Author Topic: Books Read in 2017  (Read 905 times)

ses

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Books Read in 2017
« on: January 01, 2017, 10:11:45 AM »
« Last Edit: February 03, 2017, 10:50:56 AM by ses »
"It's a fool who looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart"

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Monty

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2017, 11:08:21 AM »
Information:
+ First Read  # Re-Read 
^ Novel (various formats)  * Audiobook  ~ Short

1.   Name +^ (Author, p.Year) 

Current Reading

The Picture of Dorian Gray +^ (Oscar Wilde, p.1890)
« Last Edit: January 06, 2017, 02:55:05 AM by Monty »


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oldkid

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2017, 11:37:17 AM »
Last year my reading was so lacking, it wasn't worth posting.  I hope this year to be different.
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St. Martin the Bald

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2017, 09:43:12 PM »
Saved
Hey, nice marmot!

StarCarly

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2017, 09:45:22 PM »
saved
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Films Watched in 2017

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ses

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2017, 11:23:29 PM »

« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 08:42:28 PM by ses »
"It's a fool who looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart"

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saltine

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2017, 03:51:15 AM »
Hero of the Empire by Candice Millard
Early adult life of Winston Churchill and some history of the Second Boer War

The Girl with All the Gifts by MR Carey
Sci-fi with zombie children; many twists and surprises; lots of biology science in the way Clancy did computer/military science

Napoleon A Life by Andrew Roberts
I came to this book knowing almost nothing about Napoleon.  Now, I know everything about Napoleon. 

The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
Interesting, though a bit tedious.

The Romanovs: 1613-1918 by Simon Sebag Montefiore
Excellent and educational

The Dry by Jane Harper
Excellent reading break from histories

Great Courses: Shostakovich, His Life and Music by Great Courses lectures by Professor Robert Greenberg
Audiobook which works very well for hearing the music as well as the lecture

Brat Farrar by Josephine Tey
A good mystery, well-told

Great Masters: Stravinsky - His Life and Music by Great Courses lectures by Professor Robert Greenberg
Excellent audiobook

Great Masters: Tchaikovsky - His Life and Music by Great Courses lectures by Professor Robert Greenberg
Excellent audiobook

A Light in August by William Faulkner
Takes awhile to get the characters sorted, but as I continued reading I became more and more engrossed in their stories and found the book rewarding.

The 30 Greatest Orchestral Works  Great Courses lectures by Professor Robert Greenberg
Excellent audiobook, loved it, every minute.

A History of the English-Speaking Peoples by Winston Churchill
   Vol. 1 The Birth of Britain
   Vol. 2 The New World
   Vol. 3 The Age of Revolution
   Vol. 4 The Great Democracies
Excellent historical series, beautifully written by the master.

Not My Father's Son by Alan Cumming
Interesting memoir; good rainy day read

Born To Run by Christopher McDougall
I didn't enjoy the information on running but the story it's telling about the natural runners of the Copper Canyon is very intriguing.

The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler
For some reason, I had never read this one. Enjoyed it, nice departure of my usual choices.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John le Carre
Very good read; must read more le Carre.

High-Rise by J.G. Ballard
audiobook: Weird, but entertaining, especially as narrated by Tom Hiddleston

The Red Necklace: The French Revolution, book 1 by Sally Gardner
audiobook: One of those teen novels, but really enjoyed it and narrated beautifully by Tom Hiddleston.

I Am Brian Wilson: The genius behind the Beach Boys by Brian Wilson
Loved the stream-of-memory style of Wilson rambling through his life story. No chronology, just memories and impressions and his coming-to-terms with his past.

True Grit by Charles Potts
Got this recommendation from Sean Gillman and loved it start to finish.

Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner
A classic for good reason

Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy
Loved this the first time I read it so I read it again.

Suttree by Cormac McCarthy
McCarthy's first book and said to be autobiographical in some regard. If it is his story, wow.

Angel of Darkness by Caleb Carr
Good, but very long and some details seemed tacked on at the end especially.

News of the World by Paulette Jiles
Discovered this title after I read True Grit. On a par with that story in themes, storytelling, setting etc

The North Water by Ian McGuire
Loved this adventure tale of men facing the reality of a dangerous situation.

Open An Autobiography by Andre Agassi
Agassi spares no one in this honest story of his life and career.

The Round House by Louise Erdrich
Set on an Indian reservation, a mystery story which reveals a lot about the present day plight of the American Indians who choose reservation life.

Breaking van Gogh: Saint-Rémy, Forgery, and the $95 Million Fake at the Met by James Ottar Grundvig
Fascinating read. I'm convinced! It's a fake! 

Even This I Get to Experience by Norman Lear
Marvelous autobiography of a man who was creating and writing at the dawn of must-see tv.

The Son by Philipp Meyer
Disappointing. I could tell the writer had researched this to death, but the writing itself didn't hold up. Plus, the name-dropping of prominent Texans of the era was annoying to me as a West Texan.

The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
Heard about this on a podcast and loved the title, plus it's Christie's first Hercule Poirot mystery.

Leonardo Da Vinci by Walter Isaacson
Gained a much deeper understanding of Leonardo's science and art.

The Guns of August by Barbara W Tuchman
Great book about the first days of WW1, very organized and easy to put all the players into focus.

Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari
Thorough study in general of humankind; I've read enough of these books that this one seemed simplistic.



« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 03:48:03 PM by saltine »
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Beavermoose

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2017, 01:31:01 AM »
2014 List
2015 List
2016 List

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.



1.Passing - Nella Larsen
2.Salome - Oscar Wilde
3.The Bluest Eye - Toni Morrison
4.Mother Night - Kurt Vonnegut
5.Slaughterhouse-Five - Kurt Vonnegut
6.Catch 22 - Joseph Heller

« Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 07:36:37 PM by Beavermoose »

BlueVoid

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2017, 07:54:42 PM »
Just finished "Under the Dome".  The more Stephen King I read the more I enjoy him as an author and understand my aunt's bookshelf packed with his books. This one was fantastic-- and its impossible to read without drawing very clear parallels to the current political climate.
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DarkeningHumour

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2017, 05:15:57 AM »
Napoleon A Life by Andrew Roberts
I came to this book knowing almost nothing about Napoleon.  Now, I know everything about Napoleon. 

That sounds like a challenge. Care for a quiz?  ;)

How was the read?
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