Author Topic: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded  (Read 4039 times)

roujin

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Re: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded
« Reply #70 on: November 14, 2019, 11:16:38 AM »
The key of the film is the story of the Aunt - the ghosts of war-time Japan cannibalize the youth.

Sandy

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Re: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded
« Reply #71 on: November 16, 2019, 04:11:35 PM »
The key of the film is the story of the Aunt - the ghosts of war-time Japan cannibalize the youth.

Ah, I see. Thanks for the clarification, roujin.

Sandy

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Re: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded
« Reply #72 on: November 21, 2019, 11:44:32 PM »
Dekalog #1




The cutest little boy possible, questions his dad about whether there is a soul. The father doesn’t know, which is as honest as it gets and then continues the conversation, helping the child see purpose in life, by saying it’s in the way someone is remembered after their gone. Their specific look. Their actions. How is that scenario pitting science against religion? I see no conflict there, unless religion is determined to have the definitive answer to all things… Well then, if that is so, then the conflict is drummed up and suspect.

If the 1st commandment is “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind” and “He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love,” the father is about as saintly as they come. 


Sandy

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Re: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded
« Reply #73 on: November 23, 2019, 12:17:14 PM »
The New Land



Arrived in Minnesota, with plenty of land to be had, except for the niggling fact that the Souix are there and who's ancestors got there before 800 AD. More on that later. The soil is good, the water is plentiful and the shoulders are strong, so once again a home and livelihood are built by the ever hard work of this little family. Children come one after another, even at the peril of the mother. Prophylactics were being massed produced by the 1850's, so it's too bad they didn't grab some at the corner apothecary on their quarterly trip into town. Or were their Lutheran beliefs keeping them from such measures?

So many struggles and losses amidst the joy of living and creating: the hunger and thirst (undiagnosed diabetes), loved ones dying in diverse situations, the Souix uprising - neither surprising or avoidable. Yet another piece in the displacement tragedy of the nation. The ending of the film is a a snapshot of a legacy, both for good and for ill. The yin and yang of existence.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2019, 05:25:28 PM by Sandy »

Bondo

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Re: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded
« Reply #74 on: November 23, 2019, 12:41:40 PM »
Lutherans don’t need contraception. We aren’t passionate like the Catholics. See Babette’s Feast for more on this subject.

Sandy

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Re: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded
« Reply #75 on: November 23, 2019, 01:07:35 PM »
:))

oldkid

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Re: The Top 100 Club: Knocked Out Loaded
« Reply #76 on: February 26, 2020, 08:00:21 PM »
The Swimmer

John Cheever, the short story writer, had one of the most unique imaginations in Western literature.  His stories don’t always make sense, but they are always captivatingly strange.  The other wonderful thing about his stories is that they are pithy, to the point, given the length of ideas he is presenting.  This adaptation of The Swimmer feels a bit long compared to the story, which is unusual for an adaptation of a written work.  Mind you, most movie adaptations are of novels or novellas, not short stories.  The Swimmer begins with a unique idea, a man with a dark past and amnesia taking a swimming tour of his suburban neighborhood.  In the story, we have the unfolding of a strange idea, trying to make sense of it.  In the movie we have Burf Lancaster and co-stars in sexy swimming wear hoping that we would be distracted enough to watch more than twice the length that it takes to read the story.

And if they had added more strangeness, more eccentric characters, it might have worked.  If they had added another theme to weave through the story of suburban dangers and nightmares, that would be good.  But spacey Burt could only keep me interested for so long.  I’m gla to have watched it, but it won’t be a favorite.  However, it does remind me that I should read more of
John Cheever.

3/5
« Last Edit: February 26, 2020, 09:08:50 PM by 1SO »
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