Poll

Your Favorite Arthur Penn Film Is...

The Left Handed Gun
0 (0%)
The Miracle Worker
4 (13.3%)
Mickey One
1 (3.3%)
The Chase
1 (3.3%)
Bonnie and Clyde
15 (50%)
Alice's Restaurant
0 (0%)
Little Big Man
4 (13.3%)
Night Moves
1 (3.3%)
The Missouri Breaks
0 (0%)
Four Friends
0 (0%)
Target
0 (0%)
Dead of Winter
0 (0%)
Penn & Teller Get Killed
0 (0%)
haven't seen any
3 (10%)
don't like any
1 (3.3%)
other
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 30

Author Topic: Penn, Arthur  (Read 1721 times)

1SO

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Re: Penn, Arthur
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2018, 11:32:18 PM »

The Chase (1966)
"If he comes back and you need any deputies, every man here will be glad to help you."
"The state of Texas says any of you can own a gun and most of you got two, but deputies you ain't."


Watching mother! is a rare film experience. Love it... Hate it... the film is alive. It's a hot, vibrant mess that may be genius or may be terrible and it all depends on when you ask me. The further I get from mother! the more I'm confident it's a film to celebrate, though I remember being more uneasy and critical while watching.

The Chase gave me the same feeling.

The movie Arthur Penn made just before Bonnie and Clyde is nothing like I expected and quite unlike most other films in existence. It's a character ensemble about an escaped convict (Robert Redford) and the small town that believes he's headed their way. Over the next 24-hours, the small southern town will tear itself apart over this event. With unapologetic and rapidly increasing melodrama, the film exposes hatred in all levels of social and economic class, save for the sheriff (Marlon Brando), the one person who wants to capture Redford alive. (Meanwhile, everyone assumes he's in one pocket or another.)

It would be impossible to accurately describe the wild directions this film goes in. I just have to say it does a number of things I normally hate, many theatrical scenes that don't make logical sense but feel right. It's a great looking, relentlessly cynical film, with an over-qualified cast that includes Angie Dickinson, Jane Fonda, E.G. Marshall, Miriam Hopkins and Robert Duvall. Brando is in peak form. At times it seems like a collection of great moments looking for a cohesive story, but as the dramatic undertow pulled me deeper towards the conclusion, I came to really respect the film's originality, which I think is ultimately very rewarding.
RATING: * * * - Very Good

1SO

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Re: Penn, Arthur
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2018, 12:24:48 AM »
Updated Rankings

The Left Handed Gun (1958)
* * ½
It’s rare to see Paul Newman chewing scenery. As Billy the Kid, Newman is like Gary Oldman in The Professional, only it doesn’t suit him and makes the film silly at times. His best scene is alone with a flute, staring out a broken window. The one moment of quiet intensity Newman does so well. Then again, the silly scenes are when this is less of a conventional western and closer to the rule breaking radicalism associated with Penn.


Alice’s Restaurant (1969)
* ½
What kind of hippie-dippy B.S. is this? This adaptation of a popular folk song I only kind of remember the chorus to is forever stuck in its time period. I can name movies about the hippie culture that are still worth watching today and maybe this is closer to the center of the movement than those. I don’t know. It’s incredibly aimless and after about a half-hour, I used it as background while I filled out my Filmspotting ballot. That said, the final shot is incredible and I wish there were more evocative and poetic images like it.
 

Dead of Winter (1987)
* * ½
A typical 80s thrillers that looks slick and acts silly. Characters either get to come to life in off-center, curious ways or they're so stock they become boring distractions. As good for you and as lasting as a milkshake. This doesn't even seem like the work of the same director, or any director at all. That could be because Penn replaced the original director early on or it could be when Hollywood entered the 80s there was no place for Penn's unique voice, so in fitting in he became just another studio hack.

Knocked Out Loaded

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Re: Penn, Arthur
« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2018, 04:00:33 AM »
Bonnie And Clyde, 60°
Little Big Man, 35°
Four Friends, 30°
Alice's Restaurant, 20°
Lumière And Company segment, 15°
I might remember it all differently tomorrow.