Author Topic: Write about the last movie you watched (2006-2010)  (Read 3688320 times)

sdedalus

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 16588
  • I have a prestigious blog, sir!
    • The End of Cinema
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25260 on: January 09, 2010, 10:11:33 PM »


Love it!  Fosse!

Keel's weird, but he grows on you.
The End of Cinema

Seattle Screen Scene

"He was some kind of a man. What does it matter what you say about people?"

roujin

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 15479
  • it's all research
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25261 on: January 09, 2010, 10:21:04 PM »
Yeah, I didn't like him until he put on all that makeup and started spanking Kathryn Grayson  :D


Throwdown Johnnie To, 2004

What a weird movie. It's about this disgraced former Judo champion or whatever that does nothing but drink and gamble all day but then this random guy comes in and challenges him and everything changes. I don't think I've ever seen a Judo film (still need to see Sanshiro Sugata, a film that's referenced here a lot apparently) but it's kind of a weird looking. Why? Because it gets kind of comical seeing people being thrown on the floor over and over again. I think To understands that which is why this huge brawl that starts out in a nightclub and spills over into the HK streets feels as much as musical number as it does a fight set piece (is there really a difference?). The film's tone is very strange, too. There are a lot of playful scenes where the gang steals money from gangsters (gangsters that hang out at arcade stores beating kids at fighting games) and then there are scenes that are extremely sentimental, bordering on mawkish. What happens then? I don't know. It just felt weird and at the end of the day I was unsure of what it added up to.

« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 10:22:46 PM by roujin »

Verite

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4439
  • Stay gold.
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25262 on: January 09, 2010, 11:37:36 PM »
Re:"The Rules Of The Game"

The aesthetic and form is why most people consider one of, if not the, best film ever made.

It's one of the reasons, definitely.  Though it seems to me that the critical and comic treatment of the French upper class dominates appreciative commentary of the film.

It's use of deep focus(2 years before "Citizen Kane") and camera movements(pre-something like "The Earrings Of Madame De...") made my mouth drop, mainly due to the film being formally incredibly impessive in and of itself, but in 1939, it's mindblowing. Puts most filmmaking to shame.

Renoir's film bursts with vivacity because of the staging and choreography that he achieved with the longish takes, camera movement, and blocking.
"When in doubt, seduce."
                   -Elaine May

Sam the Cinema Snob

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 24509
  • A Monkey with a Gun
    • Creative Criticism
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25263 on: January 10, 2010, 12:06:51 AM »
The Hudsucker Proxy

probably in my bottom three Coen Bro's films.
I'd put it in their top 3. Probably their most underrated. Then again I always thought the Coens were better at being funny than serious and violent and existential. Leave that stuff for those pretentious Europeans.

Corndog

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 16468
  • Oo-da-lolly, Oo-da-lolly, golly what a day!
    • Corndog Chats
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25264 on: January 10, 2010, 12:31:56 AM »
#13.
Youth in Revolt (Miguel Arteta, 2010) -

Look, I love Michael Cera. He, to me, is very funny. What I find so funny about him is his vocabulary and his delivery. Both are great and both are on display here. There are some genuinely hilarious moments in this film. The story itself is kind of nice, but nothing to knock your socks off. Other than Cera I found the film to be rather average to be honest, nothing really that memorable other than when he flips the cereal bowl, I lost it at that. But I feel like when I wake up tomorrow I will have moved on to bigger and better things and will have forgotten about the majority of what I saw tonight.

Rating: **1/2

#1 of 2010 so far
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."

roujin

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 15479
  • it's all research
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25265 on: January 10, 2010, 01:10:39 AM »

The Quiet Man John Ford, 1952

A nuanced and realistic portrayal of the Irish people.

ferris

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 10832
  • "Bravo Vincent....Bravo!"
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25266 on: January 10, 2010, 01:27:23 AM »
A Serious Man

What the CINECAST! did I just watch?

**** 1/2

There's a great discussion in our spoiler thread if you haven't seen it yet
"And if thou refuse to let them go, behold, I will smite all thy borders with frogs" - Exodus 8:2 KJV
(switchboard)

THATguy

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2377
  • Contrarian At Large.
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25267 on: January 10, 2010, 01:37:46 AM »
I have and I stick by my initial statement.

Speaking of the Coens...

Intolerable Cruelty

This was just kind of bland and not that funny. Color me disappointed. Although I haven't seen the Ladykillers, easily the worst Coen film I've seen.

FifthCityMuse

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3375
  • Good work, sycophants!
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25268 on: January 10, 2010, 02:07:25 AM »
From the Melbourne Movie Marathon.

The Lady Eve Preston Sturges 1941
Screwball romantic comedy where of course you know how it ends so it is the journey that counts. Not a lot of laughs, chuckles yes, a little bit of slapstick.
I think I laughed more at this than the others. It is wonderfully funny, and a wonderful comedy. I do think it's a little ridiculous in terms of plot, but it's just such fun.

B+

Solaris Andrei Tarkovsky 1972
An unusual viewing experience, the DVD version I had must be spliced together from different versions. Mostly it was a dubbed version, but every now and then it would go to a subtitled version, strange.
This is a detail film, long drawn out tracking shots, luxuriating over the scenes. You are given lots of time to study the subjects, not surprising then that during the film there were references to both Tolstoy and Dostoevsky both wordy writers. This did help bring you into the world of madness/reality that Hari was experiencing. Did this film need to be nearly 3 hours long, not really.
People always talk about Tarkovsky like his work is impossibly slow, but I feel like it's a lot quicker than either Werckmeister Harmonies or I Don't Want to Sleep Alone. I also think I liked this a lot more than any of the others at the marathon. I do wish a little that I'd seen it with a little more time to think and process it, because I think it's really remarkable.

I love the way he plays with colour and black and white photography. I think the setup in the beginning is really interesting, and important for what follows. The footage of Tokyo is gorgeous and such a wonderful contrast to the images of nature, which have been the sole dominance to that point. The philosophy was never as heavy for me as I think some of the others found it, and I think it fits really well. It forces you to think but never provides the answers in the conversation, although they are definitely present in the text and subtext.

I found the ending brilliant.

A

The Cook The Theif His Wife & Her Lover Peter Greenaway 1989
Another visual film, but this one a feast. This is the 4th time I have seen this film and it still has not diminished. Now having also watched Greenaway's 'Nightwatching' about Rembrandt I keep seeing what appear to be references to Rembrandt's work (e.g. the way some of the kitchen staff dress). Love this film.
What a film. Pretty gross, right? The use of colour is so extreme and gorgeous, as are the amazing sliding tracking shots from room to room. The costume changes between room are brilliant as are the costumes themselves. Mirren's performance is really incredible.

Incredibly impressive.

A-

All That Heaven Allows Douglas Sirk 1955
Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson in a May September romance, which because of the era it was from I was not sure how it would end, tragedy or not. Some superb framing and use of light and dark, particularly when Jane Wyman's son issues an ultimatum to her, Jane's face is fully lit, while his is shadowed except for the eyes.
I adore Sirk. I think this is probably his second best, right behind Imitation of Life. The photography is amazing, and the colour is so rich and vivid. I love the story, and the wonderful social commentary, whilst occasionally a little obvious, is so fantastic. It's a brilliant film.

A-

Favourite of the marathon The Cook... least favourite (but still enjoyed) That Lady Eve.

'Til next time.
Best: Solaris. Worst: The Lady Eve. Enjoyed them all. Well, maybe enjoyed isn't the best way to describe some of them. Admired maybe.

And today:

The Return - Andrei Zvyaginstev, 2003
My third time watching this film. It's quite incredible. One of the best looking films I've seen. The photography is amazing, and the colour is just as incredible, using blues and greys and startling occasionally with vivid greens.

The plot is simple: two sons are surprised when their long absent father reappears. The older strives to impress, the younger is petulant and stubborn. The father takes them on a trip into the wilderness.

And while it's a simple plot, it's a gripping one, and it's imbued with massive thematic and symbolic overtones. The subtext is pouring out of every scene. I wonder if it's taken me three viewings where it gets to the point that I'm beginning to understand some of the symbols and metaphors and transformations. It's quite and incredible film.

As a side note, it is very Tarkovskian - in the camera movement, in the way it photographs nature and the industrialised world, and the huge presence of water and rain. Impressive.

A

FifthCityMuse

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3375
  • Good work, sycophants!
Re: Write about the last movie you watched
« Reply #25269 on: January 10, 2010, 05:11:17 AM »
You point out a great scene, probably the best scene, in the one with the hand mirror. But I can't agree that the symbolism is better handled here - I found it really heavy handed - the snake, the apple; blerg.