Author Topic: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid  (Read 1808 times)

BlueVoid

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Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« on: December 09, 2019, 11:01:21 AM »
Here is my most recent Top 100:

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1SO

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2019, 12:22:59 AM »
I've seen them all, but filtering your complete list here are some films you love that I haven't seen.

Maelstrom (2000)
13th (2016)
A Generation (1955)
Free Solo (2018)
The Son's Room (2001)
Icarus (2017)


Are there two you'd like to dictate to me?
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BlueVoid

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2019, 09:46:07 AM »
Interesting all of those are within the last year or two.

Of the ones you listed, I would recommend 'A Generation' especially if you've already seen Kanal.

Yeah, a note about my top 100-- I generally only watch a movie once, and a lot of my top 100 have been there for a long time. They made the biggest impact on me from when I first watched them.
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colonel_mexico

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2019, 06:43:45 PM »
I'll move this post over here and I'll add RASHOMON and 8 1/2 for the extended month.

I would like to watch FITZCARRALDO and revisit INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS - I always love seeing Tarantino on people's top 100 and hearing what they think.
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BlueVoid

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2019, 11:10:00 PM »
I'll move this post over here and I'll add RASHOMON and 8 1/2 for the extended month.

I would like to watch FITZCARRALDO and revisit INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS - I always love seeing Tarantino on people's top 100 and hearing what they think.

Sounds great. I re-visited Rashomon for the first time last month. I was not enamored with it as much as my original viewing, but still see it as a monumental piece of film making. It probably won't make my 2020 list though.
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colonel_mexico

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2019, 12:37:45 PM »
FITZCARRALDO - While I am familiar with Werner Herzog from funny things like BOONDOCKS and his latest appearance in Mandalorian, I really (besides GRIZZLY MAN) have never seen any of the films he's actually directed.  This seemed like a very apropos place to start given his eccentricities.  It sweeping and beautiful, with very long shots with silence or stills on Kinski's and others faces that remind me a lot of PT Anderson's THERE WILL BE BLOOD.  The clashing of two very different worlds is brought to life in Fitzcarraldo himself, as he wants to bring opera to the jungle and later become the first overland boatman.  The adventures and failures of Fitzcarraldo are sometimes genius and sometimes pure lunacy, and while our (sad) hero swings much farther toward the latter, I found it beautiful in its own way.  I guess this charisma is what Claudia Cardinale's character sees in her paramour, blindly funding his adventures with pure confidence this new scheme will make them 'rich.'  The rest of the characters are a display of archetypes of boat captain (I mean this guy could be the real-life Bluto from POPEYE), double-crossing heavy (and of course he's brown guy, but that is a different topic that is unnecessary to delve into to enjoy this), and a drunk heathen who has one foot in both worlds, Herqueque who does represent a lot of what I love of the mixing of cultures (and who reminds me of a few family members). I thought they were all great, a boat trip of follies with traces of APOCALYPSE NOW and DON QUIXOTE.  That moment when they arrive at the place of their destiny and Herqueque comes up with the idea (clearly the more intelligent and likely much easier idea) to dig a tunnel, and everyone shrugs it off and goes forward with the great overland crossing was comedy gold.  I am unfamiliar with the backstory on the production, but from the little I've picked up on, it seems Herzog had some Fitzcarraldo in himself in actually dragging that boat around.  This is likely a film I would not return to, but it has its moments with gorgeous shots of Peru and the Natives and Cardinale are worth the view.  Very good.
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BlueVoid

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2019, 03:16:00 PM »
FITZCARRALDO - While I am familiar with Werner Herzog from funny things like BOONDOCKS and his latest appearance in Mandalorian, I really (besides GRIZZLY MAN) have never seen any of the films he's actually directed.  This seemed like a very apropos place to start given his eccentricities.  It sweeping and beautiful, with very long shots with silence or stills on Kinski's and others faces that remind me a lot of PT Anderson's THERE WILL BE BLOOD.  The clashing of two very different worlds is brought to life in Fitzcarraldo himself, as he wants to bring opera to the jungle and later become the first overland boatman.  The adventures and failures of Fitzcarraldo are sometimes genius and sometimes pure lunacy, and while our (sad) hero swings much farther toward the latter, I found it beautiful in its own way.  I guess this charisma is what Claudia Cardinale's character sees in her paramour, blindly funding his adventures with pure confidence this new scheme will make them 'rich.'  The rest of the characters are a display of archetypes of boat captain (I mean this guy could be the real-life Bluto from POPEYE), double-crossing heavy (and of course he's brown guy, but that is a different topic that is unnecessary to delve into to enjoy this), and a drunk heathen who has one foot in both worlds, Herqueque who does represent a lot of what I love of the mixing of cultures (and who reminds me of a few family members). I thought they were all great, a boat trip of follies with traces of APOCALYPSE NOW and DON QUIXOTE.  That moment when they arrive at the place of their destiny and Herqueque comes up with the idea (clearly the more intelligent and likely much easier idea) to dig a tunnel, and everyone shrugs it off and goes forward with the great overland crossing was comedy gold.  I am unfamiliar with the backstory on the production, but from the little I've picked up on, it seems Herzog had some Fitzcarraldo in himself in actually dragging that boat around.  This is likely a film I would not return to, but it has its moments with gorgeous shots of Peru and the Natives and Cardinale are worth the view.  Very good.

Glad you enjoyed it! Herzog is such an icon. I highly recommend the documentaries "Burden of Dreams" and "My Best Fiend" as a companion to this and other Herzog work. It adds so much to the Herzog experience.
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Bondo

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2019, 10:06:43 PM »
Serpico

This was the top ranking unseen film for me, and it was quite a good one to watch. This film still feels pretty essential in 2019 given Black Lives Matter and the Blue Lives Matter rebuttal. My twitter "joke" was that this film is true because it recognizes that the problem with the police is few good apples, a spin on the claim that bad things about the police are the result of the minority that are bad actors. Given how police unions act, how cops are the biggest babies in the world and take their ball and go home if anyone dares suggest they could do better (something this film pretty explicitly touches on), I am pretty convinced that the median cop is a bad cop. These days it might not mean a cop that is on the take, as seems to be the primary concern here, but just being a reactionary, authoritarian type quick to abuse the power they are given to push people around for the thrill. At a minimum, the median cop is a bad cop because of their unwillingness to check the worst cops...and that passivity in the face of evil is itself a form of evil. Serpico is a man who does not show that passivity. Those like him should feel more safe and comfortable in the post than those who create the worst problems. It's a bit like women in engineering/computer science...it isn't the job that fails to appeal, it is the work environment that keeps them underrepresented.

I haven't done a lot of watching of older films this year, so I imagine this will be well placed on the Discoveries list.

BlueVoid

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2019, 01:53:25 PM »
Serpico

This was the top ranking unseen film for me, and it was quite a good one to watch. This film still feels pretty essential in 2019 given Black Lives Matter and the Blue Lives Matter rebuttal. My twitter "joke" was that this film is true because it recognizes that the problem with the police is few good apples, a spin on the claim that bad things about the police are the result of the minority that are bad actors. Given how police unions act, how cops are the biggest babies in the world and take their ball and go home if anyone dares suggest they could do better (something this film pretty explicitly touches on), I am pretty convinced that the median cop is a bad cop. These days it might not mean a cop that is on the take, as seems to be the primary concern here, but just being a reactionary, authoritarian type quick to abuse the power they are given to push people around for the thrill. At a minimum, the median cop is a bad cop because of their unwillingness to check the worst cops...and that passivity in the face of evil is itself a form of evil. Serpico is a man who does not show that passivity. Those like him should feel more safe and comfortable in the post than those who create the worst problems. It's a bit like women in engineering/computer science...it isn't the job that fails to appeal, it is the work environment that keeps them underrepresented.

I haven't done a lot of watching of older films this year, so I imagine this will be well placed on the Discoveries list.

I saw that Twitter joke and thought it was brilliant.  :)

Glad you liked it. This was an addition to my top 100 this year, and is one of the discoveries of the year for me as well. Pacino was great in it, and I really just dig Lumet's stuff in general.
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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2019, 12:26:46 AM »
A Generation (1955)
★ ★ ★ - Good
Andrzej Wajda's most popular films are Kanal and Ashes & Diamonds, yet this - which is thematically the first film of the trilogy - makes those films better. In chronological order, you can see Wajda grow in confidence as a director, with increasingly artistic direction. That's not to say this is lacking in that department, it's more like unmolded clay of long takes and interesting frames that become only more interesting once he gets away from neorealism and becomes more confident. This is like Mean Streets or Fellini's I Vitelloni, that early raw hit from a director who would refine over time, but I've never seen a film from the director that felt so personal.


I didn't know he was in this...

A very young Roman Polanski.
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