Author Topic: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid  (Read 7338 times)

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2020, 10:55:49 PM »
Superbad



Let's get together, before we get much older. "Baba O'Riley" by The Who

This little window of time is creating a tempest in a teapot! PIV must occur before graduation, or all is lost! Drastic measures are in order and nothing, I mean nothing, will deter this rite of passage, not even a barrage of seen and unforeseen obstacles. Well, that's the game plan anyway. The obstacles come, one after drastic one and the goal gets further and further away, until the goal changes. Who knew there are more important thresholds to pass through, ones that will change the future as much, or more than even the initial objective.

Side note. Is this film the embodiment of the adolescent male mind and its preoccupation? If so, I'm not sure I would have wanted to know this when I was an teenager. I was pretty clueless back then and my biggest concern was whether I would embarrass myself by doing something stupid, not whether my assets were being assessed.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2020, 11:01:29 PM by Sandy »

Eric/E.T.

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #31 on: January 22, 2020, 11:01:12 PM »
I've done Perfect Blue and Shoeshine, and I loved them both. I was going to do Modern Times, still will down the road, but for my third and final BlueVoid film, at least for this marathon, I'm going to do The Thing this weekend. Super excited. I'm pretty sure I've seen the original Halloween, but way long ago. The only Carpenter I really recall was Village of the Damned, and I know it's not exactly an adored piece of cinema, but it freaked me out. Time to see what an actually good Carpenter film will do to me.
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Eric/E.T.

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2020, 03:16:33 AM »
The Thing
Love the concept and alien design. I've read that its ability to provoke fear and mystery with just the use of practical effects is what makes it special. For all I know about it, I would concur. What I really appreciated was how Carpenter develops the conceit of the film without really any exposition at all. It is a textbook definition of "show, not tell." From the opening helicopter hunting scene to the final credits, you're strapped in and the action just takes you.

If this film has anything on its mind but freaking you out for its duration, I don't know what it is. And that's OK. I read a review (and I will say things like this without a link because I read and click on something else and read and so on, so I don't always remember where I found it) that claimed it contains a critique on masculinity based on how its men react to their situation and what happens at the end, but I don't buy it. It was '82. Perhaps there was a concern about men and women scientists cohabiting in Antarctica for long periods without the rule of law. Honestly, the concern seems to be tone and story. It's just a fun genre film.

Not sure that it's inspired me to go on a personal Carpenter marathon, but the show is going to revisit Starman, and I may just take that trip with 'em.
A witty saying proves nothing. - Voltaire

smirnoff

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #33 on: January 28, 2020, 12:05:05 AM »
Every time someone mentions The Thing, I end up going and watching this clip. :))

Eric/E.T.

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #34 on: January 28, 2020, 05:50:27 PM »
Lmao, love it!
A witty saying proves nothing. - Voltaire

Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2020, 06:39:58 PM »
Three Colours: Red



“Either fraternity is spontaneous, or it does not exist. To decree it is to annihilate it. The law can indeed force men to remain just; in vain would it would try to force them to be self-sacrificing.”
— Frédéric Bastiat

Frédéric Bastiat's parable of the broken window, "That Which We See and That Which We Don't See," is a forerunner to the concept of opportunity costs. Repairing a broken window may bring money to the village glazier, but had the window not been broken in the first place, that money could have gone to new shoes, or a book. Bastiat's point is that it's a fallacy to see destruction as a net gain, because it "takes no account of that which is not seen."

In the film, the judge, after decades on the bench, says, "Deciding what is true and what isn't now seems to me...a lack of modesty." He had been a witness to countless stories, where the opportunity costs of each decision weighed on him heavily. He was unable to unsee the hidden ramifications of people's lives and therefore lost hope in humanity itself. It takes an "innocent" to spontaneously show him something he missed. Altruism repairs that which is broken and the interconnectedness of us all is our real profit.

BlueVoid

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #36 on: February 11, 2020, 01:12:32 PM »
Superbad



Side note. Is this film the embodiment of the adolescent male mind and its preoccupation? If so, I'm not sure I would have wanted to know this when I was an teenager. I was pretty clueless back then and my biggest concern was whether I would embarrass myself by doing something stupid, not whether my assets were being assessed.

 ;D

I'm glad you took the time to catch up on this one. I know it's not for everyone. For me it came at a time where my little group of friends meant a lot to me and at its core this is a movie about friendship. Also, even with the low brow humor-- the timing is perfection.
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BlueVoid

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #37 on: February 11, 2020, 01:14:42 PM »
The ThingIt's just a fun genre film.


I think this is what I love about it. I like genre, and this is about as fun as they come. And there is awesome effects! I wish there was some deep meaning as to what this film means to me but really its as simple as "its awesome!".
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BlueVoid

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #38 on: February 11, 2020, 01:19:57 PM »
Three Colours: Red



“Either fraternity is spontaneous, or it does not exist. To decree it is to annihilate it. The law can indeed force men to remain just; in vain would it would try to force them to be self-sacrificing.”
— Frédéric Bastiat

Frédéric Bastiat's parable of the broken window, "That Which We See and That Which We Don't See," is a forerunner to the concept of opportunity costs. Repairing a broken window may bring money to the village glazier, but had the window not been broken in the first place, that money could have gone to new shoes, or a book. Bastiat's point is that it's a fallacy to see destruction as a net gain, because it "takes no account of that which is not seen."

In the film, the judge, after decades on the bench, says, "Deciding what is true and what isn't now seems to me...a lack of modesty." He had been a witness to countless stories, where the opportunity costs of each decision weighed on him heavily. He was unable to unsee the hidden ramifications of people's lives and therefore lost hope in humanity itself. It takes an "innocent" to spontaneously show him something he missed. Altruism repairs that which is broken and the interconnectedness of us all is our real profit.

I really love this take on the movie. The Trilogy made a huge impact on me, but its been well over a decade since I've seen them. I think its time for a revisit.
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Sandy

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Re: Top 100 Club: BlueVoid
« Reply #39 on: February 12, 2020, 02:13:12 PM »
;D

I'm glad you took the time to catch up on this one. I know it's not for everyone. For me it came at a time where my little group of friends meant a lot to me and at its core this is a movie about friendship. Also, even with the low brow humor-- the timing is perfection.

That friendship theme really came through and it got surprisingly complex as things got real.

I really love this take on the movie. The Trilogy made a huge impact on me, but its been well over a decade since I've seen them. I think its time for a revisit.

I still have White to see! Watching these films every decade makes a lot of sense. You're in a different place, so new aspects may reveal themselves.

 

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