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Poll

What's your favorite film by Asghar Farhadi?

haven't seen any
1 (5.3%)
don't like any
0 (0%)
Dancing in the Dust
0 (0%)
The Beautiful City
0 (0%)
Fireworks Wednesday
0 (0%)
About Elly
2 (10.5%)
A Separation
16 (84.2%)
The Past
0 (0%)
The Salesman
0 (0%)
Everybody Knows
0 (0%)
A Hero
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 19

Author Topic: Farhadi, Asghar  (Read 1975 times)

MartinTeller

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Farhadi, Asghar
« on: August 09, 2014, 08:08:07 PM »
« Last Edit: July 13, 2015, 07:36:09 PM by 1SO »

MartinTeller

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2014, 08:08:30 PM »
1. A Separation
2. About Elly
3. The Salesman
4. The Past
5. Fireworks Wednesday


« Last Edit: September 29, 2017, 11:15:41 PM by MartinTeller »

MartinTeller

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2014, 08:09:18 PM »

The Past - Quickie review today, don't feel like writing much lately.  Farhadi's follow-up to the rightfully celebrated A Separation isn't quite as rich and multi-faceted.  But it is quite engaging, with strong performances all around.  Farhadi again emphasizes barriers, and in a way the opening scene picks up symbolically where the previous film left off.  A recurring motif is characters attempting to find a safe space to communicate and reveal secrets and emotions, seeking out a bubble of isolation against the outside world.  Ahmad shuts the door so he can bond with Fouad, he takes Lucie into the back room of a restaurant when she breaks down in tears, Samir lowers the iron shutters of his business to have a heart-to-heart with Marie.  The third act is perhaps too overloaded with twists and revelations, but the movie is compelling nonetheless, an insightful look at people struggling to get beyond their unresolved pasts.  Rating: Very Good (85)

Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2014, 08:24:21 PM »
A Separation
About Elly
The Past

Fireworks Wednesday
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 09:28:52 AM by Sam the Cinema Snob »

roujin

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2014, 10:57:50 AM »
1. Fireworks Wednesday (2006)
2. A Separation (2011)
3. About Elly (2009)
4. The Past (2013)

Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2014, 05:46:01 PM »
About Elly

SmashTheTV

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2014, 07:12:28 PM »
Only seen A Separation and The Past. A Separation is a masterpiece.

DarkeningHumour

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2015, 03:06:34 PM »
I felt The Past went further than A Separation once the initial setting is established. More themes are explored, it seems to have more to say.

The Past
A Separation
« Last Edit: July 06, 2015, 08:10:59 AM by DarkeningHumour »
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chardy999

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Re: Director's Best: Asghar Farhadi
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2015, 07:02:29 AM »
A Separation
The Past
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Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Farhadi, Asghar
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2016, 09:27:50 AM »

Fireworks Wednesday (2006)

Dramatically explosive and slow-building, Fireworks Wednesday is a biting drama. From the strong sound design to the use of simple objects to build conflict, the film makes for a slow-moving, nail-biting look at a marriage gone horribly wrong. Itís a shame then that the filmís device for exploring the film proves to be one of its weakest points.

While riding on a motorcycle with her betrothed, Roohiís (Taraneh Alidoosti) chador gets caught up in the wheel of the bike. Much like her charod, Roohi becomes entangled in the lives of a married couple in the midst of a feud when she goes to clean their apartment. The wife believes her husband has had an affair and is reaching the end of her rope even as a trip to Dubai is just a day away.

Roohiís perspective into the story is a bit of a weak point in the film. It gives the film a bit of a distance effect from the drama, which makes it not quite as powerful as the films where the audience is placed right in the midst of the strife. Compared to director Asghar Farhadiís later films, this is a weak narrative tool that the film relies on for a while only to drop it later as the film progresses, making for a far more engaging and engrossing second half.

Once caught in this drama, itís amazing how little threads and pieces are used to enhance the drama. For instance, Roohiís chardor becomes an object of drama when she accidentally leaves it at the apartment. The plane tickets for Dubai become another object of contention as the film progresses. The way something so tiny can sow a seed of contention between the couple shows how heated their fight has become.

The film also shows the past conflict of the couple through a shattered window. Roohi cleans up the remnants of glass left in the room from the broken window. Itís not until late in the film that it is revealed that the husband is the one who broke the window the night before in the midst of a fight.

Further enhancing the drama is the superb sound design. The film takes place on Persian New Year and there are constant fireworks going off throughout the film. These explosions are almost constant throughout the film. This constant barrage of sound induces a feeling of anxiety while watching the film, constantly leaving the audience on edge as the film unfolds.

Even despite the filmís flawed framing device, Fireworks Wednesday is a strong, gripping drama that leaves the tension high, drawing the audience into the hysteria of the couple as they grasp at the end of the rope. While it lacks the maturity of Farhadiís later films, itís still a strong and memorable work, warts and all.

 

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