Author Topic: 1960s World Cinema  (Read 32500 times)

roujin

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #200 on: June 11, 2009, 06:47:04 PM »
Force yourself.

worm@work

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #201 on: June 11, 2009, 08:46:14 PM »
Going totally out of order, but I'm going to be watching the Forman films this weekend, so I put up the thread for Czechoslavakia.

pixote

I am just happy to see this thread being revived.

pixote

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #202 on: February 15, 2017, 01:16:48 AM »


Charulata  (Satyajit Ray, 1964)

A cursory internet search tells me that I might be the only person in the world to be bothered by the camera movement in Charulata. The other aspects of the cinematography - lighting, composition, contrast - are all pretty exquisite. But the movement of the camera really bothered me. The film as a whole is so tightly composed that the uncertain pans and tilts seem very out of place. The camera reacts unknowingly to the actors, letting their moves dictate its moves. When an actor moves away to the left, the camera tracks to the right but pans back to the left, always maintaining distance. When an actor bobs and weaves within the frame, the camera bobs and weaves in reactive counterpoint. There's even an ill-advised POV shot in which the camera attempts to mimic the bob of an actor's head.

It wasn't until after my viewing that I read - I think in a Criterion essay - that Charulata was the first film in which Ray added "camera operator" to his auteuriat resume of duties. If that's true, it might well explain some of the amateurish technique on display in a film that's otherwise very controlled and polished. Ray's musical score, for instance, is much more successful, adding immeasurable charm and character to the film.

The other oddity of Charulata is its tendency to build upon subtlety after subtlety, only to yield to big, overdramatic moments, most of which are entirely needless. These moments echo the camera operation in the way that they are too effortful for a film that is otherwise effortlessly compelling and beautiful.

Grade: B

Up next: Ritwik Ghatak's The Cloud-Capped Star (India, 1960)

pixote
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

pixote

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Re: 1960s World Cinema
« Reply #203 on: July 07, 2017, 01:31:57 AM »


The Cloud-Capped Star  (Ritwik Ghatak, 1960)

So, damn, this film didn't work for me, and as a result I don't really have much to say about it. There are plenty of strong elements at play — the sound design, the music, and the cinematography all shine at various points — but there's no flow between them. The melodramatic story only really works as allegory, and those allegorical implications were lost on me. I was left then with a group of characters that largely annoyed me, from the ineffectually idealistic patriarch and shriller-than-shrill matriarch; to the daughter with the absurd martyr complex and her selfish sister and whiny brother and spineless boyfriend. (The second brother is peripheral enough so as not to annoy.) But, yeah, there are some wonderful trees and three great songs and randomly cool whip-lashing sound-effects on the soundtrack and lovely compositions, etc. — but it's all very inconsistent and rough around the edges and at the service of a story that failed to engage me.

Grade: C

Up next: Agnès Varda's Le bonheur (France, 1965)

pixote
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.