Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 90747 times)

dusty bottoms

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3830 on: October 29, 2019, 10:33:10 AM »
A rewatch of 'Edward Scissorhands'.


I knew I always liked this film but didn't know I liked it this much. It has obvious themes of being different, alone and of loneliness but also seems ahead of it's time dealing with mob culture, mass hysteria, virtue signalling and a whole load of other negative traits that are seen online and in various forms today. The plot is almost Shakespearean. It's a damning indictment of society and morals. Not forgetting Danny Elfman's score and the amazing set design (which looked great in 4K) - I'm tempted to say it's Burton's masterpiece.
"Listen up, there's a storm coming.......... like nothing you've ever seen.......... and not a one of you.......... is prepared for it"

Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3831 on: October 29, 2019, 03:54:09 PM »
Welcome dusty bottoms

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3832 on: October 30, 2019, 12:07:18 AM »
Twisted Pair (2018 Neil Breen)
I don't get the appeal of Neil Breen. Having watched about half of his first movie, I can see that he has his own view of the world and of filmmaking that can be technically labeled his "personal vision" but the work is painfully inept, not entertainingly so.
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1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3833 on: October 30, 2019, 12:09:19 AM »
A rewatch of 'Edward Scissorhands'.


I knew I always liked this film but didn't know I liked it this much. It has obvious themes of being different, alone and of loneliness but also seems ahead of it's time dealing with mob culture, mass hysteria, virtue signalling and a whole load of other negative traits that are seen online and in various forms today. The plot is almost Shakespearean. It's a damning indictment of society and morals. Not forgetting Danny Elfman's score and the amazing set design (which looked great in 4K) - I'm tempted to say it's Burton's masterpiece.
I always loved this film right up until it falls apart at the end. It still has a magnificent look and tone, but I can say the same for Batman Returns and would have to ask if you considered Ed Wood, which can arguably be considered Burton's masterpiece?
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smirnoff

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3834 on: October 30, 2019, 12:18:37 AM »
Twisted Pair (2018 Neil Breen)
I don't get the appeal of Neil Breen. Having watched about half of his first movie, I can see that he has his own view of the world and of filmmaking that can be technically labeled his "personal vision" but the work is painfully inept, not entertainingly so.
Red-letter media's review of Breen's Twisted Pair is one of the best, Best of the Worst episodes. :))

Sandy

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3835 on: October 30, 2019, 12:20:19 AM »
Welcome, dusty bottoms! Glad you had a great re-watch.

Virtue signaling. Excellent point.This movie is near and dear to my heart too. I can't disagree with 1SO about the ending, but there is much to glean from the film. (I have yet to see Ed Wood!)


I found my old review-of-sorts.



Day 15- A Film That Depicts Your Life: Edward Scissorhands (1990, Burton)

The idea of this film came about from Tim Burton’s lonely childhood. He said, “I get the feeling people just got this urge to want to leave me alone for some reason, I don’t know exactly why.” Caroline Thompson, the writer of the original story, dedicated the “love poem” to Burton, saying that he was “the most articulate person I know, but couldn't put a single sentence together.” Those two reasons alone could be reasons enough to use this film as my choice for today.

I do have an idea about the why’s of being left alone though. I believe it is part self preservation and part internal living. There tends to be a “not available” sign on my forehead at times. Riding the seesaw of I care too much and I care to little is tiring yet it’s almost impossible to stay balanced in the middle.

As for self preservation, I watch Edward innocently become the new trend, the side show attraction for all to utilize and exploit and I know the outcome is burnout, inability to meet expectations, and then retreat.

There is also the danger that if he does reach out, more harm than good could occur. I worry also. My daughter says that I have been known to delve too deep. It’s the caring too much side.

Beautiful isolated Edward, I see you, I understand you and in a minuscule way, I am you. As I reside in my internal tower chipping away at my creations, perhaps the by-product will create a happy moment for someone somewhere.

(TMI for today’s assignment.)
"I'm a new day rising."

jdc

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3836 on: October 30, 2019, 12:59:03 AM »
A rewatch of 'Edward Scissorhands'.


I knew I always liked this film but didn't know I liked it this much. It has obvious themes of being different, alone and of loneliness but also seems ahead of it's time dealing with mob culture, mass hysteria, virtue signalling and a whole load of other negative traits that are seen online and in various forms today. The plot is almost Shakespearean. It's a damning indictment of society and morals. Not forgetting Danny Elfman's score and the amazing set design (which looked great in 4K) - I'm tempted to say it's Burton's masterpiece.

I soured on Elfman though think he does have a few gems in there. I didn't have a strong opinion of this one though remember so much love for it at the time when it came out. Just wondering how it aged for me know, a 4K transfer likely should make it worth to revisit
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Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3837 on: October 30, 2019, 03:41:44 AM »
Twisted Pair (2018 Neil Breen)
I don't get the appeal of Neil Breen. Having watched about half of his first movie, I can see that he has his own view of the world and of filmmaking that can be technically labeled his "personal vision" but the work is painfully inept, not entertainingly so.

I tried to watch one of his other movies and could not do it. This time I watched it sort of as part of a group (online group) and that worked, his films are very much a group experience thing.

When I said I had tears in my eyes it was true as I wrote the review I was laughing so hard I had tears in my eyes.

dusty bottoms

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3838 on: October 30, 2019, 05:42:35 AM »
A rewatch of 'Edward Scissorhands'.


I knew I always liked this film but didn't know I liked it this much. It has obvious themes of being different, alone and of loneliness but also seems ahead of it's time dealing with mob culture, mass hysteria, virtue signalling and a whole load of other negative traits that are seen online and in various forms today. The plot is almost Shakespearean. It's a damning indictment of society and morals. Not forgetting Danny Elfman's score and the amazing set design (which looked great in 4K) - I'm tempted to say it's Burton's masterpiece.
I always loved this film right up until it falls apart at the end. It still has a magnificent look and tone, but I can say the same for Batman Returns and would have to ask if you considered Ed Wood, which can arguably be considered Burton's masterpiece?

Thank you for the welcomes.

I had the same conversation with a friend this week - who said Ed Wood is better. I must admit I tried watching Ed Wood years ago and didn't finish it (I rarely give up on movies as it's a terrible habit) but will now try and seek out Ed Wood to fix this gap in Burton's filmography.
"Listen up, there's a storm coming.......... like nothing you've ever seen.......... and not a one of you.......... is prepared for it"

Bondo

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3839 on: November 01, 2019, 08:55:31 AM »
Knives Out

Most important, this is a terrifically fun movie with a cast that should by all rights have the Best Ensemble Filmspot locked up. But I was surprised the way it wove a few barbs of social commentary in. In the Q&A after the film, Rian Johnson talked about how Agatha Christie's works, while perceived in hindsight as somehow existing in some timeless "past," were actually very much constructed of characters representing her present, and so Johnson felt it important to make a whodunit that properly incorporates a 2019 setting. Most notable in this sense is the way these (adult) children like to stress they are self-made successes, in spite the clear support of their crime novelist father who made the fortune they too frequently rely on. I can think of a certain President who has touted his business acumen while ignoring the degree to which his success was given to him. Can't recommend this film enough.

A

Shame

Admittedly I've not written about a lot of the films I've been watching, but I feel I should make a note about this rewatch. On first viewing I had Shame (this is the Steve McQueen one) flirting with my top-100. On rewatch I find it as empty as the chasm Brandon is trying to fill with sex. It may be my least favorite of his films now. And while I think he has a high average level of quality, I don't know that any quite make the case for top-100 inclusion...though I imagine 12 Years A Slave would be the most likely.