Poll

Which film represented the biggest creative Risk?

Toy Story 1, proving the viability of computer animation.
4 (18.2%)
A Bug's Life, pushing the limits of what TS1 was able to do.
0 (0%)
Toy Story 2, attempting to match the critical success of TS1
0 (0%)
Monsters Inc., handing the Studio's growing reputation to an unproven director
0 (0%)
Finding Nemo, moving to Summer blockbuster season with another unproven director
1 (4.5%)
The Incredibles, similar action-focused animated films weren't succeeding
0 (0%)
Cars, their most fantastical world to date
0 (0%)
Ratatouille, surprisingly adult and the original director fired
0 (0%)
Wall-E, most wordless opening third
9 (40.9%)
Up, emotionally rough and not as easily translatable into marketable toys
2 (9.1%)
Toy Story 3, hold up to the high regard of the prior two films
6 (27.3%)

Total Members Voted: 21

Author Topic: The Elite Eleven - Pixar's Biggest Creative Risk  (Read 1874 times)

DarkeningHumour

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 10440
  • When not sure if sarcasm look at username.
    • Pretentiously Yours
Re: The Elite Eleven - Pixar's Biggest Creative Risk
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2015, 04:55:25 AM »
If I had to pitch one of these movies to my CEO, or the board or whatever magical entity of animated happiness rules Pixar (oh that's right, Disney) I think Nemo would have been the hardest. All the others are easily conducive to creating magical alien worlds, if only because of their respective settings and premises. Nemo is essentially a movie about fishes doing very little in the ocean and in an aquarium. Or maybe I'm just saying that because I don't like it.
Society is dumb. Art is everything. - Junior

https://pretensiouslyyours.wordpress.com/

oldkid

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 17921
  • Hi there! Feed me worlds!
Re: The Elite Eleven - Pixar's Biggest Creative Risk
« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2015, 09:20:22 PM »
Toy Story was a creative risk.  The whole reputation and future of computer animation depended on this feature film not only being good to look at, but a story that audiences would appreciate.  If they failed creatively, they would fail the whole industry.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

Totoro

  • Guest
Re: The Elite Eleven - Pixar's Biggest Creative Risk
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2015, 08:55:43 PM »
If I had to pitch one of these movies to my CEO, or the board or whatever magical entity of animated happiness rules Pixar (oh that's right, Disney) I think Nemo would have been the hardest. All the others are easily conducive to creating magical alien worlds, if only because of their respective settings and premises. Nemo is essentially a movie about fishes doing very little in the ocean and in an aquarium. Or maybe I'm just saying that because I don't like it.

Talking animals sell.

philip918

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4086
Re: The Elite Eleven - Pixar's Biggest Creative Risk
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2016, 06:24:53 PM »
Went with Up, which I had neck and neck with Wall-E.
"If God gives you lemons find a new God."