Author Topic: No Country for Old Men  (Read 36206 times)

zarodinu

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #210 on: April 29, 2009, 05:01:27 PM »
Bardem didn't deserve as much recognition as Brolin did. Brolin played a living breathing person, I know that guy, that guy went to school with my dad, I see that guy at the Legion every once and a while.

I agree with you, though Bardem was also impressive.  I particularly loved how Brolin did so much of his acting with body gestures and facial expressions.  I actually thought that the best character was Tommy Lee Johns as Sheriff Bell, I swear that role was written with him in mind.  I completely bought him as Bell, despite the fact that his role was severely chopped from the novel.
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saltine

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #211 on: April 29, 2009, 07:22:02 PM »
Maybe because Tommy Lee Jones was reared in West Texas and spends a lot of time there, he "fit" the part.
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gateway

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #212 on: May 01, 2009, 12:05:50 AM »

If you lived here I think you would understand the brilliance of Brolin's character.

I actually have an uncle who grew up in that area, and he sounds exactly like Josh Brolin in No Country. Not just the accent, he's got the exact same voice and delivery. If you close your eyes and just listen to him, the resemblance is uncanny.
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ferris

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #213 on: May 01, 2009, 10:04:50 AM »

If you lived here I think you would understand the brilliance of Brolin's character.

I actually have an uncle who grew up in that area, and he sounds exactly like Josh Brolin in No Country. Not just the accent, he's got the exact same voice and delivery. If you close your eyes and just listen to him, the resemblance is uncanny.

I think I could listen to your uncle tell stories for hours.


I've spent a lot of time in rural West Texas and New Mexico with my job: Odessa, Ft Stockton, Arlington, Midland, etc.  I swear I've been to that exact gas station (the one with the coin flip)  I've really come to appreciate that area that I live in the Northwest.   Everything from the people, the towns, and even weather in this movie are spot-on what I know of that area.   So I don't know if the credit goes to Cormac Mccarthy for painting such great pictures in his novel, or the Coens for rendering them so accurately.

The credit that assuredly goes to the Coens is how the weather is portrayed.  Like this scene:



I don't know if they planned that scene around the weather or just got lucky that day of shooting, but either way it's stuff like this that elevates this film from very good to great.


Another great touch are the cattle guards and fences.  I always found it interesting that even out there in the middle of the scrub desert there would be this gate in front of the dirty road - still pretty important to folks were the property border was.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 10:09:27 AM by ferris »
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Variable

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #214 on: May 03, 2009, 04:11:52 PM »
Coens do have a flair for local color, I'm certainly willing to give them the credit.

though I haven't read the novel  :(

masterofsparks

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #215 on: June 25, 2009, 12:26:06 PM »
I agree with the folks who say that Tommy Lee Jones is the heart of the movie. The film (and novel) feels to me like it's about the nature of evil - the Bardem character as some kind of newer, deeper evil and Jones as the man who, as he ages, feels less and less able to comprehend evil itself. In that regard, Jones's character is clearly the film's center, and I think he give the film's best performance.

ferris

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #216 on: June 25, 2009, 12:36:35 PM »
I agree with the folks who say that Tommy Lee Jones is the heart of the movie. The film (and novel) feels to me like it's about the nature of evil - the Bardem character as some kind of newer, deeper evil and Jones as the man who, as he ages, feels less and less able to comprehend evil itself. In that regard, Jones's character is clearly the film's center, and I think he give the film's best performance.

Good to see this thread pop up again. 

I think you're right.  As much as I love the other two lead performances, you don't appreciate TLJ's performance until you start trying to think of someone else to put in that role...who else would have fit? 

But it's a credit to the directors that all the roles were so spot on.  I don't know if it's casting or direction or a combination of the two, but you rarely see a fish out of water in a Coen Bros joint.  I was thinking of Kelly Macdonald when I wrote this.
"And if thou refuse to let them go, behold, I will smite all thy borders with frogs" - Exodus 8:2 KJV
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Holly Harry

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #217 on: June 25, 2009, 04:40:38 PM »
I love the details of the movie so much. Notice a scene early on in the film when Josh Brolin as Moss is hunting pronghorn (A prime opportunity), he shoots, wounding one, and then walks over to the location and sees it's left a trail of blood. He then looks on in his binoculars and sees a dog galloping off into the distance, only to look back once, before continuing. Kind of sets up the whole movie nicely, I think.

I have my own theories about the film. Maybe I'll post them soon.
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OmNom

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #218 on: October 22, 2009, 01:04:24 PM »
Wow.  I just watched this movie last night.  I can't stop thinking about it.

I thought I would hate it!  I was *sure* I would hate it.  But I really like it.  I... I... I think I... I think I love it. 

Now I have to read all of these posts in this thread to see what y'all thought.  Make sure I'm not a deviant of some sort for liking this movie. 

Crap.  I love a violent movie.  My soul must be so jaded... Prolly when I die I'll just go straight to hell.
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ferris

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Re: No Country for Old Men
« Reply #219 on: October 22, 2009, 01:08:13 PM »
Wow.  I just watched this movie last night.  I can't stop thinking about it.

I thought I would hate it!  I was *sure* I would hate it.  But I really like it.  I... I... I think I... I think I love it. 

Now I have to read all of these posts in this thread to see what y'all thought.  Make sure I'm not a deviant of some sort for liking this movie. 

Crap.  I love a violent movie.  My soul must be so jaded... Prolly when I die I'll just go straight to hell.

Glad you revived this thread.  I love talking about this movie.

I'm NOT into violent movies at all, but I still LOVE this one. 

What I love most is how true it is to the original source material.  The novel is a pretty quick read and I recommend it to anyone who dug the film.
"And if thou refuse to let them go, behold, I will smite all thy borders with frogs" - Exodus 8:2 KJV
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