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Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 676233 times)

smirnoff

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3330 on: March 12, 2019, 05:32:13 PM »
The prospect of watching this story again didn't appeal to me, but given what you and 1SO wrote about it I'm now very interested. I shall have to put it on my watchlist.

oldkid

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3331 on: March 12, 2019, 11:33:51 PM »
The prospect of watching this story again didn't appeal to me, but given what you and 1SO wrote about it I'm now very interested. I shall have to put it on my watchlist.

The Missles of October, that long movie/short miniseries, single handedly got me interested in politics.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3332 on: March 13, 2019, 06:47:16 AM »
Bee Movie (2007)

Lets create a movie about how important the small things in life can be. Then lets let the completely distort the world. Apparently male honey bees are the ones the go out into the dangerous world to collect the honey. Oh wait they don't, women don't you worry your pretty little heads about that. You can have a little place in the world as a poster on the wall, or the person to be saved. If you want an big obvious example of the displacement of women in the world of movies here is one that does that plainly and simply.

This movie annoyed me, way out of portion to it's insignificant narrative. Still it does have one good message and it moves along ok. Not going to fail it, but only just. As I have been writing this review I having been knocking more and more off my vote. I started with 65, now its 54 and I am not sure it will survive with that rating.

Rating: 52 / 100

How to Talk to Girls at Parties (2017 John Cameron Mitchell)

John Cameron Mitchell does good music again. The music in this film is a definite highlight. Best way to describe this movie is Jodorowsky light. The opening with the really weird filming style, the rather trippy plot make for a strange movie, which dips in and out of a more conventional one.

Rating: 74 / 100

Bondo

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3333 on: March 13, 2019, 10:24:01 PM »
The Hate U Give

It is a shame this came and went while I was in a less attentive period for film watching as it is something I would have liked to have prior to submitting my nominations ballot. It also rounds out a set of seven films that got significant attention that focus on issues of race. Six that center the story on a black character, written by a black writer, and brought to screen by a black director, and Green Book.

Amandla Stenberg is great here as Starr Carter, a teenager who is in a car when they get pulled over and he is shot. This is a story we are sadly too familiar with as viewed from the outside and it plays to certain beats. We know the victim's misdeeds will be aired, no matter their irrelevance and we know the cop's not getting convicted. But I'm not sure we've truly gotten the perspective this much from inside of what both the culture of racial bias in policing generally does to black families, but the struggles in knowing what to do. At one point Starr worries about being targeted by the police if she testifies and we know this fear is grounded as Serial season three covers in one episode.

There are a few moments that ring less true to me. While I could certainly see an interviewer asking Starr about her friend's involvement in drugs, it felt odd that she went out of her way to call out his specific gang in a way that puts her in danger. I think it maybe tries to establish one motive for this, but it seemed an odd choice. The second thing that stuck out where her white friends (she has earned a spot outside her district at a mostly white school). While I get that they are trying to emphasize certain problematic ways white people respond to things, it didn't play naturally. I think part of it is just the level of acting among the white classmates was just poor compared to the big hitters filling out the black cast. But these are small quibbles in an otherwise very strong movie.

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3334 on: March 14, 2019, 01:59:40 AM »
Prospect (2018)
Highly recommended by Tasha Robinson, this low-budget but awfully pretty sci-fi (like Stalker pretty) is not Leave No Trace in outer space but more like a better Beyond the Black Rainbow. In other words, I don't understand why this film exists beyond it doing some solid world building and looking great. 17-year-old Sophie Thatcher is exceptional and Pedro Pascal (Game of Thrones) teeters between energized and annoying. I'd like to hear from people who discover it and hold it up as a buried treasure. I imagine there will be a lot of them, but I was never hooked by the slim story or the thick atmosphere.

FLYmeatwad

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3335 on: March 14, 2019, 09:22:21 PM »
The Hate U Give

It is a shame this came and went while I was in a less attentive period for film watching as it is something I would have liked to have prior to submitting my nominations ballot. It also rounds out a set of seven films that got significant attention that focus on issues of race. Six that center the story on a black character, written by a black writer, and brought to screen by a black director, and Green Book.

Amandla Stenberg is great here as Starr Carter, a teenager who is in a car when they get pulled over and he is shot. This is a story we are sadly too familiar with as viewed from the outside and it plays to certain beats. We know the victim's misdeeds will be aired, no matter their irrelevance and we know the cop's not getting convicted. But I'm not sure we've truly gotten the perspective this much from inside of what both the culture of racial bias in policing generally does to black families, but the struggles in knowing what to do. At one point Starr worries about being targeted by the police if she testifies and we know this fear is grounded as Serial season three covers in one episode.

There are a few moments that ring less true to me. While I could certainly see an interviewer asking Starr about her friend's involvement in drugs, it felt odd that she went out of her way to call out his specific gang in a way that puts her in danger. I think it maybe tries to establish one motive for this, but it seemed an odd choice. The second thing that stuck out where her white friends (she has earned a spot outside her district at a mostly white school). While I get that they are trying to emphasize certain problematic ways white people respond to things, it didn't play naturally. I think part of it is just the level of acting among the white classmates was just poor compared to the big hitters filling out the black cast. But these are small quibbles in an otherwise very strong movie.

Thought the classmates were fine, they didn't really feel all that false to me. Maybe a little sensationalized, or playing to stereotypes, but they seemed appropriately 'rich white high schoolers' to me. Who knows, like you say, it's minor regardless.

This film is great, btw, think it ended up at the top of my Best Surprise Nominations Ballot (or very high up, if I gave the nod to Flower) and, not sure if I just wrote it in passing here or elsewhere, but agreed completely that it's a shame it got overlooked. Of all the 'big films' about race and police brutality last year I definitely felt this was easily the strongest. A lot has to do with that central performance, but her family as a whole is well drawn and the film engages with each member's perspective about their home and identity. The film's probably a bit long, though on the whole it's pretty fantastic and I hope more people get a chance to check it out. Not sure if it just came out at a bad time, if the trailers were poor (they were, I immediately wrote this thing off when I saw the first saw one, but checked it out on that opening Thursday due to the strong reviews), or if, more with FS and the forum in general, it got washed away in the late push that Blindspotting got towards the end of the year, but something definitely happened. I do feel like I wrote somewhere here that it seemed puzzling that so many people were drawn to Blindspotting and THUG was getting no conversation at all, and I'm still puzzled, but I figure it's the Hamilton connection and the fact that more people are willing to give something a look that's got a couple of 20 something men at the center rather than a high school girl. Also, Blindspotting is less consistently heavy than THUG/allows for a few more moments of levity.

Bondo

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3336 on: March 14, 2019, 09:36:55 PM »
Well, Blindspotting was my #1 last year and will be in my top-100. THUG is nearer the bottom of my top-10 and without a sniff of my top-100. Blindspotting was better acted IMO and while THUG was effective, it also hit all the expected beats.

Captain Marvel
It's possible I went in with low expectations after it sort of got meh'd by the critics, but at the moment I'd say this slots in right behind Black Panther. There were some early annoyances in how casually Captain Marvel takes blowing crap up on Earth (though I suppose we discover her species, for lack of a better term, is actually rather comfortable with collateral damage), and to be honest, Nick Fury isn't all that bothered about putting humans at risk either. But thankfully that nit fades after the initial sequences on Earth.

After an iffy opening act, which is both a bit more smashy bangy but also just too disorientating to really be enjoyable (though it is appropriate to the story). After those aforementioned sequences on Earth we settle into the really strong buddy dynamic between Larson and Jackson, strengthened further when Lyshana Lynch's Maria Rambeau (and we can't forget Goose). Of the other characters, Ben Mendehlsohn delivers a more rangy performance than is often allowed of presumptive baddies, which was also something we said about Michael B. Jordan in Black Panther. That we didn't say that about Thanos is a lot of why the Avengers film failed so hard for me. Jude Law is a more one-note smarm factory.

Aside from just the generally enjoyable tone and pace of things, it was the thematic underpinning that really hit home, though it hinges heavily on a spoiler so I won't talk about it here. All I'll say is it effectively touches on a major political issue. Leaving the film the thing that at the end of the day is the toughest struggle with the film, and the character of Carol Danvers, is that she is too powerful. It's a bit the Thor dilemma I guess, or also frequently compared with Superman. Like, the powers she demonstrates at the end of the film are pretty absurd and god-like to the point that you could never effectively build a film's drama around her personal peril. Of course, being so hyper-powered, we do get some good girl power moments, including one action scene set to No Doubt's "Just A Girl" that is fairly enjoyable, like much of the 90s-driven soundtrack of my youth.

Captive State
I got out to this one opening night on the strength of Rupert Wyatt's Rise of the Planet of the Apes. This alien invasion thriller does not inspire confidence that a successful trilogy or series will arise here. It tries to world-build in rapid fashion, establishing this alien species that can basically zap humans into blood dust, and quickly establishes authoritarian control over the world, enforced by a horde of human middlemen who have decided that is the side that their bread is buttered. The bulk of the film simply takes us through the orchestration of one rebellion attack that, fairly impotent in its own right, maybe sets up some grander thrust. But while it is actually an impressive process film, akin to a heist film in its focus, any such exciting climax is basically left off-camera with just a credit art sequence suggesting bigger progress. Whether it is setting up for a hoped for sequel or not, it is really underwhelming. This can safely be skipped.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 10:26:03 PM by Bondo »

FLYmeatwad

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3337 on: March 14, 2019, 09:59:58 PM »
I might just have a weakness for Jordans too  :P

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3338 on: March 14, 2019, 10:57:29 PM »
Captain Marvel
After those aforementioned sequences on Earth we settle into the really strong buddy dynamic between Larson and Jackson, strengthened further when Lyshana Lynch's Maria Rambeau (and we can't forget Goose). Of the other characters, Ben Mendehlsohn delivers a more rangy performance than is often allowed of presumptive baddies,
I have to remind myself this is why the film is ultimately Okay, even though it really muffs the typical Marvel beats that work.

which was also something we said about Michael B. Jordan in Black Panther. That we didn't say that about Thanos is a lot of why the Avengers film failed so hard for me.
I say that about Thanos. Say it all the time. Top 5 Marvel villain for me. The MCU has evolved to where Loki lacks dimension compared to some of the baddies who came after.

Bondo

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3339 on: March 14, 2019, 11:14:18 PM »
You weren't included in my "we." Only people who were right were included in my we.  :P