Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 52946 times)

Bondo

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 20249
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2950 on: January 12, 2019, 06:09:57 PM »
Blindspotting (2018)

The king is dead. Long live the king. Fiilmspot fever coming at me for keeps.

Daveed Diggs naturally has capital built up from Hamilton. This film, co-written by stars Diggs and Rafael Casal, will never manage the cultural influence of Hamilton...not many things have or will, but it isn't less important. It cuts right to the bone on so many of the most urgent problems of our society including the effect of gentrification and racial bias in policing, and society more broadly.

The most amazing thing is it is labeled a comedy...and it isn't entirely lying. It has a lot of buddy comedy traces amid some really heavy shit. Those moments of lightness soften the blow so maybe it doesn't hit as hard emotionally as A Star Is Born did yesterday, but it left me in awe all the same. My new new top film of 2018.

philip918

  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4244
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2951 on: January 12, 2019, 06:35:31 PM »
Blindspotting (2018)
The most amazing thing is it is labeled a comedy...and it isn't entirely lying. It has a lot of buddy comedy traces amid some really heavy shit. Those moments of lightness soften the blow so maybe it doesn't hit as hard emotionally as A Star Is Born did yesterday, but it left me in awe all the same.

I think that's the film's greatest feat: managing those drastic swings from humor to horror or terror. The scene with the gun for example. I liked this from the start, but it's another film that's really stuck with me and has been moving up my favorite's list.
"If God gives you lemons find a new God."

jdc

  • Godfather
  • ******
  • Posts: 6252
  • Accept the mystery
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2952 on: January 12, 2019, 07:15:37 PM »
Blindspotting (2018)

The king is dead. Long live the king. Fiilmspot fever coming at me for keeps.

Daveed Diggs naturally has capital built up from Hamilton. This film, co-written by stars Diggs and Rafael Casal, will never manage the cultural influence of Hamilton...not many things have or will, but it isn't less important. It cuts right to the bone on so many of the most urgent problems of our society including the effect of gentrification and racial bias in policing, and society more broadly.

The most amazing thing is it is labeled a comedy...and it isn't entirely lying. It has a lot of buddy comedy traces amid some really heavy shit. Those moments of lightness soften the blow so maybe it doesn't hit as hard emotionally as A Star Is Born did yesterday, but it left me in awe all the same. My new new top film of 2018.

Wow, two in a row where Iím in agreement with Bondo. I am struggling to have this or A Star is Born as my 2018 fav
"Beer. Now there's a temporary solution."  Homer S.
ďThe direct use of physical force is so poor a solution to the problem of limited resources that it is commonly employed only by small children and great nationsĒ - David Friedman

ProperCharlie

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 258
  • Am I right sir? Ithangyou.
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2953 on: January 13, 2019, 05:56:35 AM »
Hello folks,

Thought I'd have another go at this.

Bridge of Spies (2015)
Tom Hanks is Tom Hanks the Good Lawyer in a Spielberg-branded Cold War. A 1960s world in which nuclear threat is casually dismissed and nuclear families are the prize for which heroes strive. The very best thing about this is Mark Rylance, and the character he's portraying. There is a depth in him out of place in a film preoccupied with the surface interactions of a deeply complex time. This is well-made and well-intentioned, but clumsy not delicate; cosy, not gritty.

Back to the Future Part III (1990)
An increasingly customised DeLorean enables Robert Zemeckis to explore the genres of his childhood. This suffers from all the problems of mainstream Hollywood sequels. It has the same cookie-cutter plot as the previous two films. Whether you like this one more that the previous films has to do with the bells, whistles and stylistic flourishes this one comes adorned with. Yes, it is fun. It does nothing wrong. Itís a production line product that fulfils its function. If you grew up with it, you might have an affection for it. This is the peanut M&Ms of film.

Star Trek Into Darkness (2013) - Rewatch
Captain Kirk breaks rules, someone shouts KHAN, Spock consults himself regarding continuity of the Star Trek canon. A perfectly fine and fun sequel that suffers from a bad case of meta-redux-remixus in which a film universe fails to expand further. This causes a shower of knowingness, deja-vu and ennui particles that, according to the second law of cinedynamics, will inevitably cause* the post-modern heat-death of the film industry. Great if you like watching attractive young people (and Simon Pegg) in tailored uniforms rebelling against their corrupt elders and boomers.

*not a split infinitive, but the next best thing.

Birdman (2014)
Being a Superhero isnít enough for Michael Keaton. He wants to be an actor as well. If only he didnít have that cameraman following him everywhere. Somehow an emotional resolution is achieved in this film, but how itís reached is not entirely clear. A melange of exclusion, anger, dissociation and vulnerability meanders along the backstage corridors of an actorís mind like so much toothpaste that will never go back in the tube. This mess of rawness yields something too slight to pick apart. It would be easy to dismiss if it wasnít so well shot, directed and performed.

Max victime du quinquina (1911) aka Max Takes Tonics
From an era when men wore hats to bed and gendarmes carried swords, Max Linder lacks vim which only a prescription error can restore. Proper slapstick that understands thereís little funnier than a drunk being carried home over a policemanís shoulder. With a cast employed largely on the degree to which they can make their eyes bulge, Max Linder is a natural in front of and behind the camera. Transitioning the music hall gags seamlessly to the screen, he exudes charm as he proceeds to infuriate the great and good of Paris.

Blow Out (1981)
Brian De Palma is little too faithful to his sources and John Lithgow enjoys his job a little too much in a Philly col bleu-noir. Stylish, grubby, naive and completely lacking the Bernard Hermann score it needed, the best performance in this is the owl in Wissahickon Valley Park. I canít help but enjoy any scene of technicians silently demonstrating their craft, and this film is stuffed with them. These small pleasures can only cover so many flaws, as Blow Out leaves the aftertaste of ready-meals rather good home cooking. Keenly anticipated, but mostly disappointing.

Talk Radio (1988)
Eric Bogosian is determined to win an Abyss-staring competition in his own stageplay. The pacing is breathtaking. Each incoming call drags the tension to darker and darker places. The tautness of a stellar gig from a performer whoís sold his soul to the devil for one night only, itís play-listed to despicable perfection. The lead strips to his unclothed essence in a windowed booth, reflected faces staring at him behind every pane of glass, each silently judging the enormity of his misanthropy. Then the lights go up, the credits roll and an incongruous Penguin Cafe Orchestra track clears the venue. You all got your grubby moneyís worth.

All the Presidentís Men (1976) - Rewatch
Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford construct an architecturally intricate and precariously delicate tower of facts while under heavy-fire. The only film to have paid premiums to insure the crew against paper cuts, thereís newspapers, red-margined typing paper, receipts, cheques, notepads casually slung in back-pockets and through the darts of jackets. For the papyrophile this is the holy grail; the truth is revealed entirely from and in paper form. The pleasure is in the painstaking craft of the characters regardless of the importance of the story. But then it just ends
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 10:07:58 AM by ProperCharlie »

MartinTeller

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 15973
  • martinteller.wordpress.com
    • my movie blog
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2954 on: January 13, 2019, 09:12:17 AM »
That's a nice batch of well-written mini-reviews, PC.

ProperCharlie

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 258
  • Am I right sir? Ithangyou.
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2955 on: January 13, 2019, 10:05:22 AM »
That's a nice batch of well-written mini-reviews, PC.

Thank you  :)

I'm aiming to continue with the reviews (also on my letterboxd page), and put up a weekly collection here.

1SO

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 30225
  • Marathon Man
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2956 on: January 13, 2019, 09:43:08 PM »
Young Dr. Kildare  (Harold S. Bucquet, MGM, 1938) ó starring Lew Ayres and Lionel Barrymore

pixote
Curious how far you got into this series of 15 films? I'm halfway right now, about to watch the final Kildare title before the focus switches to Dr. Gillespie (Barrymore). Barrymore is the best thing about the series in front of the camera, but I imagine there will be a dip in quality from changes behind the scenes. I like the series, though there are no outstanding episodes I can see myself watching again some day.
Average Rating: ★ ★ ★ - Okay



Tragedy Girls
(2017)
★ ★
Horror Satire about two teen killers covering their rampage for Internet acclaim. There are moments where it comes really close, such as when they capture another serial killer (Kevin Durand) hoping for a mentor only to find to their disappointment that he's working without a plan. Would like to have seen a female director bring out the friendship more and I'll happily watch something else by this writer or director. Also Brianna Hildebrand (Negasonic Teenage Warhead from Deadpool) has got the makings of a movie star.



1SO

  • FAB
  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 30225
  • Marathon Man
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2957 on: January 13, 2019, 09:47:47 PM »
The love for Blindspotting is spreading. Love it.

Talk Radio (1988)
Eric Bogosian is determined to win an Abyss-staring competition in his own stageplay. The pacing is breathtaking. Each incoming call drags the tension to darker and darker places. The tautness of a stellar gig from a performer whoís sold his soul to the devil for one night only, itís play-listed to despicable perfection. The lead strips to his unclothed essence in a windowed booth, reflected faces staring at him behind every pane of glass, each silently judging the enormity of his misanthropy. Then the lights go up, the credits roll and an incongruous Penguin Cafe Orchestra track clears the venue. You all got your grubby moneyís worth.
What did you think of the middle flashbacks between the two broadcasts? This used to be a Top 100 film for me, but on the most recent watch that section, where the writing is noticeably weaker and it's all the same points pounded in with less subtlety, hurt my overall opinion. The broadcasts themselves are a perfect synthesis of Bogosian's words and Stone's visual flash.

ProperCharlie

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 258
  • Am I right sir? Ithangyou.
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2958 on: January 14, 2019, 12:02:17 AM »
What did you think of the middle flashbacks between the two broadcasts? This used to be a Top 100 film for me, but on the most recent watch that section, where the writing is noticeably weaker and it's all the same points pounded in with less subtlety, hurt my overall opinion. The broadcasts themselves are a perfect synthesis of Bogosian's words and Stone's visual flash.

Like you, I didn't like it as much, but to me it felt like the downtime between the support and the finale.  You needed a break, and the roadies needed to change the set and to plant the seeds regarding his past, his personality and Ellen.  In terms of pacing it was necessary and it worked, but it was definitely a star and a half inferior in quality when compared to the on-air scenes.  As for his hair...

Bondo

  • Objectively Awesome
  • *****
  • Posts: 20249
Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #2959 on: January 14, 2019, 07:47:39 AM »
Took in a Men Suck double feature yesterday:

Mary, Queen of Scots

There's a certain brand of historical drama that brings light to the way women pulled levers of power behind the scenes even though they were in essence deemed powerless by society. This one is slightly inverse in that the film's two most powerful characters, at least by title, are Elizabeth and Mary, Queens of England and Scotland respectively. While they are definitely the leads, the film is very concerned by how the male characters (and every other character of influence is male) scheme. The reason this isn't a true inverse to the stories where the women work behind the scenes is that they share the common factor of patriarchy. While the reigns of kings may not be free of intrigue, there are specific ways that these two Queens are reined in by a society that never takes the idea of female leadership to heart. The film doesn't attempt to act as a metaphor for the 2016 election, but one can see certain ways this hasn't changed in the nearly 500 years since these events. End of the day, a fair but hardly overwhelming historical drama.

B-

On The Basis of Sex

The cult of the Notorious RBG is strong, shown by the success of the RBG documentary and now timely release of a biopic. The documentary only hit lightly upon her legal work leading up to appointment to the Supreme Court so this story that illustrates her struggle against sex discrimination, both personally and as a legal focus, is a welcome expansion, spanning her enrollment at Harvard Law through some 15 years until her major breakthrough as a civil rights advocate. It has many of the weaknesses of the biopic genre, but does highlight some interesting strategic questions about when and how to push effectively for change.

B-