Author Topic: Baseball  (Read 10905 times)

colonel_mexico

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1045
Re: Baseball
« Reply #220 on: July 09, 2017, 01:41:29 PM »
Not that I was asked, but I feel like documentaries have covered this a bit better and I have always put forth A PLAYER TO BE NAMED LATER as the best I've seen that has discussed the hard work, dedication, and heartbreak that goes into attempting to summit the Big Leagues.  All the old films on baseball are way too romantic, the modern stuff glosses over all of it. MILLION DOLLAR ARM is such a Disney pile of crap, while I enjoyed it for a kids film, those guys were unlikely to become big leaguers (not to say their story isn't worth noting, because it is a good one). The scouting aspect isn't expanded upon in the docu as much as it was it takes to develop talent. I'm waiting for a piece on the Dominican leagues or Japanese leagues. SUGAR gives a glimpse of baseball school and talent searching, but its main focus is on the character with baseball as scenery.

I played throughout high school, faced Spooneybarger who did make it to the big leagues as well as had cousins and teammates that have played college ball, so I've been around a bit.  I also follow minor league baseball pretty closely and no film has ever really gotten the intense work and dedication, with the huge reality that there will probably be no payoff, except for what I've seen in documentaries. KNUCKLEBALL is an interesting look at a difficult pitch, not really thrown well by anyone save a select few.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 01:45:38 PM by colonel_mexico »
"What do you want me to do draw you a picture?! Spell it out?! Don't ever ask me, as long as you live don't ever ask me more!"

1SO

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 30023
  • Marathon Man
Re: Baseball
« Reply #221 on: July 09, 2017, 08:11:44 PM »
Not that I was asked, but I feel like documentaries have covered this a bit better...

Yeah but who wants to watch a documentary on Baseball that isn't made by Ken Burns.


EDIT: And that one about the guy in the stands who caught the ball and caught hell for it. Can't remember the title.

colonel_mexico

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1045
Re: Baseball
« Reply #222 on: July 09, 2017, 08:18:40 PM »
Ken's BASEBALL is great, but I'm telling you A PLAYER is really good, if you're interested. The Bartman stuff is interesting, but kinda stale
"What do you want me to do draw you a picture?! Spell it out?! Don't ever ask me, as long as you live don't ever ask me more!"

1SO

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 30023
  • Marathon Man
Re: Baseball
« Reply #223 on: September 02, 2018, 01:24:19 PM »
I finally watched It Happens Every Spring, though 3 years later I bet you've largely forgotten about it. I defend Lloyd Bacon in our conversations, but this is one of his weakest efforts. He largely seems checked out and unconcerned with the numerous potential story lines that go undeveloped. The way to keep the wood-resistant baseball from being the film's sole joke is to use it as a launching pad for exploring the nerdy professor having to learn to pitch, to condition his arm enough to get the ball over the plate. What about the angle of the die hard fan getting to play in the sport he's fanatical about? Why the stupid sub-plot where his girlfriend thinks he's part of a gang of jewelry store robbers? Wouldn't Kelly's no-hit streak raise some questions?

You questioned being in the mood for this sort of comedy, but I'd like to defend all comedies of this time period by saying this is not even a typical average 1940s comedy. I wish I could've traded your time watching this with Big Leaguer (1953) starring Edward G. Robinson, a more honest, educational and entertaining look at the sport during that time period.

Antares

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4126
  • "Haec olim meminisse iuvabit."
Re: Baseball
« Reply #224 on: September 02, 2018, 09:41:31 PM »
I have had a lifelong love affair with the game of baseball

I know you posted this over two years ago, but I just found it.

Up until the strike of 1994, I was probably the biggest baseball fan in the history of the game. I lived inside a MacMillan Baseball Encyclopedia, and was the de facto ass kicker in baseball trivia. But after the strike, and the PED bullshit of the mid-nineties, I drifted away from the game. But I have one great baseball story, and I think you'll get a kick out of it.

Back in the early months of 1991, I went through a painful divorce from my first wife. I started a new job and met the woman who is now my current wife. We started dating in July of that year. She was a huge Celtic & Larry Bird fan, so when her birthday rolled around, I took her to the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Ma. (There's also a great story from this date, but it'll have to wait for another time). When my birthday came around in October, she took me to Cooperstown, and it was my first visit. I was completely enthralled, and absorbed and loved every second I was in there. At this time, touch screen computers were just coming into vogue, and as I was walking around, I spotted one. So I start surfing around this database, which has all the info on all the players in the Hall of Fame. Now like I said, I lived in a MacMillan, so this was like being a kid let loose in a candy store. I'm searching through everything I can find in this database. People are milling around, and I can tell that Jan (my wife), is standing right behind me. I'm completely oblivious to anything else, as I soak in all the information I'm finding. Finally, I turn around and I say to her, "OK, I'm done." She hands me back my jacket, and she says "I didn't think you were ever going to get off that thing." I look at her and ask, "How long was I on it?" She looks at me, with a smirk, and says, "You've been on that computer for two and a half hours."

At that moment, I knew I had finally met the person I was meant to be with, for the rest of my life. ANY woman, who'll stand quietly behind you, while you're enjoying the birthday present they gave you, for 2 1/2 hours, has the patience of a saint, and must really love you. True story.

Corndog

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 16296
  • Oo-da-lolly, Oo-da-lolly, golly what a day!
    • Corndog Chats
Re: Baseball
« Reply #225 on: September 04, 2018, 07:17:28 AM »
I finally watched It Happens Every Spring, though 3 years later I bet you've largely forgotten about it.

I have largely forgotten it (and for good reason), but I have a few fleeting memories of it generally. It was certainly a disappointment given the fanaticism of the main character, I certainly hoped for a more charming film, one which showed reverence for the game. Oh well.

I have had a lifelong love affair with the game of baseball

I know you posted this over two years ago, but I just found it.

Up until the strike of 1994, I was probably the biggest baseball fan in the history of the game. I lived inside a MacMillan Baseball Encyclopedia, and was the de facto ass kicker in baseball trivia. But after the strike, and the PED bullshit of the mid-nineties, I drifted away from the game. But I have one great baseball story, and I think you'll get a kick out of it.

What a great story! And I can understand drifting away from the game. i think my excuse was my youth during that time. I was 6 when they struck in 1994. 10 in the summer of 1998 when the game came back with the home run race. And while I was more mature when the PED scandals were coming out, I still had a passion for the game, was still playing it for my high school team. So I was able to weather the storm. I think the game is in a great place right now, with some really interesting personalities and stars.

I'm still in love with the game, otherwise I wouldn't still be playing it at 30 years old with two bum knees.
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."