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Author Topic: Write about the last movie you watched (2006-2010)  (Read 4551234 times)

Fugee

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22500 on: November 13, 2009, 06:37:00 PM »
Even if you didn't love it, I'm glad you got some laughs out of it, 'Noke. Any interest in The Naked Gun?

Did it come across as if I didn't love it? I totally loved it! I was just worried at the start it was going in a direction that could have annoyed me. All the stuff on the plane and on the ground was brilliant.

And yes, now I've loads of interest in The Naked Gun.

I remember watching Airplane as a 6th Grader at some massive birthday sleepover and we all laughed at everything and felt like such rebels. Fond memories with that film, glad you enjoyed it.

Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22501 on: November 13, 2009, 10:14:33 PM »
"It's all research." -roujin

roujin

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22502 on: November 13, 2009, 10:26:18 PM »

The Limits of Control Jim Jarmusch, 2009

so, the lone man goes around Spain, enjoying the architecture, enjoying the art, enjoying something. He's sharply dressed and perfectly still and all that stuff. He's the epitome of self-control. Then he gets some kind of assignment, relayed to him through codes and signs and all this bunch of other nonsense. He goes around Spain looking for these people that have the instructions for him. They find him sipping two expressos. They go on at length about whatever subject interests them. The Lone Man hardly responds to them, but he seems to internally digest what they say. Even if they don't speak the same language, they're the same kind of people, even if The Lone Man doesn't have a people. He's still part of some kind of larger world community that's against people who think they're bigger than everyone else. Basically, AMERICANS, who are ugly and not creative bohemians or something. It's pretty cute and idealistic in a way and interesting in all the usual roujin ways, but I guess the reason I like it is because it feels like Jarmusch has basically stripped pretty much everything but the repetition and the variations on the theme from his repertoire. The only new tool is Doyle's cinematography, which is amazing, duh, but come on. Well, I guess Boris' score is awesome, too. Boris is awesome. I am awesome. You are awesome. Gossip Girl is the greatest TV show of ALL TIME.

oldkid

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22503 on: November 14, 2009, 12:06:31 AM »
M
All kinds of awesomeness.  Peter Lorre's monologue near the end is just brilliant.  That whole scene is one of the best ever.  The end kinda sucked, but what can you do?  4/5

La Dolce Vita
Not as good as 8 1/2, but I'm not really sure how good it was.  Anyone want to discuss it with me, please join me: http://www.filmspotting.net/boards/index.php?topic=6898.0
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Solid Blake

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22504 on: November 14, 2009, 01:22:25 AM »


Talk about a transcendent movie-going experience. It was a midnight showing and I'm pretty sure everyone was drunk. What a great time! Can ya dig?

pixote

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22505 on: November 14, 2009, 05:39:52 AM »
2012 - Were all the non-FX shots filmed on video?  SFU.

pixote
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DrKimble

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22506 on: November 14, 2009, 07:23:46 AM »
Observe and Report
I give it 1 1/2 pill out of 5.
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roujin

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22507 on: November 14, 2009, 07:31:50 AM »

Modern Romance Albert Brooks, 1981

wow, so goddamn painful. There are parts that are really funny, like the whole Quaaludes bit that goes on forever and a half, each second pitiful and hilarious, and then there are parts that are so sad and pathetic that it makes you question on what level Brooks is working on. Basically, Brooks plays this film editor d00d, and he breaks up with his girlfriend at the beginning of the film for like the millionth time. But, Brooks basically goes crazy in the next days as he can't forget about her and he has trouble remaining in his apartment and he thinks she's CINECAST!ing someone else (of course). Brooks' jealousy and anxiety is so creepy and broad and needling and hilarious that it's hard to identify with him a bit, but then it gets to a really, really funny part and then you're on his side again. So, basically, Modern Romance is just this totally self-deluded cycle that's both painful and funny. Yay. Perfect saturday morning viewing :(

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Emiliana

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22508 on: November 14, 2009, 08:07:25 AM »

Les roseaux sauvages (Wild Reeds, André Téchiné, 1994)

Damn you, pixote. Your #2 film of all time is soooooooo beautiful. I could never, ever do the experience justice in my own words, so I'll just quote someone who has said it all perfectly already.

Wild Reeds is the story of four young people caught exactly at the point where they are on the cusp of adulthood and adolescence, an age that seems to capture the imagination a lot of filmmakers but one that seldom gets portrayed just right. The film's title comes from The Oak and the Reed, a fable by La Fontaine that is the subject of a classroom lesson. Firstly, I was mistaken in thinking that Wild Reeds was just a coming-of-age film. It's so much more than that. It's a period piece about a very particular place and time - i.e. A small town in Southwest France right around the end of the Algerian conflict. Consequently, it also ends up being a political allegory. Plus, its a movie about starting to get comfortable with one's own sexuality. It's also a character study of four individuals caught in a love quadrangle. But all of this is secondary to what the film is really really about, namely, the intimacy and joy that friendship offers even as one is going through all of the insecurities and uncertainties that inevitably accompany the process of growing up.

Okay, so I admit, this is definitely one of the best coming-of-age films I've seen. I think what really makes it so great is how intimate and real and detailed it all feels. By the end of the film, I felt like I had gotten to know these characters as friends and I was genuinely invested in their future. The film doesn't offer any easy answers nor does it offer any reassurances that everything has been resolved neatly. Rather, it shows us how these characters have matured and grown stronger during the course of the film thereby offering us hope that even though life will continue to challenge them, their ability to love and connect and change will help them get through quagmire we call life. I am amazed at the way Téchiné manages to completely do away with melodrama, downplay the tragedy and even let the political stuff remain solidly in the background and focus almost completely on the evolving relationship between these four characters. Plus, these characters always feel like completely realized, living and breathing human beings. Human beings that are thoughtful, intellectual and feel everything intensely. I love every one of them!

Another really exceptional thing about this film is the way the entire story unfolds. We seem to be merely following characters along as each scene just flows seamlessly into the next and I didn't even realize at what point I got so attached to these characters. Even though, on the surface, these characters seem to inhabit personalities and positions that are seemingly at odds with one another (gay and straight, male and female, Communist and right-wing, French and Algerian), the portrayal of how they are drawn to each other by the shared outsider status and their circumstances is completely credible and one of the most authentic depictions of budding friendship I've ever seen on film. Despite the obvious downplaying of the dramatic elements in the film, I was able to feel the same sense of urgency towards every new sensation and emotion that the characters in the film are bound to feel at their stage in life.

Élodie Bouchez, oh Élodie Bouchez - where do I even begin. Why wouldn't everyone be in love with her! She is youthful and joyous in parts, mature beyond her years and sober in others, compassionate at times and bitterly hurtful in others, but through all of this she never loses her luminescence and beauty. Her character really forms the emotional core of the film and she seems to carry that burden with such grace and ease. Seriously, I don't think this movie has any weak performances but Élodie really stands out. Oh and Stéphane Rideau is HOT!

Ultimately, nothing spectacular ever really happens in Wild Reeds. These are simple events in the lives of normal characters and maybe that's why this has so much emotional resonance because the film never trades authenticity for drama and never turns manipulative or false. At the end, I was left with the feeling that every relationship in this film, no matter how deep and close it felt, was ultimately ephemeral.

Yet another film with a perfect ending scene. The camera revolves in a circular pan of the countryside and we anxiously look around but don't see our protagonists anywhere. Finally, we hear someone whistling and see three friends crossing a bridge with their arms interlinked and we feel comforted that ultimately these kids are going to be alright.
I agree with everything worm said - one of the best films about youth and friendship and falling in love and figuring out oneself and one's relationships that I've ever seen.

One little thing that I want to add: The scene from which I've taken the screenshot plays to Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings, which is the piece of music that is most likely to bring me to tears no matter how often I've heard it (even though it has still greater impact on me when it's called "Agnus Dei" and sung by an a cappella choir). It's not as if that scene hadn't packed an immense emotional punch even without the music. Like it was though?  Absolutely killed me.

I have to thank to w@w not only for expressing everything I wanted to say about the film, but especially for working a little magic so that I was able to watch this film in the first place. And pix: thank you.

FLYmeatwad

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Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #22509 on: November 14, 2009, 08:27:29 AM »
Black Dynamite

Talk about a transcendent movie-going experience. It was a midnight showing and I'm pretty sure everyone was drunk. What a great time! Can ya dig?

So lucky, I want to see this film so bad.

 

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