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21
Marathons / Re: Horror: A New Beginning
« Last post by Knocked Out Loaded on Today at 05:10:34 AM »
The Boogey Man (1980)
½
Man this is bad. A girl sees her brother commit murder through a mirror. Years later, the woman finds the mirror and shatters it, only to have the pieces commit inexplicable evil deeds as they are scattered around. (Kind of like Oculus but terrible.) Poorly filmed with little money and a bad script, it’s the kind of film whose inclusion in They Shoot Zombies makes me question the entire list.
In Decemer 1980 there was a debate on Swedish television on the influence of violent movies availible on VHS at that time and the destructive effect they had on young people. I remember that The Boogeyman was one of the titles that were singled out on this program. Other movies that were mentioned in this context were The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, The Driller Killer, Tourist Trap and a few others. Btw, The Boogeyman has the scene with the girl and the pair of scissors in front of the mirror, right?
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Marathons / Re: Horror: A New Beginning
« Last post by 1SO on Today at 12:04:57 AM »

The Boogey Man (1980)
½
Man this is bad. A girl sees her brother commit murder through a mirror. Years later, the woman finds the mirror and shatters it, only to have the pieces commit inexplicable evil deeds as they are scattered around. (Kind of like Oculus but terrible.) Poorly filmed with little money and a bad script, it’s the kind of film whose inclusion in They Shoot Zombies makes me question the entire list.


Zombie Holocaust (1980)
aka. Doctor Butcher M.D.
★ ½
I’ve seen a few (too many) of this type of Italian Horror, but this one throws everything into the stew. An organ thief at a hospital leads to an expedition into the jungle where cannibals live in fear of a mad doctor and his zombie army. The gore effects are really well done, and the movie moves quickly through all the sub-genres, but this is still only for people into this type of extreme film. Frequently mentioned on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast.


Bloody Moon (1981)
aka. The Saw of Death
★ ½
I’m not instantly against sleazy filmmaker Jesûs Franco. I was a fan of Paul Verhoeven once. There are a couple of memorable violent kills in this slasher, but most of it captures the inane plotting and stupid characters that’s bad about the sub-genre. It’s Giallo without the flash.


Amityville II: The Possession (1982)
★ ½
Most of the movie is very grim, with an abusive father and the demon possessing the son lusting after his sister. The haunted house scares are standard fare. (Doesn’t helped that I just watched Netfilx’s Haunting of Hill House.) The final third is a pretty good Exorcist knock-off with good special effects supporting the battle between Priest and Demon.


976-EVIL (1988)
aka. Dial the Devil
aka. Horrorscope
½
Hard to believe this was directed by an actor. While Robert Englund will never be nominated for an Academy Award, he’s one of the best within the Horror genre. The ‘acting’ here (by some pros as well as amateurs) is across the board terrible, as if they were trying to invent a new type of performance art. I’m talking Gigli bad, less believable than those scenes of Nicholas Cage in The Wicker Man, except here it’s all the time (and not even a fraction of it is entertaining.) The cheap production and nonsensical story might have bothered me more, if I could’ve gotten past the people.
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Movie Games / Re: Movie Antonyms
« Last post by joem18b on Yesterday at 11:51:54 PM »
24
Movie Games / Re: Movie Antonyms
« Last post by MartinTeller on Yesterday at 11:41:16 PM »
Blow
25
Movie Games / Re: Movie Antonyms
« Last post by joem18b on Yesterday at 11:14:28 PM »
Suck

imdb = 7.6

tomatometer = 55%  but audience score = 87%

in the venacular, "suck" and the antonym i have in mind mean the same thing
26
Movie Clubs / Re: Top 100 Club: Sam the Cinema Snob
« Last post by 1SO on Yesterday at 10:41:53 PM »
The Man Who Planted Trees (1987)
“Men could be as effective as God in tasks other than destruction.”
A simple, beautiful experience. Emotionally contemplative while intellectually you can apply a number of meanings to the story. It works as a humanist fable or a religious parable. The animation seems to blow with the sand and the sand, and in later scenes flow with the earth and the water and the breeze. This is now in my Top 10 for 1987, and it’s going into my Essentials (#276)


Meshes of the Afternoon (1943)
I think of this film as Key to getting me to enjoy David Lynch. The imagery is surreal, and on the surface, incomprehensible. Yet, there’s a dream logic to everything that happens and by the final reveal it seems to all make sense, even if I can’t explain any of it. A film that teaches me to feel instead of think all the damn time.


One Week (1920)
I wrote about this one for you before. Still great fun to revist. Buster Keaton on his game was amazing.


The Old Mill (1937)
Beautiful simplicity. The mill itself is just a frame for a mixture of realistic/naturalistic animal behavior, realistic/stylized animal behavior and mini-moments where animals take on more human behaviors. It all blends into a cohesive presentation of life both fantastical and relatable. The one moment that distresses me is the mother bird who made her nest in the grove of the horizontal wheel and is only saved by the missing tooth.


Night and Fog (1956)
The images are powerful and the overall structure along with some edits show brains and talent put this documentary together rather than just let the images speak for themselves. I have Schindler’s List in my Top 100 and Shoah also in my Essentials, but I doubt I could write a good persuasive argument as to why I include them and not this. Maybe it’s because those are more classically dramatized while there’s a sense of the arthouse to this.


One Froggy Evening (1955)
I never got the appeal of this short’s frustrating one joke. I guess I sympathized with the worker who loses everything trying to share his discovery. “Duck Amuck” and “Rabbot of Seville” I get, but this makes me long for Pixar’s “Presto” where the rabbit has good reason to not perform for the crowd and it only escalates from there.


The House is Black (1963)
I was hoping for a different reaction with this rewatch, but I still don’t connect with it, or maybe I won’t allow myself. It’s what I lean into cinema to avoid or escape from, the knowledge that this is some people’s reality. And I write that knowing the presentation is more hopeful than you might expect. It’s also more poetic, which is my other theory. That there is a layer of artifice in place that keeps me at a distance.
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Movie Talk / Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Last post by Smoke on Yesterday at 10:11:02 PM »
^good flick!
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Marathons / Re: Shocktober Group Marathon 2018
« Last post by Junior on Yesterday at 09:01:32 PM »
I think she identified all the qualities that make it such a classic.
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Marathons / Re: Shocktober Group Marathon 2018
« Last post by 1SO on Yesterday at 08:42:31 PM »
I honestly never thought Mrs. 1SO would want to watch Halloween (1978), let alone that she would like it as much as she did. She thinks the fun is with the camera playing a constant game of "Where's Michael?," sometimes in the deep background, sometimes right on top of you. She thinks the simplicity of Myers, from the blank face to the lack of any psychological motivation, makes him a perfect horror everyman. He might kill you just because... he doesn't need a reason. She also really appreciated the lack of blood and guts, which makes the tension more effective.
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Movie Games / Re: Filmspotting Gif Uno
« Last post by smirnoff on Yesterday at 07:29:29 PM »
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