Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 84111 times)

jdc

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3760 on: September 12, 2019, 07:02:38 AM »
Sideways - Rewatched. Wonderful film. A little masterpiece. :))

But will drink Merlot?
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smirnoff

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3761 on: September 12, 2019, 11:19:23 PM »
Sideways - Rewatched. Wonderful film. A little masterpiece. :))

But will drink Merlot?

It's funny the moments of that film that stuck. The Merlot line. Miles drinking from the spittoon. Virginia Madsen's monologue. But there really are so many! Just the way Jack gets out of bed in the morning after a night at Miles' mom's house. Hilarious. Or Miles monologue that precedes Madsen's is also excellent.

The dynamic of Miles and Jack is such a pleasure to watch... the more strained their relationship gets the more true it is. Giamatti is a master of angry acting.

Bondo

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3762 on: September 15, 2019, 07:07:57 PM »
Once Upon A Time In Hollywood

This is kind of a tale of two films (and the length of two films at that). There is a story of an actor (and his stunt double friend/partner) aging out of his prime. It is a story we've seen in various contexts (Singin' In The Rain, Sunset Boulevard) and there is something to the specificity of Rick Dalton's struggles. The scenes with Rick (DiCaprio) and Trudi (Julia Butters) are quite good. And while I felt some annoyance at the length of the show within the show segments at times, I do think they build the sentiment of Rick's struggles (some based on changing society, some based on his own personal failings). And Brad Pitt does historically do well in charismatic supporting roles...though being invited to like Cliff so much sits uncomfortably next to the implication Cliff murdered his wife. It would be a story naive to race and gender issues, but ultimately mostly harmless.

But then there is the second film regarding Charles Manson and Sharon Tate that the first is woven into. The revenge/revisionist tales of Inglorious Basterds and Django Unchained have the benefit of taking on broad ills. In taking on this very specific story, this handling feels significantly more exploitative. Also, the way this flattens Manson's group into a generic hippie cult instead of white supremacy would be like IB ignoring that the Nazis committed genocide against the Jews and ignoring that southern plantations enslaved Africans. Obviously those films don't ignore that central aspect. Yet this one does. The appending of this story made the film feel unfocused and long, it opened itself up to more problematic aspects, and most notably in the last 30 minutes, it reduced what might have been a decent, palatable film with good moments into a smoldering pile of ashes, one of the worst and most off-putting films of the year...with Tarantino outdoing The Hateful Eight.

As an aside, over a few films this year I've become rather smitten with Margaret Qualley, but even that affection was not enough not to get disgusted by the weirdly shot feet scene. Like, I'm sure her feet are perfectly normal, but something about the composition just made them look hideous.

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3763 on: September 15, 2019, 07:31:28 PM »
Retiring may prove to be the smartest decision Tarantino makes. Everything that was great about his early films remains so, and his direction matured from indie basics to complicated widescreen framings somewhere around Kill Bill (aka. when Robert Richardson became his Director of Photography.) His uneasy relationship with racism, sexism, conservative values and ultra-violence hasn't changed, but the times have changed around him. Right now, it seems that people who've always loved Tarantino films continue to do so either with reservations or apologies, while those who don't are getting handed fresh examples with each film that build a bigger case against the director's deserved place in film history.

I say this as someone who is from Tarantino's generation. I laughed at the Bruce Lee scene and at the way Brad Pitt sat during the brief scene with his wife and was all jazzed during the finale, which found humor in the extreme violence in a way I found missing from Hateful Eight. I know I'm not a racist and I don't hate women so I think the problem is more about my age and what was considered acceptable in my generation. The times are changing, and my change will be slower than those younger than me.
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colonel_mexico

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3764 on: September 15, 2019, 07:39:37 PM »
I remember being 14 and my grandparents immediately turning off PULP FICTION when we rented it one day.  I would spend the next summer consuming the film from end to end.  I have never felt in the slightest a need to apologize for a director who has never been shy to cross many kinds of lines.  Dave Chappelle does this regularly in his comedy and I think its genius.  There are many societal and social ills in the world, but Tarantino is not the place to go digging around to find a place to plant the social justice flag. I thought more people, especially here, would have enjoyed a movie that is in love with movies and stunt-people.  The decaying decadence of the post-Hollywood Golden age, the dark-sides of counter-culture and its lack of answers for the "problem with no name-" and the rejection of being a company man of the young adult boomers. 
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Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3765 on: September 15, 2019, 08:37:13 PM »
I feel like I need to see this film now since Bondo hates it, but I have a feeling we'll agree given my take on the last few Tarantino films seems to align with Bondo's feelings on OUATITW.

Teproc

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3766 on: September 16, 2019, 07:44:09 AM »
I don't see how the white supremacist ideas of the Manson family really have to be explored here, seeing as they mostly murdered white people ? I mean, he could have shown interest, but I fail to see how that's a major failing of the film - it's not as important a part of the Tate murders specifically as the idea of "counter-culture gone wrong", and this is, quite obviously, a Hollywood fairy tale, so that's what the film is interested in.
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MartinTeller

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3767 on: September 16, 2019, 02:17:45 PM »

Seder-Masochism (2018)

I don't know what Nina Paley does for money but I hope she gets a raise real soon. Because of her disdain for Copyright and refusal to pay for song rights, her work is distributed freely. Probably a big reason why she's only made two features in 10 years. I say this because I want to see more of her art, but also because I want to see her grow as an artist. SM has all the style of Sita and uses a similar framework of explaining religion, but it's more a collection of odds and ends.

Sita weaves the tale of Ramayana with a personal one by Paley, using three bickering narrators to tie it together. The only dialogue in SM comes from some friendly questions she asks her father. These moments have a similar casual humor, but they sometimes jerk the story to the next topic or, in the case of Paley deciding where to place the microphone, have nothing to do with the film at all. There are occasional moments where Paley points out this is history as written by "a series of patriarchal males," but her feminist mirror never transforms the material. It ends up a three-quarters baked idea.


With a lot less dialogue, that means a lot more songs and the soundtrack is often inspired. However, aside from some clever animation, these scenes (especially so many) start to feel like a music video art installation more than a movie. One of Sita's great pleasures is its ability to blend many unique styles into a true work of zany animated jazz art. This shows what magic alchemy that film was. Still fun because nobody makes films like Nina Paley, but if you don't know that already this will probably turn you off of her talent.
Rating: ★ ★ ★ - Good

I finally got around to watching this yesterday. "A collection of odds and ends" sums it up well. It doesn't really hang together. My understanding is that the patriarchy angle was hit upon mid-development, which probably explains why it comes off as not entirely baked. The best moments are when the film comments on the role religion plays in propping up the patriarchy. Other segments are downright dull and repetitive. I would say the good outweighs the not-so-good, the song choices are often delightful, and I'm always down for Paley's style. But it's definitely a disappointing follow-up to Sita. Rating: Good (78)
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jdc

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3768 on: September 16, 2019, 09:20:25 PM »
I don't see how the white supremacist ideas of the Manson family really have to be explored here, seeing as they mostly murdered white people ? I mean, he could have shown interest, but I fail to see how that's a major failing of the film - it's not as important a part of the Tate murders specifically as the idea of "counter-culture gone wrong", and this is, quite obviously, a Hollywood fairy tale, so that's what the film is interested in.

Did the Manson family hold White supremacist ideas? From what I recall, I thought he or they thought that the murders would lead to a race riot, not that they had the idea of any race being superior. Though, I admit, I only know from what I can remember when I watched Helter Skelter back in the 80's. I know ever now and then he would get some interview on TV but never did any of his ramblings seem worthy and thought it would be better to just have ignored him.
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“The direct use of physical force is so poor a solution to the problem of limited resources that it is commonly employed only by small children and great nations” - David Friedman

Bondo

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3769 on: September 16, 2019, 10:50:28 PM »
it's not as important a part of the Tate murders specifically as the idea of "counter-culture gone wrong",

I mean, it's not as important if you prefer to tell conservative-soothing lies as a way to scapegoat hippies. Google Charles Manson White Supremacy. His agenda was to false flag attack white people to stir up violence against the blacks and ultimately a race war he thought blacks would lose because he thought they were inherently inferior. By condoning Tarantino rinsing the racism out of Manson, you perpetuate the notion that Manson's ideology wasn't inherently and inseparably about race, which allows white dudes like Tarantino to rinse the racism out of Manson.

Hustlers

My overall sense of this film needs more settling but I'm perhaps a bit disappointed. Even though it goes for a really overt ending thesis statement, the story of these working class strippers pulling one over on wall street 1%ers did not really stick the thematic landing for me. It mostly had me banging my head against a wall screaming "FFS, maybe invest your money instead of blowing it on conspicuous consumption." Not that there isn't plenty of conspicuous consumption among the super-wealthy, and certainly some of it was essentially business spending, but a lot of the durable wealth problem in this country is precisely because they save it well. And to go back to the business spending thing...they need an LLC and some good tax write-offs.

There is a certain kinetic aspect about the film, but if I had to rank it would go:
The Girlfriend Experience
Magic Mike
Hustlers
« Last Edit: September 16, 2019, 10:57:04 PM by Bondo »