Author Topic: 70's US  (Read 9740 times)

Jeff Schroeck

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
Re: 70's US
« Reply #20 on: February 03, 2015, 07:02:32 AM »

29. The Deer Hunter (Michael Cimino, 1978)

I've seen complaints regarding the film's opening hour or so online, regarding it as overly long and "when it will get to the point" and "hey I thought this was a Vietnam movie" and such. That's all nonsense. The film's opening hour pretty much wipes the floor with most of the films of the 70's, just by itself. Those slow rhythms are just wonderful. Nothing but drinking, dancing, camaraderie, all those goddamn rituals that I'm so uncomfortable with, but secretly wish to uphold and cherish. Just get shitfaced, man! This entire sequence is honestly just perfect. Where the film treads more dangerous and icky terrain is the Vietnam stuff. Yeah, all that stuff is complete fabrication, but I liked the Russian Roulette stuff as a metaphor for the craziness of war (and how this major event affects each character). I bought it, but your mileage may vary. A completely emotionally draining experience.

★★★★

The cut in time from the end of the bar scene to the moment where the film "gets to the point" is one of the best and most jarring things I've seen. I'm sure there are plenty of films that skip the training and preparation and all that stuff, but I hadn't seen any as if a character has just woken up a year into it.

roujin

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 15377
  • it's all research
    • ssmvc
Re: 70's US
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2015, 09:48:41 AM »
These continue to be interesting and informative reads. Would you go as far as to say that Busting makes you feel good?


??? I guess so? It was a good movie.

oneaprilday

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 13731
  • "What we see and what we seem are but a dream."
    • A Journal of Film
Re: 70's US
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2015, 11:04:27 AM »
25. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (Sam Peckinpah, 1974)

Warren Oates hang out in mexican bars, playing the piano, being the token gringo. Then a way out is introduced, an opportunity to leave the drudgery of an ordinary life. Oates ignores his girlfriend's wishes and gets down in the muck of violence and death, alcohol-fueled and gripped by mania. Another cynical classic in the vein of Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Peckinpah delves into the psychosis and the bizarre tenderness of Oates' death pursuit with gusto, while also being acutely critical of the behaviors that got us to that place. A brutal, unflinching film; no weak bones, no weak moments. Get drunk, taste mud and blood, CINECAST! life, for this is a masterpiece.

★★★★
Great film.

Sam the Cinema Snob

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 23705
  • A Monkey with a Gun
    • Creative Criticism
Re: 70's US
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2015, 11:46:48 AM »
I'm one of those people who didn't care for the lengthy wedding, but I liked all of the other parts a lot. It's no Heaven's Gate, though.

Sisters is on my shortlist. Looking forward to catching up with it.

Antares

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3958
  • . . . and the pump caught in my trouser leg.
Re: 70's US
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2015, 04:38:07 PM »
26. Busting (Peter Hyams, 1974)

Elliot Gould and Robert Blake are two roguish vice cops who pretty much do whatever they want.

If you liked Robert Blake in that, you should also check him out in Electra Glide in Blue and even though they were made in 1968 & 1969, In Cold Blood and Tell Them Willie Boy is Here.
            
                                                           Beep! Beep!

roujin

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 15377
  • it's all research
    • ssmvc
Re: 70's US
« Reply #25 on: February 03, 2015, 07:00:43 PM »

31. Rocky (John G. Avildsen, 1976)

Driven by Stallone's relentlessly odd characterization (it's in the way he talks, moves around, shifts his body, the whole cadence of Stallone) but anchored by Avildsen's modest, effective direction. Avildsen roots Rocky in a mostly believable environment, capturing the grimy atmosphere (paint peeling, deserted city streets), so when the underdog film cliches come through the most, the film has already earned some trust. Gets points an ending that's genuinely moving because the logical plot outcome ceases to matter, and all that comes through is Rocky's complete disregard for anything but what he cares about.

★★★


32. Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979)

I finally get the jokes. Hard for me to imagine how much I could've gotten out of this when I was 13 (the last time I watched this). I'm pretty ambivalent toward Woody, but it's hard to dismiss this film when it's so completely beautiful. Willis' cinematography is a complete triumph, romanticizing every frame, submerging the characters in his usual shadows. The characters here are all middlebrow bourgeois intellectuals, and Woody's set of references by this point are so familiar that I'm pretty sure he never moved past Fellini or Bergman. The film is affectionate toward them, mocking at points, but always interesting and engaging them, treating them fairly. Still, it's hard to not to feel a little icky when it comes to the Mariel Hemingway plot line, no matter how beautifully it's concluded.

★★★



33. The Andromeda Strain (Robert Wise, 1971)

Actually pretty similar to Wise's later Star Trek film in that it's pretty much just people looking at screens, speaking jargon to each other. Andromeda differs in that it's a film that's pretty much solely interested in the scientific processes that its main characters employ, to the exclusion of much else. Still, Wise shoots his sets and characters with about the same level of interest, and can't quite ratchet up the tension when it counts.

★★


34. The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972)

Coppola's film is arguably the ground zero of today's Golden Age of TV anti-hero nonsense where our hero's morality is corroded by the end of its runtime. Its depiction of screen violence also seems prescient. Anyway, what makes the film of interest is how Coppola both mythologizes the Corleones, makes them emblematic of his thematic ideas, develops them metaphorically, while also sketching them as out more than just archetypes. It's also remarkably fleet-footed, running through its scenarios without becoming cumbersome in its relentless focus on plot, though a couple of detours (Michael's stay in Sicily) overstay their welcome. Also: Gordon Willis is the MVP.

★★★


35. 10 (Blake Edwards, 1979)

Almost completely loved this, but felt it lost a little bit of its comic invention by film's end. Still, another Edwards comedy that's surprisingly full of pain and sadness, even if pratfalls and drunken buffoonery interrupt things every once in a while. The ending, however, is completely genius,  as thematic strands regarding voyeurism, looking and perspective all come to fruition in the iris shot. But we've all read Dave Kehr on this movie, right?

★★★

Junior

  • Bert Macklin, FBI
  • Global Moderator
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 27204
  • What's the rumpus?
    • Benefits of a Classical Education
Re: 70's US
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2015, 09:48:48 PM »
Keep 'em coming, these are great. Love your thoughts on Manhattan and will probably rewatch that in the next 2 or so years now that I've seen some more of the movies he's referencing. It is absolutely gorgeous, which always helps.

I was watching the first hour or so of The Godfather with Coppola's commentary track. The guy is top tier and yet half the stories are about how he was almost fired every other day. One interesting tidbit, his cinematographer really wanted to have a POV character for the camera in every scene, that is, the camera wouldn't see something a character couldn't see, so there are very few angles that aren't kinda eye level. One exception is in the restaurant assassination scene which has a high angle just so Coppola could capture the cool pattern of the tiles on the floor. That's fun.
Check out my blog of many topics

Im not a quitter, Kimmy! I watched Interstellar all the way to the end!

jbissell

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 10842
  • What's up, hot dog?
Re: 70's US
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2015, 11:53:30 AM »
Glad to see this since my attempt a few years back totally flamed out.

roujin

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 15377
  • it's all research
    • ssmvc
Re: 70's US
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2015, 12:21:13 PM »
Couple of those aren't even on my list, I think. Will add them.

Sam the Cinema Snob

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 23705
  • A Monkey with a Gun
    • Creative Criticism
Re: 70's US
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2015, 01:55:59 PM »
Yea, Stalone's performance is what makes Rocky notable.

I'll give you that Manhattan looks beautiful, but beyond that, I have a hard time liking anything in that film.

I never cared much for the Sicily bit of The Godfather, although I get why it exists.