Author Topic: April 2013 MDC: Enchanted April  (Read 7147 times)

Clovis8

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Re: April 2013 MDC: Enchanted April
« Reply #90 on: April 28, 2013, 09:42:04 PM »
Chasing Amy (Kevin Smith, 1997) -

It's the only great Kevin Smith film and among the best, and most honest, explorations of modern relationships. It's also very romantic, in an honest not movie way.

Much to my dismay, I watched this film a few weeks ago and failed to make the time to actually write about it. I had some great things to say, but of course with time they have slipped a bit while the film itself has remained behind in my memory. I quoted Clovis' original dictation above for the sole purpose that it is far and away the most concise way to truly sum up my own thoughts on the film. The 'in an honest not movie way' bit is perfect. Smith creates scenes of conversation that just flow beautifully, like true conversation, and tackling the most interesting topics. He does this time and time over and construct not just a romance, but a conversation on romance and what it means to love in more ways than one. It just sort of is, and is pretty much perfect. I think the only moment that felt false or out of place was the scene at the hockey game, but apart from that everything seemed right in the relationships and characters which were built by Smith. None of the performances are overpowering, or the technical aspects of the film, but what it lacks there it makes up in droves with pure, brutal, loving honestly and openness. How perfect it must have felt to craft something so pure, and so personal for Smith. How perfect about the line that Holden hoped to go back to doing something personal, as that is just what Smith has done here. I'm not sure it's possible to ever return to these heights for any filmmaker or artist. It's just that personal. Definitely something that will need revisiting, and perhaps often, years down the line for me. Thanks Clovis.

***1/2 - Great

Great review. So glad you loved it also.

Eldog

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Re: April 2013 MDC: Enchanted April
« Reply #91 on: April 29, 2013, 03:00:51 AM »
Rosemary's Baby (1968)

To my surprise, this wasn't my first foray into Roman Polanski's body of work. I say "surprise" because since I've become more serious about films in the last six months (sadly at the expense of reading), my education has included learning more about directors rather than just actors.  So following consultation with IMDB, embarrassingly I discovered that this is the fourth Polanski film that I've seen - the others being Chinatown, The Pianist and Carnage. I was then less surprised that I enjoyed this film as I have rated all three of Polanski's aforementioned films at least 8/10.

The film could be classed as a "cerebral" horror film as it exhibits subtle aspects generally not associated with the genre. Although the plot is fairly predictable, Polanski expertly creates a chilling atmosphere of foreboding. Barring Mia Farrow's stand out performance as the titular character, the remainder of the acting is okay though campy at times. The idea of modern day witchcraft might seem a little silly but there is always the question of Rosemary's sanity and perception of the events unfolding around her. On a side note, it seems witchcraft is not appealing to the young American as coven members were quite old except for their foreign affiliates!

Nice one Mr Polanski, you're four from four.

8/10
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 06:49:00 AM by Eldog »

Tater0091

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Re: April 2013 MDC: Enchanted April
« Reply #92 on: April 29, 2013, 06:15:52 AM »
Read the book...I highly recommend it. Long story short, I read it in one sitting, scared myself to death, and had to watch South Park in the middle of the night in order to get the heavy evilness out of me. Powerful stuff!

IdeaThy12

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Re: April 2013 MDC: Enchanted April
« Reply #93 on: April 30, 2013, 12:34:32 AM »
Dance, Girl, Dance

Well...it was not what I normally watch, that's for certain.

Great though, it was the kind of film I could go along with without having it explained. Dance, Girl, Dance was about Judy O'Brien, a girl who dreamed of being a ballerina star. She was in a troupe of 8, with her, and Bubbles(those are the two names I know). Bubbles had a certain charm that made everyone come. Everyone wanted to have Bubbles. All Bubbles wanted was the men. Eventually, Bubbles got a job offer and left the troupe, making them 7, then the madame had a job offer for Judy, but had no chance to tell her. From there, Judy became the stooge for Bubbles, now the White Lily. Two men were after Judy.

That's a little bit of writing, I'm sorry if it told too much, I need to get back into the review biz. Anyway, I'd call it a 3.5/5, mainly due to it being B&W.
"Moving on doesn't mean you forget about things. It just means you have to accept what happened and continue living." ~Erza Scarlet (Fairy Tail)

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1SO

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Re: April 2013 MDC: Enchanted April
« Reply #94 on: April 30, 2013, 01:12:32 AM »
Thanks for bringing this to my attention. Adding it to Merry Musical May.

Eldog

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Re: April 2013 MDC: Enchanted April
« Reply #95 on: April 30, 2013, 08:26:21 AM »
Fried Green Tomatoes (1991)

Of all the means of conveying a narrative, the flashback although often effective is probably one of the most overused. My problem with the flashback in Fried Green Tomatoes is that it is so contrived. Following an incident with an ornery in-law at a retirement home, candy loving Evelyn (Kathy Bates) is drawn into conversation by another resident, Ninny Threadgoode (Jessica Tandy). The unflappable Evelyn then happily listens to the pensioner's nostalgic recollection. Maybe I'm being a bit harsh but had I been treated with such a lack of appreciation by a relative, the last thing I would want to be doing was listening to some senile stranger rambling on! But I digress...

Ninny's story is retold over a number of subsequent visits and revolves around the relationship between two polar opposite woman, the prissy Ruth (Mary-Louise Parker) and the tomboyish Idgie (Mary Stuart Masterson). This odd couple become inseparable as they deal with themes such as domestic violence and racism, although neither is deeply explored in the film. To spice things up, there's even a little murder mystery thrown in. While Evelyn immerses herself in the past, she also has to come to terms with the waning romantic nature of her marriage in the present and this leads to an empowerment montage reminiscent of  Bette Midler's in Ruthless People. The final act is predictable and does not hold many surprises for the savvy movie goer.

Despite my grievances, I thought this was a nice film, the type of movie that I would love to watch with my mother or grandmother.

7.5/10