28 AM
I have almost no memory of Stalker from when I watched it a couple months back.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 17, 2011, 01:11:26 PM
The Blues Brothers

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/500/12267293/The+Blues+Brothers.jpg)

Jake and Elwood.  A couple of simple men, with simple desires.  They love good music, good friends, fast cars and to stay away from their exes.  But there is a crisis: the severe nun who raised them is about to lose her orphanage.  So they embark upon their mission from God: they are going to get their rockin’ blues band back together and do one more big benefit show to keep the orphanage going.  In the midst of this, they find that they must have a number of car chases, including one through a mall, insult some rednecks and run from a mysterious woman who wants to kill them.  Just another adventure for God.

(http://www.ridelust.com/wp-content/uploads/aa_1974_dodge_monaco_blues_brothers.jpg)

Technical 3/5—The acting is basic, sometimes it is basically bad.  But that is all to remind us that most of these supporting characters aren’t actors, they are musicians. The cinematography is also pretty basic—nothing fancy or pretty.  It’s your basic entertainment from the 80s.

Interest—4/5—What a fun film.  The music is great, having some of the classics rock and soul songs from some great artists.  And it is such a blast.  The car chase through the mall is still classic, and the Brothers’ choices are amazingly stupid.  For a skit brought to screen, it is really entertaining.

Tension—3/5—In a sense, it doesn’t really matter what happens.  The important thing is that the movie goes from song to violence to song to violence.  What happens to the characters aren’t so important.  The only tension is really found when the Brothers’ are VERY late for the show.  But Cab Calloway saves the day—how fantastic!

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_OJl6ATsGFco/RlFz6m186uI/AAAAAAAABMU/wKinbWO4eWs/s400/bnvb.jpg)

Emotional—3/5—If LOL is an emotion, then I was there.

Characters—3/5—Frankly, I like the fact that Belushi and Ackroyd played the Brothers deadpan.  It offered a wonderful contrast to their stage presence and the insanity around them.  It just added to the humor, even if it means no character development for them.  Carrie Fisher, however, is perfect as the Ex.  She steals every scene she’s in and is way better than all of Scott Pilgrim’s Exes combined.

Theme—2/5—Abusive nuns shouldn’t ever ask the kids she’s raised to help her.  In anything more than painting walls.

(http://www.bluespatrol.com/pictures/oysterfest2007preview/blues_brothers_penguin.jpg)

Ethics—2/5—Ethically, the film is interesting.  We are asked to withhold judgment on the various criminal activities of Jake and Ellwood because they are doing it to help out an orphanage and they are socially clueless as to what would be appropriate.  In other words, since their moral imagination is low and their motivation is good, then we should wink at the damage they have done to relationships, buildings, families, as well as the countless laws they have broken.  Besides, their band rocks.

Two things disturb me about this moral reasoning.  First, that good motivation always produces moral actions.  Clearly, in the Blues Brothers, this is not the case.  And it is not the case in real life.  The fact is, moral action not only needs positive motivation (“I want to help this person”), but it also requires wisdom to understand the best options.   Which J and E clearly lacked.

(http://www.theblackninja.com/images/movie/blues_brothers/blues_brothers_jake_blues_sees_the_light.png)

Second, and what really bugs me, is J and E represent a certain kind of religious reasoning that damages the world.  We can laugh at their idiocy, but others see their kind of religious experience without thought to be a fair assessment of proper religious action.  They can be seen as a mockery of religion (which I don’t think the Blues Brothers is) or they can be used as a defense for a kind of religious action.  Really, I’ve seen it.  I know a number of Jake and Ellwoods.  I know of people who pray for protection before they break into a store to steal thousands of dollars of goods, and believe that God has heard their prayers.  This is horrible.  Again, it’s not the fault of the movie.  Perhaps the film is just laughing at this kind of reasoning.  Unfortunately, knowing that the reasoning is actually out there, takes away some of the absurdity for me.

If God was truly in The Blues Brothers, He was behind the closing of the abusive orphanage in the first place.

Personal—2/5—Nothing personal, it’s just an entertaining film.

(http://math.gc.cuny.edu/IM-Jake_&_Elwood_Blues.jpg)

The Blues Brothers is along the lines of The Emperor’s New Groove or the original Pirates of the Caribbean film.  It is simply entertainment, nothing more.  And it isn’t as great entertainment as those other films, so it won’t make my top 100.  But it is worth rewatching about every decade.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FroHam X on April 17, 2011, 04:31:13 PM
Blues Brothers is tons of fun AND it has a Spielberg cameo.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on April 17, 2011, 04:31:58 PM
Ethics—2/5—Ethically, the film is interesting.  We are asked to withhold judgment on the various criminal activities of Jake and Ellwood because they are doing it to help out an orphanage and they are socially clueless as to what would be appropriate.  In other words, since their moral imagination is low and their motivation is good, then we should wink at the damage they have done to relationships, buildings, families, as well as the countless laws they have broken.  Besides, their band rocks.

Two things disturb me about this moral reasoning.  First, that good motivation always produces moral actions.  Clearly, in the Blues Brothers, this is not the case.  And it is not the case in real life.  The fact is, moral action not only needs positive motivation (“I want to help this person”), but it also requires wisdom to understand the best options.   Which J and E clearly lacked.

Second, and what really bugs me, is J and E represent a certain kind of religious reasoning that damages the world.  We can laugh at their idiocy, but others see their kind of religious experience without thought to be a fair assessment of proper religious action.  They can be seen as a mockery of religion (which I don’t think the Blues Brothers is) or they can be used as a defense for a kind of religious action.  Really, I’ve seen it.  I know a number of Jake and Ellwoods.  I know of people who pray for protection before they break into a store to steal thousands of dollars of goods, and believe that God has heard their prayers.  This is horrible.  Again, it’s not the fault of the movie.  Perhaps the film is just laughing at this kind of reasoning.  Unfortunately, knowing that the reasoning is actually out there, takes away some of the absurdity for me.

If God was truly in The Blues Brothers, He was behind the closing of the abusive orphanage in the first place.

Don't you think that the fact that they get punished (prison) at the end mitigates all of this a little bit?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 17, 2011, 04:41:46 PM
Prison is what happens when you run askance of the law.  However, that doesn't make one immoral.  There's a lot of films in which the moral one runs askance of the law and would go to prison (if they could get caught), but they are still technically the "good guys".  The Blues Brothers, if they were a little smarter, would fall in this category.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on April 17, 2011, 05:01:29 PM
The morality of the Blues Brothers is the morality of anarchy.  They seek to destroy square society and remake it own their own, cooler terms.  In the end, they are punished, and they succeed.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 18, 2011, 05:53:09 PM
The morality of the Blues Brothers is the morality of anarchy.  They seek to destroy square society and remake it own their own, cooler terms.  In the end, they are punished, and they succeed.

Excellent summary.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 18, 2011, 06:06:42 PM
Mother
(http://screencrave.frsucrave.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/mother1kj10-03-10.jpg)

Some children just never grow up, they always need their mother’s care.  Some are born disabled in some way, and so they always have to be overseen.  The worst are those who have limited mental capacity, for whatever reason, because they can look and sometimes act like an adult, and so people assume they can made adult decisions, but they really aren’t fully ready to function in an adult world.  And this is why, for some mothers, their work is never done.

Technical—5/5—Every aspect of this film is well done.  Perhaps it isn’t as gorgeous as some or as well edited as others, but it is perfectly suited for the story the film is telling.

Interest—5/5—There was never a dull moment in this film.  It is a constant surprise, from the dancing scenes to the shifts in characters, to the logical but shocking decisions of the main characters.  And the main character is a wonder to behold, sometimes mesmerizing. 

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_apCJhCuK-xg/S73AXQTCYtI/AAAAAAAAGyw/0KeszU-AM1k/s1600/Mother_korean_movie-1.jpg)

Tension—5/5—The surprising actions keep the tension high, because we don’t know what is coming next. 

Emotional—4/5—The situation the mother finds herself in are surprisingly emotional.  I sympathize with her even when I think she’s making a terrible mistake. 

Characters—5/5—Every character was spot on.  Even the characters that suddenly shift, they do so for discernable reasons.   

Theme—3/5—I’d perhaps have to watch the film again to capture a clear theme.  Of course, there is the theme of a mother’s love, but that’s a given rather than a theme.  Perhaps it is the flexibility of truth in light of responsible love.   I’m not sure.

(http://www.highdefdigest.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/mother.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—Clearly, unethical decisions were made.  But they were made for reasons that seem ethical to the people involved.  Evil was done for the sake of good.  Here, the duality between motivation and action is clearly seen, where it was fuzzy in The Blues Brothers.   It offers the question, where is the line that parental love goes too far?  When does a good thing turn evil?  And just how much truth should we ignore for the good of those we love?  This might be good to show a group of parents raising addicts to ask questions about the necessity of boundary-making.

Personal—5/5  There is this man who used to be my neighbor who is just like the son in this film.  He had gotten into a motorcycle accident, which caused him to lose part of his brain.  I could see him making decisions like this son.  And every parent can see themselves—a little bit—in the mother.  We all make mistakes in judgment for our children at times, and we all beat ourselves up for our inadequacies in raising them.   It would be great if we could also dance away our sorrows.

This film was marvelous for me.  It makes the cut.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on April 18, 2011, 06:16:54 PM
Woohoo! Great take on it, steve. I've seen it twice now and love it even more.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on April 18, 2011, 06:35:36 PM
Mother

Personal—5/5  ...every parent can see themselves—a little bit—in the mother.  We all make mistakes in judgment for our children at times, and we all beat ourselves up for our inadequacies in raising them.   It would be great if we could also dance away our sorrows.

This sounds like a knock on the ending but you give it 5/5 so I assume you embraced it. As much as I liked the movie I can't say as the ending really spoke to me (outside of her giving herself the accupuncture in that particular spot). :-\
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on April 18, 2011, 11:03:36 PM
It is a very interesting film and I'm not surprised to see it make a Top 100. Give this premise to the Top 100 Hollywood screenwriters and none of them would have delivered a take so subdued, which is very much to the benefit of the film. Keeps you focused on character.
[That's a lot of praise from a guy who normally finds Bong to be incredibly uneven.]
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 19, 2011, 06:45:51 PM
Yeah, I watched The Host and it wasn't close to a masterful film as Mother was.  I hope he does more films that focus on a single character.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 19, 2011, 06:56:59 PM
Kill Bill I and II
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_6qgeWVXWLfY/S7DCCXpkNWI/AAAAAAAAAtA/IB72p-siMKQ/s1600/Kill+Bill+2.jpg)

There are few people who watch movies who haven’t heard of Quentin Tarantino.  And most of those folks have seen Kill Bill, at least one of the volumes, probably both.  On IMDB and other official sites, the two volumes are considered separate films and this makes sense because they were released some time apart and they each have a different feel and one can say that they attract a different audience.  The first is full of action, and the second is much more dialogue oriented.  However, since I often find movies attractive because of plot, character and theme, it is difficult for me to separate the two films.  These are two volumes of one story, not a complete story with a sequel.  The first movie leaves us in the middle, and the second completes the themes hinted at in the first film.  The two films complete each other, and one should really not be seen without the other.   So, while I understand the need to separate them, I find it almost impossible to do so.  If I was forced to, then I would choose the second one, because it fulfills the promise of the first. 

Technical—5/5—The former video store employee is a master filmmaker.  He has taken his interest in B movies and re-created them to their full potential.  Not only is each scene perfectly stylized and choreographed, but the dialogue adds what no B movie does—create full characters that have an arc. Bill as we see him in flashbacks is not the Bill we are presented with at the end of the film.  The vengeful Bride at the beginning of the film is not the same Bride at the end.  And their motivations aren’t clear until the very end.  Although QT borrows much from martial arts films and action thrillers of all sorts, he creates a world full of real people that surpasses almost all of them.
(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSwg80WLsG1eWDx5WaOW6enstpOUDpgHYZFgKZx8svFLTZAulibQA&t=1)

Interest—5/5—QT works really hard to keep us focused on this film.  Rather than giving us long stretches of dialogue about the relative quality of fast food burgers, he keeps us focused on the story—the revenge of the Bride.  It is so full of action and tension that one could barely turn aside from the screen. 

Tension—5/5—This isn’t just an action film where we go from one fight to another, knowing who will win and half bored through the process.  The stakes increase for the Bride in each fight, and we are given the motivations and strengths of each character as we go on.  Every scene has its own power, and we don’t know how it will end.  Even when watching it the second time, I am stunned with watching the Bride get buried alive, or fight off an army of bodyguards.

(http://whysoblu.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/kill-bill-uma-and-daryl-whysoblu.jpg)

Emotional 4/5—Throughout most of this epic, I am unmoved.  Sure, the Bride deserves her revenge, but I don’t really care who wins, who is harmed or what happens.  Each scene is fascinating and tense in the own ways, but emotionally they leave me cold.  Until the final showdown between Bill and The Bride.  I cry each time I see The Bride see the one she didn’t know existed.  And it is as tense and emotional as any couple discussing a divorce, yet the stakes are much higher.   Rarely have I seen a movie come to a more fitting, more fulfilling climax.

Characters—5/5—I struggle with this.  So much work is done on character development, but in the end, do we have even one person that we relate to?  Probably not.  The world of Bill is so far removed from our world, and their motivation is so different from the day to day life of non-assassins.  But, as removed as they are, the characters of Bill, of the Bride and of Bill’s brother, Budd, become, by the end of the film, very human and their motivations can be comprehended.  Again, I am impressed by the slow burn of the film, how it all makes sense by the final scene.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSa5WmObkQfI1wqCmmOkZhKwAt76p4oHWlIZjTXRKeAPeitXYSuZQ&t=1)

Theme—5/5—I spend a lot more time exploring this in my article in The Reelists.  Read it here.  (http://www.thereelists.com/main/2011/3/18/the-gospel-according-to-kill-bill.html)To summarize, the ultimate theme of Kill Bill is the confrontation of patriarchy by matriarchy.  On the surface, it seems like a revenge film, but in the end it is a conflict on how to raise children.  I’m glad most parental conflicts don’t need to be resolved so violently.

Ethics—3/5—The two ethical systems are powerfully presented, but in the end both systems rely on violence to fulfill their obligations.  The use of violence is never questioned, the way it subtly is in Pulp Fiction.  Perhaps this is a personal concern, but it is the one thing that separated me from the context of the film.  There are good ethical questions brought up, though.  The place of loyalty in different contexts.  The response to just revenge.   Good stuff, but not emphasized, and the questions are usually given pat answers.

(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGqFGO-YLTr2U29-4OQUIL6dnA4TZY67CyPPOrsuJ4qApF-NSo&t=1)

Personal—2/5—The one problem I saw with the film is that it is so far removed from my context and there was nothing done, such as in The Godfather, to allow a “normal” person to be brought into the world, to understand why they think the way they do.   Thus, while I have my own conflict between patriarchy and matriarchy within myself, I can easily dismiss the versions of both philosophies as presented in this film.  The choice between the father with a gun protecting his family’s honor and the mother bear defending her cubs isn’t really a choice at all, it seems.

Despite my reservations, Kill Bill is a masterful film, and one I am proud to put in my Top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on April 19, 2011, 08:39:19 PM
I think the film does question violence, as the various showdowns become less and less murderous.  Check this out (http://www.slantmagazine.com/house/2008/11/blooming-lotus-redemption-and-spiritual-transformation-in-kill-bill/) for Kill Bill as a Zen allegory.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 19, 2011, 10:36:14 PM
I think the film does question violence, as the various showdowns become less and less murderous.  Check this out (http://www.slantmagazine.com/house/2008/11/blooming-lotus-redemption-and-spiritual-transformation-in-kill-bill/) for Kill Bill as a Zen allegory.

It is true that the Bride is seeing the real people behind her revenge, but I disagree that the violence is toned down.

I read that article about KB and I think it is brilliant.  I am not convinced that it represents the film, but I think it offers a fantastic alternative interpretation.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on April 19, 2011, 11:54:38 PM
I have no problem separating Vol. 1 from 2 because they're so different in form and content. Looking at your take (which is radically different from mine (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=7319.msg430021#msg430021) even though we both really like both films) I see how you can't look at one without the other.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on April 20, 2011, 12:42:43 AM
I can't wait to see the Whole Bloody Affair cut. What I've read about the differences and how they affect the experience seems really interesting. I love both movies as they are, but the promise of an ultimate combined cut has me very intrigued.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on April 20, 2011, 11:04:26 AM
Has it been confirmed when/if that will ever be released? I have seen Kill Bill Vol. 1 and parts of Vol. 2, but have held off on rewatching them (and I saw them before I engaged with film the way I do now) because there have long been rumors of an ultimate cut.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 20, 2011, 04:14:57 PM
Has it been confirmed when/if that will ever be released? I have seen Kill Bill Vol. 1 and parts of Vol. 2, but have held off on rewatching them (and I saw them before I engaged with film the way I do now) because there have long been rumors of an ultimate cut.

He's shown it in L.A., but no date on a DVD release yet.
Here's an article about what the version is like (http://veryaware.com/2011/03/kill-bill-the-whole-bloody-affair-details/)

And, of course, there's Vol. 3, which IMDB says will be released in 2014.

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 20, 2011, 04:24:59 PM
The Seventh Continent

(http://cdn.mos.totalfilm.com/images/t/the-seventh-continent-1989--630-75.jpg)

Michael Haneke has quickly become a favorite director of mine.  His films are starkly filmed, and they usually leave out important pieces of information that are only hinted at. Most importantly, they try to open the lid off of polite society and show the wormy core within.  The Seventh Continent is his first film and it is as powerful and as harsh as any of his later films.

 Technical—4/5—If there is one way that Haneke improved in later years, it is cinematography.  Visually, the film is pretty dull.  However, it makes up for unimaginative camerawork with writing and acting.

Interest—5/5—The main question that I ask when watching any Haneke film is: Why is he showing me this?  What is the significance?  In this film, that question isn’t answered until more than halfway through the film.  Then the questions multiply: “Why are they doing this?” “Why bring their daughter into this?”  “Is this action really effective?”  One way or another, my interest is focused and I can’t turn away lest I miss the smallest clue.  (Small clues are important in Haneke films).

(http://wtflicks.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/vlcsnap-00015.png)

Tension—5/5—The tension increases as we see the family’s plan unfold, because, as in all plans, not every aspect works out perfectly.   As we realize what the family is doing, there isn’t a release of tension.  I personally think that Haneke is the master of understated tension.

Emotional—3/5—I am left with questions more than sorrow.  This is a pretty intellectual film about a terribly emotional subject.  I felt some emotion at the end, especially about the child, but given the potential for great emotion, I didn’t feel much.

Characters—3/5—We learn a lot about the characters.  A lot of details, a lot of their philosophy.  But how did the parents come to this conclusion?  How did they justify this to themselves?  Again, I am only partly satisfied because much of what I want to know isn’t clearly told.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR2k36PF9X8K-27qfAR5foXeyoRCtrdupbQnm061vmuM1lf1xqF&t=1)

Theme—4/5—On the surface, the film is about this family and the action they did.  It is based on a newspaper article in which family does this and it seems, on the surface, to be as cold and objective as a newspaper article.  They did this and then this.  But since the story begins two years before their act, we can see some motivation.  In the motivations, we can perhaps understand the theme: that our reasonable, logical, middle class society can send reasonable people to do irrational, desperate acts.

(http://www.cinestatic.com/infinitethought/uploaded_images/sc5-758111.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—For those who have not seen the film and might, you might want to skip this paragraph.  Wikipedia and others are wrong in identifying the Seventh Continent with Australia.  Yes, the family says they are moving to Australia, but the seventh continent that they are really moving to is Death. There are three ethical questions that I think the film asks, without really answering it.  First of all, the family assumes that Death is better than living in this world.  But is it really? If it is, how do they know? Secondly, do they have the right to take their child with them to death?  Can they let the child make her own decision about this?  Is this really the best decision for her?  Finally, because their act is not simply a personal act, but a public communication.  Is this communication effective?  Is this the most effective way to give a message about consumerist society?

Personal—3/5—Never would I make such a choice for me or my family.  However, I also am upset at consumerist, narrow-minded society.  I have my own ways of speaking against it.  But are these ways any more effective than their way?  This is the final question I am left with.

The reason I value Haneke’s films is because I think that films that ask questions are just as important or more important than films that answer them.  I think Haneke does answer some questions, but he makes us work for those answers.  This is a puzzle film, but the answers to this puzzle are more important than any Nolan film.  So I feel that I must put Seventh Continent in my top 100, as difficult as it is to watch.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 21, 2011, 12:55:32 PM
The Gleaners and I

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_4ksGK-UgfSs/TTHQ9qFFQ4I/AAAAAAAAAxk/3q2A0H1RyXA/s1600/the%2Bgleaners%2Band%2Bi2.jpg)

Another personal confession: I am a gleaner.  Not the kind that goes out in the fields and harvests food unharvested, but I go to a “gleaner” to pick up items that grocery stores can’t sell, and I also regularly visit the dumpsters of other stores that don’t give to a gleaner service.   So this movie would already have an extra  push for me.

Technical—4/5—Most documentaries aren’t meant to be made pristinely, but Agnes Varda, the director and narrator, has already been a professional director, and given the un-directed scenes, it is as good as one could imagine it to be.  The editing is superb, and the progress from one gleaner to another is excellently put together.

Interest—5/5—I really didn’t know what to expect, but this is fantastic.  Just as I’m getting tired of a talking head, Varda shifts to scenery, or a dump, and then she switches to her joyful self, explaining her reactions to all this.  I wasn’t bored for a moment.

(http://www.offoffoff.com/film/2001/images/gleaners.jpg)

Tension—2/5—The only real tension was when the wine growers, as a community, determined to deny any gleaning.  I was hoping for repercussions, but no.  It’s just a fact.

Emotional—3/5—Perhaps this was just because of my personal connection to the story, but these people breaking past legal and social barriers to accept what others call trash is truly emotional to me.

(http://ferdyonfilms.com/Gleaners.jpg)

Characters—4/5—Agnes Varda is a great character.  Besides making the film, her presence in the film added so much to it.  I’m looking forward to seeing her biography, The Beaches of Agnes. 

Theme—5/5—A very clear theme.  Not only is every person about making use of what others consider unusable, but it is about the moral necessity of accepting those who are socially unacceptable.  Under this theme,  Varda counts herself among the ranks, simply by making the movie.  This film is making the attempt to include those who are excluded, which is, in itself, an act of gleaning.  That meta-message is wonderful as well.

(http://arinyoon.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/2009vardadecade.jpeg?w=440&h=240&crop=1)

Ethics—5/5—Varda makes a wonderful point: that a deeper morality is found on the edges of society than in the center of it, and we must, by necessity, listen to those edges if we are to be a complete society.

Personal—5/5—I’ve said already that I belong among Agnes’ ranks.   It is like there is a whole army trying to save society from it’s rejections and judgments.  I am pleased to be counted among them.

I don’t consider this a deep film or sophisticated.  However, it is not a preachy film, but it is really more about the joy of being a gleaner.  How wonderful is that!  It will be close, but I’d be happy to have this on my top 100.
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_PU65OIh-86Q/StN89nVaFhI/AAAAAAAAAGQ/25Gve7kaZkw/s400/gleaners.jpg)

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 21, 2011, 12:59:57 PM
Adding recent reviews to my list, so we are up to 75!  Almost half way there!
Newly added films in bold.


1.   Finding Nemo
2.   Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
3.   In America
4.   To Kill A Mockingbird
5.   Rear Window
6.   Amelie
7.   The Red Shoes
8.   Edward Scissorhands
9.   Princess Mononoke
10.   The Dark Knight
11.   Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
12.   Tideland
13.   Red Beard
14.   The Brothers Bloom
15.   Groundhog Day
16.   I [Heart] Huckabees
17.   The Lion King
18.   Citizen Kane
19.   I’m Not There
20.   Toy Story 2
21.   Close Encounters of the Third Kind
22.   Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
23.   Mother
24.   Kill Bill Vols. I and 2

25.   The Man Without A Past
26.   The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
27.   Dog Day Afternoon
28.   Brick
29.   District 9
30.   Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
31.   Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl
32.   50 First Dates
33.   The Seventh Continent
34.   Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
35.   The Secret of Kells
36.   Rachel Getting Married
37.   Wild Strawberries
38.   Synecdoche, New York
39.   The Godfather
40.   Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
41.   The Gleaners and I
42.   The Son (2003)
43.   Raising Arizona
44.   Shaun of the Dead
45.   Do The Right Thing
46.   Adaptation
47.   Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
48.   Exit Through The Gift Shop
49.   Scizopolis
50.   Buckaroo Bonzai Across the Eighth Dimension
51.   How To Train A Dragon
52.   *ucking Amal/Show Me Love
53.   The Big Lebowski
54.   The Big Sleep
55.   Four Months, Three Weeks and Two Days
56.   Black Narcissus
57.   The Apartment
58.   Three Kings
59.   The Blues Brothers
60.   Y Tu Mama Tambien
61.   The White Ribbon
62.   Wristcutters: A Love Story
63.   Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
64.   The Science of Sleep
65.   Grizzly Man
66.   Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
67.   Scarecrow
68.   Fitzcaraldo
69.   Zelig
70.   Harold and Maude
71.   Repulsion
72.   The Philadelphia Story
73.   Stalker
74.   Mister Roberts
75.   It Happened One Night
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on April 21, 2011, 01:01:51 PM
I’m looking forward to seeing her biography, The Beaches of Agnes. 
Can't wait to hear what you think. :) 

It will be close, but I’d be happy to have this on my top 100.
It may make mine, too.  But also maybe Beaches of Agnes.  And I really loved Cinévardaphoto, too.  And Cleo.  !!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on April 21, 2011, 01:38:30 PM
I love these kinds of marathons. Keep going, and know that even if I don't comment I'm reading all of them.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 'Noke on April 22, 2011, 07:42:25 AM
even if I don't comment I'm reading all of them.

This. It's always good to know someone is paying attention.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on April 22, 2011, 03:21:35 PM
even if I don't comment I'm reading all of them.

This. It's always good to know someone is paying attention.

Thanks, guys.  Nice to have responses, but better to have readers. :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on April 22, 2011, 03:47:51 PM
I'll respond if it's a movie I've seen. Sadly, I haven't seen the last couple.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on April 22, 2011, 04:01:41 PM
even if I don't comment I'm reading all of them.

This. It's always good to know someone is paying attention.

Me too! I'm reading too, Steve! And I appreciate your formatting!
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 02, 2011, 09:04:39 PM
Sorry about my occasional disappearances.  Sickness and work.  I hope to catch up some this month.


Pulp Fiction

(http://i.screwattack.com/content/images/orig_23580_1_1273890245.jpg)

Technical—5/5—Despite Tarantino nay-sayers, I think that QT’s direction and imagination is top-notch.  Yes, he certainly draws ideas and whole scenes from other films.  However, the quality of shooting, the camera angles, the editing, the dialogue are all excellent.  The acting is fantastic as well.  Pulp Fiction is rightly called one of the best films of the 90s, no matter what the personal opinion of QT’s style is.

Interest—4/5—Although I was still fascinated by Pulp Fiction, my utter captivation was not present in this viewing.  There is still a lot to appreciate.  Sam Jackson’s monologues and his and Travolta’s banter is fantastic.  The story is good and the twists still work.  But some of the slower parts were more obvious.  The long scene in the 50’s diner just seemed to deaden the pace, for example.

(http://jaymckinnon.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/pulp__fiction_dance.jpg)

Tension—4/5—Knowing that Travolta returns at the end of the film eases some of the tension, but the story of Willis’ boxer is just as captivating as ever, especially the final scene.

And there's this scene, which was masterfully done:
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_03BT5svgliA/St9pQUhra5I/AAAAAAAAAEM/FPyauKSR_Eg/s400/pulp+fiction.jpg)


Emotional—3/5—The tension is high, but the gentle touches aren’t as present here as they are in other QT films.

Characters—5/5—Still some of the best characterizations ever.  I am totally sold on Travolta and Jackson especially.  But even other characters that don’t get as much screen time are revealed in parts, beginning as mysteries that are unraveled as they talk.  Probably the best characterization in QT films—I was completely invested.

(http://www.moviequotesandmore.com/image-files/pulp-fiction-quotes-34.jpg)

Theme—5/5—Humanity in violence.  Jackson and Travolta are very violent, but that is not their core.  Violence is their job, they “get into character” to be violent.  Willis is a boxer whose job is violence and he wants to escape without violence.  But it was not to be and the core violence in his soul is revealed.  Violence can be damaging or it can be redemptive, but it is rarely inhuman.  Finally, Jackson realizes that the violence was deadening his humanity, and so decides to escape it, completely.  Which, in the end both saves his life and destroys Travolta.  There is a lot to explore in this film along these themes.

(http://www.moviequotesandmore.com/image-files/pulp-fiction-quotes-29.jpg)

Ethics—4/5—I think that the myth of redemptive violence is a grave error, one that is perpetuated by Hollywood continuously.  However, violence is always more complex in QT films, it is both glamorized and questioned in Pulp Fiction.  And Jackson’s “conversion” isn’t as simple as it seems in Hollywood films.  The final scene is as complicated as any major life decision, in which ties are cut, then compromised, then a final decision is made.  I don’t think that QT is the best one to open a discussion about the complexities of violence or conversion because the violence is so attractive, and the violent lifestyle seems, if not normal, then acceptable.  The ethical stakes aren’t high enough, even if the plot stakes are.  This doesn’t mean the ethical questions aren’t there, just as they are there in Inglorius Basterds.  However, these films so easily lend themselves to a “switch off the brain and enjoy the ride” mentality, that makes it difficult to discuss them ethically.  QT encourages this, even as he places the ethical element in them.  I find this to be a double message, a hypocrisy in his films that is somewhat disconcerting—and downright frustrating in IB. Nevertheless, I don’t give up on the man.  It is a brilliant hypocrisy.

Personal—3/5—I am not a violent man, but the humanity behind the violence is not foreign to me. Still, this film is not necessarily about the personal connection as much as the coolness factor.

(http://www.curiousinkling.com/graphic-t-shirts/img/t-shirt%20designs/pulp-fiction-shirt.gif)

I hate being in step with a broader trend, but I find myself agreeing with many FSers that I am getting a bit colder toward Pulp Fiction as time goes by.  Perhaps that is the same with every film who’s basic heart is the “cool” factor.  Awesome only lasts so long.  I still like the film a lot, but it didn’t have as much staying power for me as the Kill Bill films.  Still, I look forward to watching Pulp Fiction again.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on June 03, 2011, 12:02:00 AM
I don't see it as hypocrisy so much as embracing the contradiction.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 03, 2011, 12:19:58 AM
I'm not saying hypocrisy in a BAD way...

Unlike most people embracing a contradiction, QT knows exactly what he's doing.  I think of him as telling a secret story that he knows most people won't get because they are only looking at the CRASH BOOM BANG of it all and so not know that he's undermining it.

But because of this, most viewers think that QT is supporting the very opposite of his "secret" point. And, in fact, he is.  He is promoting the violence he questions.  Therein lies the hypocrisy.  But if that's what he wants to do, I guess that's okay.  But it makes me knock a point off of his ethical score.  Which I'm sure he's fine with.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: sdedalus on June 03, 2011, 02:19:17 AM
I think he's just fascinated by the attraction/repulsion effects of violence in cinema.  He knows it's immoral, but that fact doesn't make it any less entertaining.  Which is interesting.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 03, 2011, 09:58:07 PM
The Island (2006)

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_iT7-5LFVHSw/Rv2QtvT6bSI/AAAAAAAAAHQ/L3Wrd0x6xEQ/s320/island1.jpg)

I've already written a review of this film on my movie blog (http://bloggingmoviesrus.blogspot.com/2011/03/sea-cruise-with-depth-island-ostrov.html), so this'll be a quickie.

Monks and monasteries have a special fascination with me.  The life of contemplation and silence has been a draw for a long time and I spend time in monasteries and in silence at least a couple times a year.  And eccentric religious people is a favorite subject of mine.  This means that I am already primed to really like this film. 

Technical—4/5—Nothing special, but nothing distracting, either.  The scenery makes the cinematography both stark and gorgeous.

(http://www.kinokultura.com/2007/stills/15/ostrov2.jpg)

Interest—5/5—Wild monks, conservative religious people having their noses tweeked, evil, redemption, wisdom… what is there not to like?

Tension—4/5—This is mostly a quiet movie, but the tension mounts near the end.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_EBnAJwXCzl4/S9bMAueHSRI/AAAAAAAAAFE/iV4iiuOb0D0/s1600/ostrov.jpg)

Emotional—5/5—I was completely invested in these people and their difficulties.

Characters—5/5—Many of the characters begin as monastic stereotypes.  The wise leader, the foolish saint, the hard-nosed conservative, the needy aristocrat—but every character has an arc and we see them differently and with more complexity by the end of the film.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_bKUlKFGjBOM/SiUy_8bvG2I/AAAAAAAAAmk/E7HPI7MStnA/s400/The+Island,+Russia,+2006.jpg)

Theme—5/5—The most saintly has need of the greatest redemption.

Ethics—5/5—This isn’t just a nice film, it is a deep one too.  Mostly it is full of hopes and godliness, but it is also a great film of understanding those who are different from us and of redemption, even when it wasn’t really necessary.

(http://kinolub.ru/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/ostrov-1.jpeg)

Personal—5/5—I have to say, this film touched me deeply.  I am so often the wise but proud religious leader that needs to be taken down a peg or two.  Good thing I have many foolish saints around me happy to take up the task.

This is among my favorite religious films ever, which places it among my favorite films ever.  It will certainly make my top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 03, 2011, 10:04:26 PM
Yup. It's a great film.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on June 03, 2011, 11:52:57 PM
It is indeed a great film. One I must revisit.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: mañana on June 06, 2011, 01:19:04 PM
ScarJo is so hot in that.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 08, 2011, 02:12:49 AM
ScarJo is so hot in that.

Yeah, I saw that one too.  Wow, it was awful.  ESPECIALLY "ScarJo" and McGregor.  Or was the script the worst part of that film?  Hard to say...
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: mañana on June 09, 2011, 12:20:09 PM
Heh, sorry, I should learn obvious joke impulse control. This one sounds interesting.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 09, 2011, 12:28:06 PM
Heh, sorry, I should learn obvious joke impulse control. This one sounds interesting.

Please, jokes are more than welcome.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: mañana on June 09, 2011, 12:32:45 PM
 :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on June 09, 2011, 10:22:21 PM
At first I didn't get the Scar-jo comment, now I come back to find steve hating on The Island. Double whammy! It's Bay's best, and that's saying nothing. :P
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on June 09, 2011, 10:39:55 PM
Clearly you haven't seen The Rock or Bad Boys.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on June 09, 2011, 10:50:30 PM
Oh but I have. I revisited The Rock recently and it did not thrill me as it had during my youth. :( It's just okay, unless it's your first time. That's probably true of most of his movies though.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on June 10, 2011, 01:28:14 PM
Oh but I have. I revisited The Rock recently and it did not thrill me as it had during my youth. :( It's just okay, unless it's your first time. That's probably true of most of his movies though.
Guess that means we'll have to shelve the subject of 'movies about green poisonous balls' if you can't use The Rock.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on June 10, 2011, 01:54:53 PM
Oh but I have. I revisited The Rock recently and it did not thrill me as it had during my youth. :( It's just okay, unless it's your first time. That's probably true of most of his movies though.
Guess that means we'll have to shelve the subject of 'movies about green poisonous balls' if you can't use The Rock.
I wondering what movie you'd have watched. (http://noffload.net/uploader/files/1/econs/eusa_think%20%281%29.gif)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: verbALs on June 10, 2011, 02:38:54 PM
It would have been Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe as an allegory about the dangers of e-coli. 8)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 15, 2011, 03:58:50 PM
Modern Times

(http://onceuponatimeininfinitespace.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/modern_times-17.jpg)

Technical—4/5—Well done for the time, it still has some moments where we say, “How did he do that?”  Chaplin was an excellent filmmaker and knew how to put it all together, from story, to acting, to music.

Interest—5/5— It’s funny and touching.  Plenty of interesting things to look at.


Tension  5/5 I love the way Chaplain puts the Tramp into these impossible situations and still the Tramp comes out, shamed but doing well.  Every scene has its own tension, and yet the Tramp endures.

Emotional—2/5—Emotion is the one area Chaplin fails at for me.  Except for a couple scenes in City Lights, Chaplin never got me dusty eyed.

(http://images.allansgraphics.com/picture/2/m/modern_times_movie_characters-10537.jpg)

Characters—4/5—Of course, the Little Tramp is one of the finest characters ever.  But this isn’t the finest portrayal of that character.  His opposite, Paulette Goddard, is an excellent character in her own right and she is set up well.  I wish she were given more scenes on her own, though.

(http://thefadeout.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/paulette-goddard.jpg)

Theme—5/5—It’s hard to make a living in this day and age.  The theme is presented in a variety of ways and consistently.

Ethics—4/5—One of the common themes that causes the Tramp to constantly fail is people not seeing things from another point of view.  They see an action, assume the motivation, and so punish the Tramp.  I realize that this is a theme that runs through the silent, but it is important to note.  The assumption of wrong doing is a constant theme in our society and needs to be reconsidered.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_4I94EWqLlfs/S7tfLLy_QtI/AAAAAAAAAXE/ZjUDlvohnQc/s1600/Modern+6+Shack.jpg)

Personal—4/5—I’ve been in the place where I’m living in a shack with little to eat but what I can scrounge for myself and my family.  And I’ve been in the place where finding work is so difficult that you’ll take anything.  So, yeah, it connects.

This is a great film, but it doesn’t have the emotional resonance that I like my films to have.  It probably won’t make my top 100, but I highly recommend it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 15, 2011, 04:06:09 PM
Agreed. I much prefer City Lights. However, my family likes this one more.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 15, 2011, 04:17:37 PM
Eh, no accounting for taste.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 16, 2011, 12:15:24 PM
Seven

(http://jaymckinnon.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/seven-sloth-victim-movie.jpg)

Technical—5/5— Very well done.  Fincher is brilliant at putting the pieces together to create a mood. 

Interest—4/5—Good thriller, but a bit slow at parts.  Frankly, I’ve read a lot of mysteries, especially dealing with serial killers, and this was good, better than your average CSI, but not fantastic.  It gave too many hints, and just played out too predictably.

(http://www.horror-movies.ca/AdvHTML_Upload/seven.jpg)

Tension—5/5—Excellent at building up to the climax.

Emotional—4/5— Great presentation of mood.  The city has a presence and you can feel the moral darkness.

(http://www.zombies-and-horror-movies.com/image-files/seven-movie-001.jpg)

Characters—3/5—This is the real weakness of the film.  Morgan Freeman was Morgan Freeman, which is always great.  Brad Pitt was the angry young man or the newlywed, but there was little to connect the two.  Kevin Spacey played the killer well, but there was no depth.  I guess that describes all the characters to me—no depth.  Gwyneth Paltrow, was the worst (but only because she wasn’t given anything to do but look pretty), but I didn’t get the sense that any of these characters were real.

Theme—4/5—We all give in to evil.

(http://i386.photobucket.com/albums/oo302/preeto_f27/Seven-Brad-Pitt-Freeman_l.jpg)

Ethics—2/5—For a film that deals with sin, it doesn’t really say much about sin.  It just assumes the ethical standard and the detectives do what they do, without any regard to morality, as such.  There is nothing to think about after this film, no depth. 

Personal—2/5—I think “lack of depth” really gets to my personal take on the film.  That isn’t a problem in and of itself, as some of my favorite films have little or no depth.  However, the themes this film skirts around—evil, personal and public; the fight against evil, etc—SHOULD have something to think about.  I should be leaving this film considering the evil in my own soul, not Brad Pitt’s.  I should be considering the nature of evil, not just deciding that serial killers are bad.  Although I am a pastor, there was no personal connection to this film at all.  That’s pretty sad.

I can recommend Seven as a fun couple of hours, but it won’t make my top 100. 
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on June 16, 2011, 12:23:05 PM
Pitt’s wife, -, was the worst

Did you blank on Paltrow's name, or is this a commentary on how forgettable she is?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 16, 2011, 12:34:02 PM
I've seen it twice and while there's a lot of craft to admire there, I just don't care for the story and Paltrow is such a wasted character.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 16, 2011, 12:35:21 PM
Pitt’s wife, -, was the worst

Did you blank on Paltrow's name, or is this a commentary on how forgettable she is?

I was supposed to follow up and get the name.  I suppose it really is a commentary at how I forget things.  :-[

And Sam, I completely agree.  I thought the story was okay, just nothing there to chew on.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on June 16, 2011, 12:47:43 PM
You know I don't agree, but I don't see mounting an argument against your belief that the film lacks depth. What surprised me most was this...

It gave too many hints, and just played out too predictably.

Se7en's biggest claim to immortality is the last 2 sins. You feel you know where everything is headed and then it ends in this explosive double-whammy. I would go so far as to say from the moment 'he' gets out of the cab, Se7en leaves predictability completely in the dust.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on June 16, 2011, 01:14:02 PM
I actually agree with the review, though maybe I like it a slight bit more. I give it a solid 4/5 but found it just not deep enough in its interaction about the sins and the moral questions to be completely fulfilling.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 16, 2011, 01:21:47 PM
"Why spend time on Paltrow (an empty character that does nothing to further the plot) unless she is going to be used in the final scene?  Yep, she's dead."  This is what I was thinking long before the final scene.  And the final two sins were anger and pride and he was going to pin one on Pitt.  The only thing I didn't know is if Pitt was going to kill him or not.

It was predictable to me, anyway.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Bondo on June 16, 2011, 01:25:57 PM
My main problem was with the justification of Paltrow's character's death. Everyone else who dies is allegedly guilty of a sin except for her. It kind of makes the whole house of cards fall down of John Doe being a misguided moralist.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 16, 2011, 01:33:50 PM
And that's one of the problems with the film.  This guy is supposed to be a genius serial killer.  But in the end, he's just a serial killer, and he just gets off on death.  There's no great underlying justification or anything.  And Kevin Spacey played him like a crazy guy-- typical serial killer.  Just wasn't unique enough.

I like the film.  I gave it a 4/5 as well (although it'd be a low 4).  Fincher did a fantastic job.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on June 16, 2011, 04:17:39 PM
This seems like a pretty fair assessment. I can't really argue with what oldkid or Bondo are saying.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 17, 2011, 02:16:59 AM
Teminator 2: Judgment Day
(http://blog.grovo.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/connor1.jpg)

Technical—5/5—When I saw this film in the theatre years ago, I was stunned by it’s use of special effects.  It still looks good, but nothing special.  What I want to know is how did Cameron make it look so shiny and campy at the same time?  That takes skill.

(http://blog.tmcnet.com/blog/tom-keating/images/terminator-2.jpg)

Interest—5/5—It was a romp.  Nothing in depth.  It’s really a kids action movie.  And that is perfect.

Tension—5/5—The first time I saw this film I thought my heart was going to explode by the end of it.  Not so much now, but it is so well paced and builds up the characters so well and the stakes are so high that you feel it.

Emotional—4/5—Dang, where did that mist come from?  I’m not really upset because the robot is leaving the kid, am I?  We need to get a dehumidifier…

(http://www.pollsb.com/photos/o/34001-sarah_connor_terminator_2.jpg)

Characters—4/5—All the characters are one note.  You got the action hero mom, the robot/alien having to learn about living as a human, and the kid as the victim/hero.  What Cameron does so well is take movie stereotypes and turn them into excellently told stories.  It’s a fairy tale, but a good one.

Theme—2/5—I must have missed the theme between the explosions.

(http://img.listal.com/image/733144/600full-terminator-2%3A-judgment-day-screenshot.jpg)

Ethics—5/5—One aspect of this film that is never dealt with in other action films is the loss of life.  The kid puts Arnold under a restriction that he isn’t to take a human life.  This leads to some pretty funny, unexpected situations.  But it also communicates the point that it isn’t easy to save life when you’ve got power and goals.  It is easier to kill without remorse to accomplish the goals.  It takes creativity and extra work to bring people with you to the tomorrow you want to build.

Personal—2/5—I never had a robot come from the future to save ME.  What a boring childhood I had.

What fun!  I don’t know if it’ll make my top 100 in reality, but it will be there in spirit.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on June 17, 2011, 02:35:48 AM
I don’t know if it’ll make my top 100 in reality, but it will be there in spirit.

That's a great line. Really wonderful.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: smirnoff on June 17, 2011, 07:39:57 AM
I don’t know if it’ll make my top 100 in reality, but it will be there in spirit.

That's a great line. Really wonderful.

Yeah, I like that :)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: fransisco4 on June 17, 2011, 08:29:57 PM

Theme—2/5—I must have missed the theme between the explosions.


Well, there's fate and free will, and the parental figure thing. I once read a review that linked the battle between T-800 and T-1000 to the practical vs. CGI effects, that was pretty interesting.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 17, 2011, 11:57:38 PM
Thanks, that's helpful.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 18, 2011, 10:55:21 AM
Fight Club

(http://blog.soldierdesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/fightclub2ac2dd7bbu1.jpg)

Technical—5/5—Really well made.  The editing was amazing.   Brad Pitt puts in his best performance.   Edward Norton is excellent.  A lot of imagination went in here as well.

(http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Film/Pix/pictures/2008/10/21/lee_palahniuk460.jpg)

Interest—5/5—The main person that is responsible for my interest in this film is Chuck Palahniuk, the writer of the book, Fight Club.  It is his ideas and narrative that drives this film and kept me on the edge of my seat.  What would happen next?  Even on my second watching, I am fascinated at how the plot is so interwoven.  Of course, there’s a lot to see and experience as well.  It is a feast for the mind.

Tension—5/5—With confusion comes tension.  To create tension, one must create mystery.  And this movie had a lot of mystery and the plot leading up to the final scene was just white knuckles the first time we watch it.

Emotional—3/5—Pretty weak on the emotional side.  Anyone with an ounce of testosterone can feel the satisfaction of the fight club and Tyler’s lifestyle.   But is there really any connection with people here?

Characters—5/5—Which is not to say that the characters weren’t well developed.  They were perfect for what they were.  There was so much detail to every main character that we totally bought them, even if their emotional side wasn’t really explored. 

(http://eriktwicedoesitagain.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/fight-club-still.jpg)

Theme—5/5—Responses to consumerist society.  For more detail, check out my article The Gospel According to Fight Club.    (http://bloggingmoviesrus.blogspot.com/2011/05/fight-club-fighting.html)

Ethics—5/5—This film is like a really complex sermon that ends with a question.  It begins by presenting the evils of consumerist society and then presenting a way out.  But it doesn’t end there, like most sermons.  Rather it draws out the idea of rejecting consumer society to it’s logical conclusion.  Then we have to wonder, at what cost do we want change?

Personal—5/5—Fight Club really struck me.  No, not literally.  But it parallels some of the thinking I had in rejecting consumer society.  Perhaps I didn’t go to the ultimate conclusion, but that’s because I’m not as warped as Chuck P.

(http://content9.flixster.com/photo/89/66/48/8966487_gal.jpg)

I think Fight Club is one of the great post modern films, and it really resonated with me.  So it’ll remain in my Top 100.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 19, 2011, 02:08:34 PM
Seventh Heaven

(http://www.slantmagazine.com/images/film/seventhheaven.jpg)

Silent films are often only half of a film.  I mean, there’s no sound.  Any text is breaking up the action.  And the music is usually not spot on at all or too spot on.  Because of the breaking of the visuals, the likelihood is that the story will be melodramatic.  This doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate silent films.  It’s just that they have to be really good, top notch, for me to really appreciate them.  Maybe this means that I don’t watch as many silent as I do later films.  But it is also a credit to filmmakers that I have a number of silent films on my list for potential top 100s: Sunrise, Metropolis, City Lights and this one by Frank Borgeze.

Technical—4/5—Well done for the time, but nothing magnificent.

Interest—5/5—There is so much charm at the beginning of this film it immediately catches you.  As the film moves on, the emotional state of everyone is powerfully realized and you can’t turn away.

Tension/Emotional—5/5—I loved that the narrative is told through the eyes of the woman and we are put through all the emotional  paces she is.  The final fifteen minutes put me through the wringer.  What fantastic storytelling!

(http://www.moviemail-online.co.uk/images/small/seventh-heaven-borzage-x-26150_1.jpg)

Characters—4/5—Although there isn’t much time to give the characters much depth, it isn’t necessary to.  They are as realized as they need to be in the film, as much as they need to be to pull us with them.

Theme—2/5—It’s a love story.  Not much unique theme there.

Ethics—2/5—I’d have to see it again, but I can’t recall anything interesting ethically.

Personal—2/5- Not much personally.

I really enjoyed this film.  The emotional impact was powerful.  And it will go on my short list of silent I’d be happy to watch again.  But it probably won’t make my top 100.

(http://dcairns.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/vlcsnap-193031.png)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 19, 2011, 02:26:46 PM
What? How is a silent film half a film? Just because it doesn't have synchronized dialogue? Are black and white films half a film because they don't have color? Are 4:3 films half a film because they aren't widescreen? And this is neglecting the fact that many silent films have musical scores accompanying them.

While I'm glad you liked the film, I think you're selling silent films short if you see them as often half a film. There are plenty of silent films that weave fantastic, gripping and rich stories without the use of synchronized dialogue, which should make them all the more amazing of a film.

Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 19, 2011, 03:02:25 PM
Wow, I never know ahead of time what I'm going to get in trouble with.

A silent film is taking run time from the film as a whole to give dialogue, which literally shortens the film.  When I was saying "half" I was really referring to run time, although "half" is hyperbole.  The other difficulty is that the dialogue is separate from the visual, and black screen has a different "mood" than the filmed visual.  So it's just an extra step.  None of this would have been a problem is subtitles would have been invented back in the day or if they had just skipped dialogue altogether, which some silents came close to doing (e.g. The General).

I'm not trying to slam silents in any way.  I'm just saying that they have a difficulty to overcome and so they have to work harder than more recent films.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 19, 2011, 03:22:10 PM
True enough, especially in terms of runtime. I will say that I don't see it as a deficient that they have more to overcome more, I think it actually makes a lot of silent films much more creative than their modern counterparts as they have to find more ways to communicate through images instead of dialogue.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on June 19, 2011, 04:35:01 PM
Part of the complete triumph of Murnau's The Last Laugh is that the visuals tell the story so completely there isn't a single dialogue card in it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 19, 2011, 04:44:36 PM
I love Murnau.  Now I have to see The Last Laugh.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 20, 2011, 02:00:20 PM
A Serious Man

(http://theotherjournal.com/filmwell/files/2009/11/623edb761795fa57_a-serious-man.jpg)

The Coen Brothers certainly have a unique take on filmmaking.  They tend to touch on ancient themes, but with a unique take, applying it to modern times and adding in characters that are real, but dealing with situations that are quirky, at best.

Technical- 5/5— The Coens are masters at their craft.  They know how to make their actors do as they want and to put a film together.  This film is excellent in editing, storytelling and acting.

(http://media.oregonlive.com/madaboutmovies/photo/a-serious-man-torahjpg-ed44ae13ff6d14b6.jpg)

Interest—5/5— The unique thing about this film is how it is told like an ancient Semitic text.  There are themes explored, then new characters and new plots, then it returns to what was already introduced, with the later context providing a different take.  It makes for difficult film watching, but is brilliant.  I suppose it could be so difficult it would be boring, but not here.

Tension—5/5—As the tension builds for our main character, so it builds for us.  He is going through a moral and personal crisis, and everything is just falling apart.  The plot itself is a tornado, with the character being drawn to the center, where he will either come to understanding or be destroyed.

(http://media.sundancechannel.com/UPLOADS/blog/wordpress/images/2009/12/a-serious-man-01.jpg)

Emotional—3/5—I find the Coens to be intellectually challenging and to say some important things, but they are emotionally distant.  Although we should be feeling the conflict within our main character, we are somewhat removed from him.

Characters—4/5—In this film, I think that the emotional distance is due to the main character’s inaction.  He is confused and distraught, but because he takes no action himself (which is, of course, the point), we are kept at a distance.  We feel more of his son’s dilemma than his own.  This is not a fault of the acting or of the filmmaking, per se, but perhaps if the reactions were more typical then we could connect with the characters better.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-c3nwAZ6ZINA/TVYanEYtN9I/AAAAAAAAB8w/RAv9tgsppq8/s1600/A-Serious-Man-shot.jpg)

Theme—5/5—This film is all about theme: To act is to exist.  Everyone is acting all around our main character, everyone is believing, everyone is responding.  But he is so confused, so powerless that he just waits, doing nothing.  And it is his doing nothing that creates the conflict.  He is Schrodinger’s cat in all of his circumstances.  He is neither here nor there, neither one thing or the other.  To be real, he must act. This relates to God, as well.  As long as God does not act then He is indefinable.  Only in action is there reality.

Ethics—5/5—Given the above theme, it seems as if there is—there could be—no moral aspect to this film.  But the film very subtly recommends a course of action.  One should always act in love.  This is played out in the first scene where we do not know if the old man is a dubbyk (evil spirit) or not.   He is neither one thing nor the other.  But in the end, it doesn’t matter, because if he is treated with respect then all will be well.  Often the truth of someone gets in our way from acting with compassion and love and so we lose everything.  Thus, the film says that there are two negative ways to live: doing nothing, or acting with hate.  The only positive way is to act with love.  Thus the greatness of Jefferson Airplane, the new Torah.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_gTka0I9Xl-8/S4FYVURfoVI/AAAAAAAACZA/pOY9q0mXz3w/s400/rabbi.png)

Personal-4/5—On an intellectual level this film really connects with me, but not in any other way.  Oh well, I’ll take what I can get.

A Serious Man is probably one of the most powerful philosophical film ever.  I hope it will make my top 100 because it is so unique and has such a powerful message, although we have to work for it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Melvil on June 20, 2011, 05:36:41 PM
Hurrah! I seriously love this movie. Great to see you respond the same way.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 20, 2011, 10:03:01 PM
Agreed, it's easily one of my all time favorites. A fun, though provoking and bleak film. Strange that all those are in the same film.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: FLYmeatwad on June 20, 2011, 11:11:44 PM
Yeah, for me it's the only thing that could potentially challenge O Brother. Though I need to see a couple of the other 'big' ones before I say that for certain, I suppose.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on June 21, 2011, 09:29:16 AM
It's probably going to make my top 20 this year. What a movie! What an ending! It looks beautiful, it's funny, great supporting cast, all the old Coen tropes, mysterious prologue. I love it. Let's get this on the list, guys.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 21, 2011, 10:50:03 AM
I agree.  I don't think there's too many people who haven't seen the film, but we should certainly promote it for the top 100 this year.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 22, 2011, 09:13:27 PM
Where The Wild Things Are

(http://blog.dinoray.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/Where-Wild-Things-1_l.jpg)

Maurice Sendak is one of the greatest children’s picture book creators in the world and I don’t know why.  If you have read a lot of his books—and I have—they are one part charming, one part creative and several parts creepy.  Have you ever read the brief tale, Pierre, where a disobedient, disrespectful boy is eaten by a lion? Why do people read this stuff to their children?  Why did I?  Partly because Sendak gives us all a context to see darkness in the world and a mythological method for us to deal with it.  We understand it is imagination, but we accept it.  (Pierre turns out okay, btw.)

Spike Jonze and Dave Eggars captures that sense in their narrative version of Sendak’s most famous work.  They provide some background and beauty to the original story that it lacks, as well as a spare story.  And this movie is all about children, especially boys.  It captures the dangerous imagination that boys have, as well as their incapacity to understand social mores.  However, this film is not really for kids.  My daughters didn’t really appreciate it.  But I get it.  It strikes me to my core.  It is a film written for my inner child.  Perhaps you think you don’t want to meet me face to face, but don’t worry—I keep my inner child locked up most of the time.

(http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/103/1031439/where-the-wild-things-are-20091005020442819_640w.jpg)

Technical—5/5—This was made brilliantly.  It is a complete fantasy—life as seen from the point of view of a hyperactive, overimaginitive boy.  Yet it has many touchstones of realism throughout it.  Well done shaky-cam, moments where the perspective is from the mother, gorgeous landscapes.  And the editing is brilliant—keeping us off guard by giving us long, slow views then suddenly quick jumps.  We have no idea what will happen next.  And the music—wow.  Jonze crafted every scene to be this perfect combination of art, film, music and context. 

Emotional—5/5—To me, this movie is all emotion.  The story is barely an outline that can be fully realized in a paragraph.  The whole fantasy sequence is actually conflict of the boy’s emotions and drives—anger, being ignored, drive for connection, loyalty, peacefulness, sadness—all pushing their agenda, attempting to reach some balance so they can all live together.  I think you might be able to cut the film into sections which begins with anger, moves into sadness and concludes in peace… only to move to the next section of anger, etc.  To me, this film isn’t about narrative, but about emotion.  There is a story to emotion and the proper conclusion is finding how to give emotion its own logic and meeting its need.   

(http://www.shockya.com/news/wp-content/uploads/where_the_wild_things_are_goat1.jpg)

Tension—5/5—WtWTA’s tension builds to an almost perfect climax.  The danger is always there, but from the wild rumpus to the end of the film, it is all about the building of tension.  It is written all over Max’s actions.  He seems so confident at first, then nervous and finally outright hiding.

Interest—5/5—Some have complained that the movie is too slow, that it is just plain dull.  And if seeing it on a strictly narrative level, I can see what they mean.  Frankly, not much happens and there’s a question whether it actually gets resolved.  But the same problem could be seen in the original picture book.  Little happens and it doesn’t seem to have a point.  The book and the film aren’t supposed to be understood intellectually, but emoted.  We are supposed to follow the ups and downs of Max’s emotional state and appreciate the turmoil he’s going through.  Not everyone senses that.  But between the story of Max’s emotions, the ever-increasing tension, and the beauty, I couldn’t take my eyes off the screen.

(http://moviecultists.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/where-the-wild-things-are-boat-max-575x272.jpg)

Characters—4/5—The only fully developed character is Max, and that is as it should be, because the majority of the story takes place is Max’s head.  The story is about the psychological healing of a young boy, and the monsters are simply parts of himself.  The dialogue in the fantasy land is the kind of story a young boy would create—unrealistic, but expressing a part of himself and keeping the spare story moving.  Yet, for all that, I have to give credit to the actors moving the monsters and the voice actors.  These “pieces of Max” were excellent characters, especially Carol, voiced by James Gandolfini.  Carol is “the angry one”, but his actions and voice were strangely calm with strong danger behind it.  Carol’s anger is powerful and controlling and sudden, but it communicates the danger quietly long before it acts.  This is powerful and adds to the horror of it.

Theme—5/5—The theme is anger.  The film speaks less about how to deal with anger than seeing the results of it.  It goes through a cycle of anger many times, giving us a fuller sense of it each time.  And though the language and story is from a boy’s point of view, it is not just about children and it is not communicating in a way that children could necessarily understand.  I don’t think children will come away with a better sense of what their anger is, but I think adults would.

(http://www.cinemablend.com/images/news/16341/_1262156727.jpg)

Ethics—4/5—This film is nothing like a sermon.  It gives no solution other than Max’s emotions need a mother.  It is descriptive, however, and clearly speaks of consequences of one’s emotions.  The cause and effect are not clearly pointed out because, like life, relationships are messy and there isn’t an easy finger to point at or solution to reach.  This is a perfect film for discussion about issues revolving around anger.

Personal—5/5—Max is my inner child.  He screams at injustices and refuses to look at things from all sides.  When things don’t go right or his needs aren’t met, he screams and is violent and hurts others.  He wishes people would understand him, but his emotional façade keeps that from happening.   The best solution is to go away for a while, allow the inner demons to deal with their conflict, allow reason to prevail and then go home for a comforting meal.  “And the food was still hot.”

This film hit all my emotional buttons.  I can see that most people wouldn’t resonate with it, but it is beautiful to me in every way possible.

(http://justjennrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/where-the-wild-things-are-book.jpg)
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on June 24, 2011, 10:44:03 AM
The New World

(http://www.zuguide.com/image/The-New-World.jpg)

Technical—5/5--Never have I been more disappointed at not seeing a film on the big screen.  How I wish to have seen such magnificent beauty writ en large.  I wished to have heard the swelling of the music in contrast to the usual quietness of most scenes. 

Interest—5/5—The main reason I hesitated to watch The New World is that the story of Pocahontas has been done so badly for so long.  I have read her history and am disappointed at John Smith’s fantasies being played out, and I cannot forget that Pocahontas was, at most, 12 (probably 9) when his fiction took place.  It is true, Malick takes some (okay, a lot) historical license here, but the end of the story is accurate, so I forgive all.  Some would say that the film is slow, even boring.  What is there to be bored about?  This film was crafted perfectly.  The beauty, the romance, the sorrow, the action, the final scenes—everything is fascinating and perfect.

(http://api.ning.com/files/UASwCXQFEUtC0wyyga89YV6ezLFs8zKMASI7cFkmFy3BfkXwFd24okWMqAR7Z63HB9I1iaXiqv5*R8z6PY5JSHrT1TZeL65b/thenewworld.jpg)

Tension—4/5—The movie really is slower paced, which can reduce tension.  But Malick uses that pace to help us feel  the tension between the father and the daughter, to sense Pocahontas’ conflict within herself, who loves both the English and the Native.   Only Kubrick could have done better.

(http://static.flickr.com/34/89590334_ca62e7ece9_o.jpg)

Emotional—5/5—It took a while for the emotional impact to hit me.  At first I was very critical of the film.  Pocahontas is too old, her relationship with Smith is too direct… blah, blah, blah.  But Malek won me over by sheer majesty of presentation and storytelling.  Although everyone is quiet (what is it with the constant whispering?), the emotional weight is communicated perfectly.  We know what all of the main characters are going through and experience with them their sorrow and pain.  I know, that is what a movie is supposed to do, but it so rarely happens so perfectly.

Characters—5/5—The actors all did a magnificent job.  Everyone was perfect.  But I want to give credit where credit is due and that is probably to Terrance Malick.  Never have I seen Colin Farrell or Christian Bale give a better performance.  Never have I seen them act with such emotional power, yet with speaking so few words.   They showed it, they carried it, and it had to be because Malick was directing.  Unless they were inspired by the trees.

(http://www.ghostinthemachine.net/newworld4.jpg)

Theme—5/5—True love.  What is love, really?  Is it a youthful passion?  Is it a committed relationship?  Is it found with the dangerous, powerful man that can be tamed?  Or with the kind man that loves you more than you love yourself?  While not denying any kind of love, it speaks to the lasting power of one.

Ethics—5/5—The saying goes, “All is fair in love and war”, yet we know just how untrue that is.  There are ethical limits to war but especially to love.  Perhaps the rules of love are unique to each relationship, nevertheless they are there.  What constitutes a marriage, what is unfaithfulness? When hurt increases, so do the ethical principles.  Although the ethical situation in this film is unique, it speaks to the limitations of love in all contexts.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_ACG6lH-LdJA/TSI1InnjXqI/AAAAAAAAA7Q/h4OdwXSwkD8/s1600/newworld2.jpg)

Personal—5/5—One thing I loved about the film that I haven’t mentioned yet is the focus on courtship.  Most films spend time on how a couple meet and fall in love then move quickly to sex or even a wedding—some sort of consummation.  Here, in both relationships that are depicted, the focus is less on the falling in love as on how the couple spends time together, the joys they have with each other apart from orgasm.  This is much more realistic and romantic and makes me reflect on my own “romantic period”. 

(http://deeperintomovies.net/journal/image09/thenewworld6.jpg)

This is one of the finest crafted films ever made, and full of power and emotion.  How can I not put it on my top 100?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: MartinTeller on June 24, 2011, 11:05:58 AM
Well put, oldkid, and I'm glad you got so much out of it.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: Sam the Cinema Snob on June 24, 2011, 12:41:08 PM
One of my all time favorites. Glad to see more love for it.

One think I'd point out is that the more I see this film, the more I think that to a certain extent Malick is very well aware that the John Smith/Princess romance is more myth and fantasy than fact and he plays off of that.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: tinyholidays on June 24, 2011, 12:47:05 PM
I saw The New World for the first time a few weeks ago, and I also was ruing that I had not gone out to see it in the theatre. Silly prejudice against Colin Farrell. I've come around to him since. And I was also wary about the whole Pocahontas storyline. But, in the end, I didn't care about the story at all. I just wanted to see more trees and fields.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: 1SO on July 09, 2011, 12:44:06 AM
I just watched Spirit of the Beehive and thought of you and how much you love Tideland (and in a smaller way, Where the Wild Things Are). Have you seen Spirit of the Beehive? Has it at least been recommended to you?
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on July 09, 2011, 01:44:31 AM
Netflix says I'd love it.  I will certainly check it out.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oneaprilday on July 09, 2011, 01:48:28 AM
I think 1SO is right; pretty sure you'd like it a lot.
Title: Re: Oldkid's Ultimately Cool (And Long) Top 100 Marathon
Post by: oldkid on November 02, 2016, 12:22:57 PM
Posting here so I can do some follow up on this marathon.