Author Topic: 1960s World Cinema  (Read 32502 times)

pixote

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1960s World Cinema
« on: February 03, 2008, 06:38:53 PM »
Here's the current lineup:

1960:  The Entertainer - Tony Richardson - UK  [Discussion Thread]
1961:  Mother Joan of the Angels - Jerzy Kawalerowicz - Poland  [Discussion Thread]
1962:  Mamma Roma - Pier Paolo Pasolini - Italy  [Discussion Thread]
                  + Accatone (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1961)

1962:  The Twelve Chairs - Tomás Gutiérrez Alea - Cuba  [Discussion Thread]
                  + Memories of Underdevelopment (Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1968)

1963:  Curse of the Crying Woman - Rafael Baledón - Mexico  [Discussion Thread]
                  + The Witch's Mirror (Chano Urueta, 1962)

1963:  Vidas Secas - Nelson Pereira dos Santos - Brazil  [Discussion Thread]
                  + Black God, White Devil (Glauber Rocha, 1964)

1963:  Young Aphrodites - Nikos Koundouros - Greece  [Discussion Thread]
1964:  Nothing but a Man - Michael Roemer - US  [Discussion Thread]
                  + The Exiles (Kent MacKenzie, 1961)

1964:  Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors - Sergei Parajanov - USSR  [Discussion Thread]
                  + Wings (Larisa Shepitko, 1966)

1964:  Charulata - Satyajit Ray - India  [Review]
                  + The Cloud-Capped Star (Ritwik Ghatak, 1960)
  [Review]
1965:  Le Bonheur - Agnès Varda - France  [Discussion Thread]
                  + Chronicle of a Summer (Edgar Morin & Jean Rouch, 1961)
                  + Cleo from 5 to 7 (Agnès Varda, 1962)
                  + Les Amitiés particulières (Jean Delannoy, 1964)
                  + Naked Childhood (Maurice Pialat, 1968)

1965:  Man Is Not a Bird - Dusan Makavejev - Yugoslavia
1966:  Daisies - Vera Chytilová - Czechoslovakia  [Discussion Thread]
                  + Loves of a Blonde (Milos Forman, 1965)
                  + The Firemen's Ball (Milos Forman, 1967)

1966:  Hunger - Henning Carlsen - Norway
1966:  Law of the Border - Lütfi Akad - Turkey
1966:  Red Angel - Masumura Yasuzo - Japan
                  + Pale Flower (Shinoda Masahiro, 1964)

1966:  Come Drink with Me - King Hu - Hong Kong
                  + A Touch of Zen (King Hu, 1971, Taiwan)

1967:  Wavelength - Michael Snow - Canada
1967:  The Red and the White - Miklós Jancsó - Hungary
1967:  I Am Curious (Yellow) - Vilgot Sjöman - Sweden
                  + My Home Is Copacabana (Arne Sucksdorff, 1965)

1967:  Peppermint Frappé - Carlos Saura - Spain
                  + Plácido (Luis García Berlanga, 1961)

1968:  Mandabi - Ousmane Sembene - Senegal
1968:  The Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach - Danièle Huillet/Jean-Marie Straub - West Germany
1968:  The Hour of the Furnaces - Octavio Getino & Fernando E. Solanas - Argentina
1969:  The Cow - Dariush Mehrjui - Iran

Incidentally, I'm not mentioning "transition" in the subject line because, even though that idea was a factor in selecting films, I think we need to watch the films before we can draw conclusions about any relationship that exists between them.  Even then, I have doubts that a worldwide survey is the best way of investigating transitions (especially since we're not watching any of the films that are being transitioned from).  :)

pixote
« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 04:11:14 PM by pixote »
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

roujin

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2008, 06:54:09 PM »
I'm down for this though I'm not seeing how these are transitional. Do you mean that in respect to each national cinema? I've only heard of a couple of these (Cleo, One-armed) but most are from places that I've never seen a movie from.

pixote

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2008, 06:57:00 PM »
Yeah, that's all very murky, which really why I dropped that word from the series title.  Here's what I wrote in another thread though:

For the idea of transition, I merely looked to (re)emergent national cinemas (sub-Saharan Africa, Cuba), various new waves (Nouvelle Vague, Japanese New Wave, Cinema Novo, Czech New Wave), and other films that, in their local contexts, seemed to signify a break with the past or the embodiment of a trend rooted in the sixties.  I also gave weight (at least subconsciously) to politically engaged films, especially those concerned with revolution and other transitions beyond cinema.

That applied to a slightly different list of films, but the same idea applies here (or was meant to).

pixote
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2008, 06:59:03 PM »
And this is why I started the Beginners' Marathon.
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sdedalus

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2008, 07:12:15 PM »
A Touch Of Zen, even with a substandard DVD, would fit in much better with this group than The One-Armed Swordsman.

Otherwise, it looks great to me.  The HK, French and Norwegian films I've seen.

But you should credit Daniele Huillet as the co-director with Jean-Marie Straub.
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pixote

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2008, 07:18:46 PM »
A Touch Of Zen, even with a substandard DVD, would fit in much better with this group than The One-Armed Swordsman. ...

But you should credit Daniele Huillet as the co-director with Jean-Marie Straub.

Agreed on both counts.  Updated above.  Huillet was in there at one point; not sure how I screwed that up.

pixote
« Last Edit: February 03, 2008, 07:20:35 PM by pixote »
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

pixote

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2008, 07:24:36 PM »
I've been debating whether to include Memories of Undevelopment as well.  It's pretty easy to find on VHS (from New Yorker video) — which is still better than nothing...

pixote
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

sdedalus

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2008, 07:30:21 PM »
Is I Am Cuba too obvious?
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pixote

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2008, 07:32:51 PM »
I think of that as being more of a Soviet film made in Cuba.  But I'm up for most anything.

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I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2008, 07:33:33 PM »
I hate Black Sunday and would love to eliminate it.
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