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Poll

What's your favorite film by Martin Ritt?

haven't seen any
6 (35.3%)
don't like any
0 (0%)
Edge of the City
0 (0%)
No Down Payment
0 (0%)
The Long, Hot Summer
0 (0%)
The Black Orchid
0 (0%)
The Sound and the Fury
0 (0%)
5 Branded Women
1 (5.9%)
Paris Blues
0 (0%)
Hemingway's Adventures of a Young Man
0 (0%)
Hud
5 (29.4%)
The Outrage
0 (0%)
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold
3 (17.6%)
Hombre
0 (0%)
The Brotherhood
0 (0%)
The Molly Maguires
0 (0%)
The Great White Hope
0 (0%)
Sounder
1 (5.9%)
Pete 'n' Tillie
0 (0%)
Conrack
0 (0%)
The Front
0 (0%)
Casey's Shadow
0 (0%)
Norma Rae
1 (5.9%)
Back Roads
0 (0%)
Cross Creek
0 (0%)
Murphy's Romance
0 (0%)
Nuts
0 (0%)
Stanley & Iris
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 17

Author Topic: Ritt, Martin  (Read 1709 times)

MartinTeller

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Ritt, Martin
« on: June 16, 2011, 03:05:39 PM »
1. Hud
2. Edge of the City
3. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold
4. The Front



Pretty sure I saw Sounder in grade school, but I sure don't remember much. 
« Last Edit: March 17, 2022, 10:45:55 AM by 1SO »

verbALs

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Re: Ritt, Martin - Director's Best
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2011, 03:17:29 PM »
Martin I haven't seen HUD either. Maybe we should bite the bullet at the same time and watch it soon. It was in one dearly departed Fspotters fave films list. Anyone else?
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sdedalus

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Re: Ritt, Martin - Director's Best
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2011, 03:24:03 PM »
1. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold
2. Hud

Both really good.
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MartinTeller

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Re: Ritt, Martin - Director's Best
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2011, 03:26:25 PM »
Martin I haven't seen HUD either. Maybe we should bite the bullet at the same time and watch it soon. It was in one dearly departed Fspotters fave films list. Anyone else?

Not a big Paul Newman fan, but I don't hate him either, so maybe.

Bill Thompson

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Re: Ritt, Martin - Director's Best
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2011, 06:18:39 PM »
Only seen Norma Rae, aka the film that Sodie completely stole from to make Erin Brockovich, and it was good, but nothing special.

Antares

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Re: Ritt, Martin - Director's Best
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2011, 07:23:22 PM »
Sounder
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold
Norma Rae
Cross Creek
Hud


The Front
The Long, Hot Summer
Hombre
The Great White Hope
The Molly Maguires
Pete 'n' Tillie
Casey's Shadow


The Outrage
Stanley & Iris
The Brotherhood
Murphy's Romance


Nuts

Ritt has always been one of those forgotten directors, who never did anything truly memorable, but still made very good films.
Masterpiece (100-91) | Classic (90-80) | Entertaining (79-69) | Mediocre (68-58) | Cinemuck (57-21) | Crap (20-0)

1SO

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Re: Ritt, Martin
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2015, 08:54:49 AM »
1. Five Branded Women
2. The Front
3. Norma Rae

4. Edge of the City
5. Hud
6. Sounder
7. Cross Creek
8. The Black Orchid
9. Pete 'n' Tilly
10. The Spy Who Came in From the Cold
11. Nuts
12. Hombre
13. The Long Hot Summer
14. The Great White Hope
15. Murphy's Romance

16. Back Roads
17. Stanley & Iris
18. The Outrage
« Last Edit: March 23, 2022, 12:26:55 AM by 1SO »

1SO

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Re: Ritt, Martin
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2022, 10:49:27 PM »

Five Branded Women (1960)
"It was January. My family had no coal.
Paul... Sergeant Keller got some for us. All he wanted,
he said, was to be part of a family again.
I was scared. He was the first man I ever knew."


I get why this isn't more well-known, it's unflinchingly dark for 1960. In a Yugoslav village occupied by German soldiers during WWII, a Nazi Sergeant (Steve Forrest) has taken a group of women as lovers in exchange for favors. (Vera Miles and Jeanne Moreau play two of the women.) The story begins with the Sergeant captured by freedom fighters, led by Van Heflin, who has the women's heads shaved before throwing them out of town. I prepared for Iñárritu misery, but the script takes a much smarter route that's more Tarantino as the women with nothing to lose show value as fighters alongside the Nazi resistance.

It's amazing that a film with such an unusual tone never loses its way. Being written and directed by men - it's from a novel from the writer of Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion - some of the gender politics is debatable, but it's debatable in a good way. It's very likely that in a time of war, villagers would see the situation with only small shades of gray. The men believe the women should be punished (until they prove useful) while the women are doing what they've always done... whatever it takes to survive. Even when the women gain respect, it's still a fight, though now more of a battle of ideas. While the men think the only way to win is by locking away any humanity, the women question how you can ever find peace again with such behavior. This is one of the year's top Discoveries.
★ ★ ★ – Very Good

I didn't want to write too much about a film that's going to be a tough sell, but I only scratched the surface of the film's many themes and ideas. As you can tell by the names I dropped, this is a smart film, though it looks like an Italian indie. I also firmly believe this was one of Tarantino's secret inspirations for Inglourious Basterds. There are quite a number of familiar elements, including an action climax set around the screening of a movie.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2022, 02:42:33 PM by 1SO »

1SO

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Re: Ritt, Martin
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2022, 12:28:22 AM »
Updated Ranking


Edge of the City (1957)
★ ★ ½
John Cassavetes usually only has chemistry with his crew and Sidney Poitier doesn’t have an easy chemistry with anyone, but these two harmonize incredibly well together. They are the film, supported by a casually cruel Jack Warden and a strong Ruby Dee. Eventually the film’s drama gets so big it breaks reality and it shouts and over-emotes its way to the ending.


The Long Hot Summer (1958)
★ ★
Southern corn, with too much butter from ‘Big Daddy’ Orson Welles and barely any salt from Paul Newman and Joanna Woodward. Based on a novella by William Faulkner, the presentation is like a filmed play but the dialogue is aggressively unmemorable.


The Black Orchid (1958)
★ ★ ½
Anthony Quinn’s specialty is his vulnerability, how unguardedly he puts his heart out there. Here he’s a widowed dad romancing Sophia Loren, a widow herself, shunned by the neighborhood because her husband was a gangster. The Italian emotional pitch surrounding the pair comes off as a bit much, especially when dealing with the kids Q&L are struggling to raise right, but the film is saved by one of the most perfect climactic resolutions for an otherwise forgettable film.


The Great White Hope (1970)
★ ★
Loosely based on boxer Jack Johnson, the first contender for the Heavyweight title, what was one edgy and important is now just thoroughly uncomfortable as it makes every scene, every plot point, nearly every line about racism, both casual and overt. The mechanics of the fight game, where the image of a black man beating on a white would be taboo busting, remain fascinating. The relationship between the fighter (James Earl Jones) and his white lover (Jane Alexander) is cringy in its theatricality.


Pete ‘n’ Tillie (1972)
★ ★ ½
Immediately, I could tell this was written with talent, and sure enough the screenplay is by Julius J. Epstein. (This is one of his 4 Oscar noms.) It starts like a sophisticated rom-com pairing Walter Matthau with Carol Burnett, but a sourness flattens the expected humor. This is deliberate as the relationship becomes as complicated as Scenes From a Marriage. Sometimes just as unpleasant, though I’m not as invested in these two characters. There are a couple of scenes where Burnett is left alone to go big and it comes off as something she would parody on her show. Ritt isn’t able to direct from her what Robert Redford did with Mary Tyler Moore in Ordinary People, but that’s what this film needed to succeed.

 

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