Author Topic: Top 100 Club: Sandy  (Read 20876 times)

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #300 on: July 01, 2021, 03:59:15 PM »
Cute! It sounds like she saw it in real time!  There's something about a new film as a teenager, whether it holds up later on or not. Movies like Footloose, Pretty in Pink, Back to the Future, Taps... seeped into my DNA right then and there. It's as much of a memory of that time, as it is the actual film.

And maybe that's where my (admittedly weird) "too period-specific" comment comes from. That was my round-about way of saying, If you aren't aware of those times and even that specific song, it's going to seem a lot more cheesy than if you'd lived around that time, especially if you were a kid. On a personal level, movies were important to me growing up, but I had a taste that I think compared to a lot of people here would be considered unusual. Cruel Intentions and Election were high school movies I liked quite a bit, which are probably on the upper end of quality in terms of what I was watching, and I enjoyed them in large part because they helped express some of my angst about suburban life (I moved to the suburbs between ages 15-18 and HATED IT); also, they were quite racy. I wonder how teenagers now would view them. I just saw Plan B, and that makes Cruel Intentions seem like, well...To Sir, With Love? lol

:D

Yeah, we're all dated, given enough time. One of the many things I love about movies is the time capsule aspect to them. Dropping into a completely unfamiliar time and place and spending a few hours there, makes for an expanding experience.

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #301 on: July 01, 2021, 04:08:24 PM »
Re: Another Year

I imagine there is thematic intention behind Tom's profession being geology, Gerry psychology, and the film itself being titled Another Year. Tom, Gerry and the film itself are all dealing with mere glimpses of a larger story. Tom study's the past, Gerry tries to encourage positive changes in the future, and the film observes the change in phase from one to the other.

I feel the film is honest about what could actually happen in such a span of time as this. This is the pace of life. It's taken half of Mary's life to reach this point, and it may take the other half to come back out of it. This film, even given a years time, doesn't tell that story, but only shows a few small waypoints. Core samples we have to draw lines between and extrapolate theories from. Interactions which we hope might affect the characters' trajectories positively, but with too narrow a view of the timeline to actually perceive it.

In that context I'm not sure there's enough information here to determine the impotence of Gerry during a particular counselling session, for example. Or to say perhaps whether Tom and Gerry are enablers. The real impotence may be in expecting or thinking this glacier could move any faster, or slower, or left or right. Not that large and rapid change isn't possible, but I think what the film touches on is that there's only so much people can contribute to bring change about. I see Tom and Gerry as trying to create those circumstance for their friends, but also being conscious of the natural limitations. And not beating themselves up over not being able to do more, or when something doesn't happen sooner. Their time spent in their community garden is not merely an peaceful escape for them, it is also a manifestation of this principle and perhaps why they seem so content. They can prepare the ground, and create shade, and fertilize and water, but that is kind of the human limit for effecting change. In the end a tomato can only grow so quickly if it happens to grow at all.

This is lovely, smirnoff. So nice to read your insights. They make me appreciate the movie all the more. Past, present, future. Reaping and Sowing. Taking responsibility for what is yours and letting go of what is not. Giving where you can. This is life. <3

smirnoff

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #302 on: July 07, 2021, 05:59:42 AM »
It's an enduring film, and I'm always so curious to see what people say about it. It was a delight to read your and E.T's perspectives and see you both diving in deeply. It gave me a good reason (or excuse) to spend time thinking about the film again. So thanks! :)



Funny Girl

A person can jump into a lake and loudly protest how cold it is. Three minutes later he's yelling to his friends on shore "it's really nice, jump in!". And he's not lying... after the initial shock it is, typically, really nice.

Musicals, I believe, are of a similar nature. A genre one becomes acclimated to. Just don't wait too long between viewings, or you'll have to go through the "shock" phase all over again. As I did with this film. For me this was a viewing about acceptance more than understanding. I would be well served, I think, to repeat the experience.

And a rewatch is not an unpleasant thought at all. For whatever reason I kept thinking of Barry Lyndon. Nicky Arnstein seemed very much to possess the same characteristics.

Quote
“Barry was one of those born clever enough at gaining a fortune, but incapable of keeping one, for the qualities and energies which lead a man to achieve the first are often the very cause of his ruin in the latter case.”

In Funny Girl the story, among other things, explores what it like if you happen to be in love with such a person. I do love these long character arcs. I find it heartening to see one's good qualities, after a long span of difficult times, come to reward them in the end (or in reverse with villains). That's putting it in more of a black and white manner than I mean, but basically this. Charles Dickens is the best I've read for this sort of thing. Funny Girl seems to possess a much weight in this regard as any other film... and if one connects with it I can imagine the impact. Awesome stuff.

A small side note: these are quite some sets and shots.

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #303 on: July 09, 2021, 06:06:32 PM »
It's an enduring film, and I'm always so curious to see what people say about it. It was a delight to read your and E.T's perspectives and see you both diving in deeply. It gave me a good reason (or excuse) to spend time thinking about the film again. So thanks! :)

:)

Mike Leigh tends to bring out the big discussions, doesn't he? He's all quiet agitator, infiltrating our psyches.

Quote
Funny Girl

A person can jump into a lake and loudly protest how cold it is. Three minutes later he's yelling to his friends on shore "it's really nice, jump in!". And he's not lying... after the initial shock it is, typically, really nice.

Musicals, I believe, are of a similar nature. A genre one becomes acclimated to. Just don't wait too long between viewings, or you'll have to go through the "shock" phase all over again. As I did with this film. For me this was a viewing about acceptance more than understanding. I would be well served, I think, to repeat the experience.

And a rewatch is not an unpleasant thought at all. For whatever reason I kept thinking of Barry Lyndon. Nicky Arnstein seemed very much to possess the same characteristics.

Quote
“Barry was one of those born clever enough at gaining a fortune, but incapable of keeping one, for the qualities and energies which lead a man to achieve the first are often the very cause of his ruin in the latter case.”

In Funny Girl the story, among other things, explores what it like if you happen to be in love with such a person. I do love these long character arcs. I find it heartening to see one's good qualities, after a long span of difficult times, come to reward them in the end (or in reverse with villains). That's putting it in more of a black and white manner than I mean, but basically this. Charles Dickens is the best I've read for this sort of thing. Funny Girl seems to possess a much weight in this regard as any other film... and if one connects with it I can imagine the impact. Awesome stuff.

A small side note: these are quite some sets and shots.

Talk about "delight to read"! This review is all generosity. :)

You could have said, "Sheesh, this musical is long." or "What a downer." But instead, you meet it more than half way. You appreciate what it is doing and even warm up to it. I love the Nicky/Barry comparison and the Dickensian "long arch" nod.  mmmmm. I totally love finding connecting points like that. It feels like mapping to me. (That may not make a lick of sense, but just know I appreciate those call outs.)

You tipped your hand though with the words, "and if one connects with it I can imagine the impact." :)) Hahaha! Or, as Data would say, "(discussing a chocolate sundae) Although I do not speak from personal experience, I have seen it have a profound psychological impact.”

So yes, even though it didn't connect with you in a big way, it does (and did) have a big impact on me. There are many of my top 100 that come from my early adolescence. Soundtracks like West Side Story, The Wiz and definitely Funny Girl played often in my little room. Big story emotions to help with my teenager emotions. Good therapy. :)

I'm so glad you found awesomeness in the movie!

Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #304 on: August 01, 2021, 07:16:37 AM »
Continuing my catch up, this will not so much be a review as a stream of notes

Moulin Rouge (2001 Baz Luhrmann)

A nice change to the production company credit

Dark and musical. Now we have a flashback which is the movie (??).

Craziness and mania, with a different colour palette it could almost be a Jeunet film. Can McGregor really sing????

Joy is on the screen, with famous songs referenced in the songs and dialogue

Kylie as the Green Fairy, keeping her with little acting required, a good thing

Such colour and spectacle

Nirvana, which I know annoys people being used in such a film, but it works for me.

It becomes a pop song melody

Moving at a blistering pace, but not a lot of story, but so much happening. Nicole Kidman arrives, and we have a love triangle set up with a voice over.

I do not think I have seen Kidman better.

I am really like the use of pop song melodies and they have been really well blended.

Ewan is very good

This opening meeting is on the level of a Busby Berkley

Oh consumption, not a good thing to get. Apparently it is not consumption, but something equally nasty

Great double meaning dialogue

Kidman is going a little too much over the top. Her face can express, makes a nice change from more recent performances.

Nice use of sound to express disappointment

Jim Broadbent working very well

I almost did not recognise Richard Roxburgh as the Duke

Ewan has a childishness to his performance

I am really enjoying the song use in this

Why did Luhrmann do this as a flash back? I would have preferred it as a straight up story.

About half way through I moved to finish watching this on the projector, so stopped writing notes as I was watching.

I love the first half of the movie, I was ready to put this into my top 100 (which it may end up in at some point). The last hour dropped the ball a bit. I am not sure what it was, but I found I was not as captivated by the last hour.

Rating: 83 / 100