Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 286134 times)

Sam the Cinema Snob

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 26348
  • "Anime is for jerks."
    • Creative Criticism
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6030 on: July 31, 2021, 07:53:24 AM »
That Green Knight is really good.
Probably seeing this this afternoon.
"It's all research." -roujin

FLYmeatwad

  • An Acronym
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 28677
  • I am trying to impress myself. I have yet to do it
    • Processed Grass
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6031 on: July 31, 2021, 08:18:50 AM »
That Green Knight is really good.
Probably seeing this this afternoon.

Have you read the poem before? We studied it as part of a course freshman or sophomore year, but id forgotten a lot outside of broad strokes. Went back after and TGK continues to rise in terms of adaptation to me. Itís done differently, but I think this might stand with Little Women in terms of modernizing an a work for film.

The theater I went to Iíve rarely seen as crowded as it was last night. I still had a full row to myself because people donít reserve companion seats even though Iíve never seen them be filled, but outside of Marvel and Star Wars, I think the last time I saw a smaller theater at this location this full was the Saturday early bird special for Filomena lol

Definitely try for the best seats and screen you can, visually beautiful. I was super disappointed the AMC Prime and Dolby Atmos theaters didnít have this and are showing Jungle Cruise on them instead.

Sam the Cinema Snob

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 26348
  • "Anime is for jerks."
    • Creative Criticism
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6032 on: July 31, 2021, 11:51:54 AM »
I have not read the poem.
"It's all research." -roujin

oldkid

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 18811
  • Hi there! Feed me worlds!
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6033 on: July 31, 2021, 05:42:45 PM »
I have not read the poem.

It's a great one.  I hope the adaptation is as good.  Admittedly, I have some pretty high expectations.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

oldkid

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 18811
  • Hi there! Feed me worlds!
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6034 on: July 31, 2021, 05:47:19 PM »
Fear Street -- Vol 1-3
Yes, these are three separate movies.  1SO gave an excellent brief rundown on all three.  Despite each having a different horror sub-genre they are all aiming toward, they work quite well as a whole, building to a perfect climax.  Nothing in this set of films are too deep, nor are they too complex, nor are they too clever.  But the way they all overlap, and the buildup of the characters keeps one watching, as well as the glorious exercise of a fast-paced genre work.  It was an entertaining six hours, and worthy of binging.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

Bondo

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 22500
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6035 on: July 31, 2021, 08:57:09 PM »
The Green Knight

As someone who did not like A Ghost Story at all, I guess I shouldn't be surprised that this largely didn't work for me. It is very atmospheric, by which I mean slow and boring. It is thin on plot and character, and to the degree stuff is meant as metaphor, it just seems very sloppy, so I take home no clear message. Guess I need to read that "the ending explained" piece I saw in the google results when I searched for the title.

Bondo

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 22500
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6036 on: August 01, 2021, 07:07:54 PM »
Scheme Birds

Didn't realize this was a documentary but this follows a young woman, Gemma, in a Scottish city in decline after Thatcher basically shut down the steel mill, which I'm sure could to some degree stand in for rust belt America (though this one takes place in the context of the National Health Service and more social welfare programs). Her and her friends exist in kind of an unmotivated, liminal space that mostly leaves them to drug use and fighting/criming. The scheme in the title basically refers to getting knocked up and accessing maternal benefits, or I guess getting locked up and having the state pay for you that way. All this taking place in the context of a country with a bigger government had me kind of pessimistic about the government's ability to engineer social change.

One thing it did call to mind was a recent point I've seen where a huge driver of economic inequality is the fact that people tend to get into relationships with people of similar socioeconomic status. All these college-educated high-earning professionals (frequently children of two high-earning professionals) just keep pairing up their wealth, meanwhile those on the margins are ending up with other people on the margins, as Gemma does here. But of course, you can't force cross-class relationships as a means of fighting inequality, and this function may be a more powerful driver of inequality than redistribution can be a driver of equality.

Anyway, that thought aside, I'd seen some people accuse this of poverty porn, but I don't actually find it a particularly miserable watch. If anything, it's a testament to how people kind of find a form of happiness no matter their position, and to a certain degree there is an external function of assuming misery from the disconnected outside viewer. It remains true that more money is correlated with greater happiness to a point, and it isn't an excuse to do nothing to fight poverty, just a message not to patronize people by erasing the moments of joy they can find even in an economically constrained life.

Suburban Birds

I was going for an S-Birds double feature but I didn't get into this at all and gave up.

smirnoff

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 25866
    • smirnoff's Top 100
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6037 on: August 01, 2021, 11:53:59 PM »
The Green Knight

As someone who did not like A Ghost Story at all, I guess I shouldn't be surprised that this largely didn't work for me. It is very atmospheric, by which I mean slow and boring. It is thin on plot and character, and to the degree stuff is meant as metaphor, it just seems very sloppy, so I take home no clear message. Guess I need to read that "the ending explained" piece I saw in the google results when I searched for the title.

Based on what you say, I feel I would dislike it in the way I disliked Annihilation.

Eric/E.T.

  • Elite Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3212
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6038 on: August 05, 2021, 12:14:04 AM »
I saw The Green Knight, and if it weren't for a more sentimental choice in In the Heights, which has gotten me through 2021 (7 watches and counting), at least so far, this would easily be the frontrunner for FOTY for me. It's also one I think I'll be able to rewatch over and over and get something more from it every time. I love Dev Patel, and he absolutely rocks it here. I'm going to check out more Lowery, though maybe it was a bad idea to following The Green Knight with Pete's Dragon, which was only somewhat redeemed by the final sequence.

Scheme Birds
Anyway, that thought aside, I'd seen some people accuse this of poverty porn, but I don't actually find it a particularly miserable watch. If anything, it's a testament to how people kind of find a form of happiness no matter their position, and to a certain degree there is an external function of assuming misery from the disconnected outside viewer. It remains true that more money is correlated with greater happiness to a point, and it isn't an excuse to do nothing to fight poverty, just a message not to patronize people by erasing the moments of joy they can find even in an economically constrained life.

I love this. I have seen enough joy in people who live in poverty that I know the dangers of making arguments around poverty too black and white. It's hard to have a nuanced discussion because it feels that when you admit people in poverty can find moments of happiness that you're understating the seriousness poverty plays in people's lives. The Florida Project is THE quintessential film for finding moments of happiness while being really quite deep in poverty. My issue with Scheme Birds is that I didn't really find many moments of redeeming happiness in this film. It was just bleak and sometimes very hard to watch, but not in a way that challenges. Well, that's my two cents on it at least.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2021, 12:17:46 AM by Eric/E.T. »
Just because a person has never walked in my shoes, that doesnít mean they canít gravitate to the art. - Mach-Hommy

A witty saying proves nothing. - Voltaire

Bondo

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 22500
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #6039 on: August 05, 2021, 12:34:11 AM »
Scheme Birds certainly plays things more on an even keel. I don't think it dives into great misery (keeping that largely off screen), nor the carefree moments of The Florida Project, but it is people kind of getting on with it through the tough moments. And I'd say I can't put my finger on a source of their misery in this...I don't think it speaks to systematic failures of Scottish capitalism or a too weak welfare state, though the documentary is framed as putting it on Thatcher for shutting down the steel mills...but like, industries come and go and it's good the coal mines in the north of England came on hard times because coal is horrid. I think it speaks to sticky cultural sources of poverty that keep people stuck in a way that is very hard to legislate out of. And in Scotland, unlike the US, this kind of poverty doesn't have much racial dynamic.