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Author Topic: Respond to the last movie you watched  (Read 530356 times)

oldkid

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3370 on: March 22, 2019, 12:00:20 AM »
I forgot all about Joy.  I meant to catch up with it and then it dropped off my radar.  I have a lot of respect for Russell, and while I donít like everything heís done, his films are always interesting.  Even his missteps are interesting.
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MartinTeller

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3371 on: March 22, 2019, 12:03:55 AM »
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh - I would write more about this, but I just spent the last three hours trying to get an inexplicably inconsolable baby to get to sleep so now I have to dash this off and get to sleep myself (oh god please don't wake up and start crying again please please please). I was really taken with this, I loved the casual absurdity and variety of delightful characters and the way the film ties itself to the stories' literary roots. Stuff that might have seemed too clever was pulled off due to the easygoing whimsy. Very enjoyable indeed. TTFN. Rating: Very Good (84)

oldkid

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3372 on: March 22, 2019, 12:12:14 AM »
I am a huge Disney Winnie the Pooh fan, since childhood.  But I strongly prefer watching the shorts as opposed to the feature film.  The differences in the shorts are too noticeable, side by side and they feel more like different films in this presentation than if I watched the shorts one after another. 
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Thief

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3373 on: March 23, 2019, 07:29:11 PM »
Re: First Reformed, count me in as someone else who didn't really pick up the Taxi Driver parallels at first. As obvious as they seem when you discuss it, I really didn't catch it first, and it's not necessary. Like oldkid said, despite the similarities, there is enough in it to make it unique. Anyway, I really, really liked this film a lot and thought it definitely deserved more recognition.

Here is a link to my Letterboxd review, in case anyone wants to read it.

First Reformed
« Last Edit: March 23, 2019, 07:30:49 PM by Thief »

smirnoff

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3374 on: March 23, 2019, 10:33:23 PM »
Supercop (Stanley Tong, 1992)         6/10

Not one of Jackie Chan's best. It's to much plot, too many moving pieces, too many characters. And the action has too many guns for a Chan film. There are a handful of good sequences, but they have great big lulls between them. This one does not hold up, unlike it's sequel Police Story 4 (aka Jackie Chan's First Strike, or just First Strike), which has continued to deliver the goods each time I come back to it. It's his best film imo.


Adaptation. (Spike Jonze, 2002)         9/10

Hilarious. Nic Cage as Charlie Kaufman... I can't imagine anyone else in this role. I think I enjoy most when he's ranting about what he doesn't want the film to be. "Or cramming in sex, or car chases, or guns. Or characters learning profound life lessons. Or characters growing or characters changing or characters learning to like each other or characters overcoming obstacles to succeed in the end. Y'know? Movie shit." Which of course all ends up happening. What a mad film. It's so well told.

ps. 1SO do you know why Curtis Hanson was cast to play Susan Orlean's husband in this? It's so random. You seem to know these things though.


About Schmidt (Alexander Payne, 2002)         5/10

Eh, there are a few moments, but really it's just not my kind of cringe comedy. It was unenjoyable the way Up In The Air was when I revisited it recently. The highlight was when Nicholson wrote in his letter to Ndugu about how he hated the way his wife would get the cars keys out way before they were anywhere near the car. Such a blah experience though overall.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2019, 10:54:48 PM by smirnoff »

ProperCharlie

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3375 on: March 24, 2019, 03:23:55 AM »
Iíve had a relatively slow film-watching week owing to lots of work, illness and a large march.  Despite that I did get to see some well above average films in what time I had.

Fanny och Alexander (1982) aka Fanny and Alexander
Bergman explores the plasticity and impressionability of young minds. To have this amount of control over a tale and its telling, youíd have to be someone like Bergman at the end of his career. It unfurls its themes slowly over the course of a Christmas party, a funeral, a wedding. A boy and his sister adrift in the world of adults where Jews and Christians different approaches to life clash, families heal after loss and what exactly may be real is as fluid as an unset jelly. Long but so nourishing of heart and mind.

Song of the Sea (2014) - Rewatch
Fairies live in the artwork of Tomm Moore. The Irish Miyazaki. Drawing a tale from Celtic mythology and bringing it heart-rendingly to life with such beautiful, filigreed, sinuous artwork takes a love that most of us donít have. The arc that defines the shape of seals and their owlish nemeses, the curve of the fatherís nose, the round helmet of the dogís fur, is inherently melancholy. A teardrop and a stained glass window into the soul. By the end we have such a clear view into the nature of love itís almost too much to bear.

Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)
The legend of Rome is tested by three American women. A post-war fairytale about finding and winning a prince. More about Italy than it is about the three romantic stories that lie at its heart, itís perhaps a tourist advertisement rather than a romance. The rest of the film is tepid and drab for such a colourful palate. Jean Negulesco cares more about what he can see through his viewfinder than he does about the plot or his characters, both of which get juggled to suit the filmís planned length.

Never Been Kissed (1999)
A cutting indictment of the trials of a female journalist in the 1990s. Where to begin? Adults posing as kids to infiltrate a high school. Teacher-student romance. An office of male newspaper staff watching what a female colleague does via a camera attached to her as part of her job. Itís troubling to say the least. Whose mind did this spring from? Everything else is recycled or off-the-peg. Classroom embarrassment. High school film ends with a prom. Will he or wonít he? As appealing as a plastic knife and fork at the bottom of the cutlery drawer.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)
Not even the first version of Stevensonís story, in which top hats and scientific glassware replace the devil in the Faust legend. This all about effects and acting, notably make-up and transformation effects to turn Dr. Jekyll into the malevolent and desirous Dr. Hyde. And creepy they are, especially the one at the end when heís menaced by the supernatural version of his darker self while in bed. John Barrymore has fun rolling his eyes in lust at any young dancer who might chance across his gaze.




The High Sign (1921)
Buster Keaton gets jobs as both bodyguard and assassin. The second half of this certainly contains much of the physical slapstick Keaton is famed for. The conceit of a house filled with trapdoors, false walls and trick pictures, filmed in cross-section allows him to run jump and shut villain's heads in doors to outrageous effect. However, the first half of this consists of tongue-in-cheek sight gags, that arenít slapsticky. The story is thin, incidental to the jokes. A lesser Keaton effort thatís overpacked with half-hearted chuckles.

Ingenium (2018)
Another film, another time travel theory. This one isnít even consistent. The best thing about this is the conceit that only women have the superpowers and theyíre subjected to a regime tantamount to how hysteria was treated prior to the 19th century, in this case by a wannabe science Nazi. Itís a theme tragically underexplored in favour of chase and action and conspiracy. The soundtrack is terrible and annoying. It tries to look good, but no imagery stands out in any way. More than underwhelming.

Carnival of Souls (1962)
The closest the film industry gets to outsider art. A group of men who make safety and instructional films for industrial plant, see an abandoned Mormon fun palace (yes, thatís right) and decide itís ideal to shoot their first and only theatrical work. And itís amazing. The cinematography is astonishingly crisp and mesmeric in its quality, the cast of unknowns arenít perfect actors, but the unworldliness of their stilted words works. The organ-based soundtrack hangs heavy over it all. This is truly a one-off wonder.

Shorts of the Week

煙り草物語 (1926) aka A Story of Tobacco
Silly woman! A pompous old fart tries and fails to mansplain the history of tobacco to a flirtatious young woman who knows what the score is. A mix of animation and live action that feels well in advance of what I thought was possible in 1926. This may be the first time someone acted against an animated character who wasnít there in real life. And itís delightful. Heís odious and incompetent, sheís just trying to read a book, but is always in emasculating control, even at gunpoint. Hoping the other three minutes are found one day.

Doll Clothes (1975)
Cindy Sherman starts as she means to go on, a photographer and film-maker commenting on the objectifying properties of a camera lens when pointed at a woman. In this case, the woman is herself and sheís photographed herself as a paper, dress-up doll. A simple short, with clarity of purpose and vision. Subversive, personal and outspoken. Disguise and exposure, external manipulation and self-definition fight with each other, concluding with one of the most inventive credit sequences in a short film.

Gus Visser and His Singing Duck (1925)
A man and his duck herald a new era of film with a quack. Incongruous. Avant-Garde. Silly. This is test footage made by Theodore Case as he sought to improve his method for recording sound-on-film and thus the inventing the talkie. Two years prior to the Jazz Singer was released in theatres, Gus Visserís vaudeville act was recorded to demonstrate the concept along with other variety acts of the day. Despite its importance, this is lovably foolish footage of a dying genre of performance recorded on the next big thing.




« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 05:00:46 AM by ProperCharlie »

jdc

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3376 on: March 24, 2019, 03:34:19 AM »
Iíve had a relatively slow film-watching week owing to lots of work, illness and a large march.  Despite that I did get to see some well above average films in what time I had.


Staggers my mind that you start with this followed by 8 film reviews and 3 shorts.  What do you do when you are at your peak?
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ProperCharlie

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3377 on: March 24, 2019, 04:58:48 AM »
Iíve had a relatively slow film-watching week owing to lots of work, illness and a large march.  Despite that I did get to see some well above average films in what time I had.


Staggers my mind that you start with this followed by 8 film reviews and 3 shorts.  What do you do when you are at your peak?

Currently I'm watching about 15-20 shorts and maybe 8 or 9 feature-length films during a week.  It's more that I've watched only about 10 shorts this week and I watched nothing at all yesterday. 

Perhaps it's more that I'm feeling the gaps in my schedule rather than being apparent in the quantity of reviews...
« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 05:04:39 AM by ProperCharlie »

NedMeier

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3378 on: March 24, 2019, 07:08:11 AM »
Iíve had a relatively slow film-watching week owing to lots of work, illness and a large march.  Despite that I did get to see some well above average films in what time I had.


Staggers my mind that you start with this followed by 8 film reviews and 3 shorts.  What do you do when you are at your peak?

Currently I'm watching about 15-20 shorts and maybe 8 or 9 feature-length films during a week.  It's more that I've watched only about 10 shorts this week and I watched nothing at all yesterday. 

Perhaps it's more that I'm feeling the gaps in my schedule rather than being apparent in the quantity of reviews...

Where are you watching these? Do you have a streaming service? Or large DVD collection? Iím especially interested in the shorts.
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1SO

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Re: Respond to the last movie you watched
« Reply #3379 on: March 24, 2019, 08:15:02 AM »
No idea about Curtis Hanson, who struck me as an unusual choice too.