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Poll

What is your favorite?

haven't seen any
6 (42.9%)
don't like any
0 (0%)
other
0 (0%)
Down Terrace
0 (0%)
Kill List
6 (42.9%)
Sightseers
1 (7.1%)
A Field in England
0 (0%)
High-Rise
0 (0%)
Free Fire
1 (7.1%)
Happy New Year, Colin Burstead
0 (0%)
Rebecca
0 (0%)
In the Earth
0 (0%)
Meg 2: The Trench
0 (0%)
Freak Shift
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 14

Author Topic: Wheatley, Ben  (Read 3792 times)

1SO

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Wheatley, Ben
« on: April 07, 2016, 11:59:55 PM »
1. Kill List
2. Sightseers

3. A Field in England
4. In This Earth
5. Free Fire
6. Meg 2: The Trench

7. High-Rise
8. Down Terrace
« Last Edit: October 22, 2023, 11:20:25 AM by 1SO »

Junior

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2016, 12:01:58 AM »
Temporarily Sightseers, though I have a feeling High Rise will take over.
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goodguy

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2016, 12:06:33 AM »
Kill List
High-Rise
Sightseers
A Field in England
Free Fire

« Last Edit: May 22, 2017, 08:20:24 PM by goodguy »

Jarvik7

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2016, 03:50:21 PM »
Loved Wheatley's A Field in England and even more so Sightseers. He's got a keen sense of absurdity that might only be matched in the U.S. by Mike Judge (maybe). Check out Sightseers!

Thanks for being there.

Alan Smithee

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2016, 05:33:33 AM »
Loved Wheatley's A Field in England and even more so Sightseers. He's got a keen sense of absurdity that might only be matched in the U.S. by Mike Judge (maybe). Check out Sightseers!

Thanks for being there.

Sightseers was the one and only Wheatley film I've seen and I didn't get what all the hype was about. I am really looking forward to High Rise though.

1SO

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2016, 07:30:01 AM »
High-Rise
* *
“Society doesn’t come undone as much as it artfully spasms.” - Josh Larsen

I've watched all of Wheatley's films, but I'm now disturbed by his recent swan dive into incomprehensibility. A Field in England remained a compelling mystery[/url] in spite of this, but High Rise hit a point where I was locked out with nothing but the pretty sights and sounds to take me to the end, which is shown in the beginning.

There's a point about halfway in where Wheatley goes into montage, that look like bits of scenes I should watch in their entirety. I want to know what's going on, but we don't find out. The film just moves on. If it wasn't such a small, personal work, I would've guessed the studio took the film from Wheatley and edited out key sequences. It disengaged me because there was no reason for me to no longer be able to follow what was happening. A Field in England was frustrating in a good way. This felt like a friend of mine played a cruel trick.

verbALs

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2016, 07:45:50 AM »
For someone with your level of experience of movies you seem inordinately tied to exposition. Isn't it going too far to take it personally though? It's experiential surely? Does it need explaining in detail? Would 15 minutes of lost footage have helped do you think? In the scheme of ....I'm not using the word ambiguous anymore it's a non sequitur ...  Films that aren't tightly plotted and exhaustively explained this movie doesn't seem that way out. Maybe reading the book would help explain something. Who needs it explaining though?

{I think you've heard this from a lot of people who don't write here any more. Who got frustrated by this level of discourse. I'm only commenting because you went so far as to sound personally offended. A friend let you down?}

On further thought it stops being a discussion at all when the "wish the film had been different from what it was" card is thrown. If everyone watches the same film then there's some room for a conversation. Saying it should have been different is a real conversation closer. You just end up talking about the actual movie and some imaginary other movie I didn't watch.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2016, 07:56:06 AM by verbALs »
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1SO

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2016, 08:12:55 AM »
You made 2 comments I've been seeing with increased regularity.

On Facebook, Totoro said I like my films "plotty to the y", and I do, but I understand a large number of films don't work that way, and I am more than willing to meet a filmmaker (usually more than) halfway to get to a positive experience. A Field in England isn't tied to exposition, but it held my interest through Wheatley's storytelling skills. High Rise goes through a wall where it leaves comprehension behind. Only this time, I wasn't still in the experience, but watching through frosted glass, not really sure what I was looking at. So I don't need explaining. I already have Snowpiercer for that. I just felt excluded on this one.

As for the other comment, I think it's difficult to discuss a problem with a film without running into "wish the film had been different from what it was". I did try to understand and accept High-Rise for what it is, and in explaining why I didn't like it, I refer to a particular sequence that didn't work for me. In explaining why it didn't work for me, it's going to sound like I want the film to be different. I guess the best way to describe it without playing that card would be to throw the problem back onto me, and that's fine too. I could come across High-Rise again a few years down the road and that montage might keep everything loosely in place. Re-watches of Naked Lunch produced those results.

Paul Phoenix

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2016, 08:13:56 AM »
{I think you've heard this from a lot of people who don't write here any more. Who got frustrated by this level of discourse. I'm only commenting because you went so far as to sound personally offended. A friend let you down?}

On further thought it stops being a discussion at all when the "wish the film had been different from what it was" card is thrown. If everyone watches the same film then there's some room for a conversation. Saying it should have been different is a real conversation closer. You just end up talking about the actual movie and some imaginary other movie I didn't watch.

It stops being an engaging conversation at all if we can't bring our personal lives into a film discussion. Saying it should have been different because I personally didn't enjoy what it does might be a conversation closer for you, but I see it as an opportunity for a conversation opener to explore that person's perspective, and why he doesn't enjoy this particular film. If you'd rather turn the conversation towards a stronger focus on the actual content of the film than the person who dislikes the film, more power to you - nobody's stopping you.
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verbALs

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Re: Wheatley, Ben
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2016, 08:21:58 AM »
So maybe the writing challenge 1SO is to find a way of explaining your feelings without resorting to a standard line that explains nothing. Why come in here to write the same review each time?

Totoro is a good example of someone looking for an argument generally so it only strengthens my point bringing him up but he doesn't write here much anyway so I struggle to care?

Hermit if you start a conversation on an argumentative point a point of disagreement then you don't have a conversation; however many times people characterise it that way. You have an argument. I'm getting the impression people don't know the difference now. Again if it becos a semantic point then that's an argument not a conversation. Argumentative points try to shut down conversation. It shouldn't be that hard for people to see the difference between enabling a conversation and shutting one down. Like for instance I am doing right now.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2016, 08:30:49 AM by verbALs »
I used to encourage everyone I knew to make art; I don't do that so much anymore. - Banksy

 

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