Author Topic: Shocktober Group Marathon 2016  (Read 4158 times)

1SO

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Re: Shocktober Group Marathon 2016
« Reply #300 on: November 13, 2016, 12:12:28 AM »
I'm glad to see you take a similar stance with this inexplicably unsavory material. If a movie's tone could be set by a Volume button, this one makes the loud parts quiet and the quiet parts loud.

oldkid

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Re: Shocktober Group Marathon 2016
« Reply #301 on: November 20, 2016, 02:08:23 AM »
I couldn't finish Alien: Resurrection.  I love Jean-Pierre Jeunet as a director, but he was not the right choice for this film.  He made it... silly, to a degree that Joss Whedon's script seemed amateurish.  At least, that's the first half.  I didn't go further.

However, I did finish Dreyer's horror classic,

Vampyr
Delayed until her servant’s due was paid in full, her death was feared lest damnation be her fate. “Doctor, please, grant me release from this destiny!” fell on closed ears for his lust was for blood.
Shades, broken from the stranglehold of life, sought her release,
For only those completely freed
May unencumbered seek the unchaining of another.


A cinematic feast, Dreyer does it again, having the eye and the power to create genius scenes. The story as a whole might be weak and slow, but there are individual sights and scenes to keep one enthralled. The biggest weakness of the film are the long stretches of text... I didn't know I was going to be reading a book! But there are more than enough visual joys to make up for it.

It has a very silent era sensibility, although released in 1932, and supposedly a sound film.  The music was quite good, and perfect for the mood, but it might have been better had no one spoke.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

pixote

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Re: Shocktober Group Marathon 2016
« Reply #302 on: January 01, 2017, 01:17:12 AM »


The Changeling  (Peter Medak, 1980)

For the bulk of this movie, the good atmosphere and production values disguise the silliness and thinness of the story. There's one standout scene — a seance — and plenty of moments of intrigue, but most of the work is done by the cinematography and the soundtrack; too little by the script. Get a little drunk and you could tear this movie apartment with MST3K treatment. Or just change the soundtrack and see how laughable the dramatic weight given to something like a falling cobweb becomes.

The scene after the seance summed up my ultimate frustration with The Changeling: George C. Scott rewinds the recording he made of the event and he hears, very clearly, a ghostly voice say, Yes. He rewinds the recording again to make sure. And then a third time. Playing the tape a little further, the voice says something else (clearly audible), and Scott rewinds to make sure — again, not once but twice. Get on with it!

It was a huge surprise to me, by the way, that the title doesn't refer to anything supernatural. Two-thirds through the film, I was still waiting for someone to change into a werewolf or something.

Grade: C+





Halloween  (John Carpenter, 1978)

It's almost funny to see Michael Myers drive a car and, at one point, let alone don a costume. I guess at some point over the years, I bought into the weird notion that the villain of this kind slasher film should be a mindless killing machine, oblivious to technology and devoid of the personality required to possess any kind of guile.

A modern perspective has also warped my ability to accept Jamie Lee Curtis as a high school girl here. She's aged far too well.

The tension of the film is mostly wonderful, made possible by great use of a Steadicam and Carpenter's classic score. A few script moments just could have used a bit more effort, like when Loomis finally notices the car he's been searching for for like half an hour even though he's practically standing right next to it. There are plenty of nice moments sprinkled throughout, but the film occasionally devolves into a repetitive game of peekaboo, with Michael appearing for a moment and then disappearing. The movie ends on maybe its best note, however.

Grade: B



Better late than never?

pixote
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

1SO

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Re: Shocktober Group Marathon 2016
« Reply #303 on: January 01, 2017, 08:55:36 AM »
Better late than never?

pixote
Were all these reviews spread around the board saved up on your computer to be released as a New Years present or did you spend all of last night writing about dozens of films?

pixote

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Re: Shocktober Group Marathon 2016
« Reply #304 on: January 01, 2017, 11:59:38 AM »
Were all these reviews spread around the board saved up on your computer to be released as a New Years present or did you spend all of last night writing about dozens of films?

I had notes for all of them (some of which I barely touched), but, yeah, I did a lot of writing last night. I wanted to start the New Year off with a clean slate!

I watched Five Easy Pieces in Paris back in September. That's when my delinquency began.

pixote
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.