love

Poll

What's your favorite film by Carlos Saura?

haven't seen any
8 (57.1%)
don't like any
0 (0%)
other
0 (0%)
La Caza (The Hunt)
0 (0%)
Peppermint Frappé
0 (0%)
The Garden of Delights
0 (0%)
Ana and the Wolves
1 (7.1%)
Cousin Angelica
0 (0%)
Cria Cuervos
0 (0%)
Elisa, vida mía
0 (0%)
Mama Turns 100
0 (0%)
Deprisa, deprisa
0 (0%)
Blood Wedding
1 (7.1%)
Antonieta
0 (0%)
Carmen
4 (28.6%)
El amor brujo
0 (0%)
El Dorado
0 (0%)
¡Ay, Carmela!
0 (0%)
¡Dispara! (Outrage)
0 (0%)
Flamenco (de Carlos Saura)
0 (0%)
Taxi
0 (0%)
Pajarico
0 (0%)
Tango
0 (0%)
Goya in Bordeaux
0 (0%)
Bunuel and King Solomon's Table
0 (0%)
Salomé
0 (0%)
The Seventh Day
0 (0%)
Iberia
0 (0%)
Fados
0 (0%)
I, Don Giovanni
0 (0%)
Flamenco, Flamenco
0 (0%)
Zonda: folclore argentino
0 (0%)
La Jota
0 (0%)
Renzo Piano, an Architect for Santander
0 (0%)
Rosa Rosae: A Spanish Civil War Elegy
0 (0%)
The King of all the World
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 14

Author Topic: Saura, Carlos  (Read 1700 times)

MartinTeller

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 17854
  • martinteller.wordpress.com
    • my movie blog
Saura, Carlos
« on: June 22, 2011, 10:36:12 AM »
1. Carmen
2. Flamenco, Flamenco
3. Peppermint Frappé
4. El amor brujo
5. Flamenco
6. Deprisa, deprisa
7. Blood Wedding
8. La prima Angelica
9. Cria cuervos
10. Elisa, vida mia
11. Ana y los lobos
12. Tango
13. Sevillanas

14. Iberia
15. Jota de Saura
16. Argentina (Zonda)
17. Goya in Bordeaux

18. Salomé
19. Taxi
20. Fados
21. Antonieta
« Last Edit: January 03, 2023, 11:00:00 PM by MartinTeller »

Antares

  • Godfather
  • *****
  • Posts: 5011
Re: Saura, Carlos - Director's Best
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2011, 10:58:30 PM »
Carmen

Haven't watched the other two films in the Eclipse set yet, probably will be added to my list of shame.
Masterpiece (100-91) | Classic (90-80) | Entertaining (79-69) | Mediocre (68-58) | Cinemuck (57-21) | Crap (20-0)

MartinTeller

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 17854
  • martinteller.wordpress.com
    • my movie blog
Re: Saura, Carlos - Director's Best
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2015, 05:02:05 PM »

Ana y los lobos - Ana (Geraldine Chaplin) is an American nanny, newly arrived at a Spanish estate to care for the three little girls of Juan (José Vivó) and Luchy (Charo Soriano).  It is a full household.  Juan lives with his ailing mother (Rafaela Aparicio), who is obsessed with death and has attacks when she gets excited.  Also living there are Juan's two brothers.  Fernando (Fernando Fernán Gómez) follows an ascetic existence, and wants to live his life as an eremite in a cave.  And José (José María Prada) is the self-proclaimed pater familias, an authoritarian, militaristic figure who insists that any concerns about the children be brought to him instead of Juan.  Ana tries to find her place in this family, intrigued by the mysterious Fernando, hounded by the lecherous Juan (who sends her anonymous, perverted letters) and enlisted by José to help maintain his collection of military gear.

Director Carlos Saura doesn't bury the allegory beneath any layers of obscurity.  This family clearly represents the forces of Franco-controlled Spain: José is the dictatorship, Juan is the morally corrupted elite, Fernando is the Catholic church.  Ana is the foreign interloper: her reactions to the absurdities (amused) and cruelties (shocked) drive the family closer together, into a defensive stance that only exacerbates the situation.  She also represents the role of women in Franco-era Spain, who were stripped of many employment opportunities and lived largely under the thumbs of men.  Ana has far less agency in this scenario than she thinks she does.

It's an intriguing film... there are a couple of surrealistic touches (Fernando's "levitation", José's vision of Ana's legs) but for the most part it stays grounded.  The allegory may be a little thin, but as a viewer who isn't terribly familiar with modern Spanish history (or any Spanish history, or let's face it, history in general) I didn't mind the lack of subtlety so much.  It addresses a lot of the issues with both sly mocking humor and haunting horror, especially in the shocking ending.  Chaplin has a magnetic presence as always.  Ana is aware of the effect her sexuality has and tries to use it to her advantage, or to protect herself.  But she also has a sense of empowerment that sadly this world does not recognize.  The three brothers are excellent as well, especially Gómez (recognizable from Spirit of the Beehive, a more nuanced Franco allegory).

Perhaps not one of Saura's most powerful works, but a very solid film that's quite watchable... enlightening, and both entertaining and sobering.  Rating: Very Good (81)
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 07:13:43 PM by MartinTeller »

1SO

  • Moderator
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 36101
  • Marathon Man
Re: Saura, Carlos
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2022, 06:12:02 PM »
1. Carmen
2. Blood Wedding

3. Cría cuervos

1SO

  • Moderator
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 36101
  • Marathon Man
Re: Saura, Carlos
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2022, 09:17:34 PM »
La Caza/The Hunt (1966)
★ ★
It's usually ideal to walk into a movie knowing nothing about it. A lot of this movie is a commentary on Spanish culture. Its history, its politics, its machismo, the plot of men from various backgrounds taking part in a rabbit hunt incorporates a lot of ideas all at once. It's straddles the line between minimalist neo-realism and fable. Much of the dialogue is banal, but I'm aware there are many strong undertones to what they're saying. I just didn't have enough background on the culture to do more than appreciate how much Carlos Saura was trying to pack in while I struggled to get more meaning. There's some strong and precise camera technique and occasionally too much bunny killings - According to the internet, it was Luis Buñuel who recommended Saura not fake these scenes. - but I would need some kind of guide to walk me through it, or a dumbed-down more unsubtle translation of the subtitles.