Author Topic: Boyhood  (Read 5049 times)

Melvil

  • Godfather
  • ******
  • Posts: 9977
  • Eek
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2014, 06:28:20 PM »
What it left out makes it less realistic.

How so? The choice not to show certain things is maybe my favorite thing about the movie.

Bondo

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 21055
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2014, 09:28:22 PM »
Leaving things out is totally realistic. But maybe I drink too much.

íKeith!

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 26777
  • Bitch, I been around since LimeWire.
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2014, 11:30:09 PM »
 ;D

Totoro

  • Guest
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2014, 04:43:40 AM »
Who would have thought that a film that's mostly about the American experience from the perspective of a white Texan would show mostly white people?

saltine

  • Administrator
  • Godfather
  • *****
  • Posts: 9517
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2014, 09:02:39 AM »
Who would have thought that a film that's mostly about the American experience from the perspective of a white Texan would show mostly white people?

I'm starting to understand that the Texas experience is not well understood outside Texas.
Texan Down Under

Sam the Cinema Snob

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 24799
  • "Anime is for jerks."
    • Creative Criticism
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2014, 09:55:21 AM »
Yea, I second this. As a lifelong Texan, there are gaps that are certainly part of what the film is trying to capture about living in Texas.

sdb_1970

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2294
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #16 on: September 01, 2014, 12:13:15 PM »
I have lived in Texas for a combined 15 years (not that it should really matter), and I had more trouble with a few of the things that were there than the gaps.  Specifically, I found the bible and a gun birthday scene utterly eye-rolling, and there were definitely a few groans from the opening night audience at that particular moment.  As one FS not from TX has put it, could that sequence happen at a birthday in some rural Texas town?  I suppose.  Could it happen with some in-laws you seem to barely know (keeping on mind that the new spouse had just come into the story)?  Not so much.  It was pretty cartoonish.  In contrast to much of Boyhood, I think Linklater did a spot on job of Texans representing Texans - and thus, representing themselves - in the map of Texas sequence in Bernie.
letterboxd

[insert pithy expression of false modesty here]

oneaprilday

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 13746
  • "What we see and what we seem are but a dream."
    • A Journal of Film
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2014, 12:48:05 PM »
I had more trouble with a few of the things that were there than the gaps.  Specifically, I found the bible and a gun birthday scene utterly eye-rolling, and there were definitely a few groans from the opening night audience at that particular moment.  As one FS not from TX has put it, could that sequence happen at a birthday in some rural Texas town?  I suppose.  Could it happen with some in-laws you seem to barely know (keeping on mind that the new spouse had just come into the story)?  Not so much.
This.

Curious, Sam and saltine, which experiences in the film do you think are specifically Texas and will therefore be misunderstood or missed by those not from Texas?

I was actually longing for more specificity, feeling that if any story has enough specificity and definition, I'll be able to relate to it, wherever or whatever it is, however personally foreign to me. The gun and bible scene felt generic to me because I couldn't see how it would happen to the particular characters of the film. I can imagine it happening generally - in fact, since the area north of Bellingham is super conservative, pro-gun, and culturally Christian, I could imagine it happening to lots of people I know. But that doesn't matter to me, not in relation to the film, to that particular world and set of characters.

Alan Smithee

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1111
    • http://cherrypicker.tumblr.com/
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2014, 08:26:21 PM »
What it left out makes it less realistic.

How so? The choice not to show certain things is maybe my favorite thing about the movie.

Not talking about the graduation scene and certain life events that were left out those are what truly make the film great, not even saying that he had to have a best friend of another race or nationality, it just would have been more real to have some kind of interaction. Its just that these encounters of people that are different than you are inherently apart of growing up.

Melvil

  • Godfather
  • ******
  • Posts: 9977
  • Eek
Re: Boyhood
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2014, 10:43:55 PM »
Its just that these encounters of people that are different than you are inherently apart of growing up.

Hmm, I don't disagree with this sentiment in general, but there are a lot of other types of differences in people besides race and I do think the film showcased how those types of encounters and relationships impacted Mason. For all the talk of the universality of Boyhood, it is grounded in a particular experience (largely Linklater's own growing up in Texas), and while there's a whole range of particulars to any one person's upbringing, for a lot of people encounters of racial diversity may not be a noteworthy thing that would appear in the "highlight reel" of your childhood experiences.

I don't know, I'm interested in hearing other takes, but it's not something I noticed as being lacking or contradictory to my own experience growing up...Really it wasn't until the time period after where Boyhood leaves off that I really had the opportunity to become friends with a more diverse selection of people. In my own boyhood, most of the important moments in my life involved the people closest to me, and most of the people closest to me just happened to be my own race. Maybe that's getting into a discussion for a different day though. :)