Author Topic: The Wrestler  (Read 13756 times)

edgar00

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2009, 06:11:55 PM »
Perhaps my ambivalence is due in part to exactly the circumstances you describe. When the part is so close to the plight or life of an actor, it's less of a performance than using the screen as a sort of confessional. Imagine Robert Downey Jr. playing a drug-addled movie star. You might give him acclaim because he's so in tune to the character, having lived it. But in my eyes, it's not so much acting as it is remembering what it's like to be that person. Same with Rourke. 

but that is what acting is is it not (at least acording to some schools... Matty?)  finding something in a character that you can internalize and draw upon your own experiences to then bring forth on stage/screen/mirror/street corner/wherever.  If you happen to have an even greater insight to the part due to yr own circumstances then all the better and more real for the audience.

I was about to get into the conversation but Keith said it best. I don't see what more you could ask for if an actor successfully draws upon personal knowledge or experience in order to inhabit their character on film.
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jbissell

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2009, 06:41:36 PM »
Perhaps my ambivalence is due in part to exactly the circumstances you describe. When the part is so close to the plight or life of an actor, it's less of a performance than using the screen as a sort of confessional. Imagine Robert Downey Jr. playing a drug-addled movie star. You might give him acclaim because he's so in tune to the character, having lived it. But in my eyes, it's not so much acting as it is remembering what it's like to be that person. Same with Rourke. 

but that is what acting is is it not (at least acording to some schools... Matty?)  finding something in a character that you can internalize and draw upon your own experiences to then bring forth on stage/screen/mirror/street corner/wherever.  If you happen to have an even greater insight to the part due to yr own circumstances then all the better and more real for the audience.

I was about to get into the conversation but Keith said it best. I don't see what more you could ask for if an actor successfully draws upon personal knowledge or experience in order to inhabit their character on film.

Couldn't agree more.  That's why I'm confused when people aren't impressed with his work.

kizik

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #32 on: January 19, 2009, 06:49:19 PM »
Perhaps my ambivalence is due in part to exactly the circumstances you describe. When the part is so close to the plight or life of an actor, it's less of a performance than using the screen as a sort of confessional. Imagine Robert Downey Jr. playing a drug-addled movie star. You might give him acclaim because he's so in tune to the character, having lived it. But in my eyes, it's not so much acting as it is remembering what it's like to be that person. Same with Rourke. 

but that is what acting is is it not (at least acording to some schools... Matty?)  finding something in a character that you can internalize and draw upon your own experiences to then bring forth on stage/screen/mirror/street corner/wherever.  If you happen to have an even greater insight to the part due to yr own circumstances then all the better and more real for the audience.

I was about to get into the conversation but Keith said it best. I don't see what more you could ask for if an actor successfully draws upon personal knowledge or experience in order to inhabit their character on film.

Couldn't agree more.  That's why I'm confused when people aren't impressed with his work.

I liked this performance, but actually liked his Marv in Sin City better. Oh well. You're talking to the only person on the planet who didn't like Man on Wire. I don't mind being unpopular. 

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #33 on: January 19, 2009, 07:30:36 PM »
Perhaps my ambivalence is due in part to exactly the circumstances you describe. When the part is so close to the plight or life of an actor, it's less of a performance than using the screen as a sort of confessional. Imagine Robert Downey Jr. playing a drug-addled movie star. You might give him acclaim because he's so in tune to the character, having lived it. But in my eyes, it's not so much acting as it is remembering what it's like to be that person. Same with Rourke. 

but that is what acting is is it not (at least acording to some schools... Matty?)  finding something in a character that you can internalize and draw upon your own experiences to then bring forth on stage/screen/mirror/street corner/wherever.  If you happen to have an even greater insight to the part due to yr own circumstances then all the better and more real for the audience.

I was about to get into the conversation but Keith said it best. I don't see what more you could ask for if an actor successfully draws upon personal knowledge or experience in order to inhabit their character on film.

Couldn't agree more.  That's why I'm confused when people aren't impressed with his work.

I liked this performance, but actually liked his Marv in Sin City better. Oh well. You're talking to the only person on the planet who didn't like Man on Wire. I don't mind being unpopular. 

don't be so hard on yrself kiz... there are like 4 or 5 of you Wire hating weirdos on this very board! ;D

jbissell

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #34 on: January 19, 2009, 07:33:58 PM »
Perhaps my ambivalence is due in part to exactly the circumstances you describe. When the part is so close to the plight or life of an actor, it's less of a performance than using the screen as a sort of confessional. Imagine Robert Downey Jr. playing a drug-addled movie star. You might give him acclaim because he's so in tune to the character, having lived it. But in my eyes, it's not so much acting as it is remembering what it's like to be that person. Same with Rourke. 

but that is what acting is is it not (at least acording to some schools... Matty?)  finding something in a character that you can internalize and draw upon your own experiences to then bring forth on stage/screen/mirror/street corner/wherever.  If you happen to have an even greater insight to the part due to yr own circumstances then all the better and more real for the audience.

I was about to get into the conversation but Keith said it best. I don't see what more you could ask for if an actor successfully draws upon personal knowledge or experience in order to inhabit their character on film.

Couldn't agree more.  That's why I'm confused when people aren't impressed with his work.

I liked this performance, but actually liked his Marv in Sin City better. Oh well. You're talking to the only person on the planet who didn't like Man on Wire. I don't mind being unpopular. 

don't be so hard on yrself kiz... there are like 4 or 5 of you Wire hating weirdos on this very board! ;D

I think it's a lot more than that now.

kizik

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2009, 08:07:57 PM »
I think it's a lot more than that now.

Good to know that I'm not the only soul who isn't scared of upsetting the masses. I can see the angry mob marching towards Portland already...

zarodinu

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #36 on: January 22, 2009, 10:26:40 AM »
I just watched The Wrestler and absolutely loved it, probably the second best movie of the year after Waltz with Bashir.  It conclusively proves that Aranofsky is not just a glorified editor, but a talented director that can make a great film even without flashy cinematography and quick edits.  Rourke is great, and you don't need to know the back story to appreciate the performance.  Its my favorite type of acting, not flashy or showy, he simply becomes the character.  I hate wrestling and never had an ounce of interest in the subject, but the movie made it look very interesting.  To think that Barton Fink couldn't write a movie that was about both Wrestling and the plight of the common man !

Also most of you are DEAD WRONG about Tomei's performance.  She just got nominated for supporting actress Oscar and I hope she wins, she was that good.  I may not know much about wrestling, but I am an expert when it comes to strippers, and she pulls off the tone and body language perfectly.  The faux friendliness, the fake smile, even the way she asks for the money as if she doesn't really want it, it is all perfect, and like Rouke she completely inhabits the character.  Also, whats wrong with the nudity?  These days, it seems like every time there is female nudity in a movie, people must go out of their way to justify why it was absolutely necessary, as if there is something wrong with it.  She is a stripper, she takes off her clothes, nothing more annoying than a movie with a covered up stripper *cough* Sin City *cough*

Great movie 9/10   
« Last Edit: January 22, 2009, 11:26:26 AM by zarodinu »
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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #37 on: January 22, 2009, 10:32:10 AM »
I may not know much about wrestling, but I am an expert when it comes to strippers, and she pulls off the tone and body language perfectly. 


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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #38 on: January 22, 2009, 10:45:25 AM »
The faux friendliness, the fake smile, even the way she asks for the money as if she doesn't really want it, it is all perfect, and like Rouke she completely inhabits the character. 


I just think pretty much any actress in Hollywood could have done the same thing in that role. Faux friendliness and a fake smile aren't exactly challenging things to pull off.
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zarodinu

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Re: The Wrestler
« Reply #39 on: January 22, 2009, 11:23:27 AM »
The faux friendliness, the fake smile, even the way she asks for the money as if she doesn't really want it, it is all perfect, and like Rouke she completely inhabits the character. 

I just think pretty much any actress in Hollywood could have done the same thing in that role. Faux friendliness and a fake smile aren't exactly challenging things to pull off.

I disagree.  A stripper is an actor, and its always difficult for actors to play actors.  You have to portray both the characters acting, and the characters real emotions beneath the acting, its not easy and very rarely done well.  Tomei pulls it off great.  Just think of the scene where she gives Ram a lap dance, and he asks her how much he owes.  She simply replies "sixty", a one word answer, but the way she says it gives you so much more.  She captures the tone and body language that says "you know you are my friend, and I really hate to take money from you, I feel bad for even asking, but you should pay me just for looks"...  The fake humility and false friendliness, all with one single word.

So no, I don't think any actress could have pulled it off.  Just look at how sex workers are portrayed in movies, they are either lustful nymphomaniacs that love what they do, or helpless victims in need of rescue.  Granted I am sure both of these exist, most of the ones I met were neither one of those.  Most sex workers in the US are not helpless victims, or sex crazed seductresses, they are just professionals doing a job.  Tomei's performance is one of the best portrayals of a sex worker I have ever seen, and I think she deserves an Oscar for it.     
« Last Edit: January 22, 2009, 11:25:23 AM by zarodinu »
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