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Filmspotting Message Boards => Movie Talk => Directors => Topic started by: MartinTeller on October 14, 2010, 02:04:17 PM

Title: Rohmer, Éric
Post by: MartinTeller on October 14, 2010, 02:04:17 PM
1. The Green Ray
2. A Summer's Tale
3. The Sign of Leo
4. The Girl at the Monceau Bakery
5. Suzanne's Career
6. My Night at Maud's
7. The Marquise of O
8. Pauline at the Beach
9. Rendezvous in Paris
10. A Tale of Winter
11. Claire's Knee
12. Chloe in the Afternoon
13. La collectionneuse
14. Nadja in Paris
15. Presentation, or Charlotte and her Steak
16. A Modern Coed
17. Veronique and her Dunce



Would definitely like to watch more. 
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: sdedalus on October 14, 2010, 02:11:21 PM
1. Maud
2. Green Ray
3. Claire's Knee
4. La collectionneuse
5. Bakery Girl
6. Charlotte and Her Steak
7. Chloe
8. Suzanne's Career
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: Bill Thompson on October 14, 2010, 03:18:39 PM
Haven't seen any
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: Verite on October 16, 2010, 03:38:14 PM
Anyone that liked My Dinner with Andre should check out Rohmer films, I think.  Rohmer's best impress me more than that Malle film.
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: Verite on October 16, 2010, 03:41:51 PM
Anyone that liked My Dinner with Andre should check out Rohmer films, I think.

Fans of Before Sunrise and Sunset, too....if one doesn't mind some slightly or really unlikeable characters that can be in some Rohmer.
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: Dave the Necrobumper on October 16, 2010, 04:11:42 PM
Have not seen any
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: worm@work on October 20, 2010, 02:54:36 AM
Haven't seen any :-[.
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: jbissell on December 02, 2010, 12:00:48 PM
Haven't seen any. Was going to do the Six Moral Tales after his death but still haven't gotten around to it.
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: sdedalus on December 02, 2010, 01:33:12 PM
Haven't seen any. Was going to do the Six Moral Tales after his death but still haven't gotten around to it.

I did, and it was probably the best movie watching thing I did in 2010.
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: Antares on December 02, 2010, 02:46:36 PM
Haven't seen any

Same here, but he is one director I've been wanting to explore.

Any suggestions for which ones to start with?
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: sdedalus on December 02, 2010, 03:03:33 PM
My Night at Maud's is probably the best starting place.
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: Antares on December 02, 2010, 03:45:28 PM
My Night at Maud's is probably the best starting place.

Thanks, I just requested Criterion's Six Moral Tales from my library.
Title: Re: Director's Best: Eric Rohmer
Post by: Antares on December 10, 2010, 06:33:38 PM
My Night at Maud's is probably the best starting place.

Thanks, I just requested Criterion's Six Moral Tales from my library.

Unfortunately, the library sent me Chloe in the Afternoon instead of the whole set. Watching it tonight.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on December 10, 2010, 09:29:19 PM
1. Maud
2. Green Ray
3. Claire's Knee
4. The Romance of Astrea and Celadon
5. La collectionneuse
6. Bakery Girl
7. Charlotte and Her Steak
8. Chloe
9. Suzanne's Career
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: roujin on December 11, 2010, 07:45:46 AM
1. My Night at Maud's
2. Claire's Knee
3. La Collectionneuse
4. Suzanne's Career
5. The Bakery Girl of Monceau

Want to watch it all.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Antares on March 18, 2011, 05:54:39 PM
My Night at Maud's
Chloe in the Afternoon

Will be definitely seeing more of his films.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: goodguy on May 14, 2011, 06:58:15 AM
     Perceval le Gallois
C4S  Conte d'été (A Summer's Tale)
C&P  Les nuits de la pleine lune (Full Moon in Paris)
C&P  Pauline à la plage (Pauline at the Beach)
C4S  Conte d'hiver (A Tale of Winter)
C&P  L'ami de mon amie (My Girlfriend's Boyfriend, AKA Boyfriends and Girlfriends)
C&P  La femme de l'aviateur (The Aviator's Wife)
6CM  Le genou de Claire (Claire's Knee)
6CM  Ma nuit chez Maud (My Night at Maud's)
6CM  L'amour l'après-midi (Love in the Afternoon, AKA Chloe in the Afternoon)
C4S  Conte de printemps (A Tale of Springtime)
     Les rendez-vous de Paris
6CM  La collectionneuse
     4 aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle
C&P  Le beau mariage (A Good Marriage)
C&P  Le rayon vert (The Green Ray, AKA Summer)
     L'arbre, le maire et la médiathèque (The Tree, the Mayor and the Mediatheque)
C4S  Conte d'automne (Autumn Tale)
     L'anglaise et le duc (The Lady and the Duke)
     Les amours d'Astrée et de Céladon (The Romance of Astrea and Celadon)
     Triple agent
6CM  La boulangère de Monceau (The Bakery Girl of Monceau)
     Le signe du lion (The Sign of Leo)
6CM  La carrière de Suzanne (Suzanne's Career)
     Die Marquise von O... (The Marquise of O)

6CM = Six Moral Tales, C&P = Comedies and Proverbs, C4S = Tales of Four Seasons

Shorts and TV Documentaries:
Nadja à Paris (Nadja in Paris)
Louis Lumière
Bois ton café
Métamorphoses du paysage (Changing Landscapes)
Une étudiante d'aujourd'hui (A Modern Coed)
Entretien sur Pascal (On Pascal)
Place de l'Étoile (segment from "Paris vu par...")
Présentation ou Charlotte et son steak (Presentation, or Charlotte and Her Steak)
Véronique et son cancre (Veronica and Her Dunce)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on May 14, 2011, 01:40:56 PM
1. My Night at Maud's
2. The Green Ray
3. Claire's Knee
4. The Romance of Astrea and Celadon
5. La collectionneuse
6. The Bakery Girl of Monceau
7. The Marquise of O
8. Charlotte and Her Steak
9. Chloe in the Afternoon
10. Suzanne's Career
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on August 23, 2011, 12:36:34 AM
This is going up in the morning on the Metro Classics website, reviews of all the Comedies and Proverbs:

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/Aviator2.jpg)

The Aviator's Wife - A young man, a law student, sees an older man leaving his (the student's) older girlfriend's apartment early in the morning.  The man was her ex-boyfriend, and he had been there to end their relationship because he was re-committing to his wife.  The student confronts the girl, but she denies everything and gets annoyed.  Later in the day, the student spots the older man and decides to follow him (he's especially suspicious when he sees the man with a mysterious blonde woman).  In a park, he meets a younger girl who decides to help him in his caper.  The film comes alive when the younger girl, played by Anne-Laure Meury (who has a supporting role in My Boyfriend's Girlfriend), appears.  She's clearly much more interesting and a much better fit for the student than the older woman, but he doesn't notice.  The location for the middle section of the film, a man-made park in Paris, is used wonderfully, and Meury and the student's adventures creating plotlines for the behavior of the older man and the blonde woman harken back to the kinds of protagonists that reinvent Paris in cinematic and narrative terms, a New Wave trope familiar from the likes of Celine & Julie Go Boating and Band of Outsiders, among many others.  This is the only one of the Comedies and Proverbs wherein the main character is a man, and as a fairly deluded one, he serves as a nice transition between the aggressively masculine (though of course quite talky and usually deluded) heroes of the Moral Tales.

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/77182d6a.jpg)

A Good Marriage - A young art history student (Béatrice Romand) breaks up with her painter boyfriend and moves back home to her small town (Le Mans) where she meets a cousin of her best friend and decides to marry him.  Unfortunately for her, the young man doesn't ever seem to have enough free time to fall in love with her as well.  The man is played by André Dussollier, familiar, though looking much much younger, from last year's releases Wild Grass and Micmacs, directed by Alain Resnais and Jean-Pierre Jeunet, respectively.  It's a film where quite literally nothing happens, all of the students schemes end in failure, but is nonetheless so full of beautiful little heart-breaking moments as to always be compelling (Romand putting her head on Dussolier's shoulder as they leave a restaurant in particular lasts maybe two seconds, but it is the kind of image that will stick in your mind forever).

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/3108156166_541e1ec7a2.jpg)

Pauline at the Beach - The actress who played the best friend in The Good Marriage, Arielle Dombasle, here plays Marion, vacationing with her younger cousin Pauline (Amanda Langlet) on the coast.  There she meets her ex-boyfriend Pierre (Pascal Greggory, who was in Luc Besson's Joan of Arc movie The Messenger and the late Raúl Ruiz's Time Regained), who is still annoyingly in love with her, and the older, more dangerous Henri.  Marion hooks up with Henri, which makes Pierre jealous, so she tries to get Pauline to like Pierre, but Pauline prefers Sylvain, a boy her own age.  While Marion is out of town, Henri hooks up with a local salesgirl and uses Sylvain to cover for him when he's almost discovered by Marion and Pierre.  Eventually, the women choose to believe their own version of events and go off reasonably happy.  This is by far the most complex Rohmer film I've seen in terms of plot, with so many major characters and their intertwining relationships.  But it's also one of the most satisfying: the beachside village is lovely, once again Rohmer proves himself the master of the vacation film.  This is probably the most representative example of what the Comedies and Proverbs are all about.  Each character has their ideal of love, and most get a chance to declaim it at length.  But in the end, none of their ideals prove practical and they are left to recreate a narrative of reality the best way they can.  It has a typically elegant visual style (with dominant reds, whites and blues and inspiration from a Matisse painting), with typically lovely cinematography from frequent Rohmer collaborator Néstor Almendros.

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/moonbastien.jpg)

Full Moon in Paris - The apotheosis of one of the mini-tropes running throughout Comedies and Proverbs: the horror of white people dancing.  Both A Good Marriage and Pauline at the Beach feature cringe-worthy looks at this peculiar and disgusting social phenomenon, but Full Moon in Paris takes it over the top.  Not only are we treated to at least three extended sequences of drunk French people boogieing, this film is steeped in the 1980s like no movie I've seen in a long, long time.  Pascale Ogier (daughter of Bulle Ogier, from Celine & Jule Go Boating) plays a young woman who lives in the suburbs with her boyfriend Tchéky Karyo (from Bad Boys, GoldenEye and the upcoming Dobermann II: Arm Wrestle).  She's convinces him that it'd be a good idea for her to keep an apartment in the city, where she can spend her Fridays partying with her friends (he prefers to stay home).  Karyo's place is all dull modernism, with Mondrians on the walls providing the only small hints of colors that aren't bluish grey, where Ogier's city apartment is a masterpiece of 80s kitsch, she even has fake Greek columns framing her bed.  Infidelity is, of course, inevitable.  Ogier suspects Karyo when she spies him in town, but decides it was nothing.  Later, she hooks up with a fellow she meets at a party who wears cotton gloves with the fingers cut-out, a neck warmer and "plays sax in a band".  Feeling guilty, she returns home and finds she had the story wrong all along.

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/thegreenray1986.jpg)

The Green Ray - A pretty, well-meaning, but slightly annoying woman (Marie Rivière, who also played the lead woman in The Aviator's Wife) can't decide what to do on vacation. Seems the friend she was going to Greece with ditched her at the last minute. She spends some time in the country with another friend's family (freaking them out with her freaky vegetarianism) goes back to Paris and mopes, heads off to the mountains and immediately leaves, and ends up on the coast watching the sunset. It's less verbal than the Moral Tales, which all feature male protagonists who non-stop talk themselves into and out of infidelities. Instead, we get a female protagonist, one who occasionally communicates in conversations, but just as often overhears other conversations, or simply walks alone through the various environments she finds herself in. Nature is more vital here than any of the other Rohmer's I've seen, as it should be given its title, a peculiar and potentially life-changing atmospheric phenomenon. Rohmer is great at endings, and the one here is as beautiful and epiphanic as any in cinema.  This remains my favorite Rohmer film, just nudging past My Night at Maud's.

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/My-Girlfriends-Boyfriend.jpg)

My Girlfriend's Boyfriend - A Cultural Affairs bureaucrat named Blanche meets a computer student named Lea (played by Sophie Renoir, who had a small role in The Good Marriage and is the grand niece of director Jean Renoir) for lunch and the two quickly become friends.  Blanche lives in a trendy suburban housing complex from which you can almost make out the Eiffel Tower on the horizon.  Lea is dating Fabien, though she doesn't really like him that much (he's too earnest for her).  Through Lea and Fabien, Blanche meets the handsome and charming Alexandre and instantly falls in lust with him.  Unfortunately, he makes her so nervous she can hardly say a word in his presence.  When Lea goes on vacation with another man (trying out a break up with Fabien), Blanche and Fabien hang out a lot playing water sports (windsurfing, mostly) and have what they agree is a one-night stand.  The ending isn't as uplifting as The Green Ray (it's less ambiguous) and its Shakespearean dynamics aren't exactly unexpected, but it's the happiest ending of any of the Comedies and Proverbs, a pleasant surprise after the downer that is the Moral Tales closer Love in the Afternoon.

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/green-ray.jpg)

And here's a new overall Rohmer Ranking:

1. The Green Ray
2. My Night at Maud's
3. Pauline at the Beach
4. Claire's Knee
5. The Romance of Astrea and Celadon
6. My Boyfriend's Girlfriend
7. The Aviator's Wife
8. La collectionneuse
9. The Bakery Girl of Monceau
10. Full Moon in Paris
11. The Marquise of O. . .
12. Charlotte and Her Steak
13. The Good Marriage
14. Love in the Afternoon
15. Suzanne's Career

But really, they're all pretty great.

(http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/theendofcinema/vlcsnap-2010-12-01-21h26m52s111.png)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Antares on August 23, 2011, 08:27:54 PM
I'm glad you posted in this thread, it reminded me to request a few of Rohmer's films from the library.

And I'm really jealous that you've seen so many of his films, I've only seen two, and cannot wait to see more. Hopefully, my library has The Green Ray.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on August 23, 2011, 08:36:39 PM
Amazon.uk had a sale earlier this year and I ended up getting 17 of them for less than $100.  Still have a bunch to watch.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Antares on August 23, 2011, 08:44:49 PM
He's steadily moving up my list of favorite directors.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: roujin on October 01, 2011, 09:12:56 PM
(http://i55.tinypic.com/1zqx0dt.jpg)
Chloe in the Afternoon Eric Rohmer, 1972

Some douchebag with his own business who does nothing but wear turtleneck sweaters and be an asshole keeps meeting up with this girl Chloe behind his wife's back. He doesn't do anything, sure, but he never says he won't. He has a kid in the way, but he always makes some time to hang out with Chloe. She's that one friend of yours who's kinda of a CINECAST! up, but you can't just abandon them. You'll always hear them out, just to see what kind of crazy shit they're getting into. But then things get hairy. Another very good Rohmer flick. The ending is probably what made me like it the most. A sudden realization, of course. Should've probably had that moment moments earlier when she was getting naked, you dirty frenchie!
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: roujin on February 25, 2012, 11:13:38 AM
The Aviator's Wife Eric Rohmer, 1981

A young french dude is in a relationship with a office worker who's a few years older than him. One morning he spies an ex-boyfriend of hers leaving her apartment, and from there on, he's all insecurities, self-doubt, etc. He's a guy who is more or less in over his head, but doesn't realize it. Every time he goes to talk to his girlfriend, he comes off as overly attached, the more invested one, as it were. But then one day as he's reading a book, he falls asleep. When he wakes up, he sees the ex-boyfriend with a mysterious woman (who might be his wife) and he decides to follow them. This is the film's best stretch: a normal day gives way to a little adventure, along with cute sidekick (who's much more awesome than anybody else in the movie). They bicker and banter, follow the couple around, indulging in play (she finding the humor in his insecurities and doubts, free from the investment of the other, much more aware of the adventure of it all). This is a wonderful, wonderful film. One of those that you just kinda wanna live inside of, if that makes sense.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: oneaprilday on February 25, 2012, 12:07:27 PM
Gonna have to try to get a hold of that one somehow.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on February 25, 2012, 01:06:56 PM
Everyone needs more Rohmer.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Totoro on June 08, 2012, 03:43:51 AM
Claire's Knee (A)
Pauline at the Beach (A)
My Night at Maud's (B)

Oh yeah. Love this guy.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: roujin on November 22, 2012, 04:59:42 PM
(http://i1258.photobucket.com/albums/ii537/roujinz/film%20500/lebeaumariage.jpg)
A Good Marriage (Eric Rohmer, 1982)

The young girl from Claire's Knee is all growns up and is done with having affairs with married men. In fact, she's made up her mind: she's going to get married. The catch is that she doesn't know who she's going to get married to. She hasn't met him, but what matters is the resolve, the will to turn your life around. What follows is a very funny character study, that's often peppered with some really wonderful melancholy moments. And then she meets him. And she knows it's going to be him. The problem is that he doesn't know he's been chosen. And he's also a lawyer who seems to work at all times. There's this great development throughout the film where the main character is pretty much infantilized throughout. I thought out she started as a fairly independent figure and all throughout the film her mentality seems to get younger and younger. She's petulant, irrational and immature - my favorite part of the movie is her birthday party (she's around 25 or so, but she dresses up like a sorta princess, and everyone that shows up are her sister's high school friends). Everything that happens is a little drama, every signal that Dussolier's character sends gets interpreted a thousand little ways, she imagines a life for herself.  And when things don't work out, she's ready to talk herself out of believing she ever thought of any those things. She regresses out of desperation, frustration, god knows what else, but the magic of Rohmer's film is that she's always sympathetic, funny, interesting; and since Rohmer's films are always beautiful and humane, why shouldn't she be given another chance (crappy synth score and all)? The mysterious back-and-forth glances of the ending suggest an all-encompassing attitude toward life; one that allows everyone their chance at happiness, no matter how neurotic they may be.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: pixote on December 03, 2012, 07:22:16 PM
(http://imageshack.us/a/img231/47/summerzr.jpg)
Summer  (Eric Rohmer, 1986)
Marie Rivière stars as a young woman who's driven to despair when a friend backs out of their planned vacation to Greece. The very thought of staying in Paris all summer drives her to tears! What a horribly proletarian fate! The piteous girl! That's the shaky foundation from which this Rohmer film begins, and it, along with the under-formed dialogue early on, had me more than a little nervous about what the rest of the film had in store. But there emerges from this setup a rather lovely character study of woman lost somewhere between her inner confidence, her beauty, and her strong worldview (on the one hand) and her terrible insecurities and sense of insignificance in the scheme of the universe (on the other). It's all very well done, in nicely understated style that's equal parts realism and romance. There's a very odd rush to the denouement that requires our protagonist to act very out of character — which is theoretically the point, but it still bothered me significantly because there's no thematic resonance from that break, and the success of the movie until that point hinged almost completely on the rich fullness of the character study. The final scenes pull the film back on track, however, and the final moments, while unsurprising, are executed to perfection and wholly satisfying.
Grade: B+

pixote
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Totoro on December 08, 2012, 05:07:36 AM
Pauline at the Beach (A)
Claire's Knee (A-)
The Aviator's Wife (B+)
La Collectioneuse (B)
My Night at Maud's (B)
Triple Agent (C-)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on December 12, 2012, 09:21:48 AM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/LRV.png)
Le Rayon Vert

I don't even quite know what to say. Such an lovely, tender and empathetic and yet truthful portrayal of loneliness. Of how we tend to simultaneously crave and repel companionship. And my a priori impression of Rohmer's films as talky was definitely contradicted by this one. There are longish conversations for sure but it's her silent walks that are to me even more revelatory of her state of mind.

But it's the ending that makes me want to watch it over and over again. It's such a joyful, life-affirming moment and in those last few moments, I felt all the anticipation, fear, despair and joy that Delphine is supposed to be feeling. My heart almost exploded.

Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on December 12, 2012, 09:44:12 AM
Woo!
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: MartinTeller on December 12, 2012, 09:46:46 AM
Still my favorite.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on December 12, 2012, 10:55:32 AM
Updated:

1. The Green Ray
2. My Night at Maud's
3. Pauline at the Beach
4. Perceval le Gallois
5. Claire's Knee
6. The Romance of Astrea and Celadon
7. My Boyfriend's Girlfriend
8. The Aviator's Wife
9. La collectionneuse
10. The Bakery Girl of Monceau
11. Full Moon in Paris
12. The Marquise of O. . .
13. Charlotte and Her Steak
14. The Good Marriage
15. Love in the Afternoon
16. Suzanne's Career
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on December 12, 2012, 04:52:46 PM
Also forgot to thank pix for giving me that little nudge that made me immediately want to watch this movie last night. Early Christmas present.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 01, 2013, 07:57:44 AM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/Monceaumain.png)
The Bakery Girl of Monceau | Rohmer | 1963

One represented truth, and the other a mistake
Oh my. I blind bought the Moral Tales box set during the last B&N sale mostly thanks to sdedalus and I wanted to start 2013 off by opening the same. Turned out to be such a good decision because this is just such a perfect little film. It's bittersweet tone encapsulates exactly what I crave from films. In <30 minutes, Rohmer captures all our little caprices and game-playing and silliness when it comes to relationships. The gliding camera, the voiceover that plunges us into the film, the way Rohmer plays with sound.. there's so much to love here.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on January 01, 2013, 11:18:44 AM
I blind bought that set the morning he died and watched them all in a week.  No regrets at all, obviously.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: MartinTeller on January 01, 2013, 01:38:41 PM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/Monceaumain.png)
The Bakery Girl of Monceau | Rohmer | 1963

One represented truth, and the other a mistake
Oh my. I blind bought the Moral Tales box set during the last B&N sale mostly thanks to sdedalus and I wanted to start 2013 off by opening the same. Turned out to be such a good decision because this is just such a perfect little film. It's bittersweet tone encapsulates exactly what I crave from films. In <30 minutes, Rohmer captures all our little caprices and game-playing and silliness when it comes to relationships. The gliding camera, the voiceover that plunges us into the film, the way Rohmer plays with sound.. there's so much to love here.

Much agreed.  One of my favorites by him. 
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 06, 2013, 12:43:21 PM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/SCmain.png)
Suzanne's Career | Rohmer | 1963

A film about the pathetic, base, cruel things we are capable of hiding under the facade of taste and intellectualism. The best thing about the film is the way the actions on screen constantly belie the voiceover narration adding so much humor to the proceedings. Also love how even in such a short duration, Rohmer constantly shifts where our sympathies lie. Initially, we see Guillaume as the cad and Bertrand as yet another victim of his abusive ways. But as the film progresses, Bertrand turns out to be even more pathetic and small-minded than his friend who is at least open about his vile ways. But like in The Green Ray, what I love most is the ending wherein Rohmer reveals his affection for the naïve and "not classically beautiful" Suzanne.
Moral of the Day: Men be monsters
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 07, 2013, 10:03:51 AM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/maudmain.png)
My Night at Maud's | Rohmer | 1969

This one is quite a variation on the basic premise that anchors and links these six films. For one, it's much more sympathetic to the men. Jean-Louis Tringtignant is confused and somewhat delusional but still remains likable throughout the film. Also, in addition to the central conundrum that faces all these characters (having to choose between two women), this one is even more focused on Jean-Louis struggles with Catholicism and in particular, Pascal's views on the same. I didn't necessarily get all of the arguments during that long conversation but it doesn't even matter because what's really interesting is the games that JLT and the titular Maud play as she tries to get him to address his hypocrisy while simultaneously making a genuine connection with him. I am also surprised by how despite being such a talky film with characters discussing religion and fidelity and marriage and such, it feels so breezy and light. There's a sense of wistfulness and regret throughout (and especially at the end) that keeps it all from being a merely cerebral exercise.

I love how the idea of chance and happenstance isn't just debated via Pascal but is integral to the film throughout thereby allowing us to be part of the conversation. This is also accentuated by the way the film is shot. The whole film is almost entirely in static medium shots and while the actors don't face the camera directly, it does give the feeling of being in the room with them. And maybe the prettiest of the Rohmer films I've seen with all those gorgeous shots of Clermont in the snow. 

Also, totally fell in love with Maud during the film.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: oneaprilday on January 07, 2013, 10:57:56 AM
A bunch more reasons to get to that film soon. Thanks, worm. :)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 07, 2013, 11:29:31 AM
A bunch more reasons to get to that film soon. Thanks, worm. :)
I can't see you not enjoying Rohmer :)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Verite on January 07, 2013, 12:25:35 PM
"You're both a shamefaced Christian and a shamefaced Don Juan."  8)



Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 08, 2013, 09:36:14 AM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/LCmain.png)
La Collectionneuse | Rohmer | 1967
I have to confess that I was rather bored during this one. I get that it's intentional and stuff but omg, that lead guy is so annoying and self-absorbed and boooooring. And the actor here, despite being goodlooking and such, doesn't bring the depth that JLT has in Maud's. And Haydée, albeit hot and with a supercute haircut is pretty much a cipher and uninteresting as hell. Apart from making me want to go on vacation where I cut down my activities to absolute zero as well, the film really didn't do much for me.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: MartinTeller on January 08, 2013, 09:42:00 AM
That was generally my reaction as well.  In other Rohmer films, characters are flawed but have some qualities that make you want to watch them.  These people were just too unpleasant and shallow to spend time with.  It's like Rohmer woke up on the wrong side of the bed when he wrote it.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 08, 2013, 09:43:30 AM
Yeah.. I do want their life though :P
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Antares on January 08, 2013, 10:02:12 AM
Also, totally fell in love with Maud during the film.

Me too, and that's a very good review of the film. You touched on every sentiment I felt when I watched it.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 08, 2013, 10:20:29 AM
Me too, and that's a very good review of the film. You touched on every sentiment I felt when I watched it.
Yay :)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: oneaprilday on January 08, 2013, 10:59:02 AM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/LCmain.png)
Quoted for beauty. :)

(Sounds like I'll be giving the film a miss though.)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on January 08, 2013, 11:22:05 AM
I like it.  Not just because I like going on vacation with movies, but I like the way Rohmer shifts sympathies, as we come to see the main characters (the men) as awful and the young girl as the one who has been much smarter than them all along.  She starts as a type, an object, then becomes real.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 08, 2013, 11:30:25 AM
I like it.  Not just because I like going on vacation with movies, but I like the way Rohmer shifts sympathies, as we come to see the main characters (the men) as awful and the young girl as the one who has been much smarter than them all along.  She starts as a type, an object, then becomes real.
that's a pattern, right? true at least of Suzanne at the end and Maud throughout etc? But here I got nothing till the end. I mostly just wanted them all to move out of the house so I could move in :D
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on January 08, 2013, 11:36:06 AM
Yeah, it's a pattern with the Moral Tales: the men think they're very clever and they're wrong.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: mañana on January 08, 2013, 11:56:53 AM
You give good screenshot, worm.

EDIT: Oops, meant to post this in Random Screenshot!. Works here too.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 08, 2013, 12:21:57 PM
You give good screenshot, worm.

EDIT: Oops, meant to post this in Random Screenshot!. Works here too.

lol :D You make it sound so dirty :P
Thanks, mañana. I've missed you.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: mañana on January 08, 2013, 01:02:54 PM
Heh, I stole the joke from a Doonesbury book  (http://www.amazon.com/Give-Great-Meeting-Doonesbury-Trudeau/dp/0030617332) title my dad had.  :)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: MartinTeller on January 08, 2013, 01:13:38 PM
I had that book.

OMG I'M YOUR DAD
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Verite on January 08, 2013, 05:28:26 PM
I mostly just wanted them all to move out of the house so I could move in :D

lol!!!
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: worm@work on January 12, 2013, 05:03:57 PM
(http://screenshots.cinemaontheroad.com/CKmain.png)
Claire's Knee | Rohmer | 1970
Maybe my favorite of all the Rohmers I've seen since Le Rayon Vert. Bearded Brialy is awesome. With zero nudity or sex (this film is wonderfully and surprisingly chaste even compared to the others in the series), Rohmer explores the notion of desire to the fullest here. I think I love Rohmer the most when he's being least judgmental and this is a great instance of that. Brialy's character is battling a mid-life crisis of sorts and wehereas in the hands of a different filmmaker, he might come off as pathetic, lecherous and just downright foolish, Rohmer sees the foolishness in youth as well as in middle-age. Yet another film that realizes how we perpetually view the grass as being greener on the other side etc. Really funny in parts too and Almendros <3.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on January 12, 2013, 05:52:55 PM
I go back and forth between that and MAUD'S as my favorite Moral Tale.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Totoro on January 20, 2013, 01:55:20 AM
(http://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20090419072105/wikiality/images/thumb/8/89/Pl-pedo-bear.png/300px-Pl-pedo-bear.png)

:P
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: pixote on March 29, 2013, 05:28:01 PM
(http://imageshack.us/a/img231/47/summerzr.jpg)
Summer
Eric Rohmer, 1986
    Votes        Average    
7
8.37

(http://imageshack.us/a/img28/273/paulineatthebeach.jpg)
Pauline at the Beach
Eric Rohmer, 1983
    Votes        Average    
7
8.17

(http://imageshack.us/a/img14/2282/theaviatorswife.jpg)
The Aviator's Wife
Eric Rohmer, 1981
    Votes        Average    
5
8.34

(http://imageshack.us/a/img854/949/percevallegallois.jpg)
Perceval le Gallois
Eric Rohmer, 1978
    Votes        Average    
4
9.03

(http://imageshack.us/a/img191/8505/asummerstale.jpg)
A Summer's Tale
Eric Rohmer, 1996
    Votes        Average    
4
8.60



If the Ratings Project has taught us anything so far, it's that the films of Eric Rohmer are crying out for a group marathon.

pixote
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: sdedalus on March 29, 2013, 07:22:36 PM
They Shot Pictures, this fall.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: 1SO on June 01, 2013, 05:10:49 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/xyL4WQu.jpg)

La Collectionneuse

Quote from: Roger Ebert
Rohmer (1920-2010) was older than his fellow directors in the French New Wave, and it's remarkable that he was already 47 when he made the film that enfolds so much of the indolence and narcissism of youth. The moral tales studied tricky questions of romance, and there was little or no sex in them but much discussion about it. He found actors of undeniable physical appeal, and his camera caressed them as they spoke, and spoke, about the possibility of caressing each other.

"La Collectionneuse," which refers to a female collector (of men, in this case) centers on a young woman named Haydée who finds herself living at the villa with Adrien and Daniel, two friends about ten years older than she is. They watch her being picked up by a series of young guys who drive up to the villa and then speed off to the fashionable beachfront city, bringing her back after dawn. Both men claim they have no desire to sleep with her, and talk themselves into an undeclared contest to see which will be the first to succumb.

For someone aiming to do absolute zero during his summer, Adrien sure does occupy himself with a lot of conversation. When he's not around people, Adrien is giving interior dialogue. His voice and his point of view dominate the film and if you're looking for a warm, likable lead then Rohmer is here to test you. I find Adrien true to someone of his age and ambition, and the truth is when you try to do nothing, the brain will always come up with some kind of intrigue. Here, that intrigue is Haydée.

Haydée sleeps around for reasons we never fully understand because A) Haydée herself doesn't have a concrete answer, nor does she feel obliged to give one B) Adrien really doesn't care. He just likes to refer to Haydée as loose and easy and along with Daniel talk about how they have no interest in a woman like that, although it's obvious from the moment the camera gives her the Megan Fox treatment while she walks along the beach in a bikini, that both men are completely in lust.

I really liked the game theory of the situation. How do you sleep with someone while at the same time acting like you don't want to sleep with them? Haydée truly doesn't care and can find guys everywhere. She's exploring her freedom and the camera loves to objectify her. (While there's no nudity, a couple of shots are so lingering on the water adjusting her bikini it has the effect of full frontal.) Daniel has excellent self-loathing no-game game, along with a real shallow mean streak when more distance is required.

Adrian the talker, comes off as the idiot of the bunch. He convinces himself that she wants him and how he'll lower himself to be with her, yet he keeps making aggressive moves that she rejects. The narcissism is off the charts, but I also see sadness in it. I wish he grew up a little during the film, but I don't feel like he ever escapes his mental injections of false confidence. So this is an interesting film, an uncompromisingly shallow film, that's still good to talk about but would've been far more successful if the characters felt like they went through something by the end. All I got was how love games are played when you have the profile of an eagle, and feathers in your head.
RATING: * * 1/2
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Totoro on June 10, 2013, 04:07:15 PM
Updated.


Pauline at the Beach (A)
The Bakery Girl of Monceau (A-)
The Aviator's Wife (A-)
Claire's Knee (A-)
La Collectioneuse (B+)
My Night at Maud's (B)
Triple Agent (D+)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: roujin on November 04, 2014, 03:33:56 PM
1. The Aviator's Wife (1981)
2. My Night at Maud's (1969)
3. Claire's Knee (1970)
4. Pauline at the Beach (1983)
5. A Good Marriage (1982)
6. Love in the Afternoon (1972)
7. La Collectioneuse (1967)
8. The Green Ray (1986)
9. Suzanne's Career (1963)

The Bakery Girl of Monceau (1963)
Full Moon in Paris (1984)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: Totoro on November 04, 2014, 07:31:34 PM
Pauline at the Beach (A+)
The Bakery Girl of Monceau (A)
The Aviator's Wife (A)
Claire's Knee (A-)
La Collectioneuse (B)
My Night at Maud's (B)
Suzanne's Career (B)
Presentation or Charlotte and Her Steak (C+)
Triple Agent (D+)

I've gone far too long without having seen another Rohmer film. LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON soon. Still kicking myself for missing out the restoration of A SUMMER'S TALE.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric - Director's Best
Post by: goodguy on November 05, 2014, 01:49:28 AM
I revisited most of his films on Blu last month, resulting in some reshuffling (http://www.filmspotting.net/forum/index.php?topic=9066.msg593853#msg593853).
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: DarkeningHumour on August 29, 2015, 04:41:09 AM
Ma Nuit Chez Maud
Die Marquise von O...
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: chardy999 on September 08, 2015, 05:09:44 AM
A lot of love in this thread has me intrigued. At this stage I just have:

My Night at Maud's


But I will be able to add to that soon with these purchases... :)

(http://i58.tinypic.com/eildub.jpg) (http://i60.tinypic.com/kdv869.jpg)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: oneaprilday on September 08, 2015, 10:48:24 AM
Nice.  8)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: chardy999 on September 30, 2015, 09:00:31 AM
Le Rayon Vert – Eric Rohmer (1986)

(http://i58.tinypic.com/ejgefl.jpg)

The advent of the Parisian Summer greets us with those perennial Parisian holiday issues – to the mountains or the beach? Or another country? Perhaps Ireland. Delphine was going to Greece but when her friend bails on her, she must find alternative plans.

Delphine is insufferable. She has been alone for two years since breaking up with her boyfriend and it is taking a toll. Inertia reigns and insecurities are allowed to prosper. Anyway, without any desire, yet with no excuse, she agrees to go to Cherbourg with a group of couples. The fit predictably doesn’t work, an unease amplified by her haranguing the table about eating meat during lunch.

Next stop is her ex’s vacant place in the mountains but that only lasts a couple of hours before she returns to Paris. This is followed by a sortie to Biarritz where the balance suits Delphine better and Rohmer considers her more empathetically. Moments of levity come at the right times, because she isn’t doing anything and we can only have that for so long. However, ultimately, it ends poorly.

Is she being serious when she says she has nothing to offer? Or is it her typical self-deprecating humour? Ironically, if she is being sarcastic it is that very humour that is her most redeeming quality - certainly in a social sense. The truth is that while she may listen, she doesn’t hear a thing.

Le Rayon Vert tests the boundary of creating a character so repulsive that you don’t care about the story. Fortunately, it wins: this is a great story. It really understands loneliness, and it is particularly shrewd regarding identity. There are square pegs and round holes but if the green ray of a setting sun can diffract around a globe, then we might just be OK.

7.5/10



Updated:

Le Rayon Vert (The Green Ray/Summer)
My Night at Maud's
A Summer's Tale
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 30, 2015, 09:04:18 AM
Le Rayon Vert tests the boundary of creating a character so repulsive that you don’t care about the story. Fortunately, it wins: this is a great story. It really understands loneliness, and it is particularly shrewd regarding identity. There are square pegs and round holes but if the green ray of a setting sun can diffract around a globe, then we might just be OK.

Nice conclusion.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: chardy999 on September 30, 2015, 09:10:59 AM
Thanks mate :)
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: DarkeningHumour on September 30, 2015, 09:14:52 AM
Australian ?

*checks profile*

Australian.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: Sandy on September 30, 2015, 01:57:09 PM
chardy, half way through I thought you had saved me from checking this movie out and then came that last paragraph. Identity exploration is my weakness. :) Thanks for the great write up!
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: chardy999 on September 30, 2015, 06:40:41 PM
Cheers Sandy, I would recommend it. Granted, something tells me I am going to like a few of his others more.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Eric
Post by: jascook on November 01, 2015, 09:25:34 AM
My Night at Maud's: 6/10
Claire's Knee: 4/10
Title: Re: Rohmer, Éric
Post by: 1SO on August 03, 2018, 01:13:01 AM
1. Claire's Knee
2. A Summer's Tale
3. Chloe in the Afternoon
4. The Collector
5. The Green Ray (aka. Summer)
6. My Night at Maud's
7. The Baker of Monceau
Title: Re: Rohmer, Éric
Post by: DarkeningHumour on August 03, 2018, 03:41:12 AM
Do you have a review of Maud's?
Title: Re: Rohmer, Éric
Post by: 1SO on August 03, 2018, 09:41:25 AM
No. Only this.

Quote from: 1SO
This is where I'm supposed to review Eric Rohmer's My Night at Maud's, but I'm not going to. This was to be my 2nd Rohmer, following Claire's Knee which I loved. Only, I couldn't get into this and it felt like I needed to approach Rohmer differently, especially since there are so many of his left to see.
Title: Re: Rohmer, Éric
Post by: Knocked Out Loaded on October 15, 2018, 05:12:35 AM
A Summer's Tale, 70°
My Night At Maud's, 65°
Claire's Knee, 60°
Autumn Tale, 45°
Suzanne's Career, 40°
A Tale Of Springtime, 35°
The Bakery Girl Of Monceau, 35°
Place de l'Etoile (Paris vu par six segment), 30°