Author Topic: Top 100 Club: Sandy  (Read 41492 times)

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #230 on: May 15, 2020, 12:34:58 AM »
Is Sin Nombre the film you love? If so, I'll try and get to it, when you have your movie club month.

That is the one.  :) I'm a big Beasts of No Nation fan, too. I go again in about ten years, so if you maybe decide to see it before then, I won't call it cheating if you see it sooner and write about Sin Nombre later.

:D

I think your next turn is next May, so if I don't get to them earlier, if you remember, remind me and I'll watch them both then.

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That being said, thank you for having me along in your movie club. I think I may still try that Powell & Pressburger.

Happy to have you participating! The movie club is my favorite thing on the forum. I like watching other's favorite films.

If you do decide to watch I Know Where I'm Going! there's a Scottish dancing and singing scene, so you can count it towards the Musical May marathon too. :)

Teproc

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #231 on: May 15, 2020, 12:46:51 AM »
Yeah, I don't like BUB at all, I agree about Hepburn.

I'm not sure why exactly, but I like hearing this. Sometimes when I don't like a famous movie, I wonder if it's just me and if I'm missing something. :)

FWIW, I'm the same way, on both points. I often wonder if I'd like Bringing Up Baby more if I rewatched it, but I found her insuferable, and I usually quite like her.
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Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #232 on: May 15, 2020, 12:58:14 AM »
FUNNY FACE (1957) - There are quite a few things I do like about this film, though overall I'm not sure I thought it was the best of the great Miss Hepburn's work.  The opening sequence reminded me so much of THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA and I loved the "Think Pink" number, it's so true on many levels!  I did like to see a woman as the head of the department, though she did seem to take a backseat to Fred Astaire during the latter parts of the film.  I love the premise of turning a nerdy-school girl into a beautiful swan, particularly because of her funny face, but Audrey is so striking so gorgeous that I felt the magical transformation was not that amazing. Granted I am likely spoiled by movie magic where can take Anne Hathaway (PRINCESS DIARIES) and complete a stunning reveal with amazing hair and makeup.  I did enjoy the songs, especially the "Bonjour Paris" anything about travel always excites me and it seemed like the little group all had their own aspects of the city they were looking forward to.  The issues I found were I didn't feel much chemistry between Hepburn and Astaire, the "plain"-ing down of her made her look really young and Fred looked a bit old to be pursuing her seriously.  I also really liked her empathicalism philosophy and in the beginning it had very noble and profound underpinnings, but when we get to her renowned professor the film pokes fun of the academic philosophy by making him out to be a lothario in professor's clothing (and probably on many levels a truthful stereotype, but still felt like it was making fun).  To be totally fair I bought the age difference more in MY FAIR LADY then I did here and perhaps I was just unimpressed because I like Rex Harrison more than Fred Astaire and am being unfair.  I think there were some great shots, especially the pictures of her modeling at the landmarks (the chapel was really special too, simple but elegant and beautiful). And the dance numbers were interesting, but I just wanted a bit more out of the story.  Still an enjoyable watch overall!

I like the way you approach movies. You are always on the lookout for what you can like and admire, whether it is visually, or through the story. And, even if it doesn't work for you fully, you are generous with your observations. Thanks for that. :)

This is one of the earlier musicals I saw, so didn't have a lot to compare it with at the time. I thought Audrey was so lovely and unique and even if she couldn't sing very well, it didn't matter. This might have been my first Hepburn movie. I appreciate what you said about empathicalism. It's a realm I kind of exist in, so don't like seeing it dismissed either. Oh boy, the age issue. It's a thing and I see it way too often. I just watched a movie with Ethel Merman and Donald O'Connor. She's 17 years older than him and there was no way they would have ever been cast as love interests. She played his matronly mentor. If it helps, Fred Astaire wasn't comfortable being cast with such younger women. When he did Daddy Longlegs, he called the age difference, "ridiculous."

I love that chapel. I looked it up and it's about an hour north of Paris. If I ever get back there, I'm going to go see it. :D

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #233 on: May 15, 2020, 12:59:28 AM »
FWIW, I'm the same way, on both points. I often wonder if I'd like Bringing Up Baby more if I rewatched it, but I found her insuferable, and I usually quite like her.

Teproc! My brother. :)

I too usually quite like Katherine Hepburn.

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #234 on: May 15, 2020, 01:39:40 AM »
Happy to have you participating! The movie club is my favorite thing on the forum. I like watching other's favorite films.

If you do decide to watch I Know Where I'm Going! there's a Scottish dancing and singing scene, so you can count it towards the Musical May marathon too. :)

Oh, I have much more in store for our musical May, just you wait!

And I agree with you about watching the films from other people. I like getting feedback on mine, too, but that was a month I didn't get to have new experiences via other people's lists. Going from Bluevoid, to 1SO, to oldkid, now to you all brought me way different experiences I probably wouldn't have otherwise had, or at least made a priority. I'm trying to get out of my comfort zone a little bit, or at least be prodded to be moved from my particular cinematic path.
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Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #235 on: May 15, 2020, 03:49:59 PM »
Oh, I have much more in store for our musical May, just you wait!

And I agree with you about watching the films from other people. I like getting feedback on mine, too, but that was a month I didn't get to have new experiences via other people's lists. Going from Bluevoid, to 1SO, to oldkid, now to you all brought me way different experiences I probably wouldn't have otherwise had, or at least made a priority. I'm trying to get out of my comfort zone a little bit, or at least be prodded to be moved from my particular cinematic path.

Yes, that is the great part about the club. Everyone has culled their lists from a lifetime of watching movies. To me that is a lot of saved time on my part. :) And, like you said, I'm seeing movies that are outside my typical movie range.

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #236 on: May 16, 2020, 09:02:05 AM »
Music From Another Room
It's a somewhat bizarre opening scene, and I hope I don't have to refresh your memory or else I'm going to have to explain to others about why the child helping to deliver a baby isn't out of place in romantic comedy.

I hate Gretchen Mol's very presence, her voice, the way she's framed as a girl next door which goes against her expensive blonde perm and way of wearing shirts tucked tight into the deep pockets of her pants. She never got to be herself on film, so I don't even know who she is. Too bombshell to be cute and too annoying to be either, yet not enough personality to be annoying. Jude Law is only slightly better because I've seen him work with more of a character in other films.

I had to get them out of the way because they're the center of the film, but they're not why the film is good and the filmmakers seem to know this. The romantic comedy center - complete with the moment where Law's ears can't hear what Mol is saying because he's so hypnotized by her beauty - is surrounded by more interesting people, and the film seems to realize it by giving the side stories more room than you would expect.

The stars of this film are Jennifer Tilly (one of her best? performances), Martha Plimpton and Brenda Blethyn. There's also Jane Adams, but her characters freewheeling way with firearms didn't sit well with me. I would trade all the Mol for more of Plimpton's tartness. These characters were so much more real than the genre usually gets, transforming scenes that shouldn't feel fresh, like Tilly's blind character getting into the dance or learning how to ride a bike and Plimpton dealing with sexual harassment at the coffee shop. "This filthy, semi-literate yahoo wants to do me. Dreams do come true!"

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #237 on: May 16, 2020, 11:36:49 PM »
:D

Yes, Jennifer Tilly! PeacefulAnarchy is in agreement too.

The big redeeming factor is Jennifer Tilly's arc. She's the real heart of the film and it'd be much better if the film was about her and not Jude Law. She has the most genuine moments and a lovely romantic arc that I would have loved to have seen developed more deeply. I saw a glimpse there of a great movie, and it made the one I was watching feel inferior. For example the scene with the bike riding is patently absurd, as far fetched as anything in the lead story, but it's sold so well by both actors that it works emotionally in a way the ending doesn't at all.

My reply to him speaks to what I want to reply to you, so I'll post part of it and then go into your review.

I made my first top 100 list in 2011 and it took me until last year [2016] to talk myself into adding Music From Another Room. It IS so uneven! [I could look past it because of the interesting characters and] I was pretty infatuated with Jude Law at the time of seeing this, so his story was okay by me! (I'm also a sucker for the song "Truly Madly Deeply") :) Also, this was the first time I saw Brenda Blethyn and I've loved her in everything I've seen, ever since.

Jennifer Tilly is why this eventually became a part of my top 100 and truth be told it's Vincent Laresca's Jesus that really solidified the choice. I find him to be so endearing and their interaction makes for some of the sweetest scenes I know. That scene you mentioned is one of them. Nina's line is what their story is all about. "I've been scared my whole life, it's only now that I'm in love I'm not scared." Secondary, but still impactful is Anna's own arc. She's the responsible one, the one doing what is expected of her and then comes to the realization "The most passionate thing in my life happened to someone else." That really speaks to me.


Music From Another Room
It's a somewhat bizarre opening scene, and I hope I don't have to refresh your memory or else I'm going to have to explain to others about why the child helping to deliver a baby isn't out of place in romantic comedy.

I remember. :) That scene prepared me for the detour the movie is taking from regular rom-coms.

Quote
I hate Gretchen Mol's very presence, her voice, the way she's framed as a girl next door which goes against her expensive blonde perm and way of wearing shirts tucked tight into the deep pockets of her pants. She never got to be herself on film, so I don't even know who she is. Too bombshell to be cute and too annoying to be either, yet not enough personality to be annoying. Jude Law is only slightly better because I've seen him work with more of a character in other films.

This is the only film I've seen her in, so I'm not sure if it is all about the way she is portrayed here, or if you also don't like her acting. I don't find her to be relatable personally, but the stoic, responsible stance is something I relate to. You're right about Jude Law, there isn't a whole lot of depth there. He's just cute and a man on a mission. :)

Quote
I had to get them out of the way because they're the center of the film, but they're not why the film is good and the filmmakers seem to know this. The romantic comedy center - complete with the moment where Law's ears can't hear what Mol is saying because he's so hypnotized by her beauty - is surrounded by more interesting people, and the film seems to realize it by giving the side stories more room than you would expect.

The stars of this film are Jennifer Tilly (one of her best? performances), Martha Plimpton and Brenda Blethyn. There's also Jane Adams, but her characters freewheeling way with firearms didn't sit well with me. I would trade all the Mol for more of Plimpton's tartness. These characters were so much more real than the genre usually gets, transforming scenes that shouldn't feel fresh, like Tilly's blind character getting into the dance or learning how to ride a bike and Plimpton dealing with sexual harassment at the coffee shop. "This filthy, semi-literate yahoo wants to do me. Dreams do come true!"

haha! Yes, these side characters are what make the movie for me. Reading your review reminds me that I haven't explored Jennifer Tilly films, even though I find her completely captivating here.

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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #238 on: May 21, 2020, 03:07:55 PM »
All That Heaven Allows A melodrama that easily captured my sentiment and raises up the genre higher than its reputation. Sirk creates an almost other worldly aesthetic with rich colors and immaculately staged sets and costumes. Wyman and Hudson are great together and sell this relationship effortlessly. Wyman in particular captures an inner struggle that is ripping her apart as she tries juggle what truly matters in her life. The movie tears away at societal conventions and elevates human connection. It's done with just the right amount of sentimentality and it never feels cheap. It's a captivating movie.

8/10

This was another classic melodrama that I held off seeing since I thought it wouldn't be for me. I loved it! Thanks!
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Re: Top 100 Club: Sandy
« Reply #239 on: May 25, 2020, 05:17:09 PM »
Summer Stock

I always look forward to movies that star two of the great "triple threats" of cinema.  I loved this particular duo in "The Pirate" and I expected a similar chemistry here.  Unfortunately, it missed the mark for me.

It feels as if the two main characters weren't fleshed out enough, or made consistent enough.  Is Garland the milquetoast, quiet woman, submitted to her community or the bold owner of a farm?  Is Kelly the brash young man ready to take over a barn for a rehearsal, or the one who steps back when receiving criticism on how to treat his star?  The love foursome is confusing at best and it seems everyone is a little too ready to switch partners in a moment, no matter how unfit the original couples were, because there wasn't enough buildup to the various kisses that happen.

Where the film shines is when each player gets to do what they are best at: singing and dancing.  Garland's opening number is bold and powerful.  I was losing my way in the film until Kelly softshoes his way into my heart with a bare stage and some newspaper.  The mix of scenes of the main musical are all fantastic... until we get to the "redneck comedy".

I guess I am of two minds about this film, where the highlights are great and much of the rest didn't work for me.  Still, I'm happy to see these great stars do what they do best.

3/5

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