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Author Topic: Top 100: oldkid  (Read 10117 times)

oldkid

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #190 on: April 17, 2020, 03:55:03 PM »
Hellzapoppin' (1941)

I gotta admit, Hellzapoppin' is a weird one for my list.  It is the only one I gave only a 4/5 while all the other ones I gave at least a 4.5/5.  It's because it doesn't always work.  I love the weird, upside-down nature, mess of a comedy.  The absolute absurdity of it all, without meaning, often without cocerance.  You don't know what they are going to throw at you next.  But the "plot" of the film is a terrible trope, just awful.  But because they dismiss that easily, I don't consider the narrative the core of the film.  If I did, I wouldn't put it on my list.  Rather, I believe that the comedy duo were trying to subvert expectations and I feel that they did that quite well, while still being funny.

I can't really argue with the faults you find in the film.  They are there, no question.  But I think it is more than that, something rare, as well.  I want people to see this film so that they can appreciate it with me.  Sorry that you didn't see the film I saw. :)
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

Antares

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #191 on: April 17, 2020, 03:59:59 PM »
I can't really argue with the faults you find in the film.  They are there, no question.  But I think it is more than that, something rare, as well.  I want people to see this film so that they can appreciate it with me.  Sorry that you didn't see the film I saw. :)

It's worth watching just for the Lindy Hop segment. That was amazing!
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oldkid

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #192 on: April 17, 2020, 04:06:05 PM »
I can't really argue with the faults you find in the film.  They are there, no question.  But I think it is more than that, something rare, as well.  I want people to see this film so that they can appreciate it with me.  Sorry that you didn't see the film I saw. :)

It's worth watching just for the Lindy Hop segment. That was amazing!

Have to remember this one when we are released from our various lock downs:
https://youtu.be/qkthxBsIeGQ
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

Sandy

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #193 on: April 17, 2020, 11:25:20 PM »
That dance number is insane!

It has to be one of the best things I've seen in a musical.



Hellzapoppin'



“Who has any interest in prolonging this confusion? I don't know. Let's not try to know. Let's leave things as they are.”
―  The Bald Soprano


At the intersection of Vaudeville and Theatre of the Absurd comes this collision of slapstick, puns, deadpan, parody, tom foolery... all piled on top of each other, with drollery debris scattered everywhere. The plot is whatever, cause it doesn't care and the point is that there is no point. For those who converge at this juncture, "Abandon all [logic], ye who enter here."

colonel_mexico

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #194 on: April 18, 2020, 05:05:34 PM »
A CANTERBURY TALE (1944) - It is hard for me to describe what this film is, its spiritual but not religious, its very insightful without being didactic, and its a comedy but also a mystery.  I thought initially this was going to be a war film taking some sort of stance on the deprivations of war, instead the war is simply the background of a small group of pilgrims who are on their way to Canterbury.  The mystery of the glue man is a binding of our characters as they are waylaid together on the ancient road to Canterbury not really looking for miracles, by finding them anyway.  The comedic parts may have struck me as funny, when they are actually the sad reality that those young boys of that era would face a generation hence in WWII.  The execution reminded me of something out of a Wes Anderson film, and I really liked the two young generals enlisted to help find the glue man.  The American sergeant touched a few spots and reminded me a bit of my grandfather, also an Army sergeant who spent a number of years abroad and found my grandmother across the pond (though in Germany instead of England).  There is a shot of an expression on his face in the Canterbury Cathedral and he thinks of his family building a church in the 1800s and says that was also not a "bad job" that evokes a humility, as he experiences that spiritual connection that pilgrims 600 years before him were seeking.  I think there are some who consider miracles to be mere coincidences, but I am not one of them, I've had too many experiences that say otherwise (including the past just over 6 years of my own sobriety and my forever changed life).  What a very touching and inspiring film, especially during a time when a little hope on a hard journey can be very useful.  Thank you for sharing oldkid.
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colonel_mexico

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #195 on: April 20, 2020, 02:57:24 PM »
SANJURO (1962) - I have only seen Kurosawa's RASHOMON, but he again hits all the right notes with a very different, but insanely great samurai film.  Toshiro Mifune, also from RASHOMON, plays what appears to be a no-good ronin, who is trying to extort some food and a bit of money out of a "noble" group of buffoons.  The buffoons are caught in a Machiavellian sort of political chess game that I am not sure is ever really clearly articulated, except that there are some corrupt samurai out looking to take down the good samurai.  Mifune is an incredible actor, his appearance is deceptive and he's almost comical in the way he speaks, but as the story unfolds you can tell he's highly intelligent and is wise enough to know when he needs to be taught.  The relationship he has with the Chamberlain's wife is extremely interesting, as if she opens up a doorway he never really understood until the end.  A sheathed sword is sort of his fate, even though nothing about his past or present are anything close to being sheathed.  My history is not good on feudal Japan, but I do know that post-WWII films often spoke about Japan's past in ways that discussed the loss of an old way of life and the birth of a new way of thinking.  The honorable samurai code was long gone, but often used to justify modern battle at the expense of such good and important life.  This is almost an anti-war/anti-violence film.  And I hoped for a battle between the main bad guy and Mifune, which is over in an instant (sort of like the battles between Tarantino's Bride and Vernita Green or the Bride and Bill that were briefly mentioned, but never occurred), much to my dismay.  But there are plenty of sword fights to be had, though Mifune does do his best to minimize the carnage.  The buffoons likely did not learn much, but the final scene was very touching.  Loved every minute of this.
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Antares

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #196 on: April 20, 2020, 04:40:05 PM »
SANJURO (1962) - I have only seen Kurosawa's RASHOMON, but he again hits all the right notes with a very different, but insanely great samurai film.

Oh you really need to watch Seven Samurai and Yojimbo.
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colonel_mexico

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #197 on: April 20, 2020, 04:46:05 PM »
Yeah I figured, I will definitely get to them soon!  I'm really excited about those!
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Antares

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #198 on: April 20, 2020, 04:49:19 PM »
Yeah I figured, I will definitely get to them soon!  I'm really excited about those!

Seeing as you just watched Sanjuro, I'd recommend Yojimbo next, it's kind of considered a pre-quel. Then you'll be ready for Kurosawa's best samurai film.
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oldkid

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Re: Top 100: oldkid
« Reply #199 on: April 22, 2020, 04:45:01 PM »
A CANTERBURY TALE (1944) - It is hard for me to describe what this film is, its spiritual but not religious, its very insightful without being didactic, and its a comedy but also a mystery.  I thought initially this was going to be a war film taking some sort of stance on the deprivations of war, instead the war is simply the background of a small group of pilgrims who are on their way to Canterbury.  The mystery of the glue man is a binding of our characters as they are waylaid together on the ancient road to Canterbury not really looking for miracles, by finding them anyway.  The comedic parts may have struck me as funny, when they are actually the sad reality that those young boys of that era would face a generation hence in WWII.  The execution reminded me of something out of a Wes Anderson film, and I really liked the two young generals enlisted to help find the glue man.  The American sergeant touched a few spots and reminded me a bit of my grandfather, also an Army sergeant who spent a number of years abroad and found my grandmother across the pond (though in Germany instead of England).  There is a shot of an expression on his face in the Canterbury Cathedral and he thinks of his family building a church in the 1800s and says that was also not a "bad job" that evokes a humility, as he experiences that spiritual connection that pilgrims 600 years before him were seeking.  I think there are some who consider miracles to be mere coincidences, but I am not one of them, I've had too many experiences that say otherwise (including the past just over 6 years of my own sobriety and my forever changed life).  What a very touching and inspiring film, especially during a time when a little hope on a hard journey can be very useful.  Thank you for sharing oldkid.

This was my fourth? Powell and Pressburger film I saw and I knew by this point that you couldn't trust them to stick to a genre or to stay within movie tropes.  Halfway through this film, I still had no idea where it was going or who the main protagonists were!  I guess I really like films that subvert my expectations.  I actually need to watch this one again, because I can't remember right now exactly what I really enjoyed about the film beside it being unpredictable and being ineffably spiritual.

Glad you enjoyed it, Colonel.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky