Author Topic: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome  (Read 236 times)

pixote

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#666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« on: February 02, 2018, 06:53:26 PM »


1983 had De Palma's "Scarface," "Eddie Murphy in "Trading Places" (and "Delirious"!), four Tom Cruise movies and the final film in the original "Star Wars" trilogy, but for their Top 5 of '83, Adam and Josh look to auteurs from here and abroad - and Wally World, of course. Plus, a Blindspotting review of David Cronenberg's prescient techno-horror film, starring a sleazy James Woods along with Blondie's Debbie Harry. And stick around for "Bar-Hopping with Adam: Tampa Bay Edition" in the post-credits 'Hot Mics' segment.

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Keil S.

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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2018, 04:37:16 PM »
I admittedly didn't hear the entire episode yet, but I tried to scan through their Top 5 and Honorable Mentions and was disappointed that I heard neither WarGames nor Bad Boys (with Sean Penn) mentioned.
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jdc

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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2018, 06:17:52 PM »
WarGames was mentioned. If I remember, Adam named his Top 5 movie of the year as if he made the Top 5 list in 1983 and it was War Games. I don't think Bad Boys was mentioned, sort of a cult film of the time, not sure how well it held up. Maybe it got lost due to the success of the later films that used the same name
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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2018, 12:13:51 PM »
WarGames was mentioned. If I remember, Adam named his Top 5 movie of the year as if he made the Top 5 list in 1983 and it was War Games. I don't think Bad Boys was mentioned, sort of a cult film of the time, not sure how well it held up. Maybe it got lost due to the success of the later films that used the same name
Indeed, WarGames was top 5 of '83 in '83. Bad Boys probably top 10-12 on same list.
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Keil S.

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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2018, 10:15:44 PM »
Further proof that I should bother listening to the entire podcast before commenting.  Sorry -- you can blame my intense appreciation for WarGames.

On a related note, at last glance, my Top 5 of 1983 was:

1) The Right Stuff
2) WarGames
3) The King of Comedy
4) Local Hero
5) Bad Boys
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Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2018, 04:27:23 AM »
I did like that you mentioned High Road to China, possibly the worst movie of the 1983 (well from Hollywood anyway). What a disappointment that film was. Selleck was very popular and I had recently read the book, by Jon Cleary, it was based on, l had lots of hope and excitement to see the movie. Well lets just say I would not be the first person to be bitterly disappointed in a book adaption.

Lorien2001

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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2018, 12:07:03 PM »
Josh, you remembering Testament is not strange at all.  It was a little, Very Big Deal at the time.  Janet Maslin http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9D0DE2D91739F937A35752C1A965948260 and Roger Ebert https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/testament-1983 gave it very high marks.  It had been produced for PBS, but was considered good enough for a light theatrical run, which was very limited, also eclipsed by the TV movie The Day After, broadcast later the same month.  They were tied together in stories though, and Jane Alexander was up for Best Actress with Shirley MacLaine, Meryl Streep, Debra Winger and Julie Walters.  It was the best movie you couldn't see, if you weren't in a top market, until PBS finally ran it, in '84, I believe.  PBS repeated things at the time, which may explain why you caught it more than once.

It had a cast of memorable faces too.  Aside from Ms. Alexander, the uncannily specific William Devane was in it; Roxana Zal, who was an easily recognizable face from television through the 80's; Ross Harris, the avid reader of Nun's Life in Airplane; and Lukas Haas, a bit before Witness; and some other familiar faces.

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Josh

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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2018, 01:50:22 PM »
Josh, you remembering Testament is not strange at all.  It was a little, Very Big Deal at the time.  Janet Maslin http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9D0DE2D91739F937A35752C1A965948260 and Roger Ebert https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/testament-1983 gave it very high marks.  It had been produced for PBS, but was considered good enough for a light theatrical run, which was very limited, also eclipsed by the TV movie The Day After, broadcast later the same month.  They were tied together in stories though, and Jane Alexander was up for Best Actress with Shirley MacLaine, Meryl Streep, Debra Winger and Julie Walters.  It was the best movie you couldn't see, if you weren't in a top market, until PBS finally ran it, in '84, I believe.  PBS repeated things at the time, which may explain why you caught it more than once.

That's very likely how I saw it (the PBS rerun). Whatever was going on at the the time that lead to the production of both of these made 10-year-old me feel like a nuclear attack was not that far-fetched.

Lorien2001

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Re: #666: Top 5 Films of 1983 / Videodrome
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2018, 03:19:31 PM »
That's very likely how I saw it (the PBS rerun).


It's definitely how I saw it.  It made less of an immediate impact than The Day After, but more of it stuck with me, images of lone bicycling, the silences...  I remember the mother/daughter conversation about what being with a man is like - not just the fact of it, but the dialogue itself, and what it meant that they were having it.  It would be the closest the daughter got to that part of life, and they both knew it.  That's having seen it only once, and that as a pretty young teenager.


Whatever was going on at the the time that lead to the production of both of these made 10-year-old me feel like a nuclear attack was not that far-fetched.

10-year-old you was not far off.  It's easy to forget that living vibe.  It came back to me when I caught a replay of the 1984 Presidential Debate on defense and foreign policy, not because of how Reagan presented, but how Mondale also spoke, so seriously, about this reality.  There weren't so much sides on the issue of whether a nuclear conflict was a genuine possibility, rather on how to handle it.  Seeing this again, for the first time as an adult, reminded me of how appropriate it was for that feeling to occasionally be palpable.

(It starts around 55 minutes in, the scary stuff)


« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 03:57:03 PM by Lorien2001 »