Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 671706 times)

smirnoff

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3400 on: April 03, 2019, 05:49:22 PM »
though this is the key film if you're wondering how Adam McKay went from Anchorman to The Big Short.

How's that?

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3401 on: April 03, 2019, 07:45:00 PM »
The villain's plan involves shady marketing deals and speculation (among other things). Towards the end, McKay folds in real life events involving the bubble bursting and companies needing Federal bailout. The closing credits feature a bunch of statistics that have little to do with this film, but you can see McKay is pre-occupied with the subject, so it isn't hard to imagine this leading to him doing some research and getting the idea to make The Big Short.

smirnoff

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3402 on: April 03, 2019, 08:22:10 PM »
Huh. I don't remember any of that, but that's interesting.

Corndog

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3403 on: April 04, 2019, 09:32:52 AM »
The Aftermath (James Kent, 2019)

World War II is a very popular subject for entertainment. It, of course, was a horrific tim period in history, and thus ripe with tons of compelling, dramatic, and incredible stories to be told. I donít think itís a backdrop that will make its way out of the cinematic experience any time soon, and The Aftermath is just another in a long line of films which use the War and itís ďaftermathĒ as the setting for the story itís telling. In this instance, the war helps create the tension between the characters, but is otherwise a romance story gone awry. If only the film could have been as engaging as the premise.

Lewis Morgan (Jason Clarke) has just been assigned to Hamburg after the conclusion of the war. A British officer, he has been afforded the occupancy of the grand house of a German architect, Lubert (Alexander Skarsgard). Accommodating, and perhaps a little too forgiving, Lewis lets Lubert and his teenage daughter (Flora Thiemann) to stay on at the house, which creates tension with Rachael, Lewisí wife who has just arrived to join her husband. But what starts as tension between Rachael and Lubert soon turns into attraction as she settles into her new life, building a whole new type of tension between the three main characters.

This film does a good job of initially building the platform for a decent romantic drama with a tense wartime backdrop, but along the way it drops the ball, seemingly having no ambition to build on its promising scenario. Instead, it settles into a far too even tempered, melodramatic telling of a conventional story with no real roots, nothing convincing. I think much of this starts with the lackluster direction by James Kent, who manages to simultaneously lack subtlety in his narrative while also failing to give us any sort of stylistic flourish to enhance the visual or emotional experience.

The performances are likewise disjointed in some fashion or another. Keira Knightley, as ever, is melodramatic to match the material, but her counterparts feel as though they are doing something completely different, making her performance stand out even more like a sore thumb. Alexander Skarsgard plays the German architect Lubert in such an understated way Iím still not sure he has any emotions at all. But his performance, in pairing with Knightley, makes the eventual attraction all the more baffling. Then there is Clarke, who I usually like. Here he seems to be trying to match Knightley, but he fails miserably in his attempt at melodrama, resulting in a nothing of a performance.

And that is the main theme with most of the movie: nothing. Nothing comes of the intriguing story. Nothing comes even of the side story with Lubertís daughter, other than a rushed delivery. Nothing in the film seems earned, which makes the experience one without reward. There is nothing truly offensive about the film, but there is also nothing to take away from it. It is a film which comes and goes with shocking ease, never challenging the viewer or even trying too hard to engage them. Iím not even sure the most ardent Keira Knightley fans will find something of worth in this extremely forgettable film.

★★ - Didn't Like It
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3404 on: April 05, 2019, 12:57:58 AM »
Dumbo (2019)
★ ★
"Pink Elephants on Parade" is the standout, mainly for the way Danny Elfman puts his stamp on the classic tune. I also laughed at the corny moment when the ringmaster (played by that boxing announcer guy) shouts, "Let's get ready for Dumbo!" Eva Green remains thoroughly watchable and I like seeing how confident Michael Keaton has become, though his determination to give his character an unusual voice often slips into Beetlejuice.

The rest isn't as bad as Alice in Wonderland, but it's the strongest argument yet for the pointlessness of many of these Disney live action remakes, and I thought nothing could be more pointless than Beauty & the Beast. Cinderella and Jungle Book remain the exceptions that improve on the originals, but here nothing is better than in the original (which I don't even like much). As for Dumbo, he's just realistic enough that the moments of emotional torture are brutal (though thankfully brief), but the silliness of a flying elephant just proves why this was designed for animation. Even Tim Burton's usually lavish Art Direction is only on display in brief moments.

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3405 on: April 05, 2019, 09:26:19 AM »

Stan & Ollie (2018)
ďWhen you watch our movies, nobody else in the stories knows us.
We donít know anybody either. It was just the two of us.
All we had was each other.
It was just the way we wanted it.Ē

We need a 2018 do-over because everyone screwed up. Under-supported and barely released, this film is utterly delightful, heartfelt and so effectively sentimental that I was pulled under by the emotions and forgiving of a few moments when it strained to wring out an extra bit of pathos. This bio-pic combines what little is good about Vice (makeup, sarcasm, a talented cast) with what little is good about Bohemian Rhapsody (superb lead performance, a peek behind the curtain, note-perfect recreations of classic moments). How could those two films receive so much awards attention with Stan & Ollie sitting right there doing it right.

John C. Reilly and Steve Coogan are so perfectly cast, I will never think of another actor who couldíve given as good a performance. They manage to bring these comedy legends to life while also putting a personal spin into the backstage scenes. These are now my favorite performance from both of them, but it gets better when the wives (Shirley Henderson, Nina Arianda) enter the film. Rather than being unwaveringly supportive or shrews, they have different complex takes on the duo that turns a buddy film into a four-handed story that adds detail to the comedians while creating many new combinations of dramatic conflict.

Like I said, even with a lump in my throat and tears in my eyes, there are some moments where I thought the filmmakers didnít need to go quite so hard, and I should probably mention I was never a big fan of Laurel and Hardy, so I like the real life exchanges more than some of the staged bits. Still, this is a beautiful surprise that shouldíve been a contender for Screenplay, Art Direction, Cinematography, Make-Up, Director and multiple acting awards. Itís my #3 film of 2018.
★ ★ ★ - Very Good

Corndog

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3406 on: April 05, 2019, 09:29:38 AM »
2019 Filmspot eligible!
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."

oldkid

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3407 on: April 05, 2019, 11:26:24 AM »
A Silent Voice

My daughter and I have been waiting for this film for about three years.  It was on Netflix for a moment, but we delayed and then it was gone.  But we've been talking about it-- the anime movie with a deaf girl-- but we couldn't find it anywhere.  Then we found out that the studio that mad the film almost went bankrupt and had to pull all their films out of availability, at least to English-speaking audiences.  Finally, it was released this week and we rushed to see it.  On Amazon Prime.  The first movie we watched on our 55 inch TV screen, which was nice.

Was it worth all the trouble and wait?  Yes!  And a second time: YES!  I haven't been so impressed with an anime movie for a while.  The emotional lifes of the characters are the focus of the film and while it is mostly a coming-of-age drama, it is intense.  There are, of course, huge misunderstandings, but also people who are plain mean and even cruel, and cowardly and persistent and heroic. It is a high school drama ratched up to 10.  Bo Burnham said that in his film Eighth Grade, he wanted to express all the contrary and intense emotions of the time, but I felt it more in this film.  Perhaps because there is (sometimes not always) reasons for the drama, and the motivation isn't always to find.

There is intense peer abuse here and declarations of feelings at times, so you are warned.  But it is well done with some marvelous art direction.  I wish this could be nominated for a Filmspot because it deserves it's chance to be in competition.  If you are a fan of anime, I recommend it.  If you are off and on about anime, I'd give it a shot.

4.5/5
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3408 on: April 05, 2019, 11:49:58 AM »
I plan on reading the manga first, but glad to hear you enjoyed it so much.

FLYmeatwad

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3409 on: April 05, 2019, 09:28:17 PM »
Definitely want to watch that, missed the Fathom Events release a few months back.