Author Topic: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments  (Read 33811 times)

AAAutin

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #110 on: August 01, 2011, 04:42:05 PM »
Lots of interesting picks. This one caught my eye. I don't believe I've ever heard it mentioned on the boards before. I like a good courtroom drama, would this fit the bill?

Not courtroom, interrogation. But I think you'd get a similar thrill: Hackman/Freeman play off each other so damn well!

smirnoff

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #111 on: August 01, 2011, 04:49:36 PM »
Also, I hope you revisit OUATITW, especially now that it's on bluray. It grew on me a lot more on the second viewing.

Owning the blu would certainly motivate me.

It's probably a very OCD reaction or something, like locking your car door, closing the door, and then lifting up on the handle before you walk away. Why wouldn't it be locked? Why doubt the mechinism? And yet...

michael x

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #112 on: August 01, 2011, 05:06:25 PM »
Lots of interesting picks. This one caught my eye. I don't believe I've ever heard it mentioned on the boards before. I like a good courtroom drama, would this fit the bill?

Not courtroom, interrogation. But I think you'd get a similar thrill: Hackman/Freeman play off each other so damn well!

Oh, I've seen this one! It was pretty good. Sorry, I don't remember more - it was probably about 5 years ago.

sdedalus

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #113 on: August 01, 2011, 05:45:41 PM »
The Blu-Ray transfer is really controversial, but I loved it.
How so?

Quote
In a new HD featurette, , Friedkin demonstrates his revisionist rationale. He wanted to mute the colors and retain a lot more grain, yet not lose the sharpness of Roizman's images. To that end he had his colorist create an element that oversaturated and de-focused the color. This smeary color image was very lightly superimposed over a B&W rendering of the film, resulting in a sharp, grainy movie with pastel colors. Because the colors are de-focused, they don't stay strictly "within the lines" of objects. Gene Hackman is as sharp as a tack, but his red Santa Claus suit bleeds softly all around him. Blacks clog up at night with almost a hi-con look. New York appears cold and inhospitable. It's an interesting effect that indeed achieves Friedkin's stated goal of creating a degraded color image. And he makes no bones about stating that it'll stay that way because that's the way he likes it!

From dvdtalk.com

There's lots of other commentary about it, pro and con, out there.
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MP

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #114 on: August 01, 2011, 06:15:28 PM »
The Blu-Ray transfer is really controversial, but I loved it.
How so?

Quote
In a new HD featurette, , Friedkin demonstrates his revisionist rationale. He wanted to mute the colors and retain a lot more grain, yet not lose the sharpness of Roizman's images. To that end he had his colorist create an element that oversaturated and de-focused the color. This smeary color image was very lightly superimposed over a B&W rendering of the film, resulting in a sharp, grainy movie with pastel colors. Because the colors are de-focused, they don't stay strictly "within the lines" of objects. Gene Hackman is as sharp as a tack, but his red Santa Claus suit bleeds softly all around him. Blacks clog up at night with almost a hi-con look. New York appears cold and inhospitable. It's an interesting effect that indeed achieves Friedkin's stated goal of creating a degraded color image. And he makes no bones about stating that it'll stay that way because that's the way he likes it!

From dvdtalk.com

There's lots of other commentary about it, pro and con, out there.
I don't like the sound of that at all. I found Roizman's comments very interesting in the Poughkeepsie Shuffle documentary; he didn't seem to see eye to eye with Friedkin on set either.

Anyway, here's one of the last Top 100s I made, way back in March 2004: click.

MP

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #115 on: August 01, 2011, 06:25:18 PM »
You've got lots I haven't seen, probably more than anyone else's list:

19. ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES BY THE COWARD ROBERT FORD, THE
35. SEXY BEAST
37. WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY, THE
73. SCUM
96. DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS (started this once, only got halfway through... need to give it another go)
All great films worth seeing. The first one is one of the finest of the century so far. I'd really like to see the last one again.

I like some of the others too.

oneaprilday

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #116 on: August 02, 2011, 12:42:48 AM »
12. 24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE
18. LA HAINE
37. WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY, THE
54. THIS IS ENGLAND
Great to see these on your list, AAAutin!

StudentOFilm

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #117 on: August 02, 2011, 01:46:41 AM »
I just finished my list as well (I'll also post in Top Films of All Time thread, I just want to double check some things first)...

Copied and pasted from my blog...

Quote from: StudentOFilm
Ranking is sometimes a tough thing to do. Ultimately I could go back and forth on whether I like one film over another.

That being said, list making is fun. I get to let people know what films are personal to me. Films that I like for my own personal reasons. That being said, I'm more modern with my list. I guess I just connect more with recent films and find myself admiring the classics with a different sensibility (don't worry, a few made my list).

You'll see I grouped certain films by the same director as I just find myself associating their works with each other for whatever odd reason my brain is telling me to do so. See my groupings of Coppola and Lumet for what I mean... perhaps I can't imagine one of their films existing without the others.

1. Schindler's List (1993, Steven Spielberg)
2. American Beauty (1999, Sam Mendes)
3. Magnolia (1999, Paul Thomas Anderson)
4. The Ice Storm (1997, Ang Lee)
5. The Godfather Part II (1974, Francis Ford Coppola)
6. The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
7. Apocalypse Now (1979, Francis Ford Coppola)
8. Adaptation (2002, Spike Jonze)
9. All That Jazz (1979, Bob Fosse)
10. The Lives of Others (2006, Florian Henckel Von Donnersmarck)
11. Amadeus (1984, Milos Forman)
12. Paths of Glory (1957, Stanley Kubrick)
13. City of God (2002, Fernando Meirelles)
14. Children of Men (2006, Alfonso Cuaron)
15. LA Confidential (1997, Curtis Hanson)
16. On the Waterfront (1954, Elia Kazan)
17. Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
18. Network (1976, Sidney Lumet)
19. Dog Day Afternoon (1975, Sidney Lumet)
20. 12 Angry Men (1957, Sidney Lumet)
21. The Verdict (1982, Sidney Lumet)
22. Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007, Sidney Lumet)
23. Taxi Driver (1976, Martin Scorsese)
24. Bonnie and Clyde (1967, Arthur Penn)
25. Alien (1979, Ridley Scott)
26. Big Fish (2003, Tim Burton)
27. Oldboy (2003, Park Chan-wook)
28. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Michel Gondry)
29. Pan's Labyrinth (2006, Guillermo Del Toro)
30. Munich (2005, Steven Spielberg)
31. The Insider (1999, Michael Mann)
32. Michael Clayton (2007, Tony Gilroy)
33. Traffic (2000, Steven Soderbergh)
34. Finding Neverland (2004, Marc Forster)
35. A History of Violence (2005, David Cronenberg)
36. Fight Club (1999, David Fincher)
37. Born on the Fourth of July (1989, Oliver Stone)
38. Quiz Show (1994, Robert Redford)
39. Glengarry Glen Ross (1992, James Foley)
40. The Constant Gardener (2005, Fernando Meirelles)
41. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, David Lean)
42. The Departed (2006, Martin Scorsese)
43. No Country for Old Men (2007, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen)
44. Black Hawk Down (2001, Ridley Scott)
45. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, Steven Spielberg)
46. Wall-E (2008, Andrew Stanton)
47. Touch of Evil (1958, Orson Welles)
48. It Happened One Night (1933, Frank Capra)
49. All the President's Men (1976, Alan J. Pakula)
50. The Last Picture Show (1971, Peter Bogdanovich)
51. The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont)
52. The Social Network (2010, David Fincher)
53. Reds (1981, Warren Beatty)
54. JFK (1991, Oliver Stone)
55. The Prestige (2006, Christopher Nolan)
56. Good Night and Good Luck (2005, George Clooney)
57. Badlands (1973, Terrence Malick)
58. Children of Paradise (1945, Marcel Carne)
59. Beauty and the Beast (1991, Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise)
60. Ordinary People (1980, Robert Redford)
61. The Lion King (1994, Roger Allers and Robert Minkoff)
62. The Truman Show (1998, Peter Weir)
63. Toy Story (1995, John Lasseter)
64. The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985, Woody Allen)
65. Broadcast News (1987, James L. Brooks)
66. Walk the Line (2005, James Mangold)
67. Road to Perdition (2002, Sam Mendes)
68. Casino Royale (2006, Martin Campbell)
69. Dead Man Walking (1995, Sean Penn)
70. District 9 (2009, Neill Blomkamp)
71. 3:10 to Yuma (2007, James Mangold)
72. Collateral (2004, Michael Mann)
73. The Matrix (1999, Andy Wachowski and Larry Wachowski)
74. In Bruges (2008, Martin McDonaugh)
75. Heat (1995, Michael Mann)
76. The Silence of the Lambs (1991, Jonathan Demme)
77. Fargo (1996, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen)
78. Reservoir Dogs (1992, Quentin Tarantino)
79. Night of the Living Dead (1968, George Romero)
80. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, Steven Spielberg)
81. Jaws (1975, Steven Spielberg)
82. Three Kings (1999, David O. Russell)
83. The French Connection (1971, William Friedkin)
84. The Long Goodbye (1975, Robert Altman)
85. Lone Star (1996, John Sayles)
86. The Proposition (2005, John Hillcoat)
87. Missing (1982, Costa Gavras)
88. Minority Report (2002, Steven Spielberg)
89. A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (2001, Steven Spielberg)
90. The Thing (1982, John Carpenter)
91. Mystic River (2003, Clint Eastwood)
92. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969, George Roy Hill)
93. The Wild Bunch (1969, Sam Peckinpah)
94. Ocean's Eleven (2001, Steven Soderbergh)
95. Knocked Up (2007, Judd Apatow)
96. Borat (2006, Larry Charles)
97. Finding Nemo (2003, Andrew Stanton)
98. The 40 Year Old Virgin (2005, Judd Apatow)
99. Superbad (2007, Greg Mottola)
100. Awakenings (1990, Penny Marshall)
« Last Edit: August 02, 2011, 01:52:56 AM by StudentOFilm »
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AAAutin

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #118 on: August 02, 2011, 09:17:46 AM »
53. Reds (1981, Warren Beatty)

Yes, yes, yes. Fantastic film! (Save for a woefully miscast Jack Nicholson.)

87. Missing (1982, Costa Gavras)
100. Awakenings (1990, Penny Marshall)

These don't get talked about often enough.

Solid picks, all around!

MartinTeller

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Re: 4th Annual Filmspotters Top 100 - Comments
« Reply #119 on: August 02, 2011, 09:32:23 AM »
SoF, you and I have very different tastes, but you've got some pretty good movies there, and I especially like these:

7. Apocalypse Now (1979, Francis Ford Coppola)
9. All That Jazz (1979, Bob Fosse)
11. Amadeus (1984, Milos Forman)
12. Paths of Glory (1957, Stanley Kubrick)
17. Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
18. Network (1976, Sidney Lumet)
23. Taxi Driver (1976, Martin Scorsese)
25. Alien (1979, Ridley Scott)
28. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Michel Gondry)
39. Glengarry Glen Ross (1992, James Foley)
41. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, David Lean)
42. The Departed (2006, Martin Scorsese)
45. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, Steven Spielberg)
46. Wall-E (2008, Andrew Stanton)
47. Touch of Evil (1958, Orson Welles)
48. It Happened One Night (1933, Frank Capra)
60. Ordinary People (1980, Robert Redford)
77. Fargo (1996, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen)
80. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, Steven Spielberg)
81. Jaws (1975, Steven Spielberg)


You're pretty big on recent films, and I saw very few non-English films.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2011, 11:17:23 AM by MartinTeller »
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