Author Topic: Books Read in 2017  (Read 1258 times)

saltine

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2017, 03:12:02 PM »
All in all, it was excellent.  There were many battle and engagement descriptions, but the writer Roberts only described those decisive actions which turned the battles so important to understanding the actions of Napoleon etc.

The personal life stuff was fascinating of course and Roberts had sifted through the sensational to focus on the proved facts of Napoleon's personal life.  Sometimes he let the reader know what was supposed or written that wasn't proved.  That was interesting to know as well.

Also, Roberts included where sites of important battles could be viewed today, and he had obviously been to all the sites himself as he would say something like "the hilltop lookout has been flattened for a roadway."  More interesting to me was where to find artifacts of the era.  Many are at Apsley House in London (home of Duke of Wellington) so I added that to my London sightseeing list.
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BlueVoid

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2017, 09:56:56 PM »
Dad is Fat
A very fun, quick read. I listened to it on Audible, so it was read by Jim Gaffigan himself, which was great. I listened to it over a period of two days, so it got a little repetitive towards the end, but still enjoyable.
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DarkeningHumour

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2017, 05:43:37 AM »
All in all, it was excellent.  There were many battle and engagement descriptions, but the writer Roberts only described those decisive actions which turned the battles so important to understanding the actions of Napoleon etc.

The personal life stuff was fascinating of course and Roberts had sifted through the sensational to focus on the proved facts of Napoleon's personal life.  Sometimes he let the reader know what was supposed or written that wasn't proved.  That was interesting to know as well.

Also, Roberts included where sites of important battles could be viewed today, and he had obviously been to all the sites himself as he would say something like "the hilltop lookout has been flattened for a roadway."  More interesting to me was where to find artifacts of the era.  Many are at Apsley House in London (home of Duke of Wellington) so I added that to my London sightseeing list.

I will run the reference by some people I know but you may have added it to my wishlist.
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StarCarly

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2017, 01:12:03 PM »
Dad is Fat
A very fun, quick read. I listened to it on Audible, so it was read by Jim Gaffigan himself, which was great. I listened to it over a period of two days, so it got a little repetitive towards the end, but still enjoyable.

I liked that one too! A nice, quick, funny read. I must caution you, though, that if you found Dad is Fat to be a little repetetive, don't even bother with Food: A Love Story. It's a terrible follow up that lowered my opinion of Jim Gaffigan as a comedian  :(
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saltine

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2017, 03:35:09 PM »
All in all, it was excellent.  There were many battle and engagement descriptions, but the writer Roberts only described those decisive actions which turned the battles so important to understanding the actions of Napoleon etc.

The personal life stuff was fascinating of course and Roberts had sifted through the sensational to focus on the proved facts of Napoleon's personal life.  Sometimes he let the reader know what was supposed or written that wasn't proved.  That was interesting to know as well.

Also, Roberts included where sites of important battles could be viewed today, and he had obviously been to all the sites himself as he would say something like "the hilltop lookout has been flattened for a roadway."  More interesting to me was where to find artifacts of the era.  Many are at Apsley House in London (home of Duke of Wellington) so I added that to my London sightseeing list.

I will run the reference by some people I know but you may have added it to my wishlist.

"Maybe them experts ain't so expert."  (Quote from a movie I'd bet money you haven't seen.)
Texan Down Under

BlueVoid

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2017, 06:52:10 PM »
Dad is Fat
A very fun, quick read. I listened to it on Audible, so it was read by Jim Gaffigan himself, which was great. I listened to it over a period of two days, so it got a little repetitive towards the end, but still enjoyable.

I liked that one too! A nice, quick, funny read. I must caution you, though, that if you found Dad is Fat to be a little repetetive, don't even bother with Food: A Love Story. It's a terrible follow up that lowered my opinion of Jim Gaffigan as a comedian  :(

Thanks for the tip! I was considering it, but will probably avoid it now.
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DarkeningHumour

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2017, 07:24:50 PM »
All in all, it was excellent.  There were many battle and engagement descriptions, but the writer Roberts only described those decisive actions which turned the battles so important to understanding the actions of Napoleon etc.

The personal life stuff was fascinating of course and Roberts had sifted through the sensational to focus on the proved facts of Napoleon's personal life.  Sometimes he let the reader know what was supposed or written that wasn't proved.  That was interesting to know as well.

Also, Roberts included where sites of important battles could be viewed today, and he had obviously been to all the sites himself as he would say something like "the hilltop lookout has been flattened for a roadway."  More interesting to me was where to find artifacts of the era.  Many are at Apsley House in London (home of Duke of Wellington) so I added that to my London sightseeing list.

I will run the reference by some people I know but you may have added it to my wishlist.

"Maybe them experts ain't so expert."  (Quote from a movie I'd bet money you haven't seen.)

I don't think I have...
Society is dumb. Art is everything. - Junior

https://pretensiouslyyours.wordpress.com/

Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2017, 05:38:58 AM »
Well 58 books read in 2016, I doubt I will beat that, but here goes:

TitleAuthorSeriesSeries #
1. Personal   Lee Child  Jack Reacher  19
2. Make MeLee ChildJack Reacher20

JakeIsntFake

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2017, 01:15:42 PM »
Books read in 2016

In school
Pride and Prejudice (1813, Jane Austen)
Heart of Darkness (1899, Joseph Conrad)
The Importance of Being Earnest (1895, Oscar Wilde)
Siddhartha (1922, Herman Hesse)
One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967, Gabriel Garcia Marquez)
Beowulf (unknown)
Nectar in a Sieve (1954, Kamala Markandaya)
The Oresteia (Aeschylus)
Silence (1966, Shusakū Endō)
Inferno (Dante)
The Odyssey (Homer)
Things Fall Apart (1958, Chinua Achebe)
The Weight of All Things (2002, Sandra Benitez)

Outside of school
Invisible Man (1953, Ralph Ellison)
Lord of the Flies (1954, William Golding)
Winesburg, Ohio (1919, Sherwood Anderson)
The Sun Also Rises (1926, Ernest Hemingway)
The Bell Jar (1963, Sylvia Plath)
But Beautiful (1991, Geoff Dyer)
Beloved (1987, Toni Morrison)
« Last Edit: December 29, 2017, 09:34:23 PM by JakeIsntFake »
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St. Martin the Bald

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Re: Books Read in 2017
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2017, 04:55:28 PM »
BlueVoid - King is a master. His output alone is cause for pantheon status. I really need to tackle The Dark Tower series this year.

Saltine - MR Carey sounds like someone I need to get to know.
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