Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 148076 times)

Sandy

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 11657
  • You're not alone No matter what or who you've been
    • Sandy's Cinematic Musings
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1620 on: December 01, 2017, 12:11:08 AM »
 :)

This is what it's all about.

Now I know one of the films I'll be watching this month, from Dave's top 100 list.

MartinTeller

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 16918
  • martinteller.wordpress.com
    • my movie blog
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1621 on: December 01, 2017, 12:22:37 AM »
Shawshank Redemption

I believe in film perfection. It may not always last, it may not be every time, but every now and then you sit down and have a perfect experience.

That’s a nice sentiment but what does it have to do with Shawshank Redemption?  ;D
Switchboard
Watched 2020

Top 250  |  Great  |  Good  |  Fair  |  PoorCrap

1SO

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 33720
  • Marathon Man
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1622 on: December 01, 2017, 12:48:22 AM »
Shawshank Redemption

I believe in film perfection. It may not always last, it may not be every time, but every now and then you sit down and have a perfect experience.

That’s a nice sentiment but what does it have to do with Shawshank Redemption?  ;D
This.

There's greatness in Shawshank, but it's reputation makes as little sense to me as Donnie Darko's. That was the year of Forrest Gump, Pulp Fiction and Quiz Show. Gump and Pulp still get discussed often, but whenever I talk about Quiz Show I feel like Viserys crying out for his golden crown.
Must See  |  Should See  |  Good  |  Mixed  |  Bad  | The Worst

DarkeningHumour

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 10456
  • When not sure if sarcasm look at username.
    • Pretentiously Yours
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1623 on: December 01, 2017, 02:10:09 AM »
Shawshank Redemption

I believe in film perfection. It may not always last, it may not be every time, but every now and then you sit down and have a perfect experience.

That’s a nice sentiment but what does it have to do with Shawshank Redemption?  ;D
This.

There's greatness in Shawshank, but it's reputation makes as little sense to me as Donnie Darko's.

This.
« Society is dumb. Art is everything. » - Junior

https://pretensiouslyyours.wordpress.com/

pixote

  • Administrator
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 33691
  • Up with generosity!
    • yet more inanities!
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1624 on: December 01, 2017, 02:52:23 AM »
That's awesome, smirnoff.

pixote
Great  |  Near Great  |  Very Good  |  Good  |  Fair  |  Mixed  |  Middling  |  Bad

oldkid

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 18687
  • Hi there! Feed me worlds!
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1625 on: December 01, 2017, 03:46:03 AM »
Watching a film is a gamble.  You are gambling for that perfect experience that stirs the mind, the emotions and the soul.  Sometimes you're satisfied with a good ride.  Often you get less than that.  But we are aiming for the big win.  We take chances at boring ourselves to tears, and God knows that we've experienced that.  But when we sit down and it lines up perfect, that's what it's all about.

Glad you won with Shawshank. For me it was a good ride, not the perfect film, but it's wonderful that this is the film that stirred your soul, smirnoff.  No one can take it away from you.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

pixote

  • Administrator
  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 33691
  • Up with generosity!
    • yet more inanities!
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1626 on: December 01, 2017, 03:52:57 AM »
smirnoff crawled through a river of shit and found catharsis in the rain.

pixote
Great  |  Near Great  |  Very Good  |  Good  |  Fair  |  Mixed  |  Middling  |  Bad

DarkeningHumour

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 10456
  • When not sure if sarcasm look at username.
    • Pretentiously Yours
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1627 on: December 01, 2017, 04:23:05 AM »
Wait, was this the first time 'noff watched it? Surely not?...
« Society is dumb. Art is everything. » - Junior

https://pretensiouslyyours.wordpress.com/

DarkeningHumour

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 10456
  • When not sure if sarcasm look at username.
    • Pretentiously Yours
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1628 on: December 01, 2017, 08:07:15 AM »
I am going to start a dump of reviews of the movies I saw at the theatre these last months. I've been procrastinating way too much.

Only the Brave
Joseph Kosinsky (2017)

I thought I was walking into Thank You for Your Service. That's what happens when your dumb country translates movie titles. As a movie it is serviceable but as a tribute to these people it is a worthwhile endeavour. The ending is powerful, despite the rest of the movie's flaws. When I realised it was a true story, I started wishing I knew more about all the members of the crew. Teller and Brolin are basically the only fleshed out characters.

6/10

Good Times
Safdie Brothers (2017)


A deeply unpleasant movie that has you spend its entire running time with unsavoury individuals. In a way it is a case study of how crime can be born out of sheer stupidity. The cinematography is unsettling and made me want to hurl something at the screen.

5/10

Winter River
Taylor Sheridan (2017)


A crime drama that has little to go for it except for star power. The investigation is not that compelling, and there is one egregious scene that serves no purpose and is in utter bad taste. There is something to be said for the photography. I must never have watched a movie this white because I never before noticed how dirty the theatre's screens are.

6.5/10

Breathe
Andy Serkis (2017)


Another true story that was at best competent. The movie chooses to embrace such a wide span of time it has no recourse but to ceaselessly jump ahead, sometimes years, sacrificing most of its effect. There is only one moment I would call affecting, which is galling in a movie about crippling disease. The best bit was seen its subject's son's name appear in the credits beneath the title of Executive Producer. Not many people get to so honour their fathers.

6/10

What Happened to Monday?
Tommy Wirkola (2017)


I am convinced the sole impetus for this movie was someone watching Armie Hammer in The Social Network and think « Huh, I should do that, but like, times four. ». I usually defend the notion that all premises have worth and all that matters is the execution, but here I am going to have to say the premise itself is idiotic. The whole story is idiotic, from start to finish ; the writing, ridiculous. The only thing that kept me going was how far and how dark the story was willing to go - it goes really far, and really dark. I thought this was going to be another moronic YA dystopian narrative, but no child should watch this movie.

The hell happened to Glenn Close?

5/10

Victoria & Abdul
Stephen Frears (2017)


The second movie of the year to mishandle the British occupation of India. Frears clearly wanted to make a feelgood movie but he way he glosses over the many problematic questions the story bifurcates in unfortunate. Little to no criticism of Britain is made. No one ever expresses concerns about showing favouritism to the Muslim side of a country that would likely be in civil war if not for the occupation. The movie is altogether too positive on both leads. It is worse than Philomena's refusal to criticise the Church. Everyone else in the movie is a caricature.

Eddie Izzard is a treasure.

6/10

Murder in the Orient Express
Kenneth Branagh (2017)

This interpretation subtracts from Christie's story by adding. Now Poirot has a past, a love story gone awry, which serves no purpose at all, but hey, and let's not forget the action scenes, because of course. The plot pays the price for all of it and Christie's clockwork of a mystery, that delicate, elegant succession of events is torn to shreds. Poirot jumps to conclusions that he summons out of thin air, deduction becomes divination, he is seemingly gifted with preternatural knowledge. The ending, the theatrical denouement to any good crime drama is a pathetic thing, because the movie has destroy any opportunity for deductions and revelations, and all that is left is a telling, and even that is not very well written.

This movie has one of the best casts of the year and it woefully underuses it. The characters are left with nothing to do. It rivals Skull Island in that Regard. We don't get enough Daisy Ridley in our lives to squander her so.

6/10

L'Avenir
Mia Hansen-Love (2016)


There was an Isabelle Huppert retrospective and someone had told me this rivalled Elle for Huppert's performance, so I went. That person is a madman. The story is intrinsically less interesting to me, but I don't think there can be discussion Huppert is superior in Elle, however good one might find her here. The story is about a middle-aged teacher whose life suffers an upheaval and I don't care much about it all. I wish they'd spent more time discussing philosophy and less time taking care of the damn cat.

6/10

The Only Living Boy in New York
Marc Webb (2017)


If you're going to title your movie Only Living Boy, you had better make sure you pull through on your lead. Or at least, when you realise you have ended up with a bland white privileged millennial who is enjoying his generation's perceived prerogative of not doing anything with himself, change the title.

There are interesting things in the building blocks of the plot here but the movie's ultimate failing is its inability to make any of its characters compelling. I fully wanted to smack the main character around multiple times for being either spineless or a walking cliché utterly unable of self-awareness.

Kate Beckinsale is always a pleasure, but her character is ill-imagined. She deserved at least better reasons to find herself in her entanglements.

6/10

The Big Sick
Michael Showalter (2017)

As I work my way down this list of disappointments, The Big Sick makes me hope. This was a true joy to watch. There is little the movie does not succeed at. It is a strong comedy with real character arcs and emotional depth. It is not a rehash of overused formulas and invigorates the romcom genre with something new and appetising. There are so many very good scenes, from the flirting to Nanjiani's bonding with his girlfriend's parents. I particularly appreciated the intelligence of the third arc, where the story recognises its two leads are necessarily in different places after having experienced the same event in different ways. Nothing is cookie cutter or meant to be.

The actors are all good, especially Holly Hunter. I will watch out for Zoe Kazan in the future and try to find Nanjiani's stand up somewhere.

8/10

Brad's Status
Mike White (2017)


This could almost be a Baumbach movie. Ben Stiller crystallises what it means to have a midlife crisis better than most other instances I have seen. He also crystallises what it means to think like a WASPy fellow from my parent's generation. His egotism is so infuriating, the most satisfying scene of the movie is when a college student calls him out on his bullshit - no projection there. Somehow, the movie still managed to make me freak out about my life choices and where I am going. It definitely made me happy to not be headed towards non-profit work and idealistic pursuits.

There is a lot of truth in the movie. Another example is in how Stiller pictures his friends' lives as paradises to later learn there is much that is rotten in the country of Denmark.

7/10

The Other Side of Hope
Aki Kaurismaki (2017)


A timely movie that provides welcome empathy to the refugee dilemma. It is my first Kaurismaki and I found his sense of humour delightful. I could have used much more of it however, as he only uses it during the restaurant portion of this dual story, reverting to a much sombre, serious tone for the refugee side (probably with good reason).

7/10

American Made
Doug Liman

Yet another true story. I wish they had done more with it because it is an incredible tale. It covers too much ground and moves too fast. As a result, the nature of the going on becomes unclear, except in their general lines. It is reasonably entertaining but never quite delivers on the scope it deals with. Cruise is charming.

6/10

Logan Lucky
Steven Soderbergh (2017)


That blasted Soderbergh pulled the rug from under my feet with his self-aware Ocean's 7/11 joke. I can say little beyond that. It is a hillbilly version of the classic, with an emotional heart that missed the mark for me and a heist that was more confusing and less well executed (cinematically). The performances are a pleasure though, especially Joe Bang and Adam Driver.

6.5/10

Hitman's Bodyguard
Patrick Hughes (2017)


There we are. Hughes broke Samuel L. Jackson. He's made him cross the self-parody line so far there's no point in having him curse anymore.

(Don't ask me how, I don't remember.)

There is some chemistry between the two leads that leads to moments of fun but the writing is too poor to sustain it. The story is a boring rehash and nothing about the general execution is very exciting. At most it is an acceptable silly romp.

6/10

A couple more coming.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 05:01:10 AM by DarkeningHumour »
« Society is dumb. Art is everything. » - Junior

https://pretensiouslyyours.wordpress.com/

Corndog

  • Objectively Awesome
  • ******
  • Posts: 16746
  • Oo-da-lolly, Oo-da-lolly, golly what a day!
    • Corndog Chats
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #1629 on: December 01, 2017, 08:17:03 AM »
The Disaster Artist (James Franco, 2017)

I think starting this review of The Disaster Artist with anything other than a disclaimer would be a disservice to both the film and its source material. Disclaimer: I have never seen The Room, the film whose production this film is based. I don't think this is a handicap for my enjoyment of James Franco's latest film, The Disaster Artist however. Could I have enjoyed the film more had I see The Room first? Perhaps. But regardless, without having seen it, I was still able to enjoy the film a great deal, and am here to tell people do not fear if you too have failed to see the supposed "worst film ever made", there is plenty in James Franco's direction and performance to enjoy all by themselves. The Disaster Artist, film about the worst film ever made, is in fact one of the best films of 2017. Imagine that.

Greg Sestero (Dave Franco) is a young man in Northern California dreaming of a career in Hollywood and acting. When at an actor's workshop, he meets the inimitable Tommy Wiseau (James Franco), whose acting style is passionate if not over-the-top. Tommy is a middle aged bachelor who reveals he has an apartment in Los Angeles, encouraging the two burgeoning actors to make the journey to the acting mecca in an attempt to make it big. Once there, however, the two struggle to find work, with rejections coming left and right. With Tommy's never ending budget, the two decide to make and star in their own movie, written and directed by Tommy. The result is something nobody in Hollywood has seen, but rather than be embarrassed by the result, they embrace the film they have made, and the success it finds despite it being not quite what they had intended.

While I had never seen The Room, prior to seeing this film, I knew of it. I knew why it was famous. Perhaps having these small nuggets in the back of my mind helped, but I'd like to think James Franco's film speaks for itself. In an odd way it becomes less a movie making fun of these men and their misdirected dreams of stardom, and more about what it means to live your dream, and to make art. The film't title can be gleaned to discover just what Franco may be getting at. He views Tommy Wiseau not as a great failure, despite the "disastrous" result of his film, which was penned to be a great drama, but turned out to be a hilarious film which audiences enjoying laughing at, but rather Franco views Wiseau as an inspiration, a testament to chasing your dreams.

Whatever the film may have resulted in, Wiseau made a movie, starred in it with his friend (Greg), and released it. He accomplished something, regardless of the result. The phrase, "the journey is the destination" is thrown around a lot, and is actually one of my favorites, but here it rings very true. But what sets The Disaster Artist apart from other movies about the process is its heart. Franco humanizes these characters to the point that their struggles, their longings, despite the hilariousness of their process, are emotionally moving in some very odd and very real way. Wiseau is a troubled character with a mysterious past, one which we never learn about, but Franco's performance of this enigmatic mad genius is both poignant and outrageously funny, a balancing act which is very hard to strike, yet Franco pulls it off quite well here.

I'm not sure I have laughed as much, or as hard, in the theater all year as I did with The Disaster Artist. What James Franco has put together here with this film is a fitting love letter to the man that brought us the laughing stock of a movie The Room. While audiences may willingly laugh at the film instead of with it, and may laugh at Wiseau instead of with him, this mysterious man has embraced his fame and his accomplishment (because that is what it is, an accomplishment). James Franco sees this, and has captured the love, passion, and humor of one of the most interesting subjects in modern film history. Why is The Room successful? That is hard to say, especially having never seen it. But I can say that making people laugh is no easy task, something both Wiseau and Franco have accomplished with their respective films.

***1/2 - Great
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."

 

love