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Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 148119 times)

Sandy

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4090 on: January 21, 2020, 11:30:22 PM »
Heart and Souls



Sigh. How simple this movie is, yet rather unique too. There is a natural flow of story, character and dialogue that sits so well with me. I never got bored by staying far out ahead. Instead, I let it unfold in front of me and happily so. EXCEPT! There is a moment in here that is too traumatic for words, because no child should ever have to go through such an abrupt and complete loss. The little boy who plays the part really sells the sadness and it takes me a while to stop internally shaking from the scene. Alfre Woodard is great as always and reminds me that a marathon of her work would be very rewarding.

Thanks, smirnoff. I really loved it. If I didn't know that pixote recommended this film to you, I would have thought that Tremors brought it to your attention. Did you know that the people who wrote and directed Tremors did this movie too? :) Do you see any similarities in the two films?

Sandy

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4091 on: January 21, 2020, 11:32:03 PM »
I wrote about Okja yesterday, but not in a right frame of mind. Here's a paragraph from my Letterboxd ramble that I figured I'd share here:
There is something very E.T. about this film to me. A central human-nonhuman relationship. Child-nonhuman. The folly and overreach of man. The idealism of children vs. the pragmatism of adults. Indifference and cruelty toward the suffering of the other. Organizing a resistance, albeit in pretty different ways. Both criticize corporate America, though it's much more subtle in E.T. than Okja. Okja is less family friendly than E.T., but I think middle school and up would be OK, maybe a bit younger for an intrepid 10 or 11 year old. Common Sense Media says it's not for kids, which just makes me want to have a kid to show them Okja. Anyway, I think Okja is the most E.T. film since E.T. back in '82. Can't believe nothing of that ilk has really been done and done well since. Unless I'm forgetting something. Tell me if I'm forgetting something.

Really, tell me if I'm forgetting something. Maybe you can add something to my watch list.

Huge Okja fan. It's by far Bong's most underrated. Was my #2 of 2017, which is really the first year I saw enough new releases to justify making a top ten list.

I didn't want this to get left behind on the previous page, so am bringing it forward. I haven't seen Okja, but your commentary on it has me intrigued. :)

etdoesgood

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4092 on: January 22, 2020, 12:50:07 AM »
Are you on Letterboxd? This is what I wrote there:
https://boxd.it/XiJN5
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ses

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4093 on: January 22, 2020, 10:08:14 AM »
Heart and Souls



Sigh. How simple this movie is, yet rather unique too. There is a natural flow of story, character and dialogue that sits so well with me. I never got bored by staying far out ahead. Instead, I let it unfold in front of me and happily so. EXCEPT! There is a moment in here that is too traumatic for words, because no child should ever have to go through such an abrupt and complete loss. The little boy who plays the part really sells the sadness and it takes me a while to stop internally shaking from the scene. Alfre Woodard is great as always and reminds me that a marathon of her work would be very rewarding.

Thanks, smirnoff. I really loved it. If I didn't know that pixote recommended this film to you, I would have thought that Tremors brought it to your attention. Did you know that the people who wrote and directed Tremors did this movie too? :) Do you see any similarities in the two films?

I've seen this movie so many times, it is one of my Dad's favorites.  Your review made me want to watch it again because it's probably been 15 years since I've last seen it.
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1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4094 on: January 22, 2020, 12:27:36 PM »
Hey you three, what are your thoughts on Robert Downey Jr., watching this performance knowing what the next 25 years was going to bring?
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Sandy

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4095 on: January 23, 2020, 12:37:46 AM »
Are you on Letterboxd? This is what I wrote there:
https://boxd.it/XiJN5

Yes. Thanks for the link!

Sandy

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4096 on: January 23, 2020, 12:54:07 AM »
I've seen this movie so many times, it is one of my Dad's favorites.  Your review made me want to watch it again because it's probably been 15 years since I've last seen it.

Hi ses! I like your dad, just because of his appreciation for this movie. :)

Hey you three, what are your thoughts on Robert Downey Jr., watching this performance knowing what the next 25 years was going to bring?

Downey has always exuded a lot of talent/skill as an actor. Even though I missed this movie at the time, I do remember his Chaplin performance and was wowed. I was also curious about his smugness lying underneath his acting back then. I saw it in Heart and Souls as well. He knows he's good, but there's more to it. Now I see it as he knew he was getting away with a lot of self destructive behavior and was living on the knife's edge intentionally. Two years later in Home for the Holidays, his unravelling is pretty apparent.

We all watched the unraveling in real time, playing out on the news and in his losses and then comebacks. So I guess my answer to your question is, it is a bitter sweet thing to see Downey's acting as a young man. There are rough roads ahead of him, but a lot of summits as well.

How about you, 1SO?

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4097 on: January 23, 2020, 08:07:33 AM »
The Gentlemen (Guy Ritchie, 2020)

The be fair, my initial introduction to Guy Ritchie were films like RocknRolla and the Sherlock Holmes, which certainly brought about a sour taste in my mouth and prevented me from seeking out his much more notable films such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch. However, I was able to return to Ritchie’s work and find enjoyment out of his style, as his return with The Man from U.N.C.L.E. was a endless joyride of a film. He has been up and down since, but seeing U.N.C.L.E. certainly renewed my interested in him as a filmmaker, and opened the door for my giving him other chances to impress. As with most filmmakers, he will have his hits and misses, but what a shame it would be to miss his hits. So which is The Gentlemen, a hit or a miss?

Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey) was a genius from a poor American family who found his way to Oxford on scholarship, only to use his smarts and resources to build a weed empire in England, a racket he proudly runs years later. But he is ready to enjoyment retirement and start a family with his wife Rosalind (Michelle Dockery), and is looking for a potential buyer in fellow American businessman Matthew (Jeremy Strong). But when oddball Fletcher (Hugh Grant) approaches Pearson’s right hand man Ray (Charlie Hunnam) with a business proposition, they must contend with a newcomer named Dry Eye (Henry Golding) and the coincidental involvement of boxing trainer Coach (Colin Farrell) to preserve the Pearson empire from the fellow gangsters looking to take him down.

What I believe I initially chalked up to poor style and use of violence in his more mediocre films, was in fact just poor stories, perhaps told with slightly heightened stylistic choices and violence which, as a result, rubbed me the wrong way. For when I have seen Ritchie’s films work, they really do work on the strength of said style and gangster violence. With The Gentlemen, that patented style returns and once again works beautifully. I believe a good story will always enhance all that surrounds it, and in this case, Ritchie’s script is smart and stylish as well, toeing the line between too meta for its own good, and meta enough to be wildly entertaining. The twists and turns of this tale really kept me fully engaged throughout, and thoroughly entertained.

But perhaps what brings everything together best is Ritchie’s filmmaking style, which pairs the aesthetic with a technical prowess which fits the gangster tale at its center. Well choreographed violence, paired with a slick soundtrack, perfect use of slow motion, and a rhythm in editing which heightens the cool we’ve come to expect from such a stylish director like Ritchie. We really see Ritchie in his full, confident self, in full command of the camera. The result is a very entertaining and cool film which works beautifully as a British gangster film.

The Gentlemen is not a game-changing film. It doesn’t set Ritchie, or any of its cast, on a new path, or on a new echelon. But it takes an existing genre with its own, very well-established tropes, and it executes them extremely well. Could the story have been a little more ambitious and different? Sure, the story may be somewhat well-trodden, but the cast is great across the board, most notably Hugh Grant and Colin Farrell, who are given plenty to have fun with. McConaughey and Hunnam, on the other hand, while good, are not given as much scenery to chew on. All in all, this is a movie I could easily recommend to fans of this type of movie, but it’s likely also not something I come back to, or particularly remember at the end of the year. It will certainly lead the “oh yea I remember that, it was good” pack. There are far worse things to be.

★★★ – Liked It
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1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4098 on: January 23, 2020, 05:43:22 PM »

We all watched the unraveling in real time, playing out on the news and in his losses and then comebacks. So I guess my answer to your question is, it is a bitter sweet thing to see Downey's acting as a young man. There are rough roads ahead of him, but a lot of summits as well.

How about you, 1SO?

I was curious because I had a similar situation with my recent rewatch of Freaky Friday w Lindsay Lohan. Different because she never fulfilled her movie star potential, but it’s something I never encounter with my classic movie stars. Even if I know they had troubles, I wasn’t around for them so I’m only seeing the legacy.

Your answer also reminded me of Downey in Two Girls and a Guy (1997). He has a scene where he looks at himself in a mirror and asks “what are you doing?” It fits within the movie, but you can’t help thinking you’re watching a troubled actor showing awareness while the camera is filming him.
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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #4099 on: January 23, 2020, 11:25:43 PM »
Two films on the flight to HK, Last Blackman in San Francisco...

I can say from moment to moment, I enjoyed it a lot but didn’t quite grab me in the end.  But I also took a short nap for about 10 to 15 mins as was up early.  It will deserve a revisit, I just don’t know when

Art of Self Defense...

So the excuse of taking a 10 min break may not hold up, did the same here but loved the film.  Had to go back to catch back up on what I missed.. best of the year so far or maybe near TOP of 2019. Though I still have lots to catch up on
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