Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 77643 times)

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3100 on: February 09, 2019, 10:35:30 PM »
Am I softening on movies in general, or Disney in particular?
A question to be answered as this rolls on. I thought the most annoying part were the three hunters with guns. Musker and Clements go full kiddie cartoon there.


The Princess and the Frog was pretty enjoyable in most respects. I liked most of the songs ("Dig a Little Deeper" was annoying, and to a lesser degree so was "Friends on the Other Side"), there were some terrific psychedelic flourishes in the animation,
It's one of the best looking cell animated films, something you can attribute to Disney's blank check when it comes to animation, but it's too bad they didn't keep this branch of the company. Curious if you're referring to some other psychedelic flourish, because the two I'm thinking of are during those two songs? Maybe the way the animation style changes for "Almost There"?

There was even a touching -- and unexpected -- moment.
Is this about Ray the firefly? That's another character I expected to annoy you.


My only major complaint is that the movie tries too hard to cram in EVERY LOUISIANA TROPE IN THE BOOK. Gumbo! Jazz! Mardi Gras! Zydeco! Bayou! Beignets! Jambalaya! We get it, y'all are super duper New Orleans-y.
My work takes me to New Orleans a couple of times a year and even my wife complains that the city isn't THIS much. I took it as when you're going to make one, and probably only one, film in that city, you might as well pack it all in.
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Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3101 on: February 09, 2019, 10:49:36 PM »
I still haven't seen The Princess and the Frog. Maybe I should.

MartinTeller

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3102 on: February 09, 2019, 10:49:43 PM »
I thought the most annoying part were the three hunters with guns. Musker and Clements go full kiddie cartoon there.

Yep, worst part of the movie for sure.

Curious if you're referring to some other psychedelic flourish, because the two I'm thinking of are during those two songs?

Those two songs are exactly what I was referring to. Didn't like the music, but the visuals were stunning.

There was even a touching -- and unexpected -- moment.
Is this about Ray the firefly? That's another character I expected to annoy you.

Yep. I would have expected him to annoy me too, but I quite liked him.

My work takes me to New Orleans a couple of times a year and even my wife complains that the city isn't THIS much.

I've never been there but of course it isn't. It seems to me that this kind of overdoing the scene-setting is something I expect from Disney (and Pixar) though for the life of me I can't think of other examples at the moment.
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ProperCharlie

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3103 on: February 10, 2019, 06:23:11 AM »
Iíve had flu this week which has meant even more films watched and an extra-long omnibus Sunday post. 

A Matter of Life and Death (1946) - Rewatch
David Niven is unflappable in the face of Nazis, death and nationalistic rivalries. At its core a story of love flowering under duress in clipped language of radio etiquette, The Archers take it in the most breath-taking directions. The camera lingers on massed ranks of the dead as the most ornately rhetorical court case in cinematic history fizzes before them. They all look so alive. Despite the mandated play to soften the hearts of Americans, this has such audacity itís impossible not to love it.

Megamind (2010) - Rewatch
An evil genius attempts to insert a puppet leader for a large population when the previous incumbent is vanquished. For a role-reversal animation that toys with the conventional archetypes of hero and villain, this ends up being a throw-back to the screaming and helpless damsel-in-distress era. It lacks much of the charm of serials and comics yet it does have wit. It is competently constructed and contains the requisite city-destroying thrills. Ultimately doesnít stand out in a crowded field.

Die Angst des Tormanns beim Elfmeter (1972) aka The Goalieís Anxiety at the Penalty Kick
Wim Wenders ponders the awareness of goalkeepers. In a slow 1970s tour of the eastern borders of West Germany, the film struggles with the motivations of a goalkeeper when the only rules he cares about are inconsistently enforced. The uneasiness that malingers throughout make this compelling and disturbing viewing. The claim is made that paying attention to what heís been doing might give you a headache and blurred vision. If so, the film is worth the price of admission.

Abducted in Plain Sight (2017)
Skye Borgman creepily re-enacts the abduction of a 12 year old girl by a paedophile with psychopathy through Instagram filters. Itís a troubling approach to documenting the decision-making that lay behind the trauma of many of those involved. Almost accidentally this exposes the scale of the naivety and gullibility of American families raised in absolute safety and easy trust. Their vulnerability to a charming salesmen illustrates how such a population can be induced to support malice and corruption.

Bullet to Beijing (1995)
Harry Palmer is older, wiser and in urgent need of cash. He will stoop to anything, including making a TV movie. A sad decline for one of my favourite actor/role combinations. This suffers from all the major flaws of a 1990s TV movie. Bad acting, bad writing and bad haircuts. The soundtrack seems to have been automatically generated using Tandy 1000 randomly selecting themes from 1980s TV movies. Thereís nothing of Len Deightonís imagination or wit in this effort.



Stalag 17 (1953) - Rewatch
William Holden has a miserable Christmas in the mud. Otto Premingerís charming camp commandant stays chipper despite the mud threatening his highly polished boots and several sheds stuffed full of sergeants all of whom can crack wiser than the last. Dry humour in wet conditions, both of which enhance the essential tragedy of their situation. Billy Wilderís writing and direction is certainly versatile. He loves down-trodden men laid low, and hereís a camp stuffed full of them.

12 Years a Slave (2013)
Steve McQueen shows us the truth, and it does hurt. Horror upon torture upon rape upon murder. One abominable act only leads to worse later, often casually encountered and smartly dressed. The perversity of the idyllic landscapes populated by a hatred so deep and reflexively defensive has rarely been rendered so clearly. Our eyes and minds are not spared. The performances, and directing have been rightly lauded, but a moment for the cinematography and production design. Beautiful is exactly the wrong word.

The Night Caller (1965) aka Blood Beast from Outer Space
John Saxon only makes bad decisions in a sleazy take on a Quatermass scenario. Despite its essential cheapness, the quality of the acting and dialogue constantly surprises. Especially in some of the smaller roles notably Warren Mitchell, Marianne Stone, Aubrey Morris and Ballard Berkeleyís moustache. Also refreshing is the willingness to kill off any character who isnít John Saxon. Even the directing and cinematography exceed what might be expected for a plot that is a teenage boyís private masturbatory fantasy.

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
Ryan Gosling broods in inclement weather. Variations on a theme by Ridley Scott. Now there are fewer vehicles in Los Angeles, is all that smog generated entirely from the toxic masculinity? This suffers from the need to hit all the right notes from the original (although not necessarily in the right order). Itís subtly and slowly done, and less overt than some other recent remakes. More than countering the negatives are the mood, design and magnificent cinematography. Only Hans Zimmer lets the side down.



Carry on Constable (1960) - Rewatch
While the male members of the Carry On team get to round up all the usual entendres, the female supporting cast seem to take this one more seriously than might be expected. Rarely for a Carry On, there are as many female comedians in this as there are male, and they arenít all Shirley Eaton having her bathroom privacy invaded. Top marks to Joan Hickson for her drunk and Sid James, both for reigning it in a bit, and the sweet kiss with Hattie Jacques at the end. Compulsory Hawtrey cross-dressing as per.

White Zombie (1932)
A Madeline gets lost in a Proustian moment. While the pacing of this is glacial, like many of the early horrors, this has many interesting and innovative touches. The diagonal wipes, the composition and framing, and the mirroring between the set architecture and the lead actressís costume all intrigue. Proper Haitian zombies, Bela Lugosiís dimple curtains, a pre-code Madge Bellamy in her scanties and a cliff-edge zombie conga add to the appeal. Itís still bloody slow though.

The Fall (2006)
Tarseem Singh paints, as a broken stuntman perverts a child with language. Itís a toothsome, curious orange of a film. The awe of the opening sequence never leaves, but is joined by itís five friends beauty, bruising, decay, deviance and sorrow. Itís an ornate filigreed cage carved from a single piece of celluloid bone containing a grieving heart at its centre. Mister pharmacist wonít prescribe you this for your pains, but it might be what you need. No one is saying ĎAs you wishí in this.

En duva satt pŚ en gren och funderade pŚ tillvaron (2014) aka A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence
Roy Andersson is the Prince of Beige and Disconnection. He uses the flattest colour palate in film to signal despair. Everyone in his films is adrift and floundering whether they know it or not. They send up hopeful signals to make contact with others, but are thwarted by their own need to preserve their precious isolation. Life has lost its flavour and smell and not even Karl XII and his 100,000 men can bring them back. An ordeal of absurdism and the horror of unwritten conventions.

The Medusa Touch (1978) - Rewatch
Richard Burton is literally out of his mind. The manifesto of this film is strikingly modern. Terrorism writ large. Weaponised misanthropy flinging planes into buildings, blowing-up religious gatherings and threatening nuclear installations. The 70s dressing of psychical-researches, space missions and the terror of electronic waveforms are unwisely underplayed in favour of conventional drama and talking in rooms. Barring the well-set up destruction of a national landmark this is not cinematic in any way.




« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 06:28:08 AM by ProperCharlie »

Thief

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3104 on: February 10, 2019, 05:20:45 PM »
Am I softening on movies in general, or Disney in particular? The Princess and the Frog was pretty enjoyable in most respects. I liked most of the songs ("Dig a Little Deeper" was annoying, and to a lesser degree so was "Friends on the Other Side"), there were some terrific psychedelic flourishes in the animation, characters and performances were sufficiently charming. If a bit slight and predictable, the story was engaging enough. There was even a touching -- and unexpected -- moment. My only major complaint is that the movie tries too hard to cram in EVERY LOUISIANA TROPE IN THE BOOK. Gumbo! Jazz! Mardi Gras! Zydeco! Bayou! Beignets! Jambalaya! We get it, y'all are super duper New Orleans-y. Rating: Good/Very Good (80)

EDIT: forgot to mention, that scene with the frog hunters was completely unnecessary and added little

I still haven't seen this one, but I remember critics and audiences in general being mostly in favor of it.

Jeff Schroeck

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3105 on: February 10, 2019, 05:39:39 PM »
Am I softening on movies in general, or Disney in particular?

Your brain might be preparing itself to handle the children's programming it'll be bombarded with in the coming years.

1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3106 on: February 10, 2019, 11:27:38 PM »
High Flying Bird (2019)
★ ★ ★ - Good
Soderbergh's 4th(?) feature since his retirement is also his best, a return to his early simplicity. It's a bit like Bubble, but also something like Sex, Lies and Videotape. In other words, it's Steven Soderbergh in his comfort zone. At first the pages of dialogue and insider talk had me worried, but like a heavy accent my ear tuned to its frequency and I found myself enjoying a lot of the talks. I'm sure I'll get a lot more out on a rewatch, especially now that I know the secrets the characters keep hidden for longer than most films would dare.

I've seen 30 by Soderbergh. This one's in the top 10.
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Thief

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3107 on: February 11, 2019, 07:40:32 AM »

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
Ryan Gosling broods in inclement weather. Variations on a theme by Ridley Scott. Now there are fewer vehicles in Los Angeles, is all that smog generated entirely from the toxic masculinity? This suffers from the need to hit all the right notes from the original (although not necessarily in the right order). Itís subtly and slowly done, and less overt than some other recent remakes. More than countering the negatives are the mood, design and magnificent cinematography. Only Hans Zimmer lets the side down.




This is one I feel like I need to rewatch. I mean, I think it had all the ingredients to be great, and yet it didn't quite stick with me. I felt it didn't leave a mark.

ProperCharlie

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3108 on: February 11, 2019, 11:22:46 AM »

This is one I feel like I need to rewatch. I mean, I think it had all the ingredients to be great, and yet it didn't quite stick with me. I felt it didn't leave a mark.

It's long enough to have a severely trimmed Director's Cut in a few years that maybe might make it zing a bit.  They could add in an omnipresent Ryan Gosling voice over or something...

I enjoyed wallowing in the Blade Runner world again.  It was faithful to the original.  Perhaps overly so.  It felt like an act of worship but one I was happy to nod along with while sitting in a rear pew and admiring the architecture.

tinyholidays

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3109 on: February 11, 2019, 01:29:49 PM »

A Matter of Life and Death (1946) - Rewatch
David Niven is unflappable in the face of Nazis, death and nationalistic rivalries. At its core a story of love flowering under duress in clipped language of radio etiquette, The Archers take it in the most breath-taking directions. The camera lingers on massed ranks of the dead as the most ornately rhetorical court case in cinematic history fizzes before them. They all look so alive. Despite the mandated play to soften the hearts of Americans, this has such audacity itís impossible not to love it.


In my top 10. So joyful, it feels like a Christmas-time movie, even though it's not.

My favorite from this past week was Personal Shopper. It's not a long or complicated story, but its themes lingered in my head. A film-lover's film. Can the camera see more than we can understand? Do we trust ourselves more than we trust a screen? A g-g-g-ghost movie without being a horror movie. (The main character says she hates horror movies.) Seems intended as a conversational companion to The Double Life of Veronique.