Author Topic: Horror: The Final Chapter  (Read 12569 times)

smirnoff

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Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
« Reply #390 on: October 26, 2018, 01:10:07 AM »
The Pit and the Pendulum (1991)
aka. The Inquisitor
★ ★
Charles Band again, only this time Stuart Gordon directs. Thatís not a mark of quality, but experience puts it a step up from the last film, which is good because the script here is even worse. Like something Uwe Boll would be a part of. Itís all over the place in terms of story and tone. The horror is mostly torture porn, but some individual scenes are interestingly played and most of the cast knows to treat it tongue in cheek.

How great was that haircut on Henriksen though? :)

1SO

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Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
« Reply #391 on: October 26, 2018, 01:45:42 PM »
It's that distracting tuft in the center of his forehead I want to know the backstory on. The only thing more distracting was the occasional dip into modern slang.
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smirnoff

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Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
« Reply #392 on: October 26, 2018, 11:50:35 PM »


The baby version.

Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: Horror: A New Beginning
« Reply #393 on: October 27, 2018, 06:06:34 AM »
Brain Dead (1990)
aka. Paranoia
★ Ĺ
A brain specialist (Bill Pullman) is hit by a car and starts having hallucinations. He might be suffering from intense paranoia or he might be a victim of his own experimental surgery. The script takes great pleasure confusing fact with fantasy but has no interest in finding a conclusion to all the weirdness or giving the characters any layers or thematic resonance. Just weird for the sake of being weird.

So this is the film that caused Braindead to be called Dead Alive in the USA.

1SO

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Re: Horror: A New Beginning
« Reply #394 on: October 28, 2018, 11:42:33 PM »

Leprechaun (1993)
★ Ĺ
Iíve dodged this bullet for a long time. On the slasher scale, Leprechauns surpass Chucky dolls at looking more silly than scary. That means you have to be really smart to write an effective film where your unstoppable menace is a Leprechaun. The script does a pretty good job laying down the rules Ė which I understand are quickly discarded in the sequels Ė but there isnít one single laugh or one threatening scene to be found. Watching a young Jennifer Aniston run around in this nonsense was more entertaining than I expected.


Necronomicon (1993)
★ ★
Adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft stories with a meta-framing story. Starts very disappointing with a poorly-done, confusing sea creature story from Christophe Gans (Brotherhood of the Wolf, Silent Hill). The 2nd tale is like a boring episode of Tales From the Crypt, but the finale is directed by Brian Yunza (Bride of Re-Animator), whose team of creative make-up artists push it to the limits. The audacious visual splatter of the last twenty minutes makes art out of gore, and its relentlessness is pretty entertaining.


Dark Waters (1993)
aka. Dead Waters
★ ★ ★ - Okay
Hereís where They Shoot Zombies serves its purpose. I donít know anybody involved, in front of or behind the camera. Itís a UK/Russian production shot in English, though thereís very little dialogue. Itís a Folk Horror mystery with symbolic use of fire and water, witchcraft and strange nuns. For a long time, it didnít make much sense, but there is a strong sense of vision that transcendeds plot confusion and a really low budget. It comes together in the end, and the horror imagery along the way held my interest.


Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995)
★ ★
The first half is so laugh-free and desperate that itís kind of sad. Iím trying to figure out why the film gets better, including a staking scene I thought was consistently amusing. My theory is that I was determined not to quit so I started looking for any near laughs, and I did find them. Not a lot, but more than I expected.


The Mangler (1995)
★ Ĺ
A sentient laundry-folding machine is a pretty thin premise Ė and I already wrote about the killer elevator Ė so the script puts in so many subplots and distractions that the movie runs 106 minutes. Director Tobe Hooper justifies this by letting the actors run wild, a technique common with his less successful work. So when the massive machine gets up and chases after people by the end, it doesnít seem that unusual.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2018, 12:20:04 AM by 1SO »
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Knocked Out Loaded

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Re: Horror: A New Beginning
« Reply #395 on: October 29, 2018, 05:59:30 AM »
Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995)
★ ★
The first half is so laugh-free and desperate that itís kind of sad. Iím trying to figure out why the film gets better, including a staking scene I thought was consistently amusing. My theory is that I was determined not to quit so I started looking for any near laughs, and I did find them. Not a lot, but more than I expected.
Vampire movies are my favorites in the horror genre. This is a stupid one, alright, but i think it is commendable how close it follows the original story.
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1SO

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Re: Horror: A New Beginning
« Reply #396 on: November 01, 2018, 12:22:09 AM »

Bad Moon (1996)
★ ★ Ĺ
I have trouble watching animals in peril because an actor will know they are giving a performance while a dog has to be trained to behave in ways they may not understand. This is a werewolf story told from the point-of-view of a family dog who discovers, confronts and fights off the monster. It speaks well of the filmmakers that I had a difficult time with some scenes, because they didnít look fake and the dog gets severely beaten. Itís a decent, little story but perhaps one thatís better to read than to watch.


Black Christmas (2006)
Ĺ
From the writer/director of that really good remake of Willard, this is one of the worst films in the wake of Scream. The Christmas period detail is decent (though not as good as Krampus), but the characters are hateful, the story is routine and the editing is choppy. Nobody seems to understand how bodies work, with people being busted up like theyíre made out of pumpkin.


Hellís Ground (2007)
★ ★
Pakistani horror film aims at a lot of targets: zombies, backwoods folk, social commentary. Itís all quite crazy and alien, while at the same time being wholly derivative.


Left Bank (2008)
★ ★ Ĺ
Slow burn, urban version of The Wicker Man and once I knew where it was going the story became sadly predictable. Has enough new wrinkles, including some really strong body horror and a well-acted relationship drama, but without the wholly original folk weirdness itís just a pale imitation.


Vinyan (2008)
★ ★
Many reviews use the phrase Donít Look (Apocalypse) Now, which is all too fitting a label. A couple travel to Burma, on the slim chance their deceased son was actually kidnapped. Along the journey, they slowly go insane while the strangeness of the jungle consumes them. The sound mix interestingly puts the atmosphere noise in the foreground and the dialogue behind it, adding to the dislocation, but I was never hooked by the journey. I have a feeling goodguy may love this.
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smirnoff

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Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
« Reply #397 on: November 01, 2018, 12:36:01 AM »
Vinyan (2008)
★ ★
Many reviews use the phrase Donít Look (Apocalypse) Now, which is all too fitting a label. A couple travel to Burma, on the slim chance their deceased son was actually kidnapped. Along the journey, they slowly go insane while the strangeness of the jungle consumes them. The sound mix interestingly puts the atmosphere noise in the foreground and the dialogue behind it, adding to the dislocation, but I was never hooked by the journey. I have a feeling goodguy may love this.

Your description piqued my interest. The trailer took it away.

1SO

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Re: Horror: The Final Chapter
« Reply #398 on: November 01, 2018, 09:16:52 AM »
I watched it. Itís pretty accurate and very Spoilery.
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1SO

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Re: Horror: A New Beginning
« Reply #399 on: November 03, 2018, 11:31:54 PM »
A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010)
★ Ĺ
One of the biggest problems with the original film is they didnít have the budget to match the ambition. You can often see the strings on the nightmare visuals, but the film is made with passion. This is the opposite. Plenty of money for production values and a talented cast, but thereís no care, so the characters behave like pawns in a film and not real teenagers. Jackie Earle Haley is a better actor than Robert Englund, but the limp script gives him nothing to sink his talent into.


Wake Wood (2010)
★ ★ Ĺ
Irish Horror starring Aidan Gillen and Timothy Spall left me deeply confused about what the filmmakers were going for. Domestic drama about a couple who lose a child and use folk witchcraft to bring her back has its emotions beaten and bloodied by numerous scenes of body horror and injured animals. Later on, the throw in some brutal murders Ė usually with the child involved Ė that would make Jason Voorhees queasy. Thereís a definite tone here, which is why I can some people enjoying its originality.


This completes the latest round of updates to They Shoot Zombies, Don't They.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2018, 05:29:55 AM by 1SO »
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