Author Topic: Animation Marathon - Suggestions  (Read 22888 times)

Dave

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Animation Marathon - Suggestions
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2006, 04:23:24 AM »
I'm really disappointed that my vote for animation has been turned into a vote for japanese anime, which doesn't interest me at all. I would never have voted for japanese anime alone.

I would have loved an animation marathon with a broad scope, featuring a lot of different aspects and subgenres. I'm thinking of throwing in some Pixar, like The Incredibles, together with some classic Disney, like Fantasia or Snow White. Then of course The Iron Giant, maybe some Don Bluth, or even Watership Down could be on the list. Some anime like Spirited Away or Metropolis. Heck, maybe even some stop motion like Nightmare Before Christmas, or an Aardman film. And let's not forget there are also a couple of great European movies, like Les Triplettes De Belleville. Also, some grand masters of animation like Ivan Ivanov-Vano, would do well on the list.

You could have had a great marathon, yet you are locking yourself down by going for the japanese anime route. I'll wait for the final list, but I think I'm going to skip this marathon.

Dave
(The Netherlands)

winrit

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Animation Marathon - Suggestions
« Reply #31 on: July 17, 2006, 09:39:38 AM »
During the musicals marathon my boyfriend was going on about how he hated musicals and I told him it was very unfair to exclude an entire genre as if there were nothing of value in the entire genre.  Then he said to me "What about animation?"

He was right, I have completed excluded the genre as if it has nothing to offer.  The point being that I have to do this marathon, at least to save face.  By the way, I think my boyfriend actually liked Swing Time.
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directorscut

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Animation Marathon - Suggestions
« Reply #32 on: July 17, 2006, 11:03:42 AM »
RE: d-Faktor

I think specifying this marathon to anime is a necessity.

Animation is not simply a genre like musicals or westerns - it is a way to make a film. An animated film can be an adventure, comedy, musical western etc.. Getting an overview of animation in seven films is impossible. It would be like getting an overview of live action films in just seven films.

I think Adam and Sam should consider an animated film for most marathons (certainly an animated musical was a big missed opportunity!). But there does tend to be an inherent snobbery about animated films among the auteur theory following generations.

Dave

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Animation Marathon - Suggestions
« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2006, 11:27:50 AM »
Quote from: "directorscut"
Getting an overview of animation in seven films is impossible. It would be like getting an overview of live action films in just seven films.
why should a marathon be a neatly packaged overview? couldn't a marathon also be an introduction? to me the fact that animation is such a broad metagenre is exactly the reason why i wouldn't specify it.

maybe i'm just disappointed to see the poll being changed after already having voted, because i was really looking forward to a (broad) animation marathon.

Dracula

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Animation Marathon - Suggestions
« Reply #34 on: July 17, 2006, 12:09:16 PM »
I think making it exclusively Anime is reasonable enough; it's good to have a narrower category then a full animation marathon.  Also the marathon should stick strictly to movies, not series.  I'm not a major follower of anime but I do know that what is generally considered to be the major anime cannon: Akira, Ghost in the Shell, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, & Grave of the Fireflies.  These aren't necessarily the best anime, but they tend to be the core cannon that beginners tend to gravitate to.  For a sixth choice I'd go for something like Perfect Blue.  As for the Dub vs. Sub thing, I'd stick with subs just to be safe, but I tend to find dubbing to be less objectionable in animated material, then live action; voice acting is voice acting after all.
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x3n0n

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Animation Marathon - Suggestions
« Reply #35 on: July 17, 2006, 04:59:29 PM »
Quote from: "oldboy"
Please see all movies in their original language and read subtitles. Its not that hard  :wink:


Ditto.  I find that the vocal nuances of the original performances (especially noticeable in animation, of course) are often lost, and indicate more about the original director's choices.  That said, if I find a foreign film interesting enough to watch a second time, I will sometimes watch the dubbed version to get a different interpretation of the characters.

As an anime fan, I am excited to hear opinions on some of my favorites (many of which have been mentioned here already), but I think it's probably more in line with the original poll question to not focus _exclusively_ on anime.

With that in mind (and considering what was already said in the podcast), a shot at a list of 6 (in no particular order):

* The Iron Giant (mentioned on the podcast; serves as a representative of the "modern" English-language family animation)
* Spirited Away (or Princess Mononoke, My Neighbor Totoro, nearly any other Miyazaki film)
* Akira (genre-changer; maybe Ghost in the Shell (?))
* The Triplets of Belleville (for diversity; critically acclaimed and somewhat recent)
* Grave of the Fireflies (perhaps the single most heartwrenching movie I've ever watched)
* Perfect Blue (or Metropolis, some brilliant non-Japanese film that I am unaware of, being an anime guy)

I could imagine running multiple from Miyazaki, but I'd second somebody's recommendation for a Miyazaki marathon.  There's a significant amount of variation and depth here, and I think a chronological progression could show something interesting.  It's easy to find more than 5 worth their time.  (Nausicaa, Totoro, Castle in the Sky, Mononoke, Kiki, Sprited Away, and maybe Howl's Castle all deserve consideration.)

I'll say that I'm quite excited about this marathon, whether it ends up being anime-only or very diverse.  If this one is not "mostly anime," then I'd be happy to see another one come by in the future.

StandAloneMatt

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Animation Marathon - Suggestions
« Reply #36 on: July 17, 2006, 05:03:46 PM »
That seems a bit harsh and unfair.  I am sure people didn't like the idea of a Western marathon, or Musical Marathon, or Kinski/Herzog marathon but those all turned out to be interesting discussions and I decided to check out films I might have otherwise not watched.

Judging by the response it seems there is a lot of interest in this marathon - so just becuase you seem put-off on the subject - don't think your opinion matters more than someone elses.

Anime is a perfectly fair theme for a marathon - its a easily definable sub-genre of film.  The fact that certain people seem to  have pre conceived notions or automatically dismiss this sub-genre is even more of a reason to do a marathon.  In fact like with the other marathons, you might find something that sounds interesting and embrace a type of film that you hadn't before.

Besides these are just suggestions and even Adam mentioned watching "The Iron Giant" - so you might not be so disapointed in the final list.

The idea "Well, they didn't pick the exact list I used" seems a silly reason to compain about the show.  Your entitled to fast forward through those parts if its really so difficult for you to listen to - I am sure there were those who have done it with every type of marathon - but my opinion is it was their loss - The marathons and top 5s are the most unique and interesting parts of the show.  I can read/hear/watch hundreds of different reviews of new movies - without these marathons - even the ones I am not interested in - filmspotting would feel much more like just another review show.

Quote from: "d-Faktor"
I'm really disappointed that my vote for animation has been turned into a vote for japanese anime, which doesn't interest me at all. I would never have voted for japanese anime alone.

I would have loved an animation marathon with a broad scope, featuring a lot of different aspects and subgenres. I'm thinking of throwing in some Pixar, like The Incredibles, together with some classic Disney, like Fantasia or Snow White. Then of course The Iron Giant, maybe some Don Bluth, or even Watership Down could be on the list. Some anime like Spirited Away or Metropolis. Heck, maybe even some stop motion like Nightmare Before Christmas, or an Aardman film. And let's not forget there are also a couple of great European movies, like Les Triplettes De Belleville. Also, some grand masters of animation like Ivan Ivanov-Vano, would do well on the list.

You could have had a great marathon, yet you are locking yourself down by going for the japanese anime route. I'll wait for the final list, but I think I'm going to skip this marathon.

Dave
(The Netherlands)

MaelStrom

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QUINTESENTIAL ANIME FILMS
« Reply #37 on: July 17, 2006, 05:18:03 PM »
Wow this is a hard one to recommend for!  As a genre Anime pretty much has it’s classics already canonized.  You’ll see a lot of the same titles pop up over and over again.  The issue for this marathon I think is what do you want to accomplish as far as the spectrum you wish to review?  Do you want to review a variety?  A particular director?  A particular production company?  I’m assuming you are going to follow your standard 6-film marathon structure.

As far as production companies go the two that have the most critically consistent are Production I.G. and Studio Ghibli.  Production I.G.’s films have a dark, realistic, and serious tone as well as touching heavily on philosophy.  They would include:

1.   Ghost In The Shell
2.   Ghost In The Shell 2: Innocence
3.   Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade
4.   Patlabor
5.   Patlabor 2
6.   Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust

Studio Ghibli’s films have a more light-hearted animation style and are generally more optimistic in tone.  They would include:

1.   Grave Of The Fireflies
2.   Laputa: Castle in the Sky
3.   Only Yesterday
4.   Princess Mononoke
5.   Spirited Away
6.   Whisper Of The Heart

Going almost hand in hand with production companies are their directors.  Production I.G.’s main man is Mamour Oshii and Studio Ghibli’s Hayao Miyazaki.  Miyazaki is considered to be the Walt Disney of Japan and hands down the greatest animation director of all time.  So really if you are going to do a marathon it would be on him.  Especially if this is your introduction to Anime.  These films would include:

1.   Kiki's Delivery Service
2.   Laputa: Castle in the Sky
3.   My Neighbor Totoro
4.   Porco Rosso
5.   Princess Mononoke
6.   Spirited Away

As far as a good variety and a sort of crash course introduction to anime my list for you would be this:

1.   Akira- Considered to be the defining announcement of Anime to the world, Akira is epic in every sense of the word and still holds up today as a monumental achievement of animation and confusion.
2.   Ghost In The Shell- Based on the Manga (Comic Book in Japan) this Science Fiction/Philosophic study of consciousness is like watching an art house version of a Hollywood action blockbuster.
3.   Ninja Scroll- The quintessential ninja anime film.  Loads of phenomenally constructed action packed scenes balanced out with some comedy, political intrigue, and heart.
4.   Only Yesterday- A little know but super critically acclaimed movie which is very significant among progressive Anime films in that it tackles a genre that has been traditionally thought to be outside the realm of what should be animated, in this case a realistic daily life drama.
5.   Princess Mononoke- Shockingly mature for Japan’s Disney, Hayao Miyazaki this study of technology vs. nature is considered to be his masterpiece.
6.   Spirited Away- This stunningly beautiful modern day fairy tale is so amazing in it’s world building and emotional resonance that you will truly experience the joys of childhood again while watching this film.
7.   The Iron Giant- While not an anime in fact definitely it’s influence can be seen in its nature.  Considered by many to be the crowing achievement of western hand drawn animation it’s inclusion in this marathon would provide an interesting point of contrast and discussion to it’s Eastern counterparts; as well as fitting in with Filmspotting’s hole (pun) “just can’t quite fit everything into the parameter/boundaries we originally set” philosophy.

Now if you want to kill even more birds with one stone I would recommend the following list, which is comprised of what some might label the great B-sides of Anime.  Films that are just as critically lauded (and some even more so) but are not as well know or as popular as the previous list.  This grouping would give you and some of your listeners who may already be familiar with Anime some exposure to titles by the previous lists creators which are lesser know commercially but just as great.

1.   Patlabor: The Mobile Police- Another philosophical masterpiece from the people behind Ghost In The Shell.  Covers many of the same themes but adds political intrigue and a detective story to a world where giant robots are the future’s construction tools.  Substitute this for Ghost In The Shell.
2.   Porco Rosso- A story of an alternate history WWII fighter pilot who is turned into a humanoid pig by a curse.  This was considered to by Hayao Miyazaki’s masterpiece before Princess Mononoke was released and in my opinion and my others still to be.  Substitute this for Mononoke.
3.   RĂ´jin Z- A sociopolitical comedy about futuristic health care robot beds by the creator of Akira.  A lot more fun and nowhere as confusing as Akira.
4.   The Wings of Honneamise- In an alternative Earth, a young astronaut participates in a controversial fledgling space program.  Heavy on themes of Spirituality and man’s thirst for self-destruction this film is truly an artistic masterpiece.  Substitute this for Akira.
5.   Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust- Made by the Ninja Scroll team and almost as well known this pick could have very well been on the last list but got edged out because of it’s similarity of content and genre.  Substitute this for Ninja Scroll.
6.   Whisper Of The Heart- Actually more well known than Only Yesterday but not better than.  This fills the “film that didn’t have to be an anime” category that is so cool.  A sweet coming of age romance between two junior high students.

Hope these recommendations help you out and I’ve looking forward to hearing your thoughts on the marathon.  Thanks.
Thank you kindly."

bhartman

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Rockin' good Anime, neh?
« Reply #38 on: July 17, 2006, 07:01:30 PM »
I think you guys will love doing this Marathon - if you don't then you're missing out on some great art (yes, I said the "a" word - I meant it)

Here's my list:
1. Yellow Submarine - technically not anime but well within the spirit of the genre.
2. Ralph Bakshi's Wizards - again not really anime - but true to the spirit.
3. Ghost in The Shell - Have you read William Gibson's "Neuromancer"? They don't need to make a movie of it because this captures the books essence and then some. Violence. Existential angst. Political 1984-style intrigue. The classic cyberpunk anime. Better than Akira, better produced, and while not as grotesque it avoids the Akira's rambling/stream of consciousness tone. What more could you want.
4. Nausicaa - 1st Myazaki film I'd seen. Creeped me out mightily. Part "Godzilla meets Star Wars" part "Road Warrior meets Ran".
5. Princess Mononoke - One of the most beautiful fims I've ever seen. Frightening in a Brother's Grimm way. Hautingly beautiful in a Fansasia sort of way. This is the one that made me really question how different the cutural archetypes are between the west and Japan. Should be seen again and again and again.

Honorable Mention:
Spirited Away - Just a gas to see. Visually awesome. Plus it gets my vote as the "little girl overcomes adversity and learns independance" over Kiki's Bistro which, well, sucks.
Finding Nemo - Its just so darn good, but really not anime.
The Animatrix - sooooooo much better than the sequel movies.

PLEASE SKIP THESE (unless you like crap):
-Vampire Hunter D
- Kiki's Bistro
- Cowboy Bebop
- Metropolis

MrPerdition

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Leave Bebop Alone
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2006, 02:23:22 AM »
Can someone explain how Adam & Sam are going to get through this marathon in less than six episodes if their watching the entire Cowboy Bebop series & movie. And to block counterpoint, I've yet to find a person who actually enjoyed Cowboy Bebop the movie without seeing anything in the original series. You might as well ask them to watch End of Evangelion.  They be just as lost. No anime series people. Let it rest. Cowboy Bebop is a fantastic anime series and add on movie. Let them watch a movie, speak on it and be done with it. Sam can spinoff an "Animespotting" podcast and you'll find your satisfaction.

P.S.- Can we please at least give one movie per director to be balanced. When Adam & Sam pick the one  out of Miyazaki, Oshii, & Satoshi Kon, it will make for better email comments & voicemail.
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