Author Topic: Silver Linings Playbook  (Read 11394 times)

St. Martin the Bald

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Re: Silver Linings Playbook
« Reply #30 on: January 29, 2013, 06:46:20 PM »
I saw this today and enjoyed it. No its not a real world depiction of mental illness but I could really care less about that. I lived with someone that was bi-polar and have no desire to ever revisit that again. It was a nice romance and I thought Lawrence was amazing whatever you thought her trope was...
I don't need realistic depictions of relationships everytime I go to the movies - the escapism was good enough for me.
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Re: Silver Linings Playbook
« Reply #31 on: July 15, 2013, 05:54:02 AM »
I know it's an oft-cited rule that we should judge a film on its own merits...

BUT

I've just finished the original book, and think that the adaptation/script for this film is bordering on scandalously bad. So many decisions taken to change the book, add new elements, change plotlines and characters, and I'm struggling to think of one that works. I really liked a lot of the performances, but (for instance)...

Patrick Senior in the book is monosyllabic at best, spends most of the time in his study, isn't a bookie, doesn't want to open a restaurant, barely speaks to Pat, certainly isn't a good husband or father. Did De Niro get involved and insist on all that sh*t? Is that why they changed the family name from 'Peoples' to 'Sollitano' for no special reason?

Pat Junior was in hospital for 5 years! So when he comes out, all sorts of things have changed, including Nikki getting remarried. His dreams of getting back together are altogether delusional, rather than just a bit over-optimistic as presented in the film.

The plotlines are all over the place. The dance competition has been blown out of all proportion.

I'll stop now (see FS-rule above). After hearing the buzz and great reviews and reading the book, I was genuinely excited to see how this tricky novel could be adapted. The answer is it was barely adapted. They used its themes and the basics of the plot and characters. But most of the rest is simply made up. I hope the author sold a lot of books off of this movie, because his writing is way better than this script.

Osprey

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Re: Silver Linings Playbook
« Reply #32 on: July 17, 2013, 12:24:08 AM »
They're two different art forms.

Read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and compare it to Blade Runner sometime. I think they are both excellent, but completely different. 

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Re: Silver Linings Playbook
« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2013, 03:09:41 AM »
They're two different art forms.

Read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and compare it to Blade Runner sometime. I think they are both excellent, but completely different.

I absolutely agree, and my response to this film was hugely clouded by the fact that I read and loved the book, finishing it just 36 hours before watching the film. That's my problem. BUT, knowing what I know about the source, I genuinely think David O Russell (as producer, writer and director I hold him pretty responsible) made a whole load of bad decisions, many of which are IMHO unnecessary and make a weaker drama than the source material offers.

Hot Biscuit Slim

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Re: Silver Linings Playbook
« Reply #34 on: November 18, 2013, 07:48:32 PM »
Agree with a lot of points -- Tiffany as MPDG, unrealistic portrayals of mental illness -- and still don't care. I was disarmed by the movie, big time.

I am not always crazy about Bradley Cooper (the occasional smugness, the reliance on his own handsomeness) but I really liked him here. It didn't bother me that his undiagnosed bipolar manifested itself in his myopic quest to win back his wife. I felt his intensity, and I believed rather self-delusional "this is a silver lining!" worldview.

Jennifer Lawrence, pixie and all, had me transfixed. I think there is a valid argument that she was trying to "save" Pat, but I didn't really see it that way. Her motivation was self-interest: she wanted to be with Pat herself. That's why she wrote the letter, that's why she lied, that's why she followed him jogging, made him commit to the dancing, etc.  She didn't really want Pat to end up with his (ex-?)wife: to me that would have been much more a symptom of the MPDG profile.

When Pat talked about his wife, she got very visibly upset and jealous. And if anything, I found Cooper to be the "quirk" of the two, though his MPDGuy tendencies didn't really show up until the final act. I am loathe to be too quick to paint any romantic comedy with quirky characters with the MPDG brush.

That aside, it took me about a half hour to really get into the movie, when the script -- like Pat in some ways -- found its focus. Although those of us with mental illness can attest it's usually not that neat, I was definitely sold on the loss of control, both by Pat himself, and by his parents. I was definitely moved by Pat's desire to make his life better, and to fix the problems he himself caused (though he never really took accountability).

I thought DeNiro was fine, not great. He's still doing the "Meet the Parents" thing: curmudgeonly gruff tough guy with a heart of gold. That is the new DeNiro persona. I can live with it. Jacki Weaver, on the other hand, wasn't really given much to do. And what on earth was Chris Tucker doing in this movie?!

The implication that "you can be cured of your insanity if someone loves you" is rather silly, but I don't think it's dangerous. Certainly no more than "lose 20 pounds and get contact lenses and you'll be beautiful." They are dumb and untrue, but anyone who's spent an hour in the real world quickly learns that it's not how things work.
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verbALs

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Re: Silver Linings Playbook
« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2016, 04:06:37 AM »
Watched again. Thought I'd put a review in here and then see what the thread said about it.

Love in the 21st Century is something I'm viewing with dad-eyes, since I've been off that field of play since the 80s. My experience of the state of play in this era is widespread. My son has been focussed on getting on, through his degree and masters and first job and move to London. Now he is earning very good money and he is in a fairly lively social environment. So many people, but a city that bites back when you try to take a nibble out of it. He seems to eat out more than eats in, so he is tremendously active, and I love to think of him in that place, gulping down life. I can't tell you much about his private life because that's what it is, private. We hear what he wants to tell us, which is a lot, but when it comes to friends and relationships, its a quieter area of discussion. One thing is he seems to have about four short holidays lined up and they are all stag weekends and weddings. So his friends are starting to pair off. So it will be a big issue for him this year. But good luck to how he wants to deal with it. My elder daughter seems so settled, she seems set for life. Same boyfriend for what seems like ten years. Veeerrrrry good jobs (he- engineer at Jaguar (Cool!) her- architect) and they cycled round Denmark this year and Holland the year before. Healthy relationship all round. My youngest threw herself into a relationship to the extent they already live together. I have this aching regret that her music has taken a back seat to love, but she won't have any idea of that, because that's none of my business. We have a close relationship and I wouldn't say anything overbearing like that to her. They are young and he has a good carpenter's job and they live with his parents. So we keep a watchful eye.

So I think we have a wide spread of the relationships field there. Work can be the all-encumbering, sucking hole that your time and effort gets drained down. Every generation has to deal with that balance and as the genders even out more and more, any old assumption of how we move forward to a work-life balance gets more and more old fashioned. Hence how one steps back away or forward into work to make space for lurve
and family is fascinating, interesting but bloody scary. And it can end up looking like a bowl of spaghetti of unplanning and accidents from the other end of the process......the waiting to become grandparents side. In this film, the couple are thrown into states of mental dis-ease by relationship trauma. It's a love story that starts from a point where the chance that this pair can succeed seems unlikely when they have the whole game stacked against them. From the first moment, and we hear Cooper say that it was love at first sight, later, they look perfect for each other a real natural pair. Cooper and Lawrence have something together. Lawrence tends to blow Cooper off the screen every moment, so she is out of his league as an actor but on screen the chemistry is apparent. The mechanisms of their states of mind deny them much chance.

If I wanted to dramatically over step my bounds and advise my kids how to find love in a harsh climate, I would look to the David O Russell playbook for the answer.

The thing about the internet is that you get into a condition where you are ignoring most of what comes to you. You don't answer the phone unless you recognise the number, you trash emails without reading them. When I looked for a job a while back the silence was deafening. Agencies get job applications in such easy, large numbers that they don't or won't even answer them anymore. I waited, I had one job interview and I got that job. It's become a process of filters and sorting and your name better come out in the top half dozen. My age, my experience, my current status all matched up to one particulate job over a period of time that I can't even tell you because it's excruciating. I knew if I waited something would fall just right. That's a horrible world to live in, isn't it. The cold edge of the chip and the harsh pixellated light, when applied to your life. If I had to computer date I think that "made for each other" claim would drive me batty. Made for me!!? I'd probably run away, even if someone could match that very strange long list of interests and opinions I have. The bizarre world of dating online feels not a lot like the fuzzy logical world of intimacy and affection.

DOR has decided that the way to ease your way into a relationship is.....should I be asking for payment for this idea?.........dancing.





Joy falls in love dancing on stage.

So go dancing. That idea of a dance montage set to Bob Dylan in mordant form is a gem. I love Russell's feel for music in all of these films. How Christian Bale and Amy Adams instantly connect over Duke Ellington and how it is one particular tune that supplies that right intensity and feel in a scene. How Led Zeppelin's "Good Times Bad Times" delivers the emotion as a background to a bipolar episode. If there was a reel of David O Russell musical numbers edited together, it would be my ideal movie.

Oh yeah, what do I think of Silver Linings Playbook? Like I said Lawrence blows Cooper off the screen like a strong gust of wind. When she ambushes him as he runs through the streets, he looks genuinely disconcerted by her, and she really attacks those scenes and scares me as well. Both SLP and Joy are centred on family and interfering overbearing families at that. Since Joy focusses on Jennifer Lawrence and since she is a sublime actor, I like Joy much more. Cooper occupies a subordinate role and it works better that way around. American Hustle has Bale and  Adams, yet each time Lawrence appears it turns into her film and she projects chaos all over the screen. But Bale and Adams are well matched to keep the movie at a crescendo (or climax) for all of its running length and it is extraordinary. SLP feels to me like the first time Russell let go and took away the safety net. The storyline of out of control mental illness probably aided his progression as a director, but he also found an actress who could match his vision.

If Jennifer Lawrence deserved an Oscar for SLP, then she deserves one for Joy. Just by sheer quantity her screen time is much greater in Joy. Like I say Adams is in her weightclass and so is Cate Blanchett. If Kate Winslet stopped mugging around she might get a role to match them (I still like the idea of that Aussie dressmaker story, so Ill see that). Lawrence has a full deck. Franchises, directors who put her in every film. She looks brilliant to work with, unless people who won't shut up aren't to your taste.

Also I think de Niro is great in this film and he repeats the performance in Joy. I have no trouble ignoring the crap he appears in. He still has it but he saves it for DOR movies.

Dance , sucka!
« Last Edit: February 21, 2016, 04:17:54 AM by verbALs »
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verbALs

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Re: Silver Linings Playbook
« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2016, 04:35:04 AM »
By about halfway down page 1, I was peeing myself laughing. Actually counting black people in a movie. The guy "-" and MP are a real loss to this place. MP points out the scene where Hemingway is defenestrated violently. As it happened I shouted "yeah that book is CINECAST!ed up!!" and to Cooper's character the ending was like a punch in the guts. Kids are made to read such bizarre works as Farewell to Arms and Lord of the Flies? Haha. Brilliant. Leave it to DOR to light a fire.

{Note to self: don't write sentences with the word BUT in the middle of them. Take the advice you offer yourself in the first half of the sentence.}

It's the inability to react calmly and with control that defines this illness for me. And its the same in negative and positive way. Blowing things out of all proportion; taking things way too badly or being outrageously overoptimistic. Calmness is a really beautiful thing. It stops you taking one step forwards and two steps back every time you try to deal with a serious issue. All you remember form the conversation is the uncontrolled crap. The outbursts. Calm means you never eject yourself from the conversation. The importance of continuing to discuss and achieve something from that discussion takes primacy over "being right" or "being justified" in how you behave. And its all about calmness. Taking someone with you in a difficult conversation instead of winning the fight. A beautiful thing.

It isn't a movie about mental illness. Its a love story involving people with mental issues. Perhaps because it is the latter, just a love story, it doesn't reach any great heights. BUT like I said, it does teach you that dancing is a great way to start a relationship.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2016, 05:12:04 AM by verbALs »
I used to encourage everyone I knew to make art; I don't do that so much anymore. - Banksy