Author Topic: Top 100 Club: Sandy  (Read 6015 times)

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2018, 10:37:36 PM »
Yes Taps is a great movie (and an ugly cry one).

Aw Dave, you validate my emotionally driven choice. :)

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I need to do a count of those of yours I have seen, but I will try to get to at least one of:

Jane Eyre
Upstream Colour
Short Term 12

You have a common theme in those films. All three have strong women, breaking free from trauma.

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2018, 10:40:58 PM »
I'd like to prioritize How Green Was My Valley and All that Heaven Allows this month.

Black and white gorgeousness vs. technicolor gorgeousness. Which will wow you more? :)

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2018, 10:43:32 PM »
The goodness of Sandy probably goes against the grain of what I normally watch though I see a few films in here that I love and are also in my top films. But I am likely to have a hard time finding the time and access to watch something I haven't seen this month. I will be moving across the country shortly (about 15KM) and starting a new job in a couple of weeks. So I may choose something I have seen and haven't watched since it came out. I am looking at you, Amadeus, since I have the Blu-ray still sealed on my shelf from when I bought is 4 or 5 years ago

Congrats on your new job! And congrats on finally unwrapping the Blu-ray. I wish my copy of Amadeus was so nice. :)

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2018, 10:47:19 PM »
I am down to Penelope and Becoming Jane and I don't know which one has the better chance with me. I might secretly watch both and only report back on the one I liked most. Of course now if I post a mostly negative review you'll wonder how much I hated the other film.

:D How about if you watch them both, I get to read both reviews. Scathing or no, I want to know what you think!

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As for a Top 100 recommendation, I will 2nd PA's choice of The Good Fairy. As for a choice of my own, it seems you still have not watched The Lady Eve starring Henry Fonda and Barbara Stanwyck, which maintains romantic comedy perfection for 45 minutes (and I have strong affection for the rest of it too.)

I've been remiss! This is definitely one I want to see and will do so, hopefully this month. Thank you for the reminder!

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2018, 10:51:33 PM »
My shortlist for Sandy's month (which I should get to a couple of):

Der Himmel ber Berlin / Wings of Desire
To Kill a Mockingbird
Sense and Sensibility
Galaxy Quest
Toki o kakeru sko / The Girl Who Leapt Through Time
Across the Universe
The Fountain
A.I. Artificial Intelligence
Short Term 12
Upstream Color

Teproc, I'm excited to hear your thoughts on any of these and all of the ones on your list (except for Galaxy Quest :) ) are seriously thought provoking. I always enjoy your reviews!

PeacefulAnarchy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2018, 12:56:28 AM »
Yours, Mine and Ours (1968)
Some of this works and some of it doesn't but on the whole its reasonably entertaining even (sometimes especially) the cheesy bits. Fonda and Ball have the charisma to carry a film with 18(!) child actors running around mugging for the camera and acting whiny and bratty and sometimes sympathetically. Their scenes without the children are best, and for a family movie there's more innuendo than I would have expected so that was a plus. The scenes with individual kids also work ok for the most part, even when they're a bit cheesy there's enough personality in there to make it both funny and sweet, but the scenes with a bunch of them are just too much and just have me thinking about how utterly impossible this would be. How are they paying for all this? Where do they find the time and energy? It's exhausting just to watch. There's also a bunch of stuff that feels neutered or forced because of the time and audience expectations and that drags the film down a bit, the sound effects are probably my biggest annoyance. It's not something I'm likely to watch again, but I had a good time watching it once.

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2018, 02:12:36 PM »
I could have sworn I wrote why I put Yours, Mine and Ours in my top 100 somewhere on the forum, but can't find it in a search. When my mom was dating my soon to be step-dad, they went to this movie. She had four kids and he had four as well. All of which were within a 6 year span. After the film, she turned to him and said, "If they can handle 18 kids, we should be able to do 8! And the rest is history. Much later, I told my mom, "You realize, there was a whole prop department making those meals, stuffing the Christmas stockings and picking up the house, right?" Chaos is a part of a large family and watching this film made me feel much less chaotic in my own situation, even while I could relate to so much of it. And, there was something about how the dad organized the rooms, bathroom time and linen which really appealed to me. Organization really speaks to me - I find it restful. :)

One time viewing is more than I could ask for, and for you to have enjoyed it on some levels makes me smile (I didn't catch the innuendo when I was a kid, but laughed when I viewed it again years later!). Thanks for giving it a shot, PA.

oldkid

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #17 on: April 05, 2018, 04:33:06 PM »
So, if they had seen the Brady Bunch Movie instead, would they have said, "Look at all the trouble they had with six kids!  We couldn't possible deal with it!" ?
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

smirnoff

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #18 on: April 05, 2018, 05:19:41 PM »
The films that shape us! :))

Bondo

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2018, 02:23:19 PM »
Benny & Joon (1993)

I think for a minute I was getting this mixed up with Henry & June. Very different movies obviously but this does make more sense as a Sandy pick. In a way, there is a Silver Linings Playbook connection. Joon (Mary Stuart Masterson) would be analogous with Bradley Cooper's character, someone with a fairly severe mental illness that makes it hard for them to function among the general public and can be straining on family, in this case her brother Benny (Aidan Quinn), whose personal life is often sidelined in his devotion to her care (see also, Laura Linney in Love Actually). I guess Sam (Johnny Depp) would be the Jennifer Lawrence adjunct, in this case seemingly on the spectrum with a particular obsession with physical comedy of the silent film era. So if these two films have some overlap, the question is does this film similarly suffer the problem of romanticizing the idea that two people with social issues will somehow act as cures.

Even if this is still problematic, I think the difference in tone makes a big difference in how critical that is to the film. This is a whimsical and slightly surreal film. Johnny Depp is very good here, reminding you how good he can be when his tendency for quirky characters has a softer touch. Sam as a character might be a bit annoying in person. He's someone you'd want to watch as a street performer, but at times the inability to switch it off would be trying. Ultimately, the film plays to my wheelhouse of stories that involve a community kind of coming together to support people through their problems.